Tues. Aug. 23, 2022 – like sands through an hourglass….

Hot and humid, seriously.  Why would I lie?   It was certainly humid yesterday.  Even just sitting outside while working on my gennie I was soaked to the skin.  Today should be the same, with the BOL due to get T storms and heavy rain, but Houston just sweltering…

Did some inside desk stuff to start the day, but finally decide it was time to get the gennie running.   The kit went in and the directions were pretty clear and straightforward.   The longest time was taken up putting stuff back together before I could take it apart and add the propane conversion.

There is one thing that doesn’t make sense, so I’m going to take the advice in the instructions and call them today.  If it needs fixing, a simple drilled hole should solve the issue.   It took more adjustment than I expected to get it running and the idle circuit seems to have an issue.   Since the missing hole is part of the idle, it all makes sense… sorta.  It does run, and I can run with it how it is.   Still, I think it can be better.   I still have to figure out a good mounting solution for the regulator and drill a big hole to pass the hose through.   My drill and step bit are at the BOL though, so that detail will have to wait.  With a couple of minor tweaks it should be great.

I also cut the grass and did some weeding.   Ants.  Freaking ants.  Raised bed is full of them.  I hate ant bites, I’ve got 3 new ones  on my hands from the BOL, and another from my garden here.   I’m going to have to look at the poison to see if I can use it in the raised bed and still plant veggies later this fall.

In other pest news, whatever has been moving around in my garage and knocking stuff off my shelves found the rat trap bait yesterday.  Stupid thing ate its way into the box and snacked on the bait.   I’m hoping it doesn’t die in the garage walls or soffits, but I’m hoping it does die.   Drought is causing stress for the wildlife and vermin too.  One of my buddies reports coyotes moving around his property, eyeballing his chickens.  His dogs aren’t up to fighting coyotes, and he has reasons why he can’t be armed properly.   I think he’s gonna be feeding coyotes.

Pickups and driving around today.   And maybe some prepping for my sale/show this weekend.   But certainly lots of stuff to do.   (ha, fragments, and style violations! I’m feeling saucy.)   I was still pretty sore and stiff yesterday from the sledgehammering and breaking rocks in the hot sun, I’m hoping to be back to normal today.   Say it with me — “we’ll see.”

Time to stack some things.

nick

 

49 Comments and discussion on "Tues. Aug. 23, 2022 – like sands through an hourglass…."

  1. Nick Flandrey says:

    77F with an edge of chill in the air.  No sun poking thru low overcast yet.   Kids bus was 20 minutes late.   Still working out the kinks I guess.   Wife took them at 19 minutes.   We are 10-15 minutes from the school but it took them almost 1 ½ hours to get home.  That seems excessive to me, even with stops.   The trade off would be me spending an hour to pick them up and get them home.   Gonna have to weigh that a bit.

    n

  2. ITGuy1998 says:

    New photos added at the end:  http://fordfe.info/AL-Shop.html

    Your shop is really coming together! You are building roughly what I want, which is a space big enough to have closed off areas for wood working, metal working, and car maintenance. Maybe the next house will be out of the ‘burbs and I can do it. I have a few years, though if we get a serious housing market downturn I might be able to do something then. For now, I’ll continue to make do with my 26×16 workspace.

  3. ITGuy1998 says:

    Re: Bus routes. We either dropped off or walked my son to elementary school (15 minute walk). The middle school is 6 miles away. The bus route would have him on the bus for 45 minutes if there weren’t any delays. We had a carpool to share the pickup/drop off load. Totally worth it. In the first days of 8th grade, our carpool partner abruptly bailed, but my wife was able to handle drop off on her way to work and I did pickups. For high school, which is a half hour commute by car (bus ride between an hour and 1.5 hours), we did another carpool. It started off with 4 kids, but very quickly dropped to 2. It worked out though, and I handled half of the afternoon pickups. Yeah, it cost me time, but I used the time waiting to read. Plus, getting to spend all those extra afternoons with my son was absolutely worth it.

    Hmmm, reading the above sounds like the ramblings of a recent empty nester….ha!

    7
  4. Nick Flandrey says:

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-11128311/How-grocery-stores-MANIPULATE-spending-money-using-psychological-tricks.html 

    –  some interesting observations in the article, but I think incorrect conclusions and lack of industry knowledge, and a really weird, almost passive aggressive tone.    “Look what you’ve made me do”….

    “forced” “tricked”  some weird analogies, and some word choices that tell me the author needs a dictionary.  

    One question for our foreign readers, the author says the store is laid out to encourage “counter clockwise” movement, like when driving…   WTF?   does that make sense in Euro land?     My costco is clockwise, small HEB also clockwise, also big HEB… but Kroger is counter (or ‘anti-’) clockwise… and what does that have to do with driving?

    n

  5. Nick Flandrey says:

    Microcenter has three graphics cards listed in their online sale flyer this week.   $575, $900, and $1000!

    you can buy a lot of console gaming and games for that kinda scratch.

    n

  6. Greg Norton says:

    Microcenter has three graphics cards listed in their online sale flyer this week.   $575, $900, and $1000!

    you can buy a lot of console gaming and games for that kinda scratch.

    What are the chipsets and memory configurations? Less than 12 GB is increasingly useless in the *coin mining arms race, and a lot of retailers stuck with physical inventory are going to take a beating this Christmas..

    And try to buy a current production console without paying a dweeb working an arbitrage side hustle.

    I’ll even go easy and challenge you to pay retail for a PS4  even though, dawg, you’re gonna look like an amateur when that fan starts running while playing the high end game, where the same game on PS5 is silent.

    A Nintendo Switch has to be the OLED version even though it doesn’t really matter to run any of the software. Again, dawg, you gonna look poor without those initials on your hardware.

    I’ve heard all the arguments from my kids, but I hate dweebs.

  7. JimB says:

    Sure happy I have never liked games. I have so many other things to waste my time on.

    2
  8. Greg Norton says:

    Sure happy I have never liked games. I have so many other things to waste my time on.

    Modern gaming platforms aren’t as much about the play as they are carefully crafted instruments of applied psychology intended to enhance the bottom line of the major manufacturers through exploitation of FOMO.

    Like a lot of the rest of entertainment, the product has been fetishized. Content isn’t nearly as important as possession of the items.

    I’ll give Nintendo some leeway since they were a game company first, but there are only so many variations on Mario Kart they can produce.

    I don’t think the interest in retro games is a coincidence. Though, there too, rarity results in fetishization and profits from arbitrage. Twenty years ago, you couldn’t give N64 cartridges away.

  9. drwilliams says:

    @JimB

    “Sure happy I have never liked games. I have so many other things to waste my time on.”

    Space Invaders

    Moon lander

    Jewelbox

  10. Alan says:

    Asteroids (vector display!) and Ms Pacman

    And my younger son has my Atari 2600

  11. lynn says:

    “I Can’t Even”

        https://areaocho.com/i-cant-even-2/

    Look at this from the CDC. (emphasis added by me)”

    “Even if you feel well, here are some ways to reduce your chances of being exposed to monkeypox if you are sexually active:”

    What he said at the end works for me.   Just say no.

  12. lynn says:

    “Oil Reserves Update”

       https://areaocho.com/oil-reserves-update/

    Somebody please tell me again why the Biden family is selling our crude oil reserves to the Chinese ?   Makes no sense to me at all.

    I can hardly wait for them to start selling my gold teeth to the Chinese.

    1
  13. Jenny says:

    Trading web work for access to some cool services on several occasions this past year. 
    I’m kinda done. Working full time, family stuff, house stuff then staying up half the night because the page needed a new registration form and it’s somehow my fault the guy who does this for a living fired the business? I kept in my lane and never spoke with the pro.

    Nope. Did the work and told them they needed somebody else.

    I am going to keep working on a particular problem because it seems absurd I couldn’t figure it out. 
     

    Site uses WordPress. Registration uses Contact Forms 7, and a slew of additional CF7 compatible plugins. Conditional fields. A date picker that lets you restrict available dates but at a system level (dumb), a pdf generator, a cf7 associated “database” (-ahem- flat file -ahem-), and I don’t remember what else. 
     

    To make the site and form do what the customer wanted, CF7 forced me to break date collection into different fields depending on what service was being enrolled in. Different services had different dates. 
     

    Three of the services were offered Mon-Thur. Used the date picker that applies system wide to lie and say weekends are Fri-Sun and not to allow picking a weekend date. Then used conditional fields based off service selected to present that date picker. CF7 pulls dates for those three services into a particular database field. 
     

    Next I had a service offered on two non consecutive days. So I forced a radio button choice for what day, conditional fields to present the CF7 date picker with min:this_Monday with step:7 to force only Mondays from this Monday forward to be selectable. The date gets its own field. 
     

    Rinse and repeat for the other allowed day of that service. Duplicate for the other service that has two different days yet again. 
     

    For a menu of five services I have dates in five fields. 
     

    Not cool and my tender sensibilities are deeply offended. 
     

    I spent a lot of time screwing around with dropping a bit of js into the footer and a CF7 compatible plug-in for dynamic text. I wanted to pull all 5 of those date fields into a unified date field. I tested the js piece and could get a function to trigger but I couldn’t get the function to retrieve the values from the fields to update the dynamic text field before (or at or after) submit. 
    The bit of js I was using was published about two years ago for a similar problem in CF7. I -think- I mirrored the original posters efforts in my test form. I am confident running js in the footer was possible. I lack the WP/CF7/js chops to make it work. I learned that CF7 short code is tucked up in a span and that obfuscates the field. My addEventListener laughed heartily at my futile efforts.  
     

    So I uninstalled all the plugins I wound up trying, brute forced it. I’ll write an Excel spreadsheet to concatenate the data after the fact. 
     

    I ran out of time. Form needs some more conditional field work as the five services are limited in other ways on who may register for them.

    How inelegant and offensive.  pardon me while I clutch my pearls -laughter-

    I can do a lot in WordPress but I am not a programmer. 
     

    Owner of the business has a pair of young twenty somethings helping her out with other stuff who are eager to take on the web stuff. I’m glad to let them at it. I don’t think they’re IT folks, not my problem. 
     

    Owner needs a proper booking interface, not all this kludging around with CF7. I don’t understand the refusal to change. 

  14. JimB says:

    All the things said about games left me cold. I have never had FOMO, never wanted to collect anything for its own sake, and don’t like organized sports anymore. Used to like to play baseball, softball, tennis, golf, and ping pong, plus a few others, such as pool. I can watch someone play an electronic game for up to about a minute, and then my attention starts to wander.

    Once spent some time in a real flight simulator. It taught me that I would be a mediocre pilot who would kill himself. 

    There’s more, but you get the idea.

  15. Lynn says:

    Pearls Before Swine: Wikiguilt

        https://www.gocomics.com/pearlsbeforeswine/2022/08/23

    Wikiguilt is a real syndrome.

  16. Rick H says:

    @Jenny – I also do a lot of web work (as you might have guessed), although mostly on my own sites (and here).

    First glance at your problem looked like the best way is to use the “DOM” element and a bunch of conditional JS to ‘read’ and ‘write’ field areas based on values of other fields. 

    The conditions look pretty complex, and I know just enough DOM/JS to get by (with much help and code ‘borrowing’ from the googles/bings/ducks), but the basics would be something like:

    • a function called when a field changes (via an onchange event for all fields)
    • go through all field’s current values by getting the DOM elements for those fields
    • make a decision based on current values to change other field values
    • use JS to write the new values to the other fields via their DOM element
    • popup alert messages if needed to alert to changes
    • Repeat on each field change

    Complex stuff to figure out. Above my pay grade. Would probably take me days to figure out. And there would need to be a definition of ‘rules’ beforehand. 

    Web site programming should be pleasant (fun) to do, and bring in appropriate rewards (satisfaction, income). If it doesn’t, another line or work (or hobby, in my case) would be indicated.

    3
    1
  17. Lynn says:

    Owner needs a proper booking interface, not all this kludging around with CF7. I don’t understand the refusal to change. 

    FOBD.  Fear of being down.  Especially for non-technical people.

  18. Lynn says:

    Dilbert: NPC Makes Movies References

        https://dilbert.com/strip/2022-08-23

    NPCs are usually boring.

    Ryan Reynolds new movie on Netflix about a NPC is pretty good.
    https://www.imdb.com/title/tt6264654/

  19. Lynn says:

    “Drought reveals huge dinosaur tracks in dried-up Texas river, video shows”

        https://www.chron.com/news/science-environment/article/dinosaur-tracks-texas-river-drought-17391827.php

    “The prints likely belonged to the species of Sauroposeidon and Acrocanthosaurus, a park representative said.””

    “In an interview with CNN, park representative Stephanie Salinas Garcia said most of the recently discovered tracks belong to the Acrocanthosaurus, a 15-foot-tall dinosaur that weighed close to seven tons. Another species that left behind tracks was the Sauroposeidon, a 60-foot-tall, 44-ton dinosaur, Garcia said.”

    Obviously, dinos did not watch their weight.

  20. Lynn says:

    “Alabama gives Saban new 8-year contract with multimillion deal”

        https://www.chron.com/sports/college/article/alabama-saban-contract-8-years-17392244.php

    “The University of Alabama trustees compensation committee on Tuesday approved a one-year extension through Feb. 28, 2030 for the 70-year old Saban, who has led the Crimson Tide to six national titles. Saban’s deal averages out to $11.7 million per year, topping Smart’s $11.25 million pay at defending national champion Georgia.”

    I am fairly sure that Saban’s product endorsements are not a part of that contract either.

    I am wondering where all this is leading to.

  21. Lynn says:

    “Inflation Reduction Act ‘will have no measurable impact on inflation,’ economists say”

        https://finance.yahoo.com/news/inflation-reduction-act-impact-inflation-economists-175826985.html

    “According to economists, however, the $430 billion price tag over the next 10 years is a hefty amount for what they consider to be marginal economic returns.  “Our preliminary analysis of the ‘Inflation Reduction Act’ (IRA), a climate, tax, and health-focused bill, shows it will boost the level of GDP by about 0.2%-0.3% by the end of 2031 and, despite its name, will have no measurable impact on inflation,” Oxford Economics economists wrote in a new note.  The IRA is a slimmed-down version of Biden’s original $4.5 trillion Build Back Better plan that focuses on driving down inflation, which hit record numbers in 2022.”

    Yup, they are telling us what we already knew.

  22. Greg Norton says:

    I am wondering where all this is leading to

    Oh, Christmas tree. Oh, Christmas tree.

    The current UT coach is Fired Coach Walking right now, and the alumni are not going to want 2024 to be a “rebuilding” year entering the SEC. The former TCU coach serving in UT Athletics as a “special consultant” is not going to be a long term solution when he is named head coach at UT a few games into the season this Fall

    UT needs a big name on the sidelines with a highly regarded recruiting class at the opening of the season in 2023.

  23. Jenny says:

    @RickH

    Looking at your comment I’m on the right track.

    I was leaning heavily on this exchange

    https://stackoverflow.com/questions/65445826/js-more-input-fields-into-one-cf7

    I’m not worried about teasing out any particular field, simply concatenating five fields into one. Of those five fields only one will contain data. 
    I was able to use a js “try it here” site to approximate the task using regular html / text input with the triggering event being text changing in an input field. 
    And I was able to run a simple js (open a url in blank page) on the owners site with a “click here” button on the CF7 form. 
     

    I gave up when it was past 2 am and I read a blurb that said that the CF7 fields I was attempting to use for my DOM events were concealed in spans so wouldn’t work. Then a different technique was described. Better part of valor I cleaned up my mess and went to bed. 
     

    @Lynn

    I can certainly understand that. I’ve tried to explain we can set it up in the background and switch over when it’s ready. No notable downtime required. Deaf ears. I think it’s fear of not understanding. The way I’m using  CF7 is too advanced for the owner to understand, they’ve said as much (not good in my opinion), however they understand the super basics of CF7. I think they fear learning a booking system and not having control of their data. That’s understandable. I believe we can implement something simple that stores data where owner can access it. 
    The teeny-boppers can have at it. I’m too old to be writing web at 2 am -laughing-

    3
  24. Rick H says:

    @Jenny – I remember those 2am sessions caused by a “I’ll just fix this one thing …”    But that was back in last century. No more.  

    I usually quit by 8pm, but mostly because my eyes are tired. But the brain keeps working on some things after then, with a new idea popping up occasionally. Or a new search phrase to try to find the solution that someone else has already figured out. (I get a lot of code that way.)

    As for your issue – I’d throw away the CF7 form, and build the form myself. Then add the JS function with an ‘onchange’ on each field. That function would do the logic previously mentioned. This allows you to apply post-submittal functions to the submitted data.

    CF7 is good for basic and quick forms, but tweaking it takes effort. You have to dig into their code for their available ‘filters’, which are not well-documented. 

    But a booking or reservation plugin would be best overall, if you could convince them. You could add such a plugin, then create the pages that implement it. Use those pages for testing, then merge them into the live site when they are comfortable using it.

    I suspect that you have already investigated booking/reservation plugins, but this link might get you started. If you want to ‘start’. 

  25. Denis says:

    One question for our foreign readers, the author says the store is laid out to encourage “counter clockwise” movement, like when driving…   WTF?   does that make sense in Euro land?   

    I like Aldi, and I have noticed that as they renovate existing shops, they tend to switch them from anticlockwise to clockwise walk-through direction, but not universally so. I am in France at the moment, and did some shopping at an Aldi opened in May 2022, and it is an anticlockwise one…

    Humans tend to scan visually from left to right and from far to near. Hunters and snipers learn to scan differently, in order not to overlook things. I wonder if setting the shops anticlockwise interferes with the customary scanning, and thus gets products more optical dwell time…? No doubt there are marketing PhDs written on such matters. Kim du Toit used to be a grocery marketing expert before he became a gub guru. Perhaps he would know…

    5
  26. Ray Thompson says:

    Complex stuff to figure out. Above my pay grade.

    When I was doing web applications I used ColdFusion to deliver the pages. A lot of backend stuff can be easily accomplished including dynamic HTML. Even the generated JavaScript was dynamic and would change depending on the type of page delivered. Actually enjoyable. JavaScript not so much.

    I also used a lot of JavaScript on some pages. I had to design an expense report for the organization. It was necessary to do calculations on the form and fill in other fields with the results of those calculations. I also had to disable fields based on selections made via radio buttons or checkboxes. Lots of onChange() events triggered on fields, lots of changing of values in fields. Lots of error checking on the page in JavaScript. I would also change the attributes of the CSS supporting some fields to show an error.

    Data was also checked on the back end by the server-side code to catch the persons who tried to get past the rules. ColdFusion could do a lot and was really easy to access databases. Fun language. JavaScript not so much. Some things seemed like a kludge to make it work within the language.

    And most of that crap is irrelevant to the issue at hand.

    I will let myself out.

  27. Jenny says:

    @Ray

    irrelevant 

    And yet very interesting. We have a few Cold Fusion web apps lurking in the dark corners at work. I know enough to know that’s outside my bailiwick. 
    And I’d disagree with irrelevant. Not using Cold Fusion for todays work but it was fascinating and useful once and remains interesting to see the million and one ways IT problems may be addressed. Depth and breadth of knowledge like yours is always relevant. 
     

    @Rick
    Thanks for the link
    It may be that if the twenty somethings suggest the booking alternative a yes will be had. I’ll gain more traction feeding them info than the owner I suspect. I am out of favor for telling owner I can’t be the Go To Tech.

  28. Rick H says:

    @Ray – as long as we are reminiscing – I used ColdFusion extensively in the 1980’s. Enjoyed it as a way to create web-based applications.

    I recall an application I wrote for the Parking department of the local city government I worked for (for 23 years, before retiring). They had 8-10 parking lots, all gathering parking data and funds. It was one guy’s job to take the data from each parking lot and consolidate it into massive spreadsheets to provide management reports. The whole process took most of a month to do.

    The department asked the IT guys to come up with a mainframe application for that process. As the dept IT support guy, I was in on those meetings. And the mainframe guys had great difficulties building that application.

    So I decided to do it all in Cold Fusion. I set up remote control modems to gather data from each server in the parking lot in an automatic process. Then take all that data and consolidate it according to the dept needs. 

    The mainframe guys gave up on the process, but I didn’t. Got it to work with thousands of lines of CF code. And my process worked.

    The former process that took several weeks each month to do took only a few hours to do via my CF application. And got the data the dept wanted. Great productivity increase. And some great job satisfaction – being able to – all by myself, and self-taught – build a full-scale application that the mainframe guys (several) couldn’t do.

    The mainframe guys (and their IT bosses) didn’t like me much after I did what their mainframe guys couldn’t do.  Caused some issues between me and them in the subsequent years of my IT work at that local government. But the main IT folks (under new management) eventually got me to come over as Information Security for the entire local government.  

    That was my final job there before retirement – there was some impending downsizing that was going to happen to me. I chose an early retirement (with a one-year bonus incentive) rather than the downsizing. I was in my late 50’s by then. 

    My experience over the 23 years there included going from standalone PCs with WordStar to city-wide networking and email and lots of servers (Novell networks, Groupwise, WordPrefect; eventually moving to Windows networking and Outlook; plus many SANS classes). I did just about every job in IT there over the years.

    Still wish ColdFusion was still around – which is probably why I do a lot of PHP coding now, even in retirement. 

  29. Alan says:

    >> Twitter whistleblower dumps piles of data to SEC

    https://hotair.com/ed-morrissey/2022/08/23/twitter-twist-former-security-chief-alleges-foreign-intel-penetration-ftc-violations-and-bot-hiding-n491591

    Hey Elon, maybe it did work:

    “When you wish upon a star…”

    Will a Twitter whistleblower end up vindicating Elon Musk? Perhaps, but that may be the least of Parag Agrawal’s headaches after his former security chief has started blowing the whistle on a wide range of issues at the social media platform. Peter “Mudge” Zatko, who began his career as an “ethical hacker,” alleges that Twitter and especially Agrawal have defied an FTC order to improve its security, allowed foreign intel agencies to penetrate it, and that its system lacks even the basic security and encryption necessary to protect customer data.

  30. Ray Thompson says:

    Still wish ColdFusion was still around

    It is still around. Taken over by Adobe. I expect Adobe to create a mess that no one wants to use.

    This https://www.tbp.org/expensereport/ is an example of the page to select entries. Nothing magical, a little JS to disable the enter key and clear some error messages and form field highlights. I built this form ten years ago and it has not changed at all since I left the organization.

    I was able to create a form that would pre-populate an Excel spreadsheet and deliver that spreadsheet to client. Probably one of the most complicated Excel spreadsheets I have ever created. Multiple hidden pages, hidden page references, hidden columns, field validation, etc. Today I really don’t fully understand how I made it all work as I have forgotten how I made it work.

    Database was SQLServer Express. A free product (at that time) from Microsoft. Limits on the size of the database, no spanning database instances (cross database references were OK). ColdFusion really handled database reads and updates quite nicely. But it all fit nicely within the organization. Database was not large and there was enough memory on the server to hold the entire database in memory. Thus quite fast.

    https://www.tbp.org/memb/MemberLookup.cfm is a place to lookup members. Again, not changed in over ten years. All dynamic HTML created on the fly by ColdFusion. Exact same page that posts back to itself with the resulting content changed depending on the input.

    I really enjoyed working at the organization. I was basically on my own with few actual requirements. I was allowed to design and create my own way of satisfying a requirement. Little to no guidance or oversight. Just make it work. Toward the end I still very much enjoyed the work, but not so much the job. I was thinking of retirement and when my best friend died of a heart attack it sealed the deal. I gave the organization a one year notice.

  31. Lynn says:

    “Saudi Arabia says OPEC could cut output to tackle oil slump”

         https://www.ogj.com/general-interest/economics-markets/article/14281668/saudi-arabia-says-opec-could-cut-output-to-tackle-oil-slump

    “OPEC leader Saudi Arabia said that OPEC stands ready to cut production to correct a recent drop in oil prices caused by illiquid futures markets and macroeconomic concerns.”

    We are selling so much of our crude oil reserve in the USA that it is depressing the world crude prices. I gather that we have sold 200 million barrels of our 680 million barrel crude oil reserve.   

    So, Saudi Arabia is saying that if we don’t stop it, they are going to lower their production of crude oil.

    Biden sucks.  You pick the first name for that statement.

  32. Lynn says:

    I just figured out that Frost King freezers are now Midea.  I am having to buy new hinges for our 7 ft3 cheap piece of Chinesium junk chest freezer that I bought from Walmart 6 or 7 years ago.

    https://midea.encompass.com/model/MIDWHS185C1WSB

  33. Alan says:

    >> I’ll give Nintendo some leeway since they were a game company first, but there are only so many variations on Mario Kart they can produce.

    And then there was EA Sports…kid would want the new edition every year…baseball, basketball, hockey, football.

  34. Greg Norton says:

    I just figured out that Frost King freezers are now Midea.  I am having to buy new hinges for our 7 ft3 cheap piece of Chinesium junk chest freezer that I bought from Walmart 6 or 7 years ago.

    Anything WalMart. Like Home Depot, their purchasing department reshaped American industry to suit their bottom line.

    I know someone who went through trying to get a patented product into WalMart stores. He said that they essentially take over your business when you sign up with their purchasing, to the point that you will not have any say about where the item gets made.

    He passed on their offer having ridden the economy all the way down in and around Waterbury, CT.

  35. Greg Norton says:

    And then there was EA Sports…kid would want the new edition every year…baseball, basketball, hockey, football.

    I passed on an interview with the EA Maitland (Orlando) office a few months ago. They were looking for C++ generalists to handle backend code on a revival of the annual NCAA Football title.

    Maitland has been notorious as a sweatshop for a couple of decades.

  36. Lynn says:

    Stolen from elsewhere:

    “An ugly word you’ll hear a lot in the next 3 years: Semiquincentennial”

    “Many Americans in the group will remember the 1976 Bicentennial.  While America was hardly a bed of roses then, the National mood seems far more fractious and dark now, as we approach 250 years of independence.”

    And the next President’s wife will get to pick the flowers and the stage buntings.

  37. Alan says:

    >> I know someone who went through trying to get a patented product into WalMart stores. He said that they essentially take over your business when you sign up with their purchasing, to the point that you will not have any say about where the item gets made.

    I’d guess it’s not beneath them to “borrow” someone’s IP, any NDA notwithstanding. I’ve also heard stories where they dictate, for example, the size or quantity of items in your packaging. Four less sheets in the roll of paper towels in the package for us vs what you sell to Target. 

  38. Greg Norton says:

    I’d guess it’s not beneath them to “borrow” someone’s IP, any NDA notwithstanding. I’ve also heard stories where they dictate, for example, the size or quantity of items in your packaging. Four less sheets in the roll of paper towels in the package for us vs what you sell to Target. 

    He conceded that they are honest and honored the NDA. His idea remained his property as far as they were concerned, and I’ve not seen his product idea sold anywhere.

  39. Greg Norton says:

    The freshly-arrived bill for my residential copper line phone service is $80.

    I believe I am the last house in my neighborhood still on the old school service.

    2
  40. nick flandrey says:

    Well that sucks.    Just got word from my electrician that he’s pushing by a week.   The electric co-op wants to change the pole after all, and won’t be ready to do the work before Thursday.   

    Dang.   It does make our family logistics easier because I’m clear next week to be up there, but Dang!

    n

    3
  41. nick flandrey says:

    WRT FOMO and gaming,  there was a User Friendly comic about playing games long after they come out, and how much cheaper it is when the graphics card is now a commodity item.   It ends with “The cake is a lie” which is a reference to an awesome game, Portal.

    Ryan Reynolds new movie on Netflix about a NPC is pretty good.  

    – yes, it is very enjoyable, the kids loved it even without getting all the gaming references from the last 15 years… so it’s accessible to non- and sometimes- gamers.   There are some really funny bits.   Pixels was funny too, with its homage to 80s arcade gaming.

    added – if you don’t do any computer or console or online gaming you might not understand the scope of gaming. IIRC revenues from electronic forms of gaming exceed ALL the revenue from movies, tv, and music- combined.

    n

  42. Ed says:

    The freshly-arrived bill for my residential copper line phone service is $80.

    I believe I am the last house in my neighborhood still on the old school service.

    Interesting! What are other folks using? VOIP? Are there advantage/disadvantages to your service vs theirs? 

    1
    1
  43. nick flandrey says:

    My voip sound quality with OOMA is sometimes poor.   But then I don’t answer the phone anymore.  It’s become the enemy with non-stop spam and indian call centers trying to find property for their masters to buy.

    On the other hand, it’s cheap, and gives the grandparents and kids a way to dial 911 without having to do more than pickup and dial.    That is the only reason we have physical phones in the house other than cell.

    n

  44. nick flandrey says:

    Some of the students must have left the state with their parents… but where are the rest?

    https://www.zerohedge.com/political/fk-wirepoints-says-chicago-teachers-union-when-confronted-facts-school-district-itself 

    n

  45. Lynn says:

    Some of the students must have left the state with their parents… but where are the rest?

    https://www.zerohedge.com/political/fk-wirepoints-says-chicago-teachers-union-when-confronted-facts-school-district-itself 

    n

    Dead due to running gun battles in the tenements.

  46. Lynn says:

    Filled up with 23 gallons for $73 tonight.  $3.279/gallon of regular unleaded.

    Our 1.5 mile walk at dusk was exhausting.  88 F at 98% humidity.

  47. Alan says:

    >> But then I don’t answer the phone anymore.  It’s become the enemy with non-stop spam and indian call centers trying to find property for their masters to buy.

    Google’s spam detection and call screening functionality has eliminated 99% of my spam calls. Highly recommended!

  48. Alan says:

    >> https://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-11128311/How-grocery-stores-MANIPULATE-spending-money-using-psychological-tricks.html 

    –  some interesting observations in the article, but I think incorrect conclusions and lack of industry knowledge, and a really weird, almost passive aggressive tone.    “Look what you’ve made me do”….

    I find that if you follow these simple steps, most/all of this article doesn’t apply…
    1. Leave the kids/spouse home (no begging for every sugar-filled product)
    2. Go right after a meal (less likely to be enticed by the smells)
    3. Try to frequent the same store (so you know where most things are)
    4. Shop from a list (if someone finished their favorite cookies and didn’t write it on the list, sorry Charlie)

Comments are closed.