Thur. Sept. 19, 2019 – more volunteering today

Wet.  Definitely wet.  Got an extra 1.25 inches of rain between my post yesterday morning and midnight yesterday.   Ground is getting squishy.

More  storms shaping up in the Atlantic too.

Don’t drive into flood waters.

—-

I am interested to see what we’ll be doing with the fifth graders this year.  We have at least 3 dissections planned.  We’re doing some other stuff too, like drones and rockets, but I don’t have any details yet.  Should be fun.  One thing I can say for sure, if you aren’t in a school this year or last, you really don’t know what is going on in schools today.  It’s not what you remember.  Volunteer and see for yourself.

In fact, as part of Meatspace Baby! get out and volunteer in your community.  You can be totally selfish in who you volunteer for too.  I’m not working in soup kitchens…  it will get you out of the house, and into your community.  LOCAL is where the problems will be, and where any solutions reside.  The dad I met yesterday is completely aligned with me politically on the issues we talked about.  He’s a CHL holder.  He might be a LMI and a good guy to know…  and I probably wouldn’t have learned that just bumping in to him at a PTA meeting.  Get out there.  Do something.   (Ham radio is good too.)

With that, I’m posting this and getting ready for school 🙂

 

nick

 

 

 

22 thoughts on “Thur. Sept. 19, 2019 – more volunteering today”

  1. Trying to use the CNN site without an ad blocker is a disgusting experience. The site slows down, sometimes not responding for 30 seconds due to the ads, thing scroll oddly after being loaded, it basically sucks.

    Many sites are becoming that way, unusable due to ads. CNN seems to be the worst example of the sites that I visit. Even the local news sites are becoming annoying. It is like a contest among sites to see which can be the most abrasive.

    One does wonder if the people the design the site, approve the ads, actually view the site. If I did not have an ad blocker I would completely avoid the site. Same goes for sites that use ad blocking detection and refuse to display the page or hide it under some notification. Guess what? It worked. I did not visit the site using using an ad blocker. I just did not visit the site.

  2. One does wonder if the people the design the site, approve the ads, actually view the site. If I did not have an ad blocker I would completely avoid the site. Same goes for sites that use ad blocking detection and refuse to display the page or hide it under some notification. Guess what? It worked. I did not visit the site using using an ad blocker. I just did not visit the site.

    The experience is different on a 64 GB development workstation sitting on Gigabit LAN to the web server. Even a site developer “working” from home is going to have a serious machine and fiber home service.

    Beyond each web page requiring multiple megabytes of code, HTTPS with high end crypto gets used for *everything* going across the connection anymore, and that’s expensive in terms of CPU resources.


  3. Don’t drive into flood waters.

    We have a couple of really old underpasses around here that flood so frequently they’ve actually painted water depth indicators by them so you can tell at a glance if it’s okay to drive through the water. They’re not high-traffic areas.

    Trying to use the CNN site without an ad blocker is a disgusting experience. The site slows down, sometimes not responding for 30 seconds due to the ads, thing scroll oddly after being loaded, it basically sucks.

    I think some of this is due to them not loading content until you scroll down to it. It’s an effort to save bandwidth (why load an image at the bottom of the page if 70% of people never even scroll down to it) and get a more accurate ad view count. They don’t load the ads until you scroll down the page to where the ad is positioned and then that triggers it to load (and makes scrolling jerky).

    Same goes for sites that use ad blocking detection and refuse to display the page or hide it under some notification.

    The number of these is increasing rapidly. I find them mostly on news sites (local TV news websites, local newspaper websites, and so forth).

  4. “Extremely heavy rainfall north and east of Houston sagging toward the city”

    https://spacecityweather.com/extremely-heavy-rainfall-north-and-east-of-houston-sagging-toward-the-city/

    “We’re continuing to track a very intense band of rainfall just north and east of Houston, which has been producing rainfall rates of 2 to 4 inches per hour. The National Weather Service has declared a Flash Flood Emergency until 11:15 am for Southeast Montgomery County, Northeast Harris County, and Liberty County. This is enough to quickly flood streets and back water up into yards (and over a long enough period of time, homes). This band is now slowly sagging into the Houston metro area, as seen on the radar image below.”

    Ruh Roh. And Beaumont is getting nailed hard with hundreds of high water rescues.


  5. Ruh Roh. And Beaumont is getting nailed hard with hundreds of high water rescues.

    I’m surprised the insurance companies have not stopped insuring people that live in swamps or flood plains.
    In California they have really been after peeps with wooden houses in wildland areas.

  6. I’m surprised the insurance companies have not stopped insuring people that live in swamps or flood plains.
    In California they have really been after peeps with wooden houses in wildland areas.

    Depending on how FEMA classifies where you live, the Federal Government’s National Flood Insurance is often the only option for flood insurance.

    The creation of the program 50 years ago enabled a lot of developer mischief in Florida during what has been a historic lull in Gulf storms.

  7. Meat space. Hmmm. I agree it’s important, but there’s just a problem for us introverts: we don’t much like being around people. A couple of hours, and we’re *done* for the day.

    We invited people over for dinner this year. Once. Or was that last year? I’m honestly not sure.

    It’s actually kind of strange, because both of us deal with people professionally. Teaching, which is my gig, involved being around dozens-to-hundreds of people every day. But that’s somehow different: it’s a job, a facade, and I have zero interest in meeting my students (or most of my colleagues, for that matter) socially.

    We just got back from two detailed meetings on the new house that demonstrate the problem. The first, with the electrician, went really well. Here’s a switch, there’s a light. Fact, decision, fact, decision. Seriously good stuff.

    The second, with the kitchen guy, was exhausting: here’s a cabinet, let me tell you what my wife did last weekend, there’s the oven, let me tell you about this really great wine. Absolutely exhausting.

  8. I’m surprised the insurance companies have not stopped insuring people that live in swamps or flood plains.
    In California they have really been after peeps with wooden houses in wildland areas.

    Depending on how FEMA classifies where you live, the Federal Government’s National Flood Insurance is often the only option for flood insurance.

    That is houses. Harvey destroyed almost a million cars along the Texas Gulf Coast. That was a tremendous hit to the insurance companies.

    I am hearing comparisons to Harvey level flooding on the east side of Houston now, 25 to 29 inches of rain since yesterday. Harvey was 200,000 homes flooded over the Houston metropolitan area. The radio is talking about high water rescues and pulling people off their roofs.
    https://www.chron.com/news/houston-texas/houston/article/Winnie-Imelda-flooding-worse-Hurricane-Harvey-14451775.php

  9. “Very serious flooding situation evolving with Imelda’s remains”
    https://spacecityweather.com/very-serious-flooding-situation-evolving-with-imeldas-remains/

    “Simply put, all heck is breaking loose across the city as a slow-moving band of heavy rainfall slogs through Houston today. Unfortunately, while we knew heavy rainfall was likely in parts of the city today, we did not anticipate an event as significant in scope as this for Thursday. So far we have seen rainfall rates of 4 and 5 inches per hour in parts of the metro area, and it has caused widespread problems for much of Houston. Here’s three separate systems as of noon CT that bear watching.”

    The NWS is reporting 40 inches of rain in some obscure little town on the east side of Houston.
    https://www.accuweather.com/%20en/weather-news/imelda-%20triggers-widespread-flooding-%20across-southeastern-texas/%20535882

    They are now expecting 55 inches of rain on the east side of Houston by tomorrow. This is crazy.

  10. That is houses. Harvey destroyed almost a million cars along the Texas Gulf Coast. That was a tremendous hit to the insurance companies.

    The Gecko isn’t hurting. Neither is Flo. Auto insurance is very lucrative in Texas and even more so in Florida, where the companies don’t have to offer homeowners in order to be allowed to sell vehicle coverage thanks to RINO Governor Charlie Crist’s sucking up to Warren Buffett.

    Still, Texas is very profitable. I just paid the Gecko $400 to drive my $700 Solara for six months, no collision or other coverage on the vehicle.

  11. I live just north of Hamshire and about five miles from Winnie. My house didn’t flood during Harvey, but I’m hearing that things may be a little different this time. I left for my place on Lake Toledo Bend last Monday and now I won’t be able to get back and see what, if any, damage there is for a while since I-10 is closed. I guess part of prepping is not being there when it hits the fan.

  12. Well, That was interesting.

    I’ll have a long, long report later, but I just got home. I was ready to leave school at 1130. At 1135, the district cancelled all after school activities, all day care, and as it turned out, all buses.

    I grabbed the kids, but while waiting to see if I was grabbing the kids of a couple of friends, high water went to “drowned in your car” water. I got 4 blocks, cautiously, only after watching someone else go thru. Then I could see that the water was at least 2-3 feet deep. My Expy isn’t THAT high. I turned around and went back to school.

    Sent the kids in and did inventory. Plenty of dry clothes, and rain gear, NO shoes or socks. No food either except my two backup MREs and the 10 lifeboat emergency bars. 3 days ago I had a case of mixed Mountain House. Plenty of water, flavored water, and sodas.

    Since I was already signed in as a volunteer, I started helping with pickup of kids. Neighborhood parents were able to get to school and get the kids, and some people from outside got INTO the neighborhood. No one was getting out. The process for the school is called “family reunification” and is part of disaster planning. Except when it hasn’t been done. Front office staff did a great job. Before I left I pointed out that they were doing it in their office with a phone number for call ins, lines to call out, computers to look up everyone’s number, and radios. I asked them to think about doing it in a parking lot, miles away. Cuz I’m a dick like that.

    I figured if we got any breaks in the rain, the high water would drain and we’d be able to get home. Our doorbell cam showed our street as flooded anyway, so no point in risking the truck or getting stuck. That’s what happened, and by 4 almost all the street flooding, in places 4 feet deep, was cleared.

    Lots of abandon vehicles. Lots of minor wrecks. Two postal trucks stuck, so I guess sometimes the rain does stop the mail….

    Almost 8 inches at my house by my gauge. Over 9 inches, 7 in two hours, by the flood control district gauge down the street from my house.

    This was a big and unexpected event.

    n

  13. “Imelda heading for the exits, but the damage is surely done”
    https://spacecityweather.com/imelda-heading-for-the-exits-but-the-damage-is-surely-done/

    “Many readers will certainly remember Allison. It made me want to become a meteorologist. Tropical Storm Erika was a prodigious rainmaker that killed 31 people in Dominica and Haiti. There will be time over the coming days to put Imelda into historical perspective. But here are a few quick thoughts:
    For parts of Golden Triangle, the rain intensity and impacts were worse than Hurricane Harvey, which is staggering.
    For that region, Imelda is overall worse than Tropical Storm Allison was for Houston.
    And in Houston, this Allison-lite. The heaviest rains (25″+) so far have been in relatively rural parts of Montgomery County. Amazingly, there are locations in Harris County under 1 inch for the entire storm.”

    The Golden Triangle in Texas is Beaumont, Port Arthur, and Orange.

  14. How did momma’s boy get all that money ?

    Yang personally or the $5 trillion of spending.

    Yang personally. He is not getting a paycheck now so he has a lot of savings. Yet he wants the government to pay for everything. Or did he inherit his wealth ?

  15. @tom lucas, I just read the article talking about Winnie, and man does it look bad. I hope your home is safe. I think you dodged a bullet, no matter what happens to the ‘stuff’. Sometimes “don’t be there” is the best we can do, and the absolute right choice.

    n

  16. Yang personally. He is not getting a paycheck now so he has a lot of savings. Yet he wants the government to pay for everything. Or did he inherit his wealth ?

    Number Two Taiwanese Son. Father was a big deal at IBM and GE. Columbia JD. A couple of mil of net worth isn’t beyond reasonable even if he works as a … community organizer!

    Beubg Number Two Son isn’t as good as being Number One Son, but it looks like Number One was a disappointment to the Yang family in that he isn’t a big deal doctor.

Comments are closed.