Fri. Nov. 19, 2021 – still plugging away

By on November 19th, 2021 in computing, personal, WuFlu

Cool and clear, damp. Still minor chance of rain. My client is out in the country (for now- housing developments are going in all around him ) and it was beautiful yesterday. So I was in a dim house, and a dim theater, and a dim rack room…

Made some progress but main tasks were held up until we got internet access back. That involved hard resetting the ATT DSL router/modem and re-entering account info. Ultimately it took a phone call to customer service by my client who knows how to escalate (he’s a C-suite guy, doesn’t normally hear ‘no’ without a whole lot of probing questions.)

I’m back out there today, trying to get enough hardware in line and on line that my erzatz partner can do some control programming remotely while I’m out of town. Enough has to work that my client can watch football over Thanksgiving. It is a challenge at this point.

But hey, challenges are why we do things, right?

And it all is money in the bank.

Which will help me stack all the things.

nick

107 Comments and discussion on "Fri. Nov. 19, 2021 – still plugging away"

  1. brad says:

    Alan said: "Level 5 autonomous driving has to deal with things like black ice, unplowed streets covered in snow, contorted construction zones, NYFC cab drivers, high winds, dust storms and any other edge case you can dream up. Does anybody really have all these dealt with, or will have in four years?"

    Some months ago, I read an article about the future of self-driving vehicles. The main point was that driving will be primarily driven by detailed maps. Not by lines on the road, not by orange cones in construction sites (although those may be present), but by highly detailed computer maps: here is a street, here is a lane, there is a traffic light you have to pay attention to. And construction zones would enter themselves into the same map database.

    The arguments were convincing, because the visual chaos that makes up roads is just not going to go away. And pattern recognition shows no signs of getting good enough to deal with it. The detailed maps will provide enough hints for the autonomous software to do the rest of the job. More: accumulating all of that data does not require any changes to the infrastructure: no wires under roads, no new standards on how to paint lines, etc.. It's all software.

    Reaching this goal requires two big steps: First, creating and maintaining the mapping database, and providing access to people (like construction companies) who need to add information. Second, more accurate and more reliable GPS. Vehicles will need to able to locate themselves to within 10cm or so, including when they are in urban canyons between high rises.

    Not going to happen by 2025. And the Tesla/Apple vision of full autonomy without that kind of detailed map support is even farther away, for all the reasons Alan lists.

  2. Nick Flandrey says:

    47F and drier w 65%RH.

    Tired.  Fell asleep in chair.  Child 2 is up and moving around early.  Bah.

    n

  3. Greg Norton says:

    Made some progress but main tasks were held up until we got internet access back. That involved hard resetting the ATT DSL router/modem and re-entering account info. Ultimately it took a phone call to customer service by my client who knows how to escalate (he’s a C-suite guy, doesn’t normally hear ‘no’ without a whole lot of probing questions.)

    If AT&T follows through on firing for the vaccination mandate covering federal contractors, things will get real ugly.

    In the run up to the 2009 strike deadline, the big fiber trunk from Santa Cruz over the mountains to San Jose was spiked as in railroad spikes. And that was just a contract negotiation antic.

  4. Greg Norton says:

    (he’s a C-suite guy, doesn’t normally hear ‘no’ without a whole lot of probing questions.)

    So what's the vaccine policy he's helped enact at his company?

    I've heard the lecture from friends with the big jobs, claiming that their careers would be ruined if they don't go along with Biden regardless of whether an OSHA mandate was in place or not.

    Then they wonder why they have high turnover and can't hire skilled trades.

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  5. Nick Flandrey says:

    So what's the vaccine policy he's helped enact at his company?

    —when I asked him, (and he's hit by both mandates, osha for size and medicare) he crowed that the way the rule is actually written, he doesn't actually have to dismiss anyone.  And he supports the AGs in seeking to block both mandates.

    He also said they are not seeing any increase in cardiac or unusual illnesses, and the person that sits on the national medical surveillance committee hasn't brought anything like that to his attention either.

    n

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  6. Nick Flandrey says:

    WRT ATT, if you can escalate to a white (in this case, shorthand for western educated, articulate, english speaker, with experience in the position)  person in Jacksonville (as opposed to a brown person in Bangladesh) they can resolve your problems.  They have backups for when the normal process falls down too.   It needs personal, real time attention though, and for at least a half hour. 

    n

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  7. drwilliams says:

    The herd immunity that Biden and BigPharma are so worried about?

    https://hotair.com/jazz-shaw/2021/11/19/an-african-mystery-where-did-covid-go-n430251

  8. Greg Norton says:

    —when I asked him, (and he's hit by both mandates, osha for size and medicare) he crowed that the way the rule is actually written, he doesn't actually have to dismiss anyone.  And he supports the AGs in seeking to block both mandates.

    The place where I currently work is covered by the Federal contractor and size mandate. Barely in both categories. I was waiting for them to raise the issue, but they seem determined to avoid the topic. The HR droids are the typical model: passive-aggressive, female, early 30s, digging working from home in yoga pants — I wasn't going to just go get a shot without a direct order.

    (Management definitely leans Dem. If I dropped a few of the names on our board, some of you would freak. I needed the gig.)

    CVS ended up billing their insurance $160 for my Covid test two weeks ago. Yikes! I didn't think about it when I filled out the online form for the test. Insurance ended up negotiating that down to $60. If they weren’t aware of my vaccination status before, they are now.

    I'm giving notice today, regardless.

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  9. Nick Flandrey says:

    https://www.zerohedge.com/markets/nothing-ive-experienced-or-seen-supermarkets-alter-layouts-use-decoys-fill-gaps-left

    –explains some of the tactics I've mentioned, and others have confirmed in their areas.

    n

  10. Nick Flandrey says:

    I'm giving notice today, regardless.

    –not sticking around for the Christmas bonus? :-p

    –I guess one of the interviews went well?

    n

  11. Pecancorner says:

    I looked through your auction, Nick. Lots of good stuff – I can see why you are bummed. I have several of those things! That exact copper chafing dish – in fact I was looking through a cookbook the other day with thoughts of getting it out to use over the holidays. And the "Scenter Steamer" is our rice cooker – one of my favorite appliances: I will replace it with that exact one when/if it ever goes the way of all things.  Silver: I picked up one of those Paul Revere pitchers a while back for 50 cents: silver plate, and even sterling, seems to be going begging these days, as is a lot of metalware. So I get the bargains when I can.

    Everyone has their own strategy, and it always seemed to me that local auction proceeds had to be taken cumulatively over several events, instead of looking at results for individual items like we would for eBay sales. I agree with the folks yesterday who mentioned the time of year – the week before a holiday/long weekend people's attention can be elsewhere.  

    On the other hand,  while your experience is different, we always did fabulously selling antiques/collectibles in the store and on eBay/Etsy starting Dec 26 through April 1: people get used to pulling out their wallets for Christmas, so they keep spending – except on themselves – and that habit continues into January until tax time.

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  12. Nick Flandrey says:

    Brits are weird. 

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-10211859/Engineers-Lake-District-village-spent-three-years-reviving-Big-Ben-clock-converted-cowshed.html

    For almost four years, the Cumbria Clock Company, in Dacre, near Penrith, has been putting the Victorian masterpiece back together while protecting it from public view. 

    a clock under repair needs to be "protected" from view?

    –and don't get me started on how strange your world view needs to be to say that a woman "falls pregnant" using the same language as when you gets sick with a serious illness….

    Two countries divided by a common language indeed.

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  13. Greg Norton says:

    a clock under repair needs to be "protected" from view?

    That clock? Yes. Lots of crazies would see some value in destroying the mechanism and recording the accomplishment.

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  14. Pecancorner says:

    "This Is Like Nothing I've Experienced Or Seen Before" – Supermarkets Alter Layouts, Use Decoys To Fill Gaps Left By Shortages

    https://www.zerohedge.com/markets/nothing-ive-experienced-or-seen-supermarkets-alter-layouts-use-decoys-fill-gaps-left

    –explains some of the tactics I've mentioned, and others have confirmed in their areas.

    Big Lots completely revamped the whole floorplan and checkout situation in their stores – and even made major merchandise changes They have added clothing, which they never carried before, and a whole new section of character/brand themed stuff Disney etc, that is almost like a store-within-a-store.  They do still have their traditional merchandise and furniture and seasonal, which I am glad of. It is one of my favorite stores and I shop there often.

    The checkout counters are truly inefficient, as though they were designed for some express convenience store than for Big Lots.

  15. Nick Flandrey says:

    Lots of good stuff – I can see why you are bummed 

    –thanks for the confirmation.  I was beginning to doubt my own experience.   With any auction, there are always some things you 'throw in anyway' without expecting much, and some you put in to draw attention, but I was pretty sure the bulk of the items were solid.

    Some didn't get merchandised very well, there is an antique lamp that got lumped in with a candlestick and a wine bottle stopper that I thought might catch someone's eye.  Shoes are tough because you either have to get the end user who likes the shoe and FITS the shoe, or you get less money from a reseller who will wait for the right buyer.

    I had good ebay sold comps for a bunch of the collectibles and was hoping to at least get reseller prices for them.  The hotwheels garage, the jeep trailer with spot light, the deep sea diver rig, all should have done much better.

    It was a little bit shorter auction time period, which might have been contributory, but there is a balance between getting and keeping peoples' attention and there wasn't much early bidding.

     I've already got stuff in his pipeline for the next auction, so I really hope that a more 'gift item' focus will help that one succeed.

  16. Nick Flandrey says:

    in the store and on eBay/Etsy starting Dec 26 through April 1: people get used to pulling out their wallets for Christmas, so they keep spending – except on themselves – and that habit continues into January until tax time. 

    — I would get a bit of "well I didn't get it for Christmas, so I'll get it for myself"  but then people were looking at credit card bills and stopped spending for a while.

    It's really hard to predict sales though.   Is it the stuff? The buyers? The ebay promotion and search results algorithm?  Poor timing? 

    The other two auctions I was watching, one didn't post sold prices, but I don't expect that they suddenly got bidding wars in the last minutes and their prices were low when I last saw them.  The other had some last minute bidding but there were still unsold and opening bid items at the end. 

    I might have to pivot again and just look for hidden gems instead of taking the wider approach.

    n

  17. Greg Norton says:

    –not sticking around for the Christmas bonus? :-p

    –I guess one of the interviews went well?

    Who gets a Christmas bonus anymore?

    Yes, I think I finally fixed the ongoing career issues which started with going out to the Left Coast without a job in 2010.

    Even if it is a train wreck, the organization is sufficiently large that management as bad as the last place is quickly removed.

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  18. Greg Norton says:

    — I would get a bit of "well I didn't get it for Christmas, so I'll get it for myself"  but then people were looking at credit card bills and stopped spending for a while.

    The local news broadcasts are doing nightly fear porn about how Thanksgiving will be pricey and turkeys are in short supply. I’m sure that has curtailed spending in other categories.

    They're playing on the fact that most people won't buy a turkey until this weekend for various reasons. We don’t due to refrigerator space issues.

  19. Pecancorner says:

    Some didn't get merchandised very well, there is an antique lamp that got lumped in with a candlestick and a wine bottle stopper that I thought might catch someone's eye. 

    Yes, that can be a serious issue with local auctions: the auctioneer calls it “One of them thangs” and you have to rely on the buyers noticing the gems within the box lots. And those won't get early bids, so it needs the excitement of the in-person live auction to get things moving at the last minute. COVID has probably hurt that – our best local house closed down in March, because they just couldn't draw the crowds – or the consignments – any more.  However he may have just been waiting for an excuse to retire, too – a lot of people did that over the past couple of years.

    Hopefully, more consignors like yourself will start sending stuff to the sales, and the auctioneers can rebuild their active customer base and get some momentum going with them again.

    It's really hard to predict sales though.   Is it the stuff? The buyers? The ebay promotion and search results algorithm?  Poor timing? …..

     I might have to pivot again and just look for hidden gems instead of taking the wider approach.

    Ah, twas ever thus!  As one oldtimer told us early in the business: "The rarest thing of all is a buyer!" Ha!

    Cherry picking the gems is always a good strategy: things that hold value.   Plus, you already have a lot of backstock still to work through for bulk for your local auction houses.  Bulk will be easy to replace down the road if you decide you need to.

    We no longer buy actively, since I don't have an outlet other than Etsy so it has to be small enough to ship and valuable enough for the customer to be willing to pay the $20+ that it costs to ship most things these days. 

  20. Chad says:

    Thanksgiving will be pricey and turkeys are in short supply.

    I’m rarely in the market for a turkey as we usually have to host the event (as we have the only home in the family that can accommodate everyone) so someone else always buys the turkey to feel less guilty about making us host for the umpteenth time. lol However, I was walking through one of our regional grocery chains last week and saw their store brand turkeys on sale for 89¢ per pound. That’s pretty cheap.

  21. Pecancorner says:

    Also, I think the cost of shipping will drive people back to local sales and local buying for second hand, used, collectible, and antique items.  

    And people ARE looking for quality. They are tired of and disgusted by the Chinese junk that Amazon pushes. They want things of substance. And since nothing is made in the USA any more, the only high quality goods are those that were made years ago and now only available second hand.

    So the second hand market is set to boom, as more and more people start looking for local sources.

  22. Greg Norton says:

    Making my car payment via account transfer today, I noticed that another Joe Bucks payment showed up in our joint checking account. I guess those will continue through the end of the year.

    And, again, strange, since I never provided direct deposit information to the IRS.

    I'm not sure I'm comfortable with that. The account is what we use for bills and I keep it skinny with a firewall against the savings at the same credit union. A sudden "accidental" EFT out would be a problem.

  23. Greg Norton says:

    And people ARE looking for quality. They are tired of and disgusted by the Chinese junk that Amazon pushes. They want things of substance. And since nothing is made in the USA any more, the only high quality goods are those that were made years ago and now only available second hand.

    People keep feeding the Amazon beast by renewing Prime, which doesn’t even begin to cover the cost of “free” shipping, increasingly borne by the vendors, many of whom are small companies trying to innovate.

    Plus the beast’s retail arm is subsidized by AWS being the Hot Skillz of the moment, regardless of whether basing infrastructure in "The Cloud" makes sense.

  24. Ray Thompson says:

    Subbing today. A new personal record on cell phone confiscations. Two from the same class. Sitting next to each other. Playing games on their phones. Snuck up on them. Boom. I love it.

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  25. Ray Thompson says:

    another Joe Bucks payment showed up

    Child tax credit, an advance on your 2021 return?

  26. Greg Norton says:

    another Joe Bucks payment showed up

    Child tax credit, an advance on your 2021 return?

    Yes, I call the bribery -er- tax credit advance payments "Joe Bucks".

    I'm saving them to buy a bot to poach PS5s for resale on EBay. 🙂

    I actually just played with tech at work that could be used to write that kind of software.

  27. Pecancorner says:

    People keep feeding the Amazon beast by renewing Prime, which doesn’t even begin to cover the cost of “free” shipping, increasingly borne by the vendors, many of whom are small companies trying to innovate.

    True.   All of these companies – Amazon, eBay, Etsy, Walmart – unfairly exploit small companies and independent sellers by forcing the "free shipping" gimmick onto them. 

    Of course, Amazon has a deal with the USPS for the items from their warehouse – and I would not doubt they are still cheating. For years, Amazon stole postage by reprinting labels again and again. When they finally got caught, the Postal Inspector wimped out and settled for a ridiculously small dollar penalty, and no other punishment.

    When Prime went up to $120 plus tax, we did not renew. I started looking around and found that there's a higher price on items with Prime shipping – just a few dollars, but still.   I put things in the cart until we get to the free shipping number. However, Amazon's latest trick is to delay shipment on those items for up to a week.  That was when I began looking on Walmart.com first.

    One of my sons who lives in a city says Prime is worth it to him because he can get things delivered that afternoon or the next morning.  He's in the renovation business and orders a lot to save the time and expense of trying to commute through city traffic to local stores.

    Originally, we bought Prime for the streaming content, but then they started added extra charges such as moving the British mysteries back to Acorn and charging an extra $5 a month for that. 

    Now, we do not pay anyone anything for streaming content – there are enough free channels that we don't need it. We buy used dvds of movies we want to watch, and we had stopped watching series TV long ago.

  28. Greg Norton says:

    Now, we do not pay anyone anything for streaming content – there are enough free channels that we don't need it. We buy used dvds of movies we want to watch, and we had stopped watching series TV long ago.

    We watch "Discovery" and "Picard" via … well let's say it is a grey area. I settle Kharma by purchasing the DVD sets later.

    Baby Yoda doesn't have DVDs, however, so I spring for a month of Disney whenever they have a new season, and my family gets their Disney fix during that month.

  29. Ray Thompson says:

    One of my sons who lives in a city says Prime is worth it to him

    My son is the same way. He orders some items and they show up at his house within 3 hours. He buys the majority of his stuff online. Groceries are done through an app and he pulls up and they load the groceries.

    He also has a lot of automation in his house. All the lights, door locks, TV, security cameras, vacuums, etc. He works in technology and really likes automating what he can.

    I got Amazon Prime free for a month. So I ordered a bunch of stuff, will binge watch some shows, some movies I have not seen in some time. I will cancel before my 30 days are expired. I don't use it enough to justify the cost. I generally stack enough in my cart to get free shipping before I place the order.

  30. ITGuy1998 says:

    I think I'm on my last year of paying for prime. My Amazon ordering is way down, and I hardly ever watch anything on their streaming service.  I did really enjoy Clarkson's Farm, however. I'll do a one month membership if there is a season 2. The final season of The Expanse will be out before my subscription is up, so I'm good there too.

    I'll rejoin Netflix for a month when Stranger Things debuts the new season.

    We have Disney+, Hulu+, and ESPN through Verizon at no extra charge. We've had that for almost two years now, and I still haven't logged in to ESPN+. I have no desire to anymore.

  31. ITGuy1998 says:

    I just ordered 27 new Precision 5820 workstations for work. Essentially the same specs as a year ago. Around 25% more expensive, and this order didn't include dual monitors while last year's did, so in reality even more expensive.

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  32. CowboySlim says:

    “Would you really get in a car with no wheei or pedals in 2025?  Give me a break.”

    YUUUP I'd get in, if I ordered an Uber/Lyft and it arrived with an empty driver's seat.

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  33. lynn says:

    "Over a Million Americans May Have Permanently Lost Their Sense of Smell to Covid-19"

        https://gizmodo.com/over-a-million-americans-may-have-permanently-lost-thei-1848082265

    "A new study estimates that up to 1.6 million Americans have experienced covid-related smell loss for longer than six months, with little chance of recovery."

    It took ten months for my sense of smell to come back after I had the Koof in Feb 2020.

    Hat tip to:
    https://drudgereport.com/

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  34. Greg Norton says:

    I got Amazon Prime free for a month. So I ordered a bunch of stuff, will binge watch some shows, some movies I have not seen in some time. I will cancel before my 30 days are expired. I don't use it enough to justify the cost. I generally stack enough in my cart to get free shipping before I place the order.

    See how far you get with "Good Omens" (Amazon exclusive) before shutting it off.

    "Man in High Castle" is also interesting in spots, especially if you are a "Northern Exposure" fan since the rural sequences in the first season were filmed in Roslyn, WA.

  35. Greg Norton says:

    I just ordered 27 new Precision 5820 workstations for work. Essentially the same specs as a year ago. Around 25% more expensive, and this order didn't include dual monitors while last year's did, so in reality even more expensive.

    Anything with a decent graphics card is going to be expensive due to the bottom feeder bitcoin mining dweebs.

    Bitcoin has reached the "cab driver" point, where even your cab driver … well, Uber driver … will have a mining rig.

    The upside is that when it all crashes, hardware will be cheap on EBay.

  36. Paul+Hampson says:

    "Reaching this goal requires two big steps: First, creating and maintaining the mapping database, and providing access to people (like construction companies) who need to add information. Second, more accurate and more reliable GPS. Vehicles will need to able to locate themselves to within 10cm or so, including when they are in urban canyons between high rises."

    Not to mention all of the working and research professions that require off-road access; same kind of reasons that working vehicles will never reach sub-compact mileage goals

    "We don’t due to refrigerator space issues."

    We've got one of those portable 12/120v plug-in coolers that bridges that gap nicely, handy at home as well as on the road.

  37. MrAtoz says:

    We binged out "Midnight Mass" on Netflix. A twisted take on a vampire story. The acting is outstanding. If you like a little bit of horror (not too much blood/gore, rated MA) in a mini series, this might be a good choice. The way the Bible is used to justify…I won't give any spoilers.

    Recommended.

  38. drwilliams says:

    Rittenhouse NOT GUILTY

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  39. Greg Norton says:

    We binged out "Midnight Mass" on Netflix. A twisted take on a vampire story. The acting is outstanding. If you like a little bit of horror (not too much blood/gore, rated MA) in a mini series, this might be a good choice. The way the Bible is used to justify…I won't give any spoilers.

    Recommended.

    Netflix has the BBC's last remake of "Dracula". While it is uneven across all three segments, the middle 90 minutes, expanding on what is only a paragraph in the book, the ocean voyage, is highly entertaining.

    And if you want to turn off the program as soon as you see Van Helsing reimagined as a female nun, at least wait for Dolly Wells to drop the money line.

    And you'll know the money line when you hear it. 🙂

    How did Dolly Wells get passed over for “Doctor Who”? Of course I have a half dozen actresses who I wonder about that also.

    Netflix "Army of the Dead" is also recommended if for no other reason to provide context for the arguably better "rom com" prequel "Army of Thieves". Plus there are hints of time travel/alternative dimensions around the series in future movies.

    I’m focused on seeing “Ghostbusters Afterlife” this weekend. My friends who saw it last night said it is indeed Spielberg-ish and they promised that I will hear a kid drop a line as non-PC good as “penis breath” which the studio removed from “ET”.

    Ok. We’ll see.

  40. Jenny says:

    I confess I enjoyed Good Omens enough that we bought the DVD and I’ve watched it more than once. I like both writers, and the main actors. I liked what’s his name very much as in his Dr Who role. 
    I’ve introduced my 9 year old to Tiffany Aching, the five book juvenile series by Pratchett. There’s a hysterical bit with angry sentient cheese that I’m cheerfully anticipating her reading. 
    Pratchett is a love him / hate him author. I didn’t care for his writing twenty years ago. Post brain injury I find him highly entertaining. 

  41. Jenny says:

    I’m greatly relieved to see the not guilty verdict. 

    Lots of additional suffering to come. The media will continue to ensure that.

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  42. drwilliams says:

    “Moral clarity” from the WTA:

    https://hotair.com/allahpundit/2021/11/19/wta-chief-well-quit-doing-business-in-china-if-they-dont-produce-peng-shuai-n430311

    Meanwhile, the pink glow on the horizon shows LeBron and the rest of the NBA still have their backsides in the air for their Chinese masters. 

  43. Ray Thompson says:

    Lots of additional suffering to come. The media will continue to ensure that.

    Indeed. The prosecution is fuming, foaming at the mouth. The decision cannot be appealed or challenged. Done deal.

    Rittenhouse may now face wrongful death lawsuits. Same thing happened to OJ. Found not guilty, but faced wrongful death lawsuits which I believe he lost. This may be different as OJ was not pleading self defense, just that he didn't kill Nicole. With Rittenhouse, being found not guilty, effectively using rightful self-defense, perhaps wrongful death is not allowed. Or if a lawsuit were to be filed the burden of proof for the complaintant may be much more difficult.

    Regardless, shooting someone who is attacking has been upheld in a court of law. The precedent has been affirmed despite the best efforts of the prosecution.

    Kudos to the jury who saw reality.

  44. Jenny says:

    Because I can. 

  45. Greg Norton says:

    Pratchett is a love him / hate him author. I didn’t care for his writing twenty years ago. Post brain injury I find him highly entertaining. 

    Find a way to watch Sky's "Going Postal" miniseries if you haven't already seen it.

    Claire Foy is possibly better there than in the first season of "The Crown". And Sir Terry himself gets the last line.

    Oh, and, yes, it is Manuel from “Fawlty Towers”.

    “Going Postal” might be a bit mature for your daughter so watch it once with your husband before deciding.

    The miniseries was Easter family viewing in Britain about 10 years ago.

  46. MrAtoz says:

    I can't wait to hear how Psaki spins plugs' take on the RH not guilty verdict. I'm guessing it took so long because the jury really dug into the drone shot and found it proved RH did not provoke shite.

    I really hope the cops are assigned to protecting the jury for several months.

    I also really hope Rittenhouse sues everybody from plugs on down plus the LSM.

  47. Ray Thompson says:

    I also really hope Rittenhouse sues everybody from plugs on down plus the LSM.

    For what?

    Anyone can be charged with a crime. The grand jury said there was enough evidence to charge with a crime. The prosecution is immune from being sued. Did the media state anything that was false? Opinion pieces don't matter as long as false statements are not made.

    Now if sponge brain comes out and states that Rittenhouse is guilty and the jury made a mistake then sponge brains should be sued, or better, removed from office. But that would be very difficult.

    Rittenhouse's best option at this point is to quietly slip away to some remote location and stay low for a few months.

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  48. Greg Norton says:

    Now if sponge brain comes out and states that Rittenhouse is guilty and the jury made a mistake then sponge brains should be sued, or better, removed from office. But that would be very difficult.

    Obama weighed in on Treyvon Martin which made that mess much worse than it would have been otherwise.

    I'm guessing Obama and Attorney General "Stedman Graham" are part of the cabal really running things in the White House.

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  49. MrAtoz says:

    Did the media state anything that was false?

    Of course they did. They called him a murder multiple time. White Supremacist multiple times. Domestic terrorist multiple times. And on. Just like Sandmann was and reached settlements. The same will happen because none of it is true and was never proved. Multiple *reporters* in each of the main LSM networks libeled/slandered Rittenhouse. The Fourth Estate doesn't get to say lies under the 1A. I want plugs pursued because he sucks dead bunnies and should have kept his yap shut and not called RH a White Supremacist. This is no different than tabloids getting sued and losing when publishing lies about somebody.

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  50. drwilliams says:

    " I want plugs pursued because he sucks dead bunnies and should have kept his yap shut and not called RH a White Supremacist."

    He yapped before stealing the Oval Office. Like to see a lawsuit there just for the sheer enjoyment of watching the P.O.S. claim "executive privilege".

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  51. SteveF says:

    Rittenhouse and the multitudinous slanderers and libelers can reach a monetary accommodation or they can duel. I'm liking the odds of Rittenhouse with an AR-15…

  52. Rick H says:

    Remember that "not guilty" is not the same as 'innocent".

    As I recall from various judge's instructions when I served on juries, "not guilty" means that the prosecution didn't prove their case against the defendant. "Not guilty" means that the defendant is not guilty of the charges by the evidence presented and prosecuted by the prosecutor.

    (The judges also told us to only examine the evidence as presented. Not the opening statements, nor the closing statements. The evidence is what matters.) *

    This is not a comment on the results of the RH trial. It is just a reminder what 'not guilty' means. Many people don't know of this distinction.

    And, of course, IANAL. ("I Am Not A Lawyer")

    * I served on a jury for a drunk driving charge. The prosecutor presented all sorts of evidence that the car was defective, the brakes weren't working correctly (it was a non-injury rear-ender where the driver was found to be above the legal limit), and other facts that were not related to the fact that the driver was 'over the limit'.

    After reviewing the charge ('DUI"), and the evidence (alcohol level test), the jury came to a guilty verdict. The defendant was driving under the influence – as proven by the evidence. Wasn't the car's fault. It was the defendant's fault.

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  53. Greg Norton says:

    I confess I enjoyed Good Omens enough that we bought the DVD and I’ve watched it more than once. I like both writers, and the main actors. I liked what’s his name very much as in his Dr Who role. 

    David Tennant.

    What's his name. Sacrelige!

    I trust the database admin gig is going well. I have a new gig that starts in a few weeks for which, frankly I thought I bombed the interview.

    I learned a few new things at the current job, but it isn’t what I like to do.

  54. MrAtoz says:

    You are innocent until proven guilty. Just because the prosecution loses doesn’t mean you are not innocent. You started out innocent and remain so. The meaning “Not Guilty” is just legal babble.

    IMHO.

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  55. ~jim says:

    Remember that "not guilty" is not the same as 'innocent".

    Thanks, Rick. A note of sanity into the schoolground accusations of wrongdoing.

    12 good men and a slowly evolving code of conduct we all agree upon is what we have to settle for at present. 

    Not perfect, yet. Nor may it ever will be given the vicissitudes of human behavior! But I think it beats honor killings and tribal warfare. 

    6
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  56. Rick H says:

    "Not guilty of the charges". Means the charges weren't proven. Has nothing to do with the ‘state of innocence’.

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  57. ~jim says:

    "Not guilty of the charges". Means the charges weren't proven.

    That demonstrates the distinction between mob justice and rule of law. Good point. 

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  58. Ray Thompson says:

    I just found out after 7 years that the backup camera on my truck has a zoom function. Makes it much easier to see the trailer hitch.

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  59. EdH says:

    @Rick:  We are back to two privacy warnings again, the one with the blue banner background across the top p, and the black square background in lower left.

    Other than that the site looks great, elegant and clean. I admit to being dubious about the upgrade at first, but it’s very nice!

    1
  60. Alan says:

    >>  And construction zones would enter themselves into the same map database.

    According to Petey's website, the public road network in the US covers 4 million miles. If say just .01 percent of that changes on a particular day, that's 400 miles of the map that needs to be updated by humans and then updated to ~290 million cars, trucks, buses, etc. (assuming a full conversion to EVs). All it takes is the emergency road repair crew foreman's cousin Louie, who works for him, being out sick and his backup forgetting to update the database and that sends your driverless, steering wheel-less, brake pedal-less Uber into oncoming traffic.

    So many years later v2.0 includes a neural network of all self-driving cars "talking" to each other. Of course all the car companies are growing old waiting for President Petey's DOT to publish a common standard.

    Someday AI will figure out all the logic in the human brain and replicate it…or not.

  61. Rick H says:

     We are back to two privacy warnings again, the one with the blue banner background across the top p, and the black square background in lower left.

    You only see those if you have cleaned out the site cookies. Although I suppose that two are a bit of overkill. One of them is built into the theme – so I need to make that an optional thing. The other is a plugin that does some other needed stuff, including server-side analytics. So I need to adjust the theme.

    It's on the list for the next theme update. Thanks for the kind words.

  62. Alan says:

    >> Of course, Amazon has a deal with the USPS for the items from their warehouse – and I would not doubt they are still cheating. For years, Amazon stole postage by reprinting labels again and again. When they finally got caught, the Postal Inspector wimped out and settled for a ridiculously small dollar penalty, and no other punishment.

    They're also reducing their reliance on the USPS…

    [As of Sep. 2020] The e-commerce giant is now shipping 67 percent of its own packages directly to customers, according to data from supply chain consultant MWPVL International. That's up from 50 percent in 2019, and the Canadian consulting firm estimates it will reach 85 percent by 2023.

    https://cheddar.com/media/amazon-replacing-usps-with-own-delivery-network

  63. Alan says:

    >> You are innocent until proven guilty. Just because the prosecution loses doesn’t mean you are not innocent. You started out innocent and remain so. The meaning “Not Guilty” is just legal babble.

    As long as you can hide your assets as well as OJ does. I doubt his civil defense attorneys are working on contingency.

    https://wgntv.com/news/oj-simpson-still-fighting-against-orders-to-pay-60m-for-goldman-deaths-lawyer-says/

    ADDED: “Rittenhouse could still be sued for damages in a civil trial, where the burden of proof is lower than in criminal trials.”
    https://www.npr.org/2021/11/19/1057288807/kyle-rittenhouse-acquitted-all-charges-verdict

  64. Greg Norton says:

    ADDED: “Rittenhouse could still be sued for damages in a civil trial, where the burden of proof is lower than in criminal trials.”

    Benny Crump is probably already on the road to Wisconsin from Texas.

  65. drwilliams says:

    "Innocent until proven guilty"

    Not proven guilty.

    Therefore, still innocent. QED

    The next step is to see if Schoeder washes his hands of the whole thing, or pursues the strong evidence that the prosecution committed multiple frauds upon the court.

    If he doesn't, Rittenhouse legal defense team should file suit.

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  66. Alan says:

    >> "Innocent until proven guilty"

    Not proven guilty.

    Therefore, still innocent. QED

    The next step is to see if Schoeder washes his hands of the whole thing, or pursues the strong evidence that the prosecution committed multiple frauds upon the court.

    If he doesn't, Rittenhouse legal defense team should file suit.

    Innocent, Not Guilty, Guilty – no matter, in the end it's the lawyers than win.

  67. Alan says:

    CDC just confirmed the FDA recommendation of booster shots for all adults (18 and over) in the US.

    My arm is tired of being jabbed. Just got my flu shot the other day. As per my PCP it was FluBlok, for people over 50 but not yet 65. Had to call around a bit to find a pharmacy that had it in stock.

    As you get older, a flu vaccine with proven protection can go a long way. FLUBLOK® QUADRIVALENT INFLUENZA VACCINE is proven to be 30% more effective than a standard-dose influenza vaccine in preventing flu in people 50+.

  68. drwilliams says:

    Draft one good lawsuit, and just change the name 40 times for each pos in this video mashup:

    https://www.powerlineblog.com/archives/2021/11/media-guilty.php

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  69. ~jim says:

    What are the hallmarks of civilization?

    How would an alien entity, peering into the present condition of Homo sapiens, recognize civilization? 

  70. drwilliams says:

    Back in the 70's a brewmaster was quoted as saying:

    "If you want a light beer just put an ice cube in it."

    Shopping for bourbon nowadays can be confusing, but one there is one criteria for rejection that can help.

    Hint:

    "If you want cherry in your bourbon, just put a Cherry Twizzler in it."

    My rule of thumb is reject any company that does such a thing, as they are hopelessly flocked up and can't be trusted to know a good bourbon from a pot run filtered through rat droppings.

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  71. ech says:

    Time to explain India or sit down.

    Did you read what I wrote and linked to? Did you? GO BACK AND READ IT.

    The positive results of Ivermectin in published studies (which were mostly a shortening of symptoms) were all from countries where worms are endemic. What is Ivermectin? A worm killer. Worms cause immune deficiencies. So, the probability is that the effect seen is due to killing worms in patients given it.

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  72. drwilliams says:

    "How would an alien entity, peering into the present condition of Homo sapiens, recognize civilization? "

    https://www.un.org/en/observances/toilet-day

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  73. drwilliams says:

    @ech

    Go back and read the link that I posted weeks ago about Ivermectin and India.

    You might also want to review what Feynmann said about the scientific method.

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  74. ~jim says:

    "How would an alien entity, peering into the present condition of Homo sapiens, recognize civilization? "

    https://www.un.org/en/observances/toilet-day

    I'm not a Freudian psychoanalyst, but I think I know a few who are still alive., drwilliams. 

  75. drwilliams says:

    trust your government…blindly:

    November 19, 2021

    The FDA says it needs 55 years to release all of Pfizer's COVID vaccine data

    By Andrea Widburg

    Public Health and Medical Professionals for Transparency (PHMPT), as its name suggests, is a medical transparency group that filed a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request with the FDA for documents tied to its approval of Pfizer's BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine.  The FDA went to court and informed the judge that it was totally willing to comply with the request — except that it will take almost 55 years to do so.

    The Epoch Times reports that the FDA claims to possess 329,000 pages of documents responsive to PHMPT's request.  Further, the FDA posits that reviewing the documents and redacting exempt material will allow it to produce, at most, around 500 pages per month.  At that rate, it will take 658 months — or 54 and 3/4 years — to complete the requested production.

    PHMPT's attorney, Aaron Siri, instantly spotted the problem with the FDA's claim that the volume of documents makes it impossible to produce them in a more timely manner:

    It took the FDA precisely 108 days from when Pfizer started producing the records for licensure (on May 7, 2021) to when the FDA licensed the Pfizer vaccine (on August 23, 2021). Taking the FDA at its word, it conducted an intense, robust, thorough, and complete review and analysis of those documents in order to assure that the Pfizer vaccine was safe and effective for licensure. While it can conduct that intense review of Pfizer's documents in 108 days, it now asks for over 20,000 days to make these documents available to the public.

    So, let's get this straight. The federal government shields Pfizer from liability. Gives it billions of dollars. Makes Americans take its product. But won't let you see the data supporting its product's safety and efficacy. Who does the government work for?

    https://www.americanthinker.com/blog/2021/11/the_fda_says_it_needs_55_years_to_release_all_of_pfizers_covid_vaccine_data.html

  76. drwilliams says:

    reposting with links suppressed:

    trust your government…blindly:

    November 19, 2021

    The FDA says it needs 55 years to release all of Pfizer's COVID vaccine data

    By Andrea Widburg

    Public Health and Medical Professionals for Transparency (PHMPT), as its name suggests, is a medical transparency group that filed a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request with the FDA for documents tied to its approval of Pfizer's BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine.  The FDA went to court and informed the judge that it was totally willing to comply with the request — except that it will take almost 55 years to do so.

    The Epoch Times reports that the FDA claims to possess 329,000 pages of documents responsive to PHMPT's request.  Further, the FDA posits that reviewing the documents and redacting exempt material will allow it to produce, at most, around 500 pages per month.  At that rate, it will take 658 months — or 54 and 3/4 years — to complete the requested production.

    PHMPT's attorney, Aaron Siri, instantly spotted the problem with the FDA's claim that the volume of documents makes it impossible to produce them in a more timely manner:

    It took the FDA precisely 108 days from when Pfizer started producing the records for licensure (on May 7, 2021) to when the FDA licensed the Pfizer vaccine (on August 23, 2021). Taking the FDA at its word, it conducted an intense, robust, thorough, and complete review and analysis of those documents in order to assure that the Pfizer vaccine was safe and effective for licensure. While it can conduct that intense review of Pfizer's documents in 108 days, it now asks for over 20,000 days to make these documents available to the public.

    So, let's get this straight. The federal government shields Pfizer from liability. Gives it billions ofdollars. Makes Americans take its product. But won't let you see the data supporting its product's safety and efficacy. Who does the government work for?

    https://www.americanthinker.com/blog/2021/11/the_fda_says_it_needs_55_years_to_release_all_of_pfizers_covid_vaccine_data.html

  77. ~jim says:

    @ech

    Did you read what I wrote and linked to? Did you? GO BACK AND READ IT.

    I did. I thought it was a wonderful exposition in critical thinking and scientific methodology., esp regard to the validity of the recent trend in "Meta-analyses". 

    His fluke pun had me laughing out loud even before the explanation. I do that sometimes and Lord knows why it happens. 

  78. Alan says:

    >> It took the FDA precisely 108 days from when Pfizer started producing the records for licensure (on May 7, 2021) to when the FDA licensed the Pfizer vaccine (on August 23, 2021). Taking the FDA at its word, it conducted an intense, robust, thorough, and complete review and analysis of those documents in order to assure that the Pfizer vaccine was safe and effective for licensure. While it can conduct that intense review of Pfizer's documents in 108 days, it now asks for over 20,000 days to make these documents available to the public.

    You mention the number of days for each effort but not the number of resources (including their probable overtime) that was/would be associated to each effort. I doubt they are anywhere close to each other. 

  79. drwilliams says:

    "I doubt they are anywhere close to each other. "

    Especially not when normalized as:

    expected return/researcher

  80. Rick H says:

    From Dr. Pournelle's family, via the FB page:

    Help Us Find the Lost Pournelle Western!

    John Carr, Jerry's long time editor, reports we might be missing a 1981 western title. The work was co-written with Gary Edmondson in the Jake Logan universe. To his memory, the story might have resonance with today's headlines as it deals with justified homicide by a vigilante in self-defense.

    Who here has the skills to find the title?

    Picture below:

     Book Cpver

  81. drwilliams says:

    @Rick

    Lot's of copies on eBay and ABE.

    ADDED:
    https://www.worldcat.org/title/slocum-and-the-yellowback-trail/oclc/798634254&referer=brief_results

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  82. Alan says:

    >> So, let's get this straight. The federal government shields Pfizer from liability. Gives it billions ofdollars. Makes Americans take its product. But won't let you see the data supporting its product's safety and efficacy. Who does the government work for?

    "Makes" to me implies 'must do.' Any names to share of people jabbed against their will?

  83. Greg Norton says:

    The FDA says it needs 55 years to release all of Pfizer's COVID vaccine data

    EUA approval of the mRNA tech vaccines shortcut a decade off of developing an AIDS vaccine using the same mechanism.

    With J&J/adenovirus, a human rabies vaccine. Vaccinations against rabies are only approved for animals while humans have a treatment, albeit unpleasant.

  84. Alan says:

    So will the DA in Kenosha now be charging Gaige Grosskreutz with attempted intentional homicide? He admitted under oath that he pointed his pistol at Rittenhouse.

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  85. drwilliams says:

    @Alan

    There's an old joke from the 1980's

    The end of the year was coming up and the company started supplying employee's with insurance information for the next year. They were offering a new plan with really outstanding benefits, with the small proviso that it would only be available if everyone signed up.

    After several company-wide meetings, everyone was signed up except for Joe. He was the last holdout, and as the end of the year and the signup deadline approached, the other employees were starting to get resentful that Joe's recalcitrance would put them all in a less desirable plan.

    The company president called Joe into his office.

    "Joe, you're the only person that hasn't signed up for the new plan, and people are starting to get ticked off. I won't have one person causing all this disruption. Here's the signup sheet and a pen. Either sign up or you're fired."

    Without a word, Joe picked up the pen and singed. The president thanked him and asked, "So, Joe, that was simple. What was the problem?"

    "Well, sir, no one ever explained it to me that clearly."

    5
  86. ech says:

    Go back and read the link that I posted weeks ago about Ivermectin and India.

    I read it. I pointed out that it had no direct links to primary source information on Ivermectin use in India. I did some Google searches (since India has a large and robust English language press) and found nothing about Ivermectin. Lots of quarantines, door to door searches in cities for cases, and aggressive contract tracing. And some of the studies that I linked to were from that area. Which has endemic worm infections.

    I am baffled by your obstinate holding on to priors and rejection of real science. 

    1
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  87. Nick Flandrey says:

    while humans have a treatment, albeit unpleasant.

    yes, I had a full rabies series as a kid.  Arms and ass…  hurt bad, really scary needle.  And all because I'd lied, and I couldn't tell the truth after the lie, even when faced with a full rabies series…   So I am super skeptical of kids' testimony.

    n

  88. Nick Flandrey says:

    I'm for Kyle suing the media too.   Those words were not just insults, they have actual definitions and they are all bad.  There were no 'weasel words' before or after either, just stated as fact in most of the cases.

    Call someone a 'dickhead' and you've insulted him, no one believes he has an actual penis shaped head.   Call someone a racist, murderer, and white supremacist, and people DO believe he is actually those things.   It's been established in a court of law that he's not a murderer, and never was.

    n

  89. Lynn says:

    I’m focused on seeing “Ghostbusters Afterlife” this weekend. My friends who saw it last night said it is indeed Spielberg-ish and they promised that I will hear a kid drop a line as non-PC good as “penis breath” which the studio removed from “ET”.

    Dad and I went to see GB this afternoon.  We both liked it.  Not a kid movie at all.  And yes, very non-PC line from the male 12 year old.  Basically, if you liked the first movie then you will like this one.  And a long goodbye to Harold Ramis.

  90. Nick Flandrey says:

    After fighting with the ubiquiti Security Gateway and their F'd up cloud based management tool most of the day and evening, I pulled the plug and put things back the way they were.  

    A dozen factory resets of various pieces were required, lappy IP addy changed so many many times, and passwords out the wazzooo. 

    So many hours of my life I won't get back and whatever I learn won't be useful to me at all.

    Read this thread if you want to see the mess that is 'automagic' config.  It's not very long, but it give a good idea of the swamp I'm wading thru.

    https://community.spiceworks.com/topic/2328179-ubiquiti-unifi-security-gateway-pro-usg-pro-4-problems-adopting

    Keep in mind the hoop jumping and wildly different advice is because the "simple, plug it in and it all gets configured" magic doesn't work for a whole lotta people.

    And the management console app doesn't have tool tips for the buttons, has a black on black theme so dark you can't see the extra thin scroll bars, and has highlighted links that just go to ads…

    n

  91. Lynn says:

    I am very happy with my double NAT'd Peplink 30 at work.  But, it does not speak IPv6 which does not appear to be a problem. 

  92. drwilliams says:

    @ech

    Just lost a long reply to the ISE error, so I'll summarize:

    Seen any worms? Science?

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  93. ~jim says:

    After fighting with the ubiquiti Security Gateway and their F'd up cloud based management tool

    So… We're back to chatting about our hemorrhoids. 

    I thought I had a rather clever topic for conversation: How would an alien entity, peering into the present condition of Homo sapiens, recognize civilization if he saw it? 

  94. drwilliams says:

    @Nick

    ubiquiti Security Gateway

    A couple of Alsatians would be more fun.

  95. ~jim says:

    Seen any worms? Science?

    Doc, I have, and believe me they are endemic in India. Plus probably a lot more vermicular things we don't even know about. The paper ech cited is worth reading. It cites multiple sources. 

    Oh lookey!
    https://astralcodexten.substack.com/p/ivermectin-much-more-than-you-wanted

    1
  96. drwilliams says:

    "I thought I had a rather clever topic for conversation: How would an alien entity, peering into the present condition of Homo sapiens, recognize civilization if he saw it?"

    I do not wish to associate with any alien entity that has standards low enough to call the present condition of homo sap "civilized".

  97. Nick Flandrey says:

    Would an alien have a frame of reference that overlaps ours by enough to even make observations about our society and civilization?  There might be vast differences in scale, or ability to perceive the world, they might not even have a similar concept.

    The result of any first contact is likely to be bad for us though.

    n

  98. Lynn says:

    Would an alien have a frame of reference that overlaps ours by enough to even make observations about our society and civilization?  There might be vast differences in scale, or ability to perceive the world, they might not even have a similar concept.

    The result of any first contact is likely to be bad for us though.

    John Ringo thinks that the first contact will be ok.  It is when they tell all their friends about us that things will probably get nasty.  For us.

  99. Greg Norton says:

    After fighting with the ubiquiti Security Gateway and their F'd up cloud based management tool most of the day and evening, I pulled the plug and put things back the way they were.  

    Am I correct in assuming that the point is to have remote access to the client's house to allow someone to work remotely? Is this a consumer grade DSL line without dedicated IP address(es)?

    On an unofficial basis, we used cheap Acer laptops with TeamViewer installed and left at the customer's sites until installs were finished at the last job. Dangerous, but we had a convention for convoluted passwords that never resulted in any problems.

    That said, as I've stated here before, I think TeamViewer is responsible for some of the ransomware attacks you see in the news, particularly where water/sewer department employees are trying to do an end run around network restrictions that firewall the infrastructure from the open Internet. No remotes, period.

    Everyone wants to work from home in their jammies as of late. We saw what happens when that gets carried too far in Texas in February.

    I know, I'm not a "dude" as in "Ssh dude, the kid has soccer and there's daytrading to be done. AMC to the moon!"

  100. Greg Norton says:

    Dad and I went to see GB this afternoon.  We both liked it.  Not a kid movie at all.  And yes, very non-PC line from the male 12 year old.  Basically, if you liked the first movie then you will like this one.  And a long goodbye to Harold Ramis.

    I figured the Reitman family would not let the father's legacy end with the 2016 "Ghostbusters". The franchise had to be fixed.

    One interesting factoid I saw in an interview with Jason Reitman is that a BluRay of "Thank You For Smoking" does not exist while one was made for "The Garbage Pail Kids Movie", a favorite of the director's from his younger days.

  101. ~jim says:

    Would an alien have a frame of reference that overlaps ours by enough to even make observations about our society and civilization?  

    Yes. I'd think math and physics should suffice. I don't see how they could possibly say hello if they didn't. Dogs know enough about gravity and momentum to catch a ball, but are they civilized?

    Are we? Didn't Stanislaw Lem cover that in a book called _Sirius_? 

  102. Greg Norton says:

    I am very happy with my double NAT'd Peplink 30 at work.  But, it does not speak IPv6 which does not appear to be a problem.

    When my last main router died, I tried one of the new Linksys with antennas sticking out everywhere, but that proved unsatisfactory in terms of performance and “cloud” setup complexity. I ended up with an older RT-AC66U B1, the next generation of the router that ran for six years.

    For auxiliary access points, I skip the mesh in favor of a couple of WRT54GL units with the NAT turned off and the WAN port connected to the LAN switch, fed by Cat6 Ethernet. The main router provides the DHCP allocation and DNS.

  103. Greg Norton says:

    Florida law takes HOAs to a whole new level. Still, the homeowner doesn't lack for options with Corn Pone Hitler wannabes, depending on how onerous the potential losses could be fighting a conventional war in court.

    I went nuclear on my Bat Guano neighbors bailing on the state in 2010, selling without any documented issues for a price that put about 1/4 of the subdivision in foreclosure, short sale, and/or Bankruptcy. Florida law prohibits a board from setting a minimum selling price unless the restrictions were originally drawn up that way.

    https://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/florida/os-ne-florida-hoa-threatens-family-with-fines-over-christmas-lights-20211118-vezwm32gwbgkrkv6h5otczbiea-story.html

    Still, I don’t recommend buying in an HOA in Florida, especially in one with stucco shacks where your gut tells you that they shouldn’t cost $600k, but the sale listing says something different.

    Condo? Fuggedaboudit. The condo laws are worse than the HOA FS 720.

  104. SteveF says:

    Just lost a long reply to the ISE error

    Ctrl-A Ctrl-C and only then click the Submit button.

  105. Nick Flandrey says:

    Ctrl-A Ctrl-C and only then click the Submit button.

    -back button to return to the form, then ctrl A, ctrl x,  vv (any two characters), submit comment.   Then edit comment, ctrl v and save.

    being able to go back to the form and have it still filled is the major difference between now and the before times….

    n

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