Fri. May 10, 2019 – made it through

67F and wet this morning, but the rain seems to have stopped.  Gauge shows 0.6 from midnight to now.  Didn’t see where we ended up before bed.

Schools are all closed.  I wonder if my auction pickups will be available.  I’ll be taking the kids with me if they are…

Some actual prepping info to pass along, I’ll add some links later.  Right now I need to see what the wife’s plans are, and get back to bed if possible 🙂

 

n

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50 Responses to Fri. May 10, 2019 – made it through

  1. Nick Flandrey says:

    Wife is going to work.

    I got most of two hours of extra sleep. Still feel weird. I think one of my kidney stones is moving around, as I have some localized pain and nausea.

    Just went and looked at the cars. Wife’s has a couple of small dings on the hood. nothing to worry about. My ranger has a lot of dents and dings on the hood. My Expedition has a big dent on the hood, but the rest looks pretty good.

    We had our roof inspected just a week ago, and he told us we had the heaviest shingles they ever made. He said we would have to see sustained baseball sized hail to have any real damage, and I certainly couldn’t see any from the ground today.

    Lots to do regardless.

    n

  2. Harold says:

    I am trialing PLEX as a home media server to share our vast library of music to our devices. This came about after two days without Internet service and no Cable TV and I realized we had lots to watch and listen too stored up on the computer.
    Last night I fought hours trying to get PLEX to see my media libraries. I thought it was a permissions issue but discovered it was simply my error in not giving a fully qualified path.
    Now to see if PLEX will serve up media to the rest of the house. I see that PLEX claims to work with our ROKU devices.

  3. Greg Norton says:

    Now to see if PLEX will serve up media to the rest of the house. I see that PLEX claims to work with our ROKU devices.

    A private Roku channel for our house has been on my list for … Gawd … eight years.

    Gotta get that project out of the ditch one day.

  4. Harold says:

    Greg – I’ll let you know how PLEX works out.

  5. Nick Flandrey says:

    So, not random and unpredictable after all—

    Officials were warned ‘something like Columbine’ could happen at ‘pressure cooker’ Denver school just five months before shooting that killed one and wounded eight more

    The mother of a student at STEM School in Denver raised fears of the next Columbine five months before Tuesday’s deadly shooting
    She raised concerns in a call with a Douglas County School District official
    The anonymous parent alleged that students were being bullied, some were suicidal, there was a high drug culture and sexual assaults had been reported
    She said the ‘pressure cooker’ environment at the school was ‘the perfect storm’
    STEM Executive Director Penelope Eucker said they investigated the allegations but found no evidence to support any of the claims
    The school filed a defamation lawsuit against the anonymous parents in January
    One student was killed and eight injured when two classmates opened fire with handguns at the school on Tuesday “

    So what does the school do? Wave their arms and then attack the whistleblower–

    “our investigation revealed no evidence to support any of the allegations,’ Eucker’s statement said.

    Eucker then sent a letter to parents disputing the parent’s allegations.

    The school filed a lawsuit on January 17 in Douglas County District Court seeking to establish the identity of the anonymous parent who they said defamed the school and Eucker. ”

    ==seriously, a school with NO bullying? NO drug use? not in the US…

    n

  6. Nick Flandrey says:

    Tragic story, but would have been prevented by common sense–

    “Norwegian tourist, 24, dies of rabies after she’s bitten by a puppy she rescued while on holiday in the Philippines

    Birgitte Kallestad died Monday after contracting rabies from a dog she rescued
    She and her friends sustained minor cuts and bites while playing with the puppy
    The health worker began to feel unwell weeks after returning home to Norway
    Doctors were stumped as rabies hasn’t occurred in mainland Norway since 1815
    Her family want rabies vaccines to become compulsory for the Philippines”

    “Neither Birgitte nor anyone she was travelling with had been inoculated against the disease, because it is not on the list of vaccines required for the Philippines unless you plan to travel to areas with poor hygiene and sanitation.” —by western, and certainly Norwegian standards this includes ALL of the Philippines..

  7. Greg Norton says:

    —by western, and certainly Norwegian standards this includes ALL of the Philippines..

    Working in the Philippines, the *health worker* should have known better than to dismiss bites from a *rescued* stray animal. The shots should have started immediately.

    The shots would have been cheaper in the Philippines too. The socialized system in Norway probably rolled the dice about rabies since the treatment is extremely expensive in first world countries anymore.

  8. Nick Flandrey says:

    Yep, I had a full rabies series as a child. Hurt like hell.

    n

  9. JimL says:

    Re: Plex – I use it at home. The only caveat is that you need to keep the server service (on my main pc in my case) up to date. The Roku channel works great. As I recall, the hardest part was deciding to spend the $10 for the license (or whatever it was – not much) that gets essentially a perpetual, ad-less license. Total time spent would have been an hour or less once I decided to get it going.

  10. Greg Norton says:

    Yep, I had a full rabies series as a child. Hurt like hell.

    Do they still have to necropsy the animal to determine rabies status?

    European snowflakes are obviously as dim-witted as American snowflakes. Probably got squeamish about cutting open the dog’s skull and/or getting the shots.

  11. Nick Flandrey says:

    I don’t know, they did it as a precaution without a specific animal to dissect.

    Scary and hurt. A lot.

    n

  12. Ray Thompson says:

    I had a full rabies series as a child. Hurt like hell.

    I have heard the newer version of the shots are not as painful and don’t require as many repeat injections. I never want to find out.

    Pre-surgery regime starts tomorrow. Showering with anti-bacterial soap, stop some medication until after surgery, no food or water after midnight on Sunday. I will have to be at the hospital at 6:00 AM to get ready, surgery is scheduled for 7:30. Should be over by 9:00 AM and I will be in recovery. I don’t know how long that will take.

    Hospital requires that I bring my own CPAP machine with me to use in the recovery room. Thus I am guessing I will be put into a much deeper comatose state than I was with the colonoscopy or the eye surgeries.

    To be frank this procedure is really scaring the crap out of me. I have visions of a friend who went in for minor outpatient surgery, had a stroke, and wound up in the hospital for a couple of weeks and has spent the last two months in a skilled nursing facility. Although my health is good for my age, shirt(-r) still happens.

  13. JimB says:

    Best to you, Ray. Hospitals are scary places. I have never been an inpatient, but do visit others. I try to hold my breath as long as I can, and not touch anything. Hats off to those who work there. OTOH, I am positive I have a phobia for hospitals 🙂

  14. JimB says:

    Dank is the word for today. We had hard, steady rain during the night, for maybe an hour. My crude rain gauge showed 0.8″, and there were other confirming signs, such as puddles in the dirt and flow marks on slopes. I haven’t heard about any major problems around our valley, but that much rain, if it was uniform (rare,) should result in some flooded streets. We are under a thunderstorm threat until the cutoff low departs. I won’t join the guessers in trying to predict when. A friend reported several short duration power outages, characteristic of dusty insulators. Surprisingly, our power has been solid. So is my DSL, miracle. Even the voice part of the landline works, but that kind of trouble usually shows about a day later.

    Compared to other places, this one is wonderful.

  15. lynn says:

    From yesterday:

    Now I need to find out where the roof leak in the game room is at. I think that the sheetrock in the ceiling is going to have to be replaced though.

    You might get away with paint if the material isn’t sagging. I saw houses for sale in Round Rock where people still tried, but the water damage was beyond obvious.

    Nope, the sagging portion is the sheetrock tape line. Gonna need new tape at a minimum.

    We need to invent Hardieplank for the inside.

  16. lynn says:

    “Dramatic photos of severe flooding and storm damage across Houston area shared by readers”
    https://www.chron.com/news/houston-weather/article/Photos-Readers-share-severe-flood-photos-across-13834927.php

    Huh, my 16 year old roof shingles are fairly light. I wonder if it is time for them ?

  17. ITGuy1998 says:

    Speaking of rabies… When I was young, somewhere around 8th or 9th grade, I had a surreal experience. It was summer, and I was at home. I don’t remember how it happened, but one of the neighbors behind us was in our back yard and pointing up one of our trees. It seems a stray cat scampered up and wouldn’t come down to them (surprise, I know.) I have no idea how they know the cat was up there or why they cared so darn much.

    Quite a crowd gathered. I called my dad to see what to do. I can’t remember what he said, or some of the other details in between. I do remember a sheriff coming out (we lived in the county) and the neighbors had called someone to climb the tree and get the cat.

    Up the tree this guy goes, all the way to the top (around 50ft.) The cat won’t move, and goes to the very top, on the thin limbs where he can’t be reached. For some unknown reason, the tree guy then starts shaking the limbs, and dislodges the cat. That sucker dropped straight down, bounced a few feet and then took off straight to our front yard and the hedges.

    Cue the idiot neighbor, who took off after the cat. She stuck her hand into the shrubs and started yelling almost immediately that she had been bit. I still remember my side hurting from laughing so hard. She had to get rabies shots, as they were never able to catch the cat.

    Thank goodness this happened in the 80’s. If it happened today, I’d hate to see the lawsuits that would have brought against us. Looking back, this is one of those times where I started to realize that people, in general, are freaking crazy…

  18. lynn says:

    Gotta get that project out of the ditch one day.

    Heh. Going by that euphemism, I have about a dozen projects in the ditch at home. And a dozen more at the office complex. And a thousand for the day job.

  19. ITGuy1998 says:

    Re: Plex. I use it and like it a lot. I use it for both movies and music, though I prefer to use it for movies

  20. lynn says:

    “Technical details on the recent Firefox add-on outage”
    https://www.osnews.com/story/129992/technical-details-on-the-recent-firefox-add-on-outage/

    “Recently, Firefox had an incident in which most add-ons stopped working. This was due to an error on our end: we let one of the certificates used to sign add-ons expire which had the effect of disabling the vast majority of add-ons. Now that we’ve fixed the problem for most users and most people’s add-ons are restored, I wanted to walk through the details of what happened, why, and how we repaired it.”
    https://hacks.mozilla.org/2019/05/technical-details-on-the-recent-firefox-add-on-outage/

    “An in-depth look at the cause and fixes for the devastating extensions bug that hit Firefox users over the weekend, written by Firefox CTO Eric Rescorla.”

  21. lynn says:

    To be frank this procedure is really scaring the crap out of me. I have visions of a friend who went in for minor outpatient surgery, had a stroke, and wound up in the hospital for a couple of weeks and has spent the last two months in a skilled nursing facility. Although my health is good for my age, shirt(-r) still happens.

    Good luck man !

    Your concerns are valid but you are in good health. I am leaving here now to go sit with my mother until 10pm tonight. She is back in skilled nursing and has been in the hospital for 5 weeks and 3 days now for a failed hip implant surgery. I’ve been spending three days a week with her. My dad has gone home for two days again and me and my brother are filling in for him. Our deadbeat brother is nowhere to be seen.

  22. Greg Norton says:

    Our deadbeat brother is nowhere to be seen.

    He knows, right?

    I hadn’t spoken to my father in 15 years when he passed in 2012. No one from the family called to tell me until after the funeral and will reading.

    High school friends wanting to get back in touch showed up at the funeral figuring I would, at least, be there in the back observing the event.

    Deadbeat brother? I have a deadbeat sister-in-law. Pushing 50. Ex-stripper. Lives in Orlando. Maybe we should set ’em up. 🙂

    I have my own deadbeat brother. He works for FEMA. Need I say more?

  23. Nick Flandrey says:

    Best wishes Ray, I hope everything goes to plan and you have a success and rapid recovery. Every time I go under, I worry. That’s normal. Still, kiss your wife…

    n

  24. CowboySlim says:

    I never disagree with Nick!

  25. Lynn says:

    I have my own deadbeat brother. He works for FEMA. Need I say more

    My deadbeat brother is still married, amazingly. Although, last Christmas his wife beat him up when he got drunk. Usually he beats her up. I wish I was kidding.

    And he has not had real job in decades. He goes around to B&Ns and rifles their dumpsters for stuff to sell on ebay and amazon. He mostly sells tattoo magazines.

  26. Lynn says:

    I hadn’t spoken to my father in 15 years when he passed in 2012. No one from the family called to tell me until after the funeral and will reading.

    Wow, your childhood life sounds as bad as Rays. Mine was a fairy tale compared to ya’lls.

  27. Lynn says:

    “Crazy Bernie Struggles to Adapt”
    https://www.rushlimbaugh.com/daily/2019/05/09/crazy-bernie-struggles-to-adapt/

    Rush had me at the picture of crazy Bernie in the straightjacket. Man, I miss my friend OFD. I am sure that we would have a great time discussing crazy Bernie the millionaire.

  28. Greg Norton says:

    And he has not had real job in decades. He goes around to B&Ns and rifles their dumpsters for stuff to sell on ebay and amazon. He mostly sells tattoo magazines.

    There is a huge picker culture here in Austin. We looked at a picker’s house before we bought our current place. The guy’s bonus room was his “warehouse”, full of electronics which looked like they came from the surplus sales which the local ISD used to hold until the pickers got too aggressive for the staff to handle.

    Your brother has got to be bummed about what Amazon has done to bookstores and the direction of the industry in general.

  29. paul says:

    What Nick said. Good luck Ray.

  30. CowboySlim says:

    I don’t have a brother, and reading the above, I guess I’m OK with that.

  31. Greg Norton says:

    “I hadn’t spoken to my father in 15 years when he passed in 2012. No one from the family called to tell me until after the funeral and will reading.”

    Wow, your childhood life sounds as bad as Rays. Mine was a fairy tale compared to ya’lls.

    My age group bore the brunt of no-fault divorce and basic cable hitting the suburbs simultaneously in the early-to-mid 80s.

  32. Lynn says:

    Your brother has got to be bummed about what Amazon has done to bookstores and the direction of the industry in general.

    Yes, he liked the eBay only days a lot better. And the B&N down the road from his apartment just closed. But he said that the muslim brotherhood took over that dumpster quite a while back.

  33. paul says:

    We need to invent Hardieplank for the inside.

    They make smooth Hardi=x in 4×8 sheets. I skirted my house with the stuff. Nasty to cut for the dust.

    Of course, it is a bit more brittle than sheetrock. And if you do have a roof leak it’s just going to run on down into your walls.

    When you re-roof, go metal. 1×4 “lathes” screwed into the existing roof, the space filled with R5 (I forget exactly ATM) foil covered foam board. It’s a Forever Roof.

    My old roof was gray/white shingles and by 11AM in June you could not do anything in the attic after 11AM. Ok, you could, but it feels weird to have your shins sweating. Kind of hard to hold tools, too.

  34. Lynn says:

    No metal roofs here in the HOA.

  35. Lynn says:

    My age group bore the brunt of no-fault divorce and basic cable hitting the suburbs simultaneously in the early-to-mid 80s.

    Basic cable ?

  36. paul says:

    Basic cable? Yeah, the locals plus Superstation Atlanta (WTCG?) soon to be TBS. And the Chicago one, WGN. Plus a scrambled HBO.

    Good times.

  37. paul says:

    No metal roofs here in the HOA.

    Contrary to what some folks think, a metal roof does not have to look like a barn roof made of galvanized tin.

  38. Lynn says:

    My warehouse has a galvanized tin roof with translucent panels for natural light. The front canopy at the office has a crimped metal roof, the rest of the roof is plain old composition shingles.
    https://www.winsim.com/contact.html

  39. Nick Flandrey says:

    We had a parade of ambulance chasing roofers this afternoon. Lots of yards with a roofer’s sign in the front yard today.

    Everyone needs to eat, but these guys strike me as bottom feeders.

    n

  40. Greg Norton says:

    My warehouse has a galvanized tin roof with translucent panels for natural light. The front canopy at the office has a crimped metal roof, the rest of the roof is plain old composition shingles.

    You’re closed Christmas Eve? Luxury.

    The ceiling leak in our temporary space at UT got worse this week. The crazy thing is that the management is Regus, not exactly a “fly by night” operation.

    Gotta wonder what will happen with the WeWork IPO later this month. I can’t imagine their spaces in old buildings are much better than Regus.

  41. JimB says:

    Lynn, would your HOA approve metal shingles or lightweight concrete shingles? I am not sure about any reasonable thickness metal shingles in hail country. Some concrete can go over existing structures.

    There are many types of roofs, as I imagine you know. You don’t have to go with conventional practice in your area, although getting a competent job can be tricky.

    When you eventually move, find a location without a HOA! Is that possible in TX? Sure is here, in fact, people here know about the few. They either like or avoid them, but they have a choice.

  42. dkreck says:

    Twenty-five years ago I got estimates for a new roof. Old was wood shake, no longer allowed. Metal shingles were $22k, concrete tile $11k and 40 yr high quality asphalt were $7.6k. The asphalt was dark brown, three dimensional to resemble shake (sort of). Still looks good and holding up.

  43. Greg Norton says:

    Basic cable ?

    Go back and watch the Kavanaugh hearings. Christine Blasey-Ford is the end result when a female from my age group was exposed to basic cable way too young.

    Kavanaugh is the poster child for what happened to the males.

    *Something* may have happened to that woman back in the day, but that testimony was schtick, an 80s sitcom rerun-inspired performance.

  44. paul says:

    *Something* may have happened to that woman back in the day, but that testimony was schtick, an 80s sitcom rerun-inspired performance.

    Like “Three’s Company” was real life drama? And “Dallas”.

    We didn’t have a lot of TV when I was a kid. Over the air. In Mobile, I remember when PBS started. It didn’t take long to dislike Big Bird. Oscar the Grouch and The Count were cool. 🙂 We had a 20″ (I think) B&W. Dad bought a 15″ Color TV. Oh, man, the swearing when that thing went to the shop every three months! Back to the old B&W for a month.
    It was funny not that I dared to let it show.
    I liked Disney and Mutual of Omaha in color. And the Wizard of Oz, first time on the color TV was “Wow!!!”.

    Then we moved to Texas. Near Mission. Three channels if I remember correctly with NBC and ABC on one station plus CBS and PBS a couple of years later. The color TV crapped out again and after six months it came home from the Sears shop and lasted a month. To the dump. Lots of cussing involved. The B&W worked for another year and then the picture quit. So, just audio until I moved out after HS.

    I had a 12″ B&W from Sears. Worked great. Bought a 19″ color TV from Sears and had to return it… it died after three weeks. No, and hell no, it’s not going to the repair shop, replace it or refund my money. They replaced it. That worked for two months. I got a refund. Went to an a/v store on Anderson Lane, almost to MoPac, and bought a floor/demo model of a Mitsubishi. 19″, cable ready tuner (whatever that means) and a remote. Like, $650. Can’t complain. It had a lot of hours when it was replaced in 1990. My next apt had cable included, 12 channels. One day I flipped the switch and I suddenly had 26 channels. Austin Cablevision was a new thing in 1982. VCR’s were new….

  45. Greg Norton says:

    Like “Three’s Company” was real life drama? And “Dallas”.

    The bit where the Blasey-Ford actress -er- witness asked for some water would have been right at home on a “Three’s Company” rerun. All that was missing was John Ritter doing a pratfall delivering the water.

    “Three’s Company” was a sign of the end times to the teachers at my fundamentalist private school outside Tampa in the 70s. It didn’t help that John Ritter was the original minister on “The Waltons” back in the day, prior to landing the role that would define the rest of his career.

  46. paul says:

    John Ritter was the original minister on “The Waltons”

    I didn’t know that. We watched the Waltons most weeks but about all I recall is “Good night Johnboy”.

    But Threes Company…. I’m not bright about this stuff but really, two pretty women and he’s doing the laundry? It seemed strange to me.

  47. aesthetic medicine uk 70 $1.34 0.15 says:

    Too often the “bean counters” are generally telling us how
    we are falling short. They come up with several
    scheme to get us to find out more patients than we could reasonably see or tips on how to “create” more procedures than are called for.
    This is bottom-line or practice-centered medicine
    and in my opinion is unethical along with immoral.
    It is also outside of what we should are called to do and is pointless and
    counter to a healthy practice. What I believe creates a healthy practice and is simply at the heart of
    doing what is a good choice for patients, is the patient-centered seek
    advice from. This type of consult is designed to reach the root
    of the patient’s concerns and do all one can because of help them
    achieve their health insurance and aesthetic goals.

    In this regarding population-based medicine we have all already been told to do
    the bare minimum, but that doesn’t change the idea that
    our patients are concerned together with optimal health and results.
    Olympic athletes do not win their very own contests by training
    into the minimum nor will our patients be served by providing the minimum.
    Let’s have a look at an example of how population-based remedies is creeping into the test room in a way that is not totally understood by physicians nevertheless has
    great impact on the (many similar examples are visible in medicine today):

    The drug organizations tell us that Plavix is mostly about 30% better than aspirin. What they do not tell us is that it is fairly 30% better.
    In total terms it is about 1% better. What does this mean? Well,
    a single study on CVA the particular relative risk reduction ended up being
    quoted as 25% however the absolute reduction was 0.
    9 for ASA versus 1 . 2 for Plavix or about 0. 3% (1). Now Plavix prices $5.
    00 per tablet and ASA is about $0. 05 so to the individual with a fixed income is the definite difference of 0.
    3% worth $4. 95 each day? Maybe, maybe not depending on numerous factors.
    Certainly it may be worth every penny to society
    but culture is not paying the bill… the on a fixed income is actually.

    This is the confusion between populace based and
    individual drugs. Some have even endorsed taxing or eliminating Functional procedures to
    reduce overall health costs in the US. This may help several
    number followed by economists but is it serving the individual
    that is interested in a specific goal?

    What exactly is the patient-centered consult? Treatments is complex and in specific, Aesthetic Medicine is complicated,
    yet it has been reduced in order to sound bites on TV.
    Tv ads ask the question “Is it better than Botox? ” or “Is it better than a Medical Peel? inches yet they do not give the answer or any real helpful information. People have, in general, no practical idea of what can and are not done for them. The patient-centered consult is an educational encounter for the patient that helps all of them understand what is realistic and exactly is not.

    It starts having gaining a detailed understanding of the actual patient’s concerns are, not necessarily what treatments they are interested in. Most aesthetic patients come in thinking they know what they desire. As an example many think they desire an upper lid blepharoplasty but what they really need is often a brow lift. Other appear in asking about fillers however really need Botox or the other way round. The understanding of what they are focused on is found not by requesting what they are interested in but rather, what their concerns are. We all start in a conversational fashion. Most often a patient will start by saying something like “I believe I need Botox right here.
    inch My answer is generally something similar to, “Well, that is certainly something we could do, but what is it which makes you want Botox? ” The following several questions are provided to helping the patient target the genuine issues
    behind the worries such as texture, tone, firmness, wrinkles, poor size, level etc .

    I use a seek advice from tool I call the actual $10,
    000 mirror. We have a simple hand mirror who has no magnification on one edge and 3 to 5
    times zoom on the other. I hand the item to the patient with the magnified side facing them.

    The particular interesting thing is that most individuals when given the reflect
    will start looking very intently at themselves and even begin picking and brushing on things
    on their face. Then i have a checklist of items My spouse and i ask
    them about. We go through the checklist item by merchandise and
    discuss its impact on the overall appearance of the face. Once this is completed, I
    actually formulate a plan of all that you can do for them, that will include things I can do but also things others may be able to do.
    To give an example, I do not do confront lifts, but if the result they are after is best served by the
    face-lift, I put in which on the plan. It is exceptional that we don’t do the majority
    of what they will benefit from.

  48. ~jim says:

    whoa!

    Previous post is a doozy. Gotta admire the ingenuity behind programming such nonsense but I wonder, to what end?

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