Wed. Aug. 31, 2022 – ain’t nothing but a thing…

By on August 31st, 2022 in decline and fall, lakehouse, personal

Maybe not hot.  Maybe only pretty warm with some moisture from the sky…  supposedly rain for the next 7 days, but given that it’s Houston, some people will be getting rain, and some won’t.  It’s a bit harder to guess what the weather will be like a few hours north at the BOL, which is where I’ll actually be.  Since we’ll be digging trenches, it would be nice if the forecast of light rain was REALLY light.   The lake needs rain, but I’m selfish.   The following week we’re digging a big hole for the septic, so NO rain next week would be ideal.

We certainly got some rain here yesterday.   It hammered down and we got more than an inch at the house.  We didn’t have any flooding on our street so it wasn’t long enough.   The yard is a squishy mess though.  Everything will probably grow crazy amounts, and split open like a fat tick.  Gah.   Dry, then too wet.

Did more cleaning and organizing, since I was confined to the house.   Poked around in the garage, and didn’t find any dead critter.  I did find some chocolate milk boxes scattered around.  I think that is what was dripping, not body fluids.   It certainly stinks like rotten something, but I think the something is milk.   I sprayed it with clorox cleaner, and I’m letting that work over night.

Today’s agenda is – work.   Get some stuff done around the house, load up, head to the BOL in the afternoon.   Plan is to stay  there while the electricians are working, then have the family join me for the long weekend late Friday night.

I’ll be doing stuff while up there, mostly plumbing I think.   I think I won’t want to do much outdoors if it’s raining, even a little.  LOTS of plumbing, including the replacement gas lines and the bathrooms.

We’ll see how it shakes out.

Stack some stuff.   Stack some skills.   Worst comes to worst, stack your enemies like cordwood.

n

 

77 Comments and discussion on "Wed. Aug. 31, 2022 – ain’t nothing but a thing…"

  1. Greg Norton says:

    Yup.  I was not smart enough to go to work for Microsoft in 1988 when they offered me a job.  I figure that I would have a boatload of stock and be retired now had I done so.

    My wife only reminds me about twice a year about my trip to One Infinite Loop in 2012.

    Remember when IBM announced that they were going to go “full Mac” around that time?

    I know why it didn’t happen and a lot of IBM employees still have ThinkPads.

  2. Nick Flandrey says:

    75F and saturated this am.  Not actually raining atm.    Wonder when the bus will get here today?

    n

  3. Greg Norton says:

    Moving day for the Battleship Texas. Until a few years ago, the widely held belief was that the ship couldn’t move without sinking.

    I will give the foundation credit – first impression is that the ship is in better shape than the USS Alabama in Mobile despite being … 25 (?) … years older.

    https://www.kut.org/texasstandard/2022-08-30/battleship-texas-moving-galveston-repairs

    2
  4. Nick Flandrey says:

    https://www.zerohedge.com/energy/how-name-god-shocked-europeans-post-astronomical-energy-bills-terrifying-winter-approaches

    – they could get a 10% discount if the VAT was waived…

    – did UK shut down domestic production too?  They have petroleum resources…

    n

  5. Ray Thompson says:

    I had an opportunity to go to work with what I think was Microsoft. I had written a program that would patch MS-Basic so that enhanced printer functions for the Epson MX-80 could be easily accessed from MS-Basic. I, ahem, basically added some additional commands to MS-Basic.

    Got a call from a company out west wanting to know if I wanted a job. The pay was lousy, no benefits, no moving allowance. Taking such a job would have been a bad decision for someone married. I thus declined. I never got the name of the company, or if I did, I have forgotten.

    If it was Microsoft, and I vaguely think it was, they were competing against IBM, Digital Equipment, NEC, and several other companies. In my mind the chances of survival were not good. I was close to getting out of the USAF, had a reasonable commitment to go with EDS. The decision was a no-brainer at that time.

    I comfort myself in saying that I had I gone to work with MS, with my luck, they would have collapsed.

  6. Ray Thompson says:

    After I went to work for National Bancshares Corporation in San Antonio I was doing computer work for Richard Calvert, the brother of the CEO of the holding company. Richard was the CEO of a high end investment firm, some big bucks clients. I wrote a portfolio management program that he used for his clients.

    One day while I was installing a new version, or fixing a problem, he asked about opening a computer store for Apple computers only. He asked how much it would cost. I just blurted out a cost of probably $2 million for a couple of years before a profit. I actually had no idea and just pulled the number out of my buttocks.

    Two days later I was back fixing a problem and he said he had acquired the money and would I be willing to run the store. I told him no as I was not a business person. He needed to find someone with business experience. He then said that was possible, would I be willing to work in the store. He named a salary which was about 50% than I was making at the bank.

    Apple was competing with IBM, Digital and many others. They were a small player. I knew their machines as I had programmed his portfolio manager on an Apple II. The risk to me was just too great.

    In retrospect it was a good decision. An Apple store did open, not by him and his investors. The store lasted two years before it collapsed.

    I was surprised that Richard could raise $2 million dollars in just two days. Apparently his investors had spare cash, could take a risk, and were willing. I have no knowledge of the background dealings that took place.

  7. Nick Flandrey says:

    Bus got here at 7:32, right on time for her “I’ll probably get there at … ” estimate.   SUPPOSED to be here 7 :11.   7:30 is too late as the kids miss half of first period.

    I’m convinced the district is doing routing by hand.   Learned that they start tentative routing in the summer,  which implies that they spend a lot of time on it, and still don’t manage to get it right.

    Oh, and they are short drivers because of “reasons”.   Some of which might be the need for clean driving record, p!ss test, background check, and willingness to work with kids.    The first three are going to reduce the pool of candidates dramatically.

    n

  8. Nick Flandrey says:

    BTW, very early notice… new piggy flu showing up…   5 people so far, no serious illnesses.   CDC is warning at risk persons to avoid pigs and ag fairs.

    n

    1
  9. Greg Norton says:

    Oh, and they are short drivers because of “reasons”.   Some of which might be the need for clean driving record, p!ss test, background check, and willingness to work with kids.    The first three are going to reduce the pool of candidates dramatically.

    Requiring vaccination for Covid will reduce the pool even further.

    I usually go to the polls not knowing much about the ISD trustee candidates so I don’t vote in those races. Not this year. All of the incumbents except two need to go IMHO, and those two are not up for election this year.

  10. Greg Norton says:

    In retrospect it was a good decision. An Apple store did open, not by him and his investors. The store lasted two years before it collapsed.

    A lot of indie Apple stores did really well until the company started experimenting with retail when Steve Jobs returned, first with store-within-a-store areas at CompUSA and then the company’s own stores.

    The indie store near my house in the early 2000s went back to the 80s in Sarasota, FL. They shuttered after CompUSA got involved with Apple, however … early 2001 (?). Tampa’s Apple Store opened right after 9/11, and even the CompUSA sales areas were gone by Christmas.

    The indie stores were really important for repairs, however, and if you didn’t have good techs, just selling the computers wouldn’t be profitable enough.

  11. ITGuy1998 says:

    Re: indie Apple stores. We had one back home. At the time, Apple would let you test drive a mac (the original). I remember dad doing that, and then buying one  from them. I have no idea when that local store went out of business, as dad never needed their support. He upgraded that mac’s RAM (had to desolder the original and solder in the new chips).  I have that mac sitting in my office right now, and it works (well, the internal floppy doesn’t, but the external floppy does).

    I also remember a computer store in a nearby city that we went to fairly regularly. They had macs and pc’s. The 80’s were a great time – every store not only had at least a small display of computers, but some had video game display consoles too. My parents had to drag me away when they were done shopping.

  12. Greg Norton says:

    I also remember a computer store in a nearby city that we went to fairly regularly. They had macs and pc’s. The 80’s were a great time – every store not only had at least a small display of computers, but some had video game display consoles too. My parents had to drag me away when they were done shopping.

    Mail order clones and Computer Shopper were really hard on the indie shops selling PCs in the early 90s.

    The small business people were brutal about picking the brains of the people running and staffing the stores before running off to order their clones and “evaluate” the software, even the OS, through the Egghead Discount Ponzi’s return policy.

    I doubt Microsoft would have become as dominant as they did without the Ponzi spreading nationwide. Gates did the Christmas videos with the management when I worked there in 1988 and again at Christmas 1989.

  13. Nick Flandrey says:

    MS has always been shady.

    n

  14. Nick Flandrey says:

    I used to go in and write little “hello world” programs to run on in store machines.   They used to include some sort of basic.

    n

  15. Nick Flandrey says:

    Ha ha!  /end muntz voice

    https://www.zerohedge.com/energy/russia-officially-halts-natural-gas-flows-nord-stream-1 

    Fears are mounting across the European Union that Russia will delay flows beyond September 3rd as the Kremlin continues to use natural gas as a weapon against Western sanctions – an allegation Moscow has repeatedly denied.

    Gazprom has said the cutoff would be temporary, as planned, noting that the pipeline would restart after three days “provided that no malfunctions are identified”, as reported by the New York Times.

    Once flows are restored in three days, according to Gazprom, it will be 20% of the pipeline’s capacity – the same level of capacity since flows were restored following July’s maintenance.

    If I were Vlad, I’d be laughing from all the winning.    Sanctions?  Thanks for driving up the price!

    n

  16. Ray Thompson says:

    Computer Shopper

    I could spend hours going through that, er, magazine, book, large tabloid. There was a Compusa close to where I lived. I did purchase some stuff from them, cables, maybe a printer ribbon. I did purchase stuff for the bank as the bank set up a PO system with them

    My first computer was a Heathkit H-89. Courtesy of the VA and the Bell and Howell program. Lots of orange binders and the final assembly was the H-89. Upgraded that machine many times adding memory, soft sector controller, Z80A UART to drive the display board. Had to also upgrade the power supply and add a fan.

    My first PC was a Gateway 2000 386. Had a whopping 4 meg of memory and a 100 megabyte drive with some funky interface. 14 inch monitor that weighed 30 pounds.

    When I was purchasing PCs for the banks foray into desktop computers I speced Gateway computers. One chap in upper management wanted a Radio Shack TRS-80 model II. The salesman convinced him it was faster machine because it ran at 9,600 baud. I never could convince the chap in management that the number was modem speed, not computer speed. He got what he wanted as it was his budget. When he found out it would not run MS-DOS he was not a happy camper.

    I did write a Burroughs Poll Select converter that would allow the PC to function as a limited terminal. Other companies came out with competing products that did more and were fairly cheap. It would be a folly to waste me time doing what others were doing better.

    One company, ICC, had a really good product. Software was on a floppy that had to be inserted to start the program. There was a laser cut hole on the disk in a specific location that was read as a flaw and would unlock the program. I really despised that method of privacy protection. Users were not kind to the floppy. The location of the flaw was specific to each copy of the software. It was impossible to use another floppy to get another user up and running.

    In the early 90’s I decided to try and gather 100 3.5″ floppies from vendors. I would write letters asking for demos of their software. Most would send a copy, generally with a crippled version. It only took three months to accumulate 100 3.5″ floppies.

  17. ITGuy1998 says:

    I used to go in and write little “hello world” programs to run on in store machines.   They used to include some sort of basic.

    Heh that brings back good memories. I would always do:

    10 CLS

    20 PRINT “ ITGuy1998 was here!”

    30 GOTO 20

  18. Greg Norton says:

    When I was purchasing PCs for the banks foray into desktop computers I speced Gateway computers. One chap in upper management wanted a Radio Shack TRS-80 model II. The salesman convinced him it was faster machine because it ran at 9,600 baud. I never could convince the chap in management that the number was modem speed, not computer speed. He got what he wanted as it was his budget. When he found out it would not run MS-DOS he was not a happy camper.

    Could have been worse. The IT teacher at my high school moonlighted as a Radio Shack manager at the store in the mall. He talked the school board into buying and installing a six terminal Tandy Xenix minicomputer, Microsoft’s foray into Unix in the mid-80s, to replace what had been a fairly reliable Burroughs system which served students well.

    The Xenix system was the only one of those I ever saw in operation in the 80s. It may have been the only one in Tampa Bay AFAIK.

  19. JimB says:

    I never had a job offer from a high flyer. My primary career employment was always conservative, but I supplemented by investing in stocks. In the mid 1980s I bought some stock in an emerging company called Microsoft. It did OK, but was dragged down in the crash of 1987. It just stayed at about break even, and I lost patience and sold it about a year after the crash. I figured it had had its run. I almost never look back and play “what if,” but I have wondered what that stock might have been worth later.

    Instead, I started accumulating Microsoft and some others. I learned why some people abbreviate it M$. It was my single best performer when I began selling it a few years later.

    Google was another, but it had a shorter, steeper climb. Cisco was a roller coaster.

    Opportunity is where you find it. Lately, I can’t seem to find anything that isn’t being bounced around by the market, so I don’t chase rainbows. I am too comfortable. Comfort is the enemy of success, and timing is everything.

  20. EdH says:

    Fears are mounting across the European Union that Russia will delay flows beyond September 3rd as the Kremlin continues to use natural gas as a weapon against Western sanctions – an allegation Moscow has repeatedly denied.

    On paper the EU has a much greater military force than Russia…

  21. lpdbw says:

    FWIW my last gen intel based Mac Mini is quite snappy (SSD and home upgraded to 32GB ram). And I use a windows style mouse, but the scrolling direction is what it is.

    I took a graphics class at the local JC a couple years back and their Macs were agonizingly slow.  I talked to a tech and he said their anti-virus and anti-malware stuff was the culprit.

    In addition, as a public facing machine and one that people regularly plugged their own media into, they wiped everything down to bare metal and re-installed from a server image regularly…daily or weekly, I can’t remember.

    1. This class is at the local JC.
    2. It’s one of the all-in-one large screen macs.  They have a bunch of them.
    3. They are locked down to the point I can’t change mouse speed or scrolling direction.  I found the settings but they’re greyed out.
    4. They reinstall everything daily.  That’s one reason why we need to keep all our work on an external drive.  Everything saved to the computer is wiped.
    5. I just found out (not tested yet) that I can run the Adobe software on my own PC,   It’s semi-cloud based, so it should work.  Either way, I need to get comfortable with their infrastructure and I still definitely need the external drive.
  22. Ray Thompson says:

    Either way, I need to get comfortable with their infrastructure and I still definitely need the external drive.

    Costco has the SanDisk NVMe 1TB Extreme Portable SSD on sale for $99.00. That is the cheapest price that I have found. I have two of them. They are USB-C on both ends of the cable. If you don’t have USB-C on the computer then a small adapter is available from many suppliers. They are fairly small and easily fit in notebook cases.

    Costco also has a 4 TB unit for $429.00 or a 2 TB unit for $219.00. All the prices beat Amazon offerings.

    1TB will store a lot of video and a whole boatload of pictures.

  23. drwilliams says:

    “Lots of orange binders”

    Saw an H-89 and the binders at an estate sale last year. IT professional. 

  24. EdH says:

    @lpdbw:  Yep, exactly the same. Wow.

    By any chance is your instructor named John Rose? Heh.

    Our final project was to do a trailer for a movie, 60 seconds of video, titles, sub-titles, sound track, etc.  

    It worked fine at home btw, but utterly choked on the JC machines. Fortunately I had screen recorded it on my phone, showed the instructor that, and did ok. Other students the instructor took the project home and checked it out there.

  25. Ray Thompson says:

    Saw an H-89 and the binders at an estate sale last year

    In a small way I wish I had kept the H-89. It probably would be sitting in a corner gathering dust. It did make the move from San Antonio to my current location.

    That machine was fun because it could be worked on easily. As I indicated earlier, I had done many modifications. Original memory was 8K. That was expanded to 64K. That required a new memory controller ROM and a modification in the boot process for CP/M. HDOS never saw anything above 48K. CP/M boot was modified to send a bit to a port that remapped the HDOS ROM to actual memory, then CP/M was relocated to the upper part of memory.

    I had installed two soft sector double sided high density drives that held a whopping 340K each replacing the hard sector drives that only held 100K. I never could afford the hard disk. All that additional memory and hard drives put a strain on the power supply. I had to install a larger voltage regulator and a heat sink. That required a fan be installed to move air through the case.

    I had JRT Pascal for awhile before switching to Turbo Pascal on my Gateway PC. JRT Pascal was a little strange but was able to accomplish what I needed. I attached an Epson MX-80 via the serial port. I had to modify the busy signal on the Epson as it was inverted to what the H-89 expected. Couple of jumpers and a spare gate on a NAND chip.

    When the Graftrax chip came out I installed that in the Epson. Opened up a new world of printing attributes.

    I also wrote a program in Z80 assembly that accessed the UART. I would let that program run at night dialing a range of numbers looking for carrier. I eventually found Bank of America and was able to access the operators console. I could see jobs, probably terminate jobs, dismount tape and other nefarious actions. After poking around for a couple of hours it dawned on me that since I worked for a bank it was probably not a good idea to hack a bank.

    7
  26. Norman Yarvin says:

    Putin is outsmarting himself with this business of keeping gas flows to Europe a trickle.  He’s doing what the South did in the Civil War: they were so confident in King Cotton that they cut off cotton flows *themselves*.  Nope, doesn’t work that way.  If you’re blockaded by the enemy, you get sympathy and perhaps help; if third parties sanction you and stop imports, you get a lobby in that country for resuming imports; but if you cut off exports yourselves you’re just a mental case and people blame themselves for ever thinking you’d be sane.

    (Of course the South was also blockaded by the Union, but that came later.)

    Gas flows are a very strong card, but that’s not how you play it.

  27. lpdbw says:

    By any chance is your instructor named John Rose? Heh.

    No.  Thankfully, for opsec reasons.

    It’s a popular class, and I’ve learned that many of today’s HS grads have already had up to 2 years of formal video training and opportunities for certification.

    I’ve ordered a 1TB Samsung ruggedized drive online.  Thanks for all the input.

  28. lynn says:

    80s

    – did UK shut down domestic production too?  They have petroleum resources…

    Yes, they did.  Massive amounts of natural gas in the north sea.  There is a company trying to resurrect the platforms that they did not blow up but they are years out since everything was concreted down the wells and pipelines.  

    They even had a company bring in a natural gas well using fracking surreptitiously in Scotland but the authorities shut it down since fracking is against the law.  I kid you not.  Something is wrong with these people.

    3
  29. Greg Norton says:

    Gas flows are a very strong card, but that’s not how you play it.

    Europe needs the gas to survive this winter. The flow from the pipeline can’t be replaced easily at any price.

    1
    1
  30. EdH says:

    I have the USS Texas move livestream on.  Just had a large number of barges pass going upstream.  

    I think they are closing the narrower channels when she is in them. 

    I imagine the tow personnel down there are world class experienced.

  31. drwilliams says:

    Fracking is largely responsible for our gas supply. Since we can’t separate the non-fracked gas, we should just tell them we can’t in good conscience let them compromise their principles. 

    3
  32. nick flandrey says:

    Dang it, now that I need to load the truck and head out, the thunder is starting up.  Rain is sure to follow.   Great timing.

    n

  33. drwilliams says:

    Story of racial slur at BYU/Dule women’s volleyball game coming apart

    https://hotair.com/john-s-2/2022/08/31/this-story-about-a-racial-slur-being-shouted-at-a-college-volleyball-game-has-gotten-complicated-n493626

    The man who was banned does not appear on any tapes doing any shouting. Nobody in the student section heard anything. Duke player’s family posting on social media were apparently not at the game.  

    So who heard what?

  34. Lynn says:

    “California asks residents not to charge electric vehicles, days after announcing gas car ban”

         https://www.mystateline.com/news/national/california-asks-residents-not-to-charge-electric-vehicles-days-after-announcing-gas-car-ban/

    “CALIFORNIA (WTVO) — With California’s power grid under strain due to extreme heat and high demand, the utility grid operator is asking residents to avoid charging their electric vehicles. This comes days after the state announced a plan to ban the sale of gas-powered cars by 2035.”

    Oh those crazy Californians.  Just wait until they shut down those two big nukes.

    3
  35. Greg Norton says:

    “California asks residents not to charge electric vehicles, days after announcing gas car ban”

    Oh those crazy Californians.  Just wait until they shut down those two big nukes.

    43% of the EVs sold to date in the US are registered in California according to one article I saw this morning.

    1
  36. Lynn says:

    All this rain is not allowing the septic guy time to get to my house and fix my septic sprinklers.  Of course, that hose going out into the back yard seems to be working ok so I am not in a hurry.

  37. Kenneth C Mitchell says:

    Greg Norton Said:

    43% of the EVs sold to date in the US are registered in California according to one article I saw this morning.

    Until recently, EVs were permitted to use the “HOV lane” even when driving alone. That was worth a lot, right there. 

  38. Greg Norton says:

    Until recently, EVs were permitted to use the “HOV lane” even when driving alone. That was worth a lot, right there. 

    Yup. I worked briefly on SR91 at the tolling company. IIRC, that is $20 each way to go all the way from Riverside to I-5 in Anaheim, across two separate authorities’ segment of the roads … unless you’re driving an EV, which is free for now.

    You still need the tag. Big brother is always watching.

  39. nick flandrey says:

    Ok, heavy rain stopped, so I’m off to the store.

    I’m officially delaying my departure, and missing my pickup along the way. 

    dang weather.

    n

  40. Lynn says:

    “Monkeypox cases reported at two Houston-area schools”

        https://www.chron.com/news/houston-texas/article/Monkeypox-houston-area-schools-17407530.php

    “News of the cases comes as Harris County Judge Lina Hidalgo announced Monday that an adult with severe illness and a presumptive positive test died over the weekend.”

    “More than 500 cases of monkeypox have been reported in Harris County, though none among children. A recent “presumptive positive” test of a toddler turned out to be a false positive. Fort Bend County has 21 cases reported, according to its site.”

    Wait, I thought that monkeypox was not fatal like the smallpox ?

  41. EdH says:

    dang weather.

    California High desert: 4” total this year, about 60% of normal. None in August.

  42. Lynn says:

    Bummer, I pulled the NVME M.2 hard drive from my daughters old ASUS 360c laptop today.  It appears to be fragged as diskpart is reporting that it has zero bytes size.  It is one of those funky old B/M drives with the dual slots.  I used the following USB device to try to read it.

        https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07TG1X4XD?tag=ttgnet-20

    I was hoping to pull her precious memories off the drive.  Of course, it has never been backed up.

  43. Gavin says:

    monkeypox was not fatal like the smallpox ?

    Just checked on WHO site, historically up to 11% fatality rate, but recently down to 3 to 6%. I’d also wonder how much underlying conditions, such as a compromised immune system, might increase the likelihood of a fatal outcome.

  44. Gavin says:

    @lynn, do you have another machine with an open NVMe slot? I’ve had better luck in the past with diagnosing or recovering hard drives directly connected to the motherboard, but I’ve never had to try with a SSD.

  45. Greg Norton says:

    I was hoping to pull her precious memories off the drive.  Of course, it has never been backed up.

    Time Machine is one of the Mac’s “killer apps” for my needs, the reason my primary email POP3 client and photos go on my ye olde MacBook Pro 2012.

  46. Greg Norton says:

    “News of the cases comes as Harris County Judge Lina Hidalgo announced Monday that an adult with severe illness and a presumptive positive test died over the weekend.”

    “More than 500 cases of monkeypox have been reported in Harris County, though none among children. A recent “presumptive positive” test of a toddler turned out to be a false positive. Fort Bend County has 21 cases reported, according to its site.”

    Wait, I thought that monkeypox was not fatal like the smallpox ?

    The patient in Texas who died was severely immune-compromised according to my wife. They got the full story at the VA.

    Isn’t the Hidalgo woman a Dem? 

  47. Lynn says:

    Isn’t the Hidalgo woman a Dem? 

    Yes, in fact she is an immigrant from Columbia.  She is a fairly nasty person and is rumored to be under indictment soon for political favors.  The state of Texas is going after her for defunding the Harris County constables.  One problem after another for the leader of the third largest county in the USA.

         https://www.khou.com/article/news/politics/lina-hidalgo-responds-defund-police-question/285-198dcbf5-39e5-48a1-9dd1-495a00d96735

    She thinks that we should be still wearings masks and be locked in our homes. Plus getting covid shots every quarter.

    Cue the under bridge dweller …

  48. Lynn says:

    @lynn, do you have another machine with an open NVMe slot? I’ve had better luck in the past with diagnosing or recovering hard drives directly connected to the motherboard, but I’ve never had to try with a SSD.

    I am not going to put it my new office pc.  My daughter spilled a glass of milk on her laptop to start this whole mess.

    I am now wondering if I got the wrong adapter.  “M.2 to USB Adapter, RIITOP NVMe to USB 3.1 Reader Card Compatible with Both NVMe (PCI-e) M Key SSD & (B+M Key SATA Based) NGFF SSD”

         https://www.amazon.com/Adapter-RIITOP-Reader-Compatible-Based/dp/B08FWZXT2N?tag=ttgnet-20/

  49. JimB says:

    Sorry to hear about your daughter’s lost date, Lynn. Are there data recovery techniques that work on SSDs?

    Reminds me. I have read about adventures with SSDs here, but so far have not taken the plunge. I really don’t have anything that requires more speed than I have, and I am very happy with my old HP Xeon workstation, purchased as a refurb. That said, I long ago wondered if it might be better to put a SSD directly on the PCIe bus instead of using SATA. I read in Storage Review (https://www.storagereview.com/) that these drives were much faster. The tradeoff is primarily higher cost. Have they disappeared? I don’t keep up, but have thought that I might start shopping for something, especially for my wife’s notebook, which would be SATA of course.

    Any thoughts?

  50. Alan says:

    96 F and 24% RH here in the low desert…not bad at all.

    >> Bus got here at 7:32, right on time for her “I’ll probably get there at … ” estimate.   SUPPOSED to be here 7 :11.   7:30 is too late as the kids miss half of first period.

    I’m convinced the district is doing routing by hand.   Learned that they start tentative routing in the summer,  which implies that they spend a lot of time on it, and still don’t manage to get it right.

    Maybe the group that does the MLB schedule can help out, theirs has been computerized since the late ‘80s. Or we could borrow one of @lynn’s PhDs for a day or two and add it as an Easter Egg in WinSim  🙂

    1
  51. drwilliams says:

    “Do you realize the bullet out of an AR-15 travels 5 times as rapidly as a bullet shot out of any other gun.” –Joe Biden

    “An AR-15 could vaporize an entire human body in a matter of seconds.”–Joe Biden

    Must be true, Twitter hasn’t labeled them misinformation.

    3
  52. JimB says:

    Twitter: garbage in, gospel out!

    3
  53. Alan says:

    >> MS has always been shady.

    NSFK (kids)

  54. paul says:

    Bought a couple of containers of Parmesan cheese.  One is HEB.  One is Hill Country Fare.

    Containers are identical beyond the color of the lids.  The date code printing is different. 

    Ingredients are the same /but/ the Hill Country Fare  lists potassium sorbate as a preservative.

    I’m good with that.  Bought a couple of containers of the HEB stuff last year and uh, while I really like blue cheese, perhaps parmesan based blue cheese is a bad thing.  Yeah, I know.  Hater.  I might have discovered the next Ivermectin.   Or died.  

    Flavor?  The HEB has a tiny bit more butter flavor.  The HCF has a tiny bit more sawdust flavor.  It’s very close to being simply different batches of cheese.  

    The HCF is a bit dryer as for shaking the containers and seeing how things pack and stick.  I think moisture is most of the flavor difference.

    I’m gonna go with the stuff that has the potassium sorbate.  

    The things I wander off to while waiting for the next thunderstorm to drop some rain.  🙂  

  55. Greg Norton says:

    I’m convinced the district is doing routing by hand.   Learned that they start tentative routing in the summer,  which implies that they spend a lot of time on it, and still don’t manage to get it right.

    Maybe the group that does the MLB schedule can help out, theirs has been computerized since the late ‘80s. Or we could borrow one of @lynn’s PhDs for a day or two and add it as an Easter Egg in WinSim

    Optimal routing of a bus route is the Traveling Salesman problem and NP-hard.

    Very good approximation algorithms exist, but the optimal solution for routing drivers is generally not popular with the drivers themselves, especially unionized drivers.

    GTE spent millions on routing phone service techs during my time there in the early 90s only to abandon the project after the techs revolted.

    “Well Fred likes to be close to home at the end of his shift, and George’s wife works three days a week so he needs to be near the elementary school at 3 PM to get his daughter.”

    NP Hard becomes NP Impossible.

  56. paul says:

    I replaced various hard drives with SSDs a couple or three years ago.  Speed?  Seems faster.  I was going for reliability.

    All on SATA.  So far, so good.   No spinning rust here. 

  57. Rick H says:

    Regarding bus routing. Seems to me that the UPS/Amazon/FedEx guys have figured out how to route efficiently. All you would need is a list of addresses where the ‘packages’ (kids) live. Or ‘collection points’, where there would be a group of kids to pick up.

    Don’t the UPS/Amazon/FedEx routings also route to minimize/eliminate left turns, because that can slow things down?

  58. Alan says:

    >> Bought a couple of containers of Parmesan cheese.  One is HEB.  One is Hill Country Fare.

    Containers are identical beyond the color of the lids.  The date code printing is different. 

    Ingredients are the same /but/ the Hill Country Fare  lists potassium sorbate as a preservative.

    I’m good with that.  Bought a couple of containers of the HEB stuff last year and uh, while I really like blue cheese, perhaps parmesan based blue cheese is a bad thing.  Yeah, I know.  Hater.  I might have discovered the next Ivermectin.   Or died.  

    Flavor?  The HEB has a tiny bit more butter flavor.  The HCF has a tiny bit more sawdust flavor.  It’s very close to being simply different batches of cheese.  

    The HCF is a bit dryer as for shaking the containers and seeing how things pack and stick.  I think moisture is most of the flavor difference.

    I’m gonna go with the stuff that has the potassium sorbate.

    @paul, no…no…no…try some Parmesan Reggiano instead. Yes, it’s expensive, but a little goes a long way, and just three ingredients.

  59. Ray Thompson says:

    Don’t the UPS/Amazon/FedEx routings also route to minimize/eliminate left turns, because that can slow things down?

    I live on the same road as UPS. I have seen the UPS trucks drive by my house when I am expecting a delivery. Usually about 9:30 AM the trucks start rolling. UPS app can truck the truck. I have seen routing go past my house one direction, past my house another direction, then finally at my house. Other times I have had the truck stop as the first stop from leaving the UPS facility.

    So who knows.

  60. EdH says:

    Ugh.  Smoke blotting out the sun from a fire probably 40 miles away as the crow flies smoke blows.  

    Apparently they’ve had to close the I5.

    We’ve been lucky up to now this year. 

  61. JimB says:

    Routing? I don’t get many UPS deliveries, but when I do, it is almost always at 4 PM plus or minus just a few minutes. The only exception is around Christmas, when deliveries run as late as 7 PM. I am near the edge of their delivery area, but don’t think that is the reason.

    FedEx usually delivers in the morning, and it can be almost any time. Extreme variations, and sometimes drivers come from over a hundred miles away in spite of the fact that there is a good size terminal in our town. They sometimes drive rental trucks instead of FedEx trucks. Seems strange to me.

    All drivers, even the Post Office if there is a package too big for the mailbox, ring our doorbell, then scoot. I sometimes surprise them when I am outside. Everyone is friendly here. I used to know our regular UPS driver when we had more deliveries. I bought my old pickup from one of his coworkers, and all the UPS guys knew of that. I recently met a restaurant server who said I looked familiar. He said he was a substitute mail carrier for a while. He remembered my mailbox as well.

    Oh wait… my father lived with us briefly in the early 1980s before he bought a place of his own. He was having coffee in McDonald’s one day when a UPS guy came in and asked if he would mind taking a small package home. It was his only delivery in our neighborhood, and that would save him a few miles. My dad asked him how he knew he was in McDonald’s. The guy said he recognized his car. After that, my dad was convinced there were spies all over town. Might have been something my wife said.

    2
  62. drwilliams says:

    81 million votes:

    https://twitter.com/Providential/status/1564705622297399297

    Only John Fetterman would think that was a big crowd.

    2
  63. drwilliams says:

    Bed Bath & Beyond Goes Broke: Retailer to Shutter Stores, Cut Staff After Cancelling MyPillow Last Year

    https://pjmedia.com/news-and-politics/ryanledendecker/2022/08/31/bed-bath-beyond-goes-broke-retailer-to-shutter-stores-cut-staff-after-cancelling-mypillow-last-year-n1625561

    Just a coincidence. Nothing to see here.

    No word on how many shares are held by BlackRock and similar companies.

    2
  64. drwilliams says:

    No charges for Ohio homeowner who fatally shot daughter’s ex-boyfriend in chilling doorbell camera video

    Duckro and his family tell Rayl to leave, but Rayl instead begins to slam his body weight into the door. Duckro is heard from inside the home saying, “I’ve got a gun.” The Mail reported that Rayl broke the deadbolt and managed to get the door open a few inches before Duckro opened fire.

    https://www.foxnews.com/us/no-charges-ohio-homeowner-fatally-shot-daughters-ex-boyfriend-chilling-doorbell-camera-video

    note: the video is edited.

    3
  65. drwilliams says:

    Just had a session searching eBay for a vintage OEM car part. 

    All sorts of shiite showing up from other manufacturers, so I took a closer look, and sure enough, most of the listings that I checked were from a handful of shiite-heads that included hundreds of unrelated keywords in their listings. So I took a few minutes and reported  a few.

    Looks like several dealers got their keyword spam list from the same source. Managed to remove most of them from the search results by including “-hudson” in the search terms.

  66. drwilliams says:

    No Worries: Feds Find 30K Mexican Passport Holders With Middle Eastern Names in Fraud Investigation

    https://pjmedia.com/news-and-politics/rick-moran/2022/08/31/no-worries-feds-find-30k-mexican-passport-holders-with-middle-eastern-names-in-fraud-investigation-n1625628

    So the Mexicans are selling passports?

    2
  67. drwilliams says:

    US life expectancy fell in 2021… again

    In the first two years of the COVID-19 pandemic, the estimated American lifespan has shortened by nearly three years. The last comparable decrease happened in the early 1940s, during the height of World War II.

    And let’s not forget drug overdoses. Those deaths have been going through the roof for the past couple of years. The trend has definitively been driven by the massive amounts of fentanyl coming out of China and being smuggled into the United States across the southern border.

    https://hotair.com/jazz-shaw/2022/08/31/us-life-expectancy-fell-in-2021-again-n493471

    I’m guessing it would be safe to say: 

    “Joe Biden is the only American president to preside over such a life expectancy debacle absent a major war.”

    How about a special program for fentanyl captured coming over the southern border? Make it into gummies and deliver a pallet to the Mexican president, every Mexican governor, every Mexican legislator, and every Mexican drug lord with a note saying random deliveries to their areas will commence in thirty days.

    3
  68. Nick Flandrey says:

    Got to the BOL safely. Very damp out here in the woods. Dark too.

    .I think I’ll skip the fire tonight.  Contractors in . morning, so I should get some sleep.

    First I want to try putting my phone in access point mode and using my laptop to post.

    N

  69. nick flandrey says:

    Well, it works.  Sorta.   Speed is ridiculously slow, with crazy latency.

    But I’m typing on my Toughbook, and not the phone.

    Didn’t work the first time, nor the second, but whatever I did the third time worked.

    That is progress my friends.  With a capital P.

  70. Nick Flandrey says:

    And now to sleep, perchance to dream… 

    n

  71. Lynn says:

    Optimal routing of a bus route is the Traveling Salesman problem and NP-hard.

    Very good approximation algorithms exist, but the optimal solution for routing drivers is generally not popular with the drivers themselves, especially unionized drivers.

    We have the traveling salesman built into our CAD front end.  You would not believe how cpu it can burn, especially when we added it back in the 80486 days.  It would not run on an 80386.  We reroute all the streams (links) in real time when the user is moving an equipment symbol around.  If there are eight or more streams attached, things would and could get dicey. We still have artifacts issues with it.

  72. Lynn says:

    No charges for Ohio homeowner who fatally shot daughter’s ex-boyfriend in chilling doorbell camera video

    Duckro and his family tell Rayl to leave, but Rayl instead begins to slam his body weight into the door. Duckro is heard from inside the home saying, “I’ve got a gun.” The Mail reported that Rayl broke the deadbolt and managed to get the door open a few inches before Duckro opened fire.

    https://www.foxnews.com/us/no-charges-ohio-homeowner-fatally-shot-daughters-ex-boyfriend-chilling-doorbell-camera-video

    Here in Texas you could shoot him out in the street.  And that father saved the taxpayers a lot of money down the road, anyone who cannot control himself in that situation is going hurt somebody down the road.  

  73. Lynn says:

    US life expectancy fell in 2021… again

    https://hotair.com/jazz-shaw/2022/08/31/us-life-expectancy-fell-in-2021-again-n493471

    I would love to make it to 76 from 62.  My parents are 83 and 81, both in stage 4 cancer remission.  

  74. Lynn says:

    Got to the BOL safely. Very damp out here in the woods. Dark too.

    We are very dark here every night.  Country roads and no street lights.  I take a flashlight with me to take the trash cans to the end of the driveway. I am worried about stepping on a cottonmouth in the dark.

  75. Greg Norton says:

    We have the traveling salesman built into our CAD front end.  You would not believe how cpu it can burn, especially when we added it back in the 80486 days.  It would not run on an 80386.  We reroute all the streams (links) in real time when the user is moving an equipment symbol around.  If there are eight or more streams attached, things would and could get dicey.

    These kids today with their 8 GB graphics cards and OpenGL …

    On second thought, even OpenGL is dated now.

  76. Lynn says:

    US life expectancy fell in 2021… again

    https://hotair.com/jazz-shaw/2022/08/31/us-life-expectancy-fell-in-2021-again-n493471

    Explain this to me, the USA overall deaths curve is still high.  Not real high but higher than expected.

        https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/vsrr/covid19/excess_deaths.htm

  77. Greg Norton says:

    Bed Bath & Beyond Goes Broke: Retailer to Shutter Stores, Cut Staff After Cancelling MyPillow Last Year

    Just a coincidence. Nothing to see here.

    No word on how many shares are held by BlackRock and similar companies.

    Bed Bath & Beyond has lots of problems beyond cancelling MyPillow. 

    I thought I saw stories that the stock was being manipulated by kids like GameStop.

    I’m surprised that place wasn’t sold to private equity and strip mined like Toys R Us.

    Kohls is headed in that direction.

Comments are closed.