Sun. Mar. 3, 2019 – wow, slept late

53F and damp. Overcast.

Slept late today. I don’t think I’ve slept that late in years. Still feel tired. And sore all over from dancing. I’m not in the shape I thought.

Time for breakfast.

n

34 thoughts on “Sun. Mar. 3, 2019 – wow, slept late”

  1. 28º and cloudy here. Just got home from the 9-5 (9-7), where I replaced a switch on schedule, and rebooted the firewall. Turns out my VPN problem was on my home PC. I should know better by now – reboots fix most things.

    The kids have a pool-party birthday party this afternoon. Just enough to break up the day & not get much done. My problem is that it takes time to get going, then time to stop.

  2. I am feeling all that dancing throughout my body. My head feels a bit hungover too. Think I’ll be seeing the chiropractor this week.

    Def time to do some stretching on a regular basis. It was LAST year’s resolution, and this year’s too.

    n

  3. Putzed around in the garage this cold and rainy morning. Reorganized the toolbox. Tightened up the bolts on my rolling stool. Had a eureka moment about my table saw. I’ve been having issues getting the blade parallel to the miter slot. It finally dawned on me to check the blade itself. Yep, it was warped. Put a new blade on and got it aligned with ease. Now I’m ready to start on some woodworking projects. First two items are a coffee table for the living room and built-in bookshelves for the closet upstairs. The built-ins are overkill for the closet, but I’m using that project as practice to get some more experience before taking on the built-ins for my office.

  4. Had a lot of fun this week installing Chromium OS on a desktop using Arnold the Bats builds. Beat my head bloody figuring out the correct BIOS settings for this particular system to allow the system to boot to Chromium OS after the installation succeeded.

    Had to scrap and start over at one point because I didn’t understand that /dev/sda1 is different from /dev/sda. Obvious once I looked at the disk with fdisk -l

    I enjoyed spending some time playing with command line install and diskpart – I’d forgotten how satisfying doing tech like this can be.

    I have no affection for Google. I’m pretty sure it’s an evil empire that will (has) sell its users to the highest bidder.

    However, the combination of Googles Chromium OS and the Google Chrome Management Console education license appears to meet the stated business requirements of the customer. The AD / GPOs have gotten increasingly less satisfactory for that particular environment and their available tech skills.

    The Windows hardware costs three times what eventual replacement with Goodgle devices will be. Being able to convert Windows devices to the Chromium environment years early will be a Very Good Thing. If they kept to a 5 year replacement cycle this would cost $20k less annually in hardware alone.

    I was tickled when a supervisor told me it couldn’t be done because so n so had tried and failed. I said yes it can. We started doing the no – yes thing. I tugged him over, pointed at the Chromium OS login screen. It can and I did. There it is. That was fun.

  5. The Windows hardware costs three times what eventual replacement with Google devices will be. Being able to convert Windows devices to the Chromium environment years early will be a Very Good Thing. If they kept to a 5 year replacement cycle this would cost $20k less annually in hardware alone.

    The big downside to blessed ChromeOS devices is that Google’s forced obsolescence timetable is much more rapid than even what Apple practices.

  6. @Greg
    That could be good in this particular case as the customer is difficult to convince to stick to a hardware replacement plan after agreeing to it. IT turns into the bad guy for ‘forcing’ them to spend money on hardware. I’ll double check the aggressiveness of Googles replacement cycle though before we pull the trigger.


  7. That could be good in this particular case as the customer is difficult to convince to stick to a hardware replacement plan after agreeing to it. IT turns into the bad guy for ‘forcing’ them to spend money on hardware. I’ll double check the aggressiveness of Googles replacement cycle though before we pull the trigger.

    At my 9-5, the owners flat-out refused to replace on a 3-year cycle, but I have them convinced that 5 years is about right. I back that up with the (very noticeable) failures of equipment at 5.5 years, which I have NOTHING to do with.

    One of the owners insists I leave his equipment in place until failure, then is upset that I don’t have equipment ready to go… He has 60+ pieces of equipment with controller PCs at 10+ years old (most are Windows XP), and I cannot keep enough XP machines going to be ready when the working machines fail.

    Just venting. I’ll be out of there soon enough.

  8. That could be good in this particular case as the customer is difficult to convince to stick to a hardware replacement plan after agreeing to it. IT turns into the bad guy for ‘forcing’ them to spend money on hardware. I’ll double check the aggressiveness of Googles replacement cycle though before we pull the trigger.

    Some of the early Samsung Chromebooks are now bricks IIRC, after just six years, but that may be due to the laptops being ARM based.

    To be fair, I have no doubt that Apple will shorten their cycle to five years once they have an adequate replacement for the “101” MacBook Pro 13″ in the pipeline. That was the last MacBook sold with a decent array of ports, easy memory upgrades, and a disc burner.

  9. One of the owners insists I leave his equipment in place until failure, then is upset that I don’t have equipment ready to go… He has 60+ pieces of equipment with controller PCs at 10+ years old (most are Windows XP), and I cannot keep enough XP machines going to be ready when the working machines fail.

    Microsoft used to have people on the payroll to hack backwards 98/95 compatibility into XP whenever necessary, but they drew a line in the sand with Vista and said “no more”. That line got blurred slightly with Windows 7, but, from what I understand, they’ve been rigidly enforcing things with 8 and 10, especially since the development of the OS moved to India.

    Wait until Microsoft tries to pull the plug on Windows 7 at the end of the year.

  10. Should be an interesting year at my church. Pastor has panceatic cancer and is retiring at the end of March. Good decision as health is more important than the church. Probably a year to find another. Old, as in over 70, deacons will want the same as we had to keep the status quo. I like to call them funeral services. The church needs a young energetic pastor that can move the church into to 21st century. But a lot of the members are stuck in the 19th century.

    Most don’t like change of any kind. Get upset if they don’t get their way. There will be a lot of butt hurt in this process. Thin skinned, thinking only of themselves, hating change.

    I have located one camera on the floor between a section of pews. Nice location with a nice shot angle. Had a couple of people complaining the camera blocks their view. Only a small section is blocked. In a church that is 2/3rds empty. The simple solution of moving apparently does not occur to these people. It’s their spot, been that for 20 years. Rather than ask me directly they are bitching to others. Not going to work, the camera stays.

    That is the mindset of these people. Change frightens them. The church needs change but these people don’t understand, nor want the change. Thus the struggle will begin. The next year will be interesting.

  11. Anyone have experience with a Raspberry Pi as a file server? Thinking of getting one to hook a couple of drives onto for backup on my Windows network.

  12. Anyone have experience with a Raspberry Pi as a file server? Thinking of getting one to hook a couple of drives onto for backup on my Windows network.

    I used Raspberry Pi boards as hotspots for my thesis project in WA State. Throughput wasn’t stellar, but the point of my project was security, not performance.

    I use a low power AMD A6-9500E on an AM4 motherboard as my home server. The total for the build, CPU, board, and memory was less than $150, drive and case recycled from other systems, and the system draws 35-40 W max at load. I used a Micro-ATX board, but Mini-ITX is available if space is a concern. Fedora Linux (my server OS of choice) runs extremely well.

    The A6-9500E is getting a little old so, if I had to do it over, I’d either use a 200G or wait for the newer chips that draw 15W.

  13. Old, as in over 70, deacons will want the same as we had to keep the status quo. I like to call them funeral services. The church needs a young energetic pastor that can move the church into to 21st century. But a lot of the members are stuck in the 19th century.

    Geesh. 70s these days means the Woodstock generation. Though, I’ve noticed that even my most left-leaning Prog acquaintances run extremely conservative home lives.

    When we took possession of our current house in North Austin, the previous owners left us a big mess, including general garbage in the recycle bins. Sorting out the recycling from the garbage, I came across a bunch of copies of letters from the husband of the house to the deacon of the local church, complaining about the pastor spending more time pursuing his acting career than taking care of parishoner’s needs.

    Who knows what was really going on. Considering the previous owners tried to stick me with a 900 lb mawbuhl kawlum (say it like burbed.com imitating Saturday Night Live) abandoned in the backyard after they cleared out, I’m inclined to give the benefit of the doubt to the minister.

  14. “At least 14 people, including an eight-year-old girl, are killed and more are injured by several tornadoes that ripped through Alabama and Georgia and left more than 35,000 without power

    At least 14 people were killed when tornadoes struck eastern Alabama and Georgia on Sunday afternoon
    Search for the missing continues into the night as rescuers comb through ‘catastrophic’ damage
    Local media reports one of the fatalities was an eight-year-old girl in Beauregard, Alabama
    More than 35,000 people have been left without power in Alabama and Georgia

    By Jenny Stanton For Dailymail.com and Associated Press

    Published: 17:53 EST, 3 March 2019 | Updated: 21:12 EST, 3 March 2019

    More than 14 people have been killed in Alabama after tornadoes hit that state and Georgia on Sunday.

    Lee County Sheriff Jay Jones confirmed at least 14 people were dead, and family members told WSFA 12 one of the fatalities in Beauregard, Alabama was an eight-year-old girl.

    ‘I can say that at this time we have 14 confirmed fatalities. And again, the search continues. We still have some people that are reported missing,’ Jones told WRBL-TV He didn’t elaborate on the exact number of those missing. ”

  15. I remember being rather optimistic about the Microkernel. I was ALSO hoping to run OS/2 on the PowerPC.

    Obviously, never happened.

    But what men dream of leads to innovation. As Edison said – they found all those things that didn’t work.

  16. IBM’s biggest mistake was charging $200 for a copy of OS/2 when Microsoft was giving away copies of Windows. Had IBM suits made the same decision as MS the computing world would be much different. Corporate greed spawned from decades of high paying mainframe customers did not translate to the desktop.

  17. Wow, I knew half of this. The other half is pure crazy. A common microkernel from PCs to Mainframes, crazy !

    GNU is still trying to make a microkernel work with Hurd after 20+ years of trying.

    Most of the GNU tools which form the foundation of a Linux system were developed with Hurd in mind. Linux infuriates the GNU management.

    Losing control of VLSI was IBM’s biggest tech blunder IMHO, but all of the debate will be moot if Oracle wins in the Supreme Court.

  18. “A common microkernel from PCs to Mainframes, crazy !”

    Linux, right?

    Linux is not a microkernel. It has plug in modules/driver, but the fundamental kernel services are linked into one block of code.

    Microkernel was the trendy research topic in the early 90s when Linux started … like global warming. Linus Torvalds was not operating on a university grant, however.

  19. IBM’s biggest mistake was charging $200 for a copy of OS/2 when Microsoft was giving away copies of Windows. Had IBM suits made the same decision as MS the computing world would be much different. Corporate greed spawned from decades of high paying mainframe customers did not translate to the desktop.

    Microsoft didn’t give away Windows. The cost got buried in the price of a new PC.

    OS/2’s biggest problem was lack of software. If the free software movement had been more serious about an Office equivalent about 10 years earlier, OS/2 might have picked up a market share similar to what Mac OS X holds today.

    Jobs at least knew enough to keep Microsoft happy and working on Mac Office while OS X developed. According to friends at Apple, some of the best Mac programmers in the world work for Microsoft. Mac Office has had p*ss poor management at times (cough … Roz Ho … cough), but it was still available with file compatibility for the IT pioneers in the office.

  20. “f the free software movement had been more serious about an Office equivalent”

    I don’t think so, as there were plenty of alternatives to the Office suite. They got killed off by MS with their upgrade and file format wars. Wordpad was free and it does 90% of what most people need.

    OS/2 had that whole “Presentation Manager” which was a different way of thinking. The mental barrier of “learn this new thing” before you can do other things was there. It also didn’t run on laptops, and in dealing with the engineers in Boca Raton, it didn’t seem like they ever considered that anyone would try to run it on a lappy. I spent a lot of time on the phone with them trying to get Warp to run on my Gateway 486 lappy. I finally gave up and installed win3.11 for Work Groups, which mostly ‘just worked.’

    IBM thought they were a mainframe company. They didn’t realize they needed to be a computer company. Xerox made the same mistake. They thought they were a copy machine company, when they could have been an information manipulation company.

    Apple finally broke their mindsets and became a phone company, a music company, a hardware company, etc. They wouldn’t have survived if they were just a computer company.

    n

  21. microkernel… whats next bit slice?

    nope, Microsoft won the day they allowed free use at home, keycodes were widely known on the wild, later, the usual user lazyness forced the environment

    xp forever, wait until 7 forever, I face this next year


  22. Microsoft didn’t give away Windows

    I was talking about COMDEX and other computer trade shows. Microsoft could not get enough discs in the hands of attendees fast enough. I think I wound up with three copies of Windows 3.1 myself (if memory serves me correctly).

  23. I remember paying for box copies of windows.. but cracking and serial numbers were widespread.

    n


  24. I remember paying for box copies of windows

    If I remember correctly Windows 3.1 (and 3.11) did not require serial numbers or activation codes to install. All you had to do was copy the discs. Neither did DOS up to 6.22. Just copy the discs. At least I don’t remember any numbers. Windows 3.1 came with my Gateway 2000 computer. I then got a copy of Windows for Workgroups and I passed it around to three other people at the office.

    The earliest I remember activation codes was for Office 2000. Really annoyed me at the time. But I knew it was going to become quite common in the future.

  25. I have to agree with Nick: OpenOffice became a real contender around 2005, with their “Open Office XML” format that promised open access and cross-platform compatibility. This was especially interesting to several governments.

    Microsoft reacted immediately and came out with their “Office Open XML” format. Note the names: the MS name is obviously chosen to be confusing. They forced their format through a compliant (corrupt?) standards process (ECMA-376), so that they could claim to be implementing an “official standard”.

    Worse, the format is deliberately designed to be utter crap, so that no one can reverse engineer it. In fact, the “standard” basically says “to be compliant, you have to do whatever MS Office does”. In some places, this even means faithfully reproducing bugs in older versions of MS Office – that really is written into the standard. So it’s an “open” standard that only Microsoft can ever comply with. Great job, ECMA, approving something like that…

    Anyway, this generated sufficient confusion amongst managers and bureaucrats; who anyway are invited to nice lunches by MS sales reps, while ignoring their fussy IT departments. It was really ugly, and unfortunately Microsoft won.

  26. I don’t think so, as there were plenty of alternatives to the Office suite. They got killed off by MS with their upgrade and file format wars. Wordpad was free and it does 90% of what most people need.

    Complete Word file compatibility was the key feature that the other office suites failed to match completely. I’ve seen bits and pieces of the Microsoft C source for reading the files, and I doubt even their programmers could come up with a clean room solution to that.

    Much like the rand()/srand() in Visual C++, the code probably dates back to when BillG still wrote source.

    Word on Windows was horrible in the late 80s/early 90s, but Microsoft kept at it, and the Egghead Software Ponzi maintained Office on the shelf in all of their stores for everyone to buy/copy/return.

  27. microkernel… whats next bit slice?

    The current tech trend which, IMHO, is a dead end we’re barreling down the road towards at 90 MPH is the LLVM backend languages such as Rust and Go.

  28. IBM’s biggest mistake was charging $200 for a copy of OS/2 when Microsoft was giving away copies of Windows.

    I recall seeing a discussion of this on Jerry’s website, and he made the point that it was the development kits IBM was selling while MS gave them to anyone with pockets.


  29. it was the development kits IBM was selling while MS gave them to anyone with pockets

    Each kit included a fully functioning version of Windows, I think it was 3.1, with a copy of DOS (5 or 6, I don’t remember). I wound up with 3 copies of the kit as I pass the Microsoft booth three times. IBM was selling their OS/2 kits, I wound up with no copies. There was some other stuff on the MS offerings but I don’t remember what as I was not interested.

    I have been to dog and pony shows put on by Microsoft. The last one I went to every attendee got a copy of Windows, Windows 7 in this case, and a copy of Office 2010. There was no charge to attend the presentation, just show up. I walked away with two sets of CD’s along with the activation codes.

    Sort of reminds of like the James Bond movie “Live and Let Die” when Kananga was going to give away heroin until every got hooked. Then charge the addicts a lot of money after the other suppliers went out of business. It certainly worked for Microsoft.

  30. MS gave away the Windows Development Kits at shows, as stated, or would mail them to you for maybe $10. That’s how I got one of my copies.

    Meanwhile, the OS/2 Dev Kit was IIRC $1500 if you bought it at the trade show, more if you were just a guy who ordered it over the phone, somewhat less if you were with a company that had a support contract with IBM. This was thirty years ago, mind, when dollars were bigger than they are now.

    Around 1990 IBM realized they didn’t have any independent developers writing the next killer app for OS/2, nor hardly any apps at all, and came up with some half-assed deal to entice developers. IIRC, you had to pay to sign up as a developer, which got you a slightly better price for dev tools and manuals. IIRC, there was also a commitment to deliver a working app within some time period, but don’t hold me to that. Even without that, it was hardly a deal.

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