Sun. Jan. 16, 2022 – another day of not rest…

By on January 16th, 2022 in open thread, personal, WuFlu

Cold and windy, but probably clear. I brought my citrus trees back inside last night. It was 40F and dropping, and got to 37F at midnight. Probably wasn’t going to freeze, but the little potted trees weren’t doing well outside.

Got the Christmas decor down, and I’ll put it way today. Some of it was still a bit damp, and I want it dry before storing it.

Got a couple small things done, but sleeping to 11 kinda kills half the day, and it was really too cold and windy to do the outdoor work I was hoping to do.

So we’ll try again today.

Supply chain from China is getting bad again. Port congestion isn’t better. I’m seeing toys show up in the overstock auctions, maybe they’ve arrived too late? And the latest wave of ‘stay at home’ workers is messing up schedules everywhere.

If you need it, stack it.

nick

68 Comments and discussion on "Sun. Jan. 16, 2022 – another day of not rest…"

  1. Denis says:

    Good morning! "… day of not rest …" sounds familiar. I fell into bed at 6pm yesterday, and awoke at 10am today, and I still feel like doing the same again. Christmas "holidays" spent with the in-laws were anything but restful. Ah well. No rest for the witless…

  2. Lynn says:

    35 F here this morning five miles on the West side of the Brazos River.  The cat and dog both went outside but the dog did her business and came right back in.  She got up early and did her business on a puppy mat in our bathroom and jumped on our bed.  I woke up at 6 am with her laying on my legs.  

    Going to church and then to lunch with friends.  Then I will take communion to my mother in rehab.  Dad is in Port Lavaca for the weekend, down time and working on taxes.

  3. Greg Norton says:

    "Okay, after this holiday weekend, can everyone get back to work?

    Really work. No more “working” from home."

    The traffic around here has been atrocious lately.  I cannot imagine what it will be like when everyone goes back to work.

    The Locust Class needs to go back to whatever states they ruined with their last 12-13 years of voting. In the case of CA, 30 years of voting.

    It is too early to tell about the new Governor in Virginia, but the KKKlansman is gone and the new Attorney General is cleaning house from eight years of Dems.

    2
    4
    1
    8
    3
  4. Greg Norton says:

    Supply chain from China is getting bad again. Port congestion isn’t better. I’m seeing toys show up in the overstock auctions, maybe they’ve arrived too late? And the latest wave of ‘stay at home’ workers is messing up schedules everywhere.

    I see the toys at Sam's club.

    The Baby Yoda with the fake Williams-Sonoma cookies either arrived late or is the result of poor marketing. It could go either way.

    Disney+ didn’t have any Baby Yoda shows ready to air this Christmas.

    2
    1
    4
    3
  5. SteveF says:

    The Locust Class needs to go back

    Easy to say. Tough to implement without screwing over a lot of people who didn't contribute to the devastation of the communist-dominated parts of the nation. Case in point, didn't you and your family come to Texas from the commie hellholes in the Northwest? Back you go!

    4
    5
    2
  6. Greg Norton says:

    Easy to say. Tough to implement without screwing over a lot of people who didn't contribute to the devastation of the communist-dominated parts of the nation. Case in point, didn't you and your family come to Texas from the commie hellholes in the Northwest? Back you go!

    I grew up in Florida and lived there for 40 years. I'm still not sure why we moved to WA State, but I knew a month in that it wasn't going to work. Once I had my "it" moment, I was done, regardless of how my wife viewed the place and family situation. We very nearly went into Bankruptcy — WA State extracted more from us than we “contributed”.

    My only voting regret in WA State was Jaime Herrera-Beutler. Once. Of course, that was before her baby was born without kidneys, which gives her that seat as long as she wants to stay there and allowed her to vote to impeach Trump even though her baby is now a normal kid following a transplant.

    We definitely did not vote for Costco’s chore boy, Governor Inslee. The pandemic gave him a new purpose in Olympia, and he won’t be easy to extract either.

    Texas was a compromise. My wife wasn’t going to return to Florida, and I don’t even look at WA State on a map anymore. We haven’t figured out the next step, but we make sure to do our part and not contribute to the problem.

    3
    1
    2
    8
    2
  7. Greg Norton says:

    We definitely did not vote for Costco’s chore boy, Governor Inslee. The pandemic gave him a new purpose in Olympia, and he won’t be easy to extract either.

    Thumbs down. Is someone a Governor Inslee fan?

    Chore boy. Costco lawyers wrote the liquor deregulation in WA State.

    2
    1
    4
    1
  8. drwilliams says:

    Friend of mine from high school exited Cali after 30 years and moved to Texas, west of Dallas. Spent six years there and did not like the trends. Moved 1900 miles NW.

  9. drwilliams says:

    Veep Thoughts with Kamala Harris

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tr-mfXT-VH0&t=58s

  10. lpdbw says:

    Chore boy. Costco lawyers wrote the liquor deregulation in WA State.

    I won't argue with your premise, but I lived in WA for 9 years (1978-1987), and please remember that WA had the most atrocious liquor laws of any of the 50 states.  You had to go to the state-owned liquor stores, when they decided to keep them open, wherever they decided to put them, with clerks who were basically state drones, and you'd pay the highest liquor prices in the country (higher even than Alaska, where liquor was flown in), and you get the privilege of a "dangers of drinking" brochure with your bottle.

    Let's just say the state was ripe for deregulation.  Massachusetts was even better, and M*ssholes drive to New Hampshire to get their booze.  I've even heard that Utah was better than WA, but I suppose you could make a case that a religious government could be a downer for personal freedoms.

    My Mormon brother-in-law told me this joke:  Why do you always take 2 Mormon friends fishing instead of just one?  Because if you take one, he'll drink all your beer.

  11. drwilliams says:

    Ace of Spades has a good short article on Public Domain Day (January 1)

    http://ace.mu.nu/

    We are now slightly less than two years away from Steamboat Willie.

    Move over Casey Jones.

    My personal prediction is that on January 1, 2024 we will see cartoon obscenity plumbing depths it has never reached before.

    Plan on laying in a supply of popcorn and wings early.

  12. drwilliams says:

    @SteveF

    The Locust Class needs to go back

    Easy to say. Tough to implement without screwing over a lot of people who didn't contribute to the devastation of the communist-dominated parts of the nation.

    Texas could start by making it as hard for relocatees to register to vote as it is to license a relocated vehicle.

    2
    4
    3
  13. dkreck says:

    From yesterday

    The farmers still exist, so…why are there shortages?

    https://www.bakersfield.com/news/farmworkers-growers-dissatisfied-after-overtime-change/article_48675756-7562-11ec-b6a6-7300e290a469.html

    That's $22.50 an hour for a basic farm hand.

    They want to work. The farmer isn't paying.

    Good job California.

  14. EdH says:

    Supply chain from China is getting bad again.

    Yeah, I have ordered two things from Amazon this year, nothing special, the two still haven’t arrived.

  15. EdH says:

    Friend of mine from high school exited Cali after 30 years and moved to Texas, west of Dallas. Spent six years there and did not like the trends. Moved 1900 miles NW.

    The parasites are abandoning their dying host of Cali and are headed for Texas:

    https://www.chron.com/business/technology/article/Facebook-Meta-expanding-in-Texas-16763429.php

  16. Pecancorner says:

    Texas could start by making it as hard for relocatees to register to vote as it is to license a relocated vehicle.

    Agreed.  I often see "conservatives" from California move here and then rant about having to go in person to get their Texas driver's license, and further rant about having to surrender their California DL.  Several work in the tech industry so they naturally want to do everything over the internet out of habit.  They complain that they should be allowed to just get the new Texas DL online and should be allowed to retain their Cali one… why? They never admit why they want that….  

    The reality is, a great many "conservatives" from blue states have lived and worked in liberal environments for so long that they want their own personal easy status-quo to continue, and don't give thought to why that's the worst thing to do.

    4
    5
    1
  17. drwilliams says:

    World Atmospheric CO2, Its 14C Specific Activity, Non-fossil Component, Anthropogenic Fossil Component, and Emissions (1750–2018)

    Skrable, Kenneth; Chabot, George; French, Clayton1

    1University of Massachusetts Lowell, 1 University Avenue, Lowell, MA 01854.

    Health Physics: February 2022 – Volume 122 – Issue 2 – p 291-305

    from the abstract at WUWT:

    These results negate claims that the increase in C(t) since 1800 has been dominated by the increase of the anthropogenic fossil component. We determined that in 2018, atmospheric anthropogenic fossil CO2 represented 23% of the total emissions since 1750 with the remaining 77% in the exchange reservoirs. Our results show that the percentage of the total CO2 due to the use of fossil fuels from 1750 to 2018 increased from 0% in 1750 to 12% in 2018, much too low to be the cause of global warming.

    https://wattsupwiththat.com/2022/01/16/how-much-manmade-co2-is-in-the-atmosphere-really/

    link to full paper here:

    https://journals.lww.com/health-physics/Fulltext/2022/02000/World_Atmospheric_CO2,_Its_14C_Specific_Activity,.2.aspx

    note: I corrected a small typo in the University of Lowell address on WUWT

    For those interested, I recommend reading the wiki article on carbon-14 to refresh your memories.

    The discussion on WUWT is already getting interesting.

  18. MrAtoz says:

    Veep Thoughts with Kamala Harris

    Why plugs picked her we'll never know.

    3
  19. Greg Norton says:

    Chore boy. Costco lawyers wrote the liquor deregulation in WA State.

    I won't argue with your premise, but I lived in WA for 9 years (1978-1987), and please remember that WA had the most atrocious liquor laws of any of the 50 states. 

    I'm not arguing the need for the deregulation, but the new rules are (were?) out there.

    The Temperance movement which resulted in Prohibition had roots in WA State, but, anymore, maintaining state-run liquor retailing, like OR still does, is more about protecting "artisan" manufacturers and distributors than public health concerns.

    Friends in Florida asked me what WA State liquor stores were like pre-deregulation, and I tell them to go watch the visit to the Canadian state-run beer store in “Strange Brew”. The general decor and lighting was identical.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nC6dBsNz0oc

    “12 Yukon Gold”

    “See ya tomorrow.”

    “Ok. Take it easy.”

    Do the math.

  20. Ray Thompson says:

    Why plugs picked her we'll never know.
     

    Plugs McSponge Brain did not pick her, his handlers picked her. They want Kamaltoe to be president. Ride senile Joe’s chariot into office, get rid of doofus in a couple of years, Camaltoe Harris is in office. The camel was not electable on her own. Thus get her in without being elected.

    2
  21. Greg Norton says:

    Plugs McSponge Brain did not pick her, his handlers picked her. They want Kamaltoe to be president. Ride senile Joe’s chariot into office, get rid of doofus in a couple of years, Camaltoe Harris is in office. The camel was not electable on her own. Thus get her in without being elected.

    The Deep State now wants Mayor Pete to replace Kamala.

  22. MrAtoz says:

    Continuing solar experiment:

    I hung my four Jackery 200W Solar Saga panels on the fence last night. 30' 8mm extensions to bring the cables inside the house to connect to the Jackery 2000. I was getting 230W out of 800W, then I wiped down the panels and am now getting 240W at noon in SA. I hung the panels upside down on the fence so I could change their angle with the built in braces. There is also attenuation from the extensions. During the summer I can hit well over 500W, but 240W is more than enough to charge up to 80% in no time. I keep the big Dometic cooler and a device charging rack connected to the *generator*.

  23. Nick Flandrey says:

    The farmers still exist, so…why are there shortages?

    they are being paid to grow feedstock for alcohol for fuel additives instead of food.

    –they had terrible flooding that reduced yields and depleted stored crops (mentioned here at the time as a sign of bad times to come) a couple of years ago

    — it takes a lot of time to make changes to what you're growing, a whole season, possibly a whole year, and not just what you plant, but the tools to maintain and harvest, store and transport.

    –many farmers have become sophisticated money traders.  They have to play the futures markets to hedge their crops anyway….   also they get rent, subsidies, and other incentives that are not related to producing more food.   google cole the cornstar on youtube for the economics and day to day, from a kid who wants to be a farmer more than anything in the world.

    –if it's the wrong time of year, you ain't getting it from locals.  we are very far away from our 'seasonal' eating.  we just bring in whatever we want from wherever.   Some of those places aren't exporting food atm.

    –Cali did their best to wipe out the Imperial Valley, America's veg super-garden…

    — it all moves by truck.  To, from, and in between and there are shortages.

    –the chinese have been buying at higher prices, building up their own stockpiles  — literally a pile of stock,  and farmers sell to the highest bidder.   Growing up in farm country you used to hear the daily farm report on the radio, and in school we heard about how we fed the world, particularly Russia.

    –you ain't seen nothin' yet.   Fertilizer shortages are going to reduce yields.  Price controls will provide negative incentives.  Bankruptcies will create a 'gap year' between productive farm and corporate raider getting production back on line.

    — a big part of  a whole season's production got wiped out at the beginning of the chinkyflu, remember all those animals and veg being buried in ditches?  

     — Bidn blames it on greedy meat packers and middle men.  You can believe that or not, but consolidation in the industry is certainly a bottleneck.

    Our economy is mature and cruising into the endstate.

    The 10 Biggest Industries by Revenue in the US
    Industry
    Revenue for 2022
    1.
    Retirement & Pension Plans in the US
    $1.257.9B
    2.
    Health & Medical Insurance in the US
    $1.145.1B
    3.
    Drug, Cosmetic & Toiletry Wholesaling in the US
    $1.049.9B
    4.
    New Car Dealers in the US
    $978.7B
    5.
    Hospitals in the US
    $968.5B
    6.
    Life Insurance & Annuities in the US
    $886.7B
    7.
    Pharmaceuticals Wholesaling
    $868.8B
    8.
    Public Schools in the US
    $791.0B
    9.
    Supermarkets & Grocery Stores in the US
    $758.4B
    10.
    Commercial Banking in the US
    $703.4B

    The 10 Biggest Industries by Employment in the US
    Industry
    Employment number for 2022
    1.
    Public Schools in the US
    6,646,292
    2.
    Hospitals in the US
    5,161,594
    3.
    Fast Food Restaurants in the US
    4,593,559
    4.
    Office Staffing & Temp Agencies in the US
    3,307,096
    5.
    Single Location Full-Service Restaurants in the US
    3,234,635
    6.
    Colleges & Universities in the US
    3,152,117
    7.
    Professional Employer Organizations in the US
    2,993,445
    8.
    Supermarkets & Grocery Stores in the US
    2,898,770
    9.
    The Retail Market for Jewelry
    2,883,145
    10.
    The Retail Market for Shoes
    2,512,650

    How much of the US economy is agriculture?

    0.6 percent

    Agriculture, food, and related industries contributed $1.109 trillion to the U.S. gross domestic product (GDP) in 2019, a 5.2-percent share. The output of America's farms contributed $136.1 billion of this sum—about 0.6 percent of GDP.Oct 15, 2020

    The British found out how bad an idea it is to import all your food at the beginning of WWII.    The "british farms" series on BBC has a "Wartime farms" series that covers Britian's attempt to rebuild their domestic food production.

    — we get only about half our food grown here.

    Q.    What is the value of U.S. agricultural exports and U.S. agricultural imports?

    A.   In calendar year 2019, U.S. agricultural exports equaled about $136.7 billion, while corresponding imports totaled about $131.0 billion. ERS publishes monthly trade updates that provide up-to-date information on agricultural trade.
    In calendar year 2019, U.S. agricultural exports equaled about $136.7 billion, while corresponding imports totaled about $131.0 billion. ERS publishes monthly trade updates [LINK "trade updates" TO: https://www.ers.usda.gov/data-products/foreign-agricultural-trade-of-the-united-states-fatus/us-agricultural-trade-data-update/} that provide up-to-date information on agricultural trade.
    How important are exports to the U.S. agricultural sector?

    Trade is essential to the U.S. agricultural sector, with agricultural exports accounting for more than 20 percent of the volume of U.S. agricultural production. In recent years, the leading agricultural export products in terms of value have consistently been bulk commodities including soybeans, corn, and wheat. Top U.S. exports of high-value products include feeds and fodder, beef and veal (fresh or frozen), and almonds. State export calculations produced by ERS estimate the volume of agricultural production within each State that contributes to U.S. export sales.

    –a casual look says we export bulk commodities (and only a few) and import a whole lot of stuff.   Details can be found—-  https://www.ers.usda.gov/data-products/foreign-agricultural-trade-of-the-united-states-fatus/fiscal-year/

    —Like a lot of things it's more than one issue.    For differences between the US and other wealthy countries, I'm guessing SCALE plays a major factor.   330M eaters vs 30-80M.   Also, Cali to Mass is the same distance as Spain to Iraq, or France to the middle of Kazakhstan. Chicago to Houston is the same distance as Germany to Morocco,  LA to Florida the same as Germany to Saudi Arabia.  (all roughly)  Just moving food around in the US is a big deal.  The entire UK and Ireland would fit in Cali alone.  The whole of central europe is just the mid western states. 

    https://thetruesize.com

    The logistics chain from producer to wholesaler to processor to manufacturer to retail wholesaler, to stores is very complicated and involves a lot of shipping by truck and rail.  Some of it goes to low labor cost countries like chine and COMES BACK, like chickens and pork.

    And lastly, some places had limited choices all along.   Walmart stores have about 120K SKUs (stock keeping units, or individual stocking items) and that number is DOWN.

    Aldi's existing stores range from 1000 to 2000 square metres and are one-third to one-half the size of Woolworths' and Coles' supermarkets. They carry about 1500 stock keeping units, compared with 25,000 SKUs in a traditional full-service grocery store.Mar 23, 2021

    — other articles put the number of SKUs in an average grocery store at 39K.

    European-style discount grocery stores are also the model for a larger trend in grocery. A defining feature of these discount grocery stores is their small assortment. Most European discounters have 2,000 to 2,500 products, about five times less than a typical U.S. supermarket.

    —granted that is for  Euro stores moving into the US, but I really couldn't get more specific data on Euro stores in situ, only that they were "smaller" and "carried fewer brands".

    –It's certainly easier to keep fewer items in stock than to keep 40K items in stock…

    n

  24. Greg Norton says:

    — we get only about half our food grown here.

    With all of the funny money sloshing around chasing returns, the land is more valuable as stucco shacks and servicing the Brown Truck Store and Foodcourt than farms. That's the big problem right now in Florida and Texas. “Work” from home compounds the demand in temperate areas of the country where freezing daytime highs are rare.

    As I've noted before, the most productive tomato fields on the planet currently sit under the first Amazon warehouse built outside Tampa.

  25. Nick Flandrey says:

    The incredibly fertile black dirt over sand in the areas surrounding where I grew up are mostly covered with suburbs now.   They used to be Dutch farmers growing cabbages, green onions and other local veg.

    n

  26. Nick Flandrey says:

    Two stories I missed during the last week of work and malaise.

    Well worth the time.   I learned several things from Divemedic's post that I didn't know before yesterday.

    https://areaocho.com/norad-alert/

    and peter at brm..

    https://bayourenaissanceman.blogspot.com/2022/01/follow-gold-follow-food-they-tell-same.html

    –I think it's very important to take note of what the 'big boys' are doing.  They are big enough that their actions can precipitate the very thing they anticipate.   There have been stories for the last 5 years about countries repatriating their gold, out of the US.  There is a lot of deliberate movement and preparation, and then the denouements come quickly.

    n

  27. Ray Thompson says:

    Just got into an argument with the owner of a site that used one of my images and removed the copyright watermark. The owner said it was OK because the coach sent them the picture. A commercial site that makes money off their content. Little jerkwad owner said it was OK as the coach sent in the image. I threatened legal action and he got all pissy about it and said it would hurt the kid. I told the owner that by inference it should be OK for another commercial site to use their images, with the watermark removed, without permission if I sent the other site the image.

  28. MrAtoz says:

    https://areaocho.com/norad-alert/

    Perfect opportunity for plugs to saber rattle to distract from his numerous failures as President. He could put the 8th Army on alert in South Korea and ramp up the pucker factor. Beau…Beau…it's for Beau, the war hero. I'm sure plugs doesn't give a shit about our troops, but can use *war hero* Beau to say to them "I know what it is like. Beau…Beau, he died in service to our country". Of course Beau didn't, but plugs lies about his entire life's journey.

    3
    1
  29. Nick Flandrey says:

    Even Disneyworld is putting watermarks across the "SURPRISE" photos from their attractions.   Seems people were just taking a picture of the monitor at the ride exit that shows the picture….

    Fwiw, we usually sign up for the Photopass service.  We don't buy many of the images but you get to look at them online after your trip, and if there is a particularly good one, like a group shot with everyone in it (instead of missing one person holding the camera), we buy it.

    IP theft isn't even theft in most people's eyes.

    And wrt Mickey going out of copyright, I wouldn't bet on it.  Every previous time, it got extended.  and Disney has been distancing themselves from Mickey for a while, just in case.

    n

  30. Ray Thompson says:

    Even Disneyworld is putting watermarks across the "SURPRISE" photos from their attractions

    I watermark everything of mine that I put on the web. Stuff I get from others I leave alone. I am really generous of the use of my images for the kids, their parents and local newspapers. The papers use the images with my permission and I get credit. I draw the line at commercial sites, who use without permission, and remove the watermark.

    The site in question promotes local high school sports, a good thing. Had the site asked I would have sent them a higher quality image, full resolution, with no watermark, and my blessings to use the image. Use without my permission is not cool.

    I have been in a copyright battle before and won. I have educated myself on copyright laws for photographs. I will not let one site start something that may be hard to stop in the future.

  31. Alan says:

    A bit out of date but gives some overall context to our food transportation

    https://kanhaul.com/news/kan-hauls-food-transportation-infographic/

    Also a lot going on in the trucking industry, including drivers sick with Covid

    https://www.vox.com/22841783/truck-drivers-shortage-supply-chain-pandemic

  32. Alan says:

    >> Fwiw, we usually sign up for the Photopass service.  We don't buy many of the images but you get to look at them online after your trip, and if there is a particularly good one, like a group shot with everyone in it (instead of missing one person holding the camera), we buy it.

    IP theft isn't even theft in most people's eyes.

    Can't people just *borrow* the online images?

    2
  33. drwilliams says:

    @Nick

    As noted on AoS:

    However, the longer old nitrate prints remain in storage without any kind of help or restoration, the less usable they'll be when it does come time for them to enter the public domain

    if copyright had remained what it had been before the Sonny Bono Act in 1998, what happened this year on January 1st would have happened in 2001, and we'd be up to 1947 in the public domain. For 21 years, from 1998 to 2019, public domain in the United States was effectively frozen, and we've just simply lost more than we probably would have if anyone could have made some modest dough on what's out there.

    Around 2017-2018, Disney apparently sent lobbyists to Congress to test the waters about advancing copyright once again, and they simply walked away without anything even getting to committee. The efforts of some activists to prevent further copyright extensions was apparently enough, but we're still two years away from Steamboat Willie entering the public domain. Disney always could put in a final push to protect one of its most profitable pieces of intellectual property.

    Someone should make a pre-emptive strike and author an F***theMouse Act to bring the public domain date forward 20 years in one shot. Among other outstanding results, it would take "Song of the South" out of the hands of the Disney censors. Walt Disney spent a lot of time working to ensure that historical regional pronunciation (aka * vernacular) was documented, and the result is certainly no different from recordings held by the Smithsonian and the National Archives, which are themselves under attack from the woke vermin infection.

    *If I used the term appropriate to the time I would be accused of racism. If the current term had been used in 1946 I suspect it would have been considered "fighting words" by the minority in question.

    1
    1
    3
    2
  34. lynn says:

    "The Mandibles: A Family, 2029-2047" by Lionel Shriver
        https://www.amazon.com/MANDIBLES-FAMILY-2029-47_PB-171-POCHE/dp/000756077X/br?tag=ttgnet-20 />

    A standalone, no prequel, no sequel, book about a financial apocalypse in the USA starting in 2029. I read the well printed and well bound 400 page trade paperback published by Harper Perennial in 2017. BTW, this book is labeled as dystopian fiction by Amazon and others. I doubt that there will be any future prequels or sequels for the book as the author does not seem to go that way.

    The book covers four generations of a family in the near future. The family consists of about twenty people of whom I mostly did not like due to their overall craziness and attitudes about life. If there was anyone who came close, it was Florence Mandible who even as a single mother managed to buy a house in East Flatbush, NYC on a low income salary. But even she makes a lot of bad decisions that lead to a tough life. And I mostly liked Enola Mandible who was a successful author living in Europe but evacuated back to the USA due to supposed discrimination in Paris. Plus I liked Jarred Mandible who managed to get his patriarch grandfather to give him the money to buy a small farm in upper state New York.

    The conditions leading up to the beginning of the financial apocalypse in the USA in 2029 had their roots in Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid, basically the Great Society federal and state programs. And in the continual wars and police actions started or participating in by the USA from WWI onward. One might exempt WWII from that list as WWII was supposedly actually good for the economics of the country but I have not researched that accepted fact for truthfulness.

    In 2029, the rest of the world changes from using the USA Dollar as the world reserve currency to the new Bancor, a basket of world currencies. The USA Treasury Bills, of which there are $40 trillion outstanding, immediately double their interest rates in the next sale. The USA President and Congress pass legislation that holding Bancors is illegal for any USA citizen. Under further financial pressure, the USA repudiates the entire $40 trillion debt and starts seizing all the gold across the country from both citizens and businesses. Even gold wedding rings are seized as China has demanded that their tbills be redeemed immediately with non USA Dollars.

    The patriarch of the Mandible family is a 97 year man with a fortune inherited from his grandparents who owned a steel mill. The patriarch has his fortune invested in gold stocks, stocks of gold bullion in central repositories, tbills, and the stock market. With the crash of the stock market, seizure of gold, and repudiation of all tbills, he is wiped out and he and his Alzheimer afflicted second wife move in with his son and his wife. And then the entire family ends up moving in with Florence in her tiny three bedroom house. But that quickly goes away also as the remaining family members are soon homeless and living in a park.

    The author freely acknowledges that in choosing paths for the family and the nation, she always chose the bad results path. She thinks that her book takes an optimistic view of the coming financial apocalypse which I find amazing.

    My rating: 5 out of 5 stars
    Amazon rating: 4.2 out of 5 stars (1,140 ratings)

  35. Nick Flandrey says:

    It won't be used to save old film, it will be used to degrade and debase the last of our culture and childhood innocence.   The counter culturists are salivating at the chance to pervert one of the last unperverted things in western culture.

    These are the same people who celebrated "Piss Christ" as a revolutionary work of art.

    Granted that current disney mgmt is anti- all of their catalog, and half seem to be pedos who can't wait to destroy what the mouse built, it's a symptom of how far the prog rot has invaded the institutions, and should be vilified not celebrated.

    n

    fwiw, if a giant corp like Disney DIDN"T hold the rights to some of this stuff, and have the deep pockets to sock it away and keep it undercover until the mood changes, Song of the South is EXACTLY what would be destroyed.   

    n

    2
    3
    1
  36. Greg Norton says:

    And wrt Mickey going out of copyright, I wouldn't bet on it.  Every previous time, it got extended.  and Disney has been distancing themselves from Mickey for a while, just in case.

    They will protect Mickey. Before the pandemic, Disneyland had embarked on a crash plan to build a Runaway Railway clone on the West Coast. Cheapek has no choice but to finish it.

    I'll bet they back away from Marvel first. The home-grown movies and TV shows are in the tank, with lots of rumors of reshoots on "Ms. Marvel" and "Doctor Strange", and Universal has an iron clad agreement for the characters in theme parks in Florida.

    Let Sony make the movies. The Japanese seem more aware of what will make the fans happy while growing the audience.

    2
    1
  37. Greg Norton says:

    Any bets on when we will see "Ms. Marvel"?

    The Mouse is serious about that mess?

  38. Ray Thompson says:

    Any bets on when we will see "Ms. Marvel"?

    Gender pronoun is too specific. I am expecting trans-gender, non-binary gay female who identifies as female but cross dresses as a male, handicapped, minority, with ADHD, with an artificial vagina and deaf in one ear.

    Called “It Marvel” or “Thing Marvel”. For the woke crowd.

  39. Greg Norton says:

    Gender pronoun is too specific. I am expecting trans-gender, non-binary gay female who identifies as female but cross dresses as a male, handicapped, minority, with ADHD, with an artificial vagina and deaf in one ear.

    Called “It Marvel” or “Thing Marvel”. For the woke crowd.

    Try Muslim.

    Non-woke “Spiderman” seems to have inspired reshoots.

  40. MrAtoz says:

    with an artificial vagina and deaf in one ear.

    Which ear? It matters to the QWERTYs.

    3
  41. Robert "Bob" Sprowl says:

    Somebody sent me two Wifi Panorama Smart cameras.  They seem to require that you install an app on my android phone using that square QR code thingy that I've never done before (probably requires a download for it also.)  The font for the instructions is so small I can't read them even with a magnifying glass.  

    When I powered a camera it talked to me but I'm very hard of hearing and have absolutely no idea what it said.  

    Is it possible to use these cameras with my wifi from my computer?  If not what are they good for?  No way am I going to give someone one unknown to me access to a camera via the cloud.  

  42. SteveF says:

    Bob Sprowl, we've gotten half a dozen camera systems in the past two or three years. (Because my wife's on a customer test program or something. She gets products in, assembles if needed (which usually means she nags me into doing it), plays with it for a while, and then writes up a review on ease of setup, usefulness, features, build quality, the manual, and what-not (which often means she nags me into writing it).) Every single system needed installation of an app on an Android or iOS phone for full access to features and in most cases in order to configure. Every single system needed internet access for full access to features.

  43. Nick Flandrey says:

    @bob, your normal camera app on your phone should read the qr code and offer to go to the web site if that is what it is.  For some, it's just a mac address or some other way for the installer app to find the device on your local network regardless of IP addresses after you've installed their app.

    Many of the cheap cams on the market only work thru the "cloud", ie. someone elses computers.   

    If there is a brand name and part number or model, post it and I'll look. 

    The one I get googling the exact phrase you used looks like a light bulb..

    n

  44. Robert "Bob" Sprowl says:

    I tried to use the QR code reader.  I installed one.  When I tried to read the code on the instructions my phone started to install an app that didn't look like the name I was expecting.  I stopped it and tried again.  I got a different app, again with a name I didn't recognize.  WTF.  I deleted the code reader.  

    I don't need these cameras to talk to my phone.

    I'll get some other system to watch my front porch via my computer.

  45. lynn says:

    "The Mandibles: A Family, 2029-2047" by Lionel Shriver
        https://www.amazon.com/MANDIBLES-FAMILY-2029-47_PB-171-POCHE/dp/000756077X/br?tag=ttgnet-20 />

    A standalone, no prequel, no sequel, book about a financial apocalypse in the USA starting in 2029. I read the well printed and well bound 400 page trade paperback published by Harper Perennial in 2017. BTW, this book is labeled as dystopian fiction by Amazon and others. I doubt that there will be any future prequels or sequels for the book as the author does not seem to go that way.

    I forgot one thing that just blew me away. By 2047, the government required all workers to have a chip embedded at the base of their skull that reported all income and expenditures instantly. The chip reported all data to the government computers using satellites which was immediately taxed using government based checking accounts. No private banks allowed.

    Starlink anyone ?

  46. Robert "Bob" Sprowl says:

    Wifi Panorma Camera (WiFi Smart Camera) model XHW-5  2Mp APP: YCC365

  47. Greg Norton says:

    CVS needed all day to fill a prescription for seven Zithromax pills. A "Z pack".

    Script called in around noon. Still not done when I went to get it at 5 PM.

    It still took the techs another hour to count out seven pills.

  48. Nick Flandrey says:

    @bob, there is a youtube that looks like it covers that cam

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yRXMCA4L99w

    They have an app installed before scanning…

    It looks like sketchy chinese stuff to me.  Who knows what it will do to your network.

    n

  49. Nick Flandrey says:

    https://www.zerohedge.com/personal-finance/should-you-move-while-you-can-or-when-you-must

    —you need to go when the writing is on the wall, but the sentence isn't yet complete.  Take 'white flight' as an example.  You leave it too long, and you can't get enough for your house to buy elsewhere, so you are stuck.  That's how you find old grannies living in fear in the middle of the block in the barrio, or the ghetto.

    I would def like to be further out from Houston proper.   At a minimum, I'd like to have somewhere to go, hence the continued search for a 'lake house'.  

    n

  50. lynn says:

    "are you just gonna execute her ?"

    "I would't call it execution, more like retribution, she killed my daddy"

    "it was what you want'd to do, besides the gun thug behind the tree killed your daddy and I got him"

    "are you gonna split hairs with me ?"

    Justified, s2e1

  51. drwilliams says:

    @Nick

    "fwiw, if a giant corp like Disney DIDN"T hold the rights to some of this stuff, and have the deep pockets to sock it away and keep it undercover until the mood changes, Song of the South is EXACTLY what would be destroyed. "

    The full theatrical release of Song of the South has been widely distributed to the rest of the world. The film was distributed in Japan on VHS tape and LaserDisc, and is now out of copyright there. When the copyright lapses in the U.S, I have no doubt that it will quickly be available. Likewise, I have no doubt that a few minutes on the Gaza Strip would yield a shop with a copy. The Disney-licensed copies would be importable under the FSD (and are intermittently avaiable on ebay for exorbitant prices), but more recent copies would conceivably be subject to confiscation by U.S. Customs.

    Neither the U.S federal government, U.S. state governments, nor any private U.S. company has ever been successful in keeping any work out of the hands of the public. I have a number of Taiwanese pirate editions (unlicensed copies) of books in my collection, as well as several copies of the Tarzan pastiches that were the subject of a lawsuit in the 1960's.

    All of those entities have, however, been successful in limiting the public's access. As always, the best defense is to let the light in–make the stuff available so people can make their own evaluations.

  52. lynn says:

    https://www.zerohedge.com/personal-finance/should-you-move-while-you-can-or-when-you-must

    —you need to go when the writing is on the wall, but the sentence isn't yet complete.  Take 'white flight' as an example.  You leave it too long, and you can't get enough for your house to buy elsewhere, so you are stuck.  That's how you find old grannies living in fear in the middle of the block in the barrio, or the ghetto.

    I would def like to be further out from Houston proper.   At a minimum, I'd like to have somewhere to go, hence the continued search for a 'lake house'.  

    Have you read this book ?  "The Dirt-Cheap Survival Retreat: One Man's Solution"

        https://www.amazon.com/Dirt-Cheap-Survival-Retreat-Mans-Solution/dp/1983810592//p?tag=ttgnet-20

       

  53. drwilliams says:

    Convicted sex-trafficker Ghislaine Maxwell will no longer fight to protect the identity of eight johns who allegedly had sex with young women she and her billionaire pedophile pal Jeffrey Epstein procured for them.

    https://nypost.com/2022/01/15/ghislaine-maxwell-will-no-longer-fight-to-keep-names-of-8-john-does-secret/

    Took Perkins Coie a long time to find volunteer fall guys to match the phony records.

  54. drwilliams says:

    In other news, the H&I Channel (heroes and Icons) has reversed the recent lineup change, re-reshuffling the order that they broadcast Star Trek series six days a weeks.

    As we mentioned here on Oct 13, H&I took the Original Series out of the rotation, sliding Walker Texas Ranger into the 6PM ET/7PM CT slot and leaving NexGen to kick off the Star Trek lineup.

    Now the Original series is back, and there is no discussion about the reversal online that I have seen. The wiki entry for H&I has an unreferenced and erroneous mention of the change, but nothing on the un-change.

    There are a couple of ways to look at it. One is that Walker wasn't a good lead-in the the Star Trek lineup. If this were true, it would seem that bringing STNG and the rest forward one slot might fix the problem.

    Another is that STNG wasn't strong enough to lead the ST lineup, which would argue for the Original Series being brought back, even though the episode count is meager from three broadcast seasons.

    Be interesting to have a complete look at ratings numbers.

  55. Ray Thompson says:

    Wife was experiencing chest pains so we went to the ER by vehicle on snowy roads. Not too bad. ER triage took an EKG and found nothing, chest X-Ray was not significant. So we sat for a couple of hours with no progress or movement by the ER. By that time the chest pains had been gone for an hour so we departed. If the pains return we will travel by ambulance as those get seen sooner.

    Power went out after we left and was out for three hours. UPS lasted with just the cable modem and router for that amount of time but it was on its last few watts. UPS for the cable amp was still going strong. UPS for the TV and cable box was fine as the TV was turned off and the cable box does not use much.

    Garage door still opened as it has battery backup. Operates much slower, but operates. No FLASHLIGHTS in the garage so I had to use my keychain FLASHLIGHT to find other FLASHLIGHTS in the house. Now I need to reset several clocks.

    We got about an inch of snow over the course of the day. Might get another 0.5 inches. Driving tomorrow will be fun as I have to go to a VA examination for increased hearing loss. I have already had my PTSD and knee examination. Apparently PTSD is fairly easy to get for Vietnam era veterans due to the abuse received from the public. I know I was called "baby killer" and spit on while in airports. Had to fly in uniform to get 1/2 price airfare and tolerate the abuse.

    I was traveling by bus from Las Vegas to Victorville. Couple of guys were on the bus giving me a hard time. Calling me names, taunting me, generally being jerks. So I got up and told them I could kill them six different ways with my bare hands and four of those methods were very painful. I asked which one wanted to be first. They shut up.

    Of course the VA may disagree and just say I am an anal orifice by nature. I have to try. If the VA says no I am not worse off than not trying.

    6
    1
  56. Alan says:

    >> CVS needed all day to fill a prescription for seven Zithromax pills. A "Z pack".

    Script called in around noon. Still not done when I went to get it at 5 PM.

    It still took the techs another hour to count out seven pills.

    Next time get a five day scrip, the counting will be easier.

    Rx service at our CVS has gone south as well, even before the Omicron surge. I remember when the doctor sending in a scrip marked as STAT would result in a text from CVS saying the Rx was ready while I was still driving home from the doctor's office. Now you have to chase them by phone for anything urgent, if someone picks up the phone. And twice recently they've refused to honor GoodRx prices. Took both to Costco with no issue.

    And there's this: https://nypost.com/2022/01/14/omicron-forces-cvs-walgreens-to-temporarily-shutter-stores/

  57. Nightraker says:

    More from Charles Hugh Smith:

    https://www.oftwominds.com/blogjun08/survival6-08.html

    Meatspace stackin'!

    2
  58. Alan says:

    >> —you need to go when the writing is on the wall, but the sentence isn't yet complete.

    Done, same for my older son, still chipping away at my younger son to get the heck out of NYFC.

    Best thing we could have done. Older son and wife's son are both within driving distance via secondary roads if necessary.

  59. Greg Norton says:

    There are a couple of ways to look at it. One is that Walker wasn't a good lead-in the the Star Trek lineup. If this were true, it would seem that bringing STNG and the rest forward one slot might fix the problem.

    Paramount could have insisted on the temporary schedule change to move "Walker, Texas Ranger" DVD sets this Christmas. $150. The change seemed to coincide with a resurfacing of J. Michael Straczynski in Hollywood this Fall, and the studio may have wanted to take advantage of new interest in his work, including "Walker".

    The film rotation of "Svengoolie" is often at the mercy of terms of the contracts Weigel signs to get the rights to broadcast the movies.

  60. Robert "Bob" Sprowl says:

    Thanks for the help.  I'm going to pass on these.

    Bob

  61. Alan says:

    Our *esteemed* Sturgeon General on CNN this morning obviously has something to hide…

    "Pressed on the number of cases in the country that are breakthrough infections, Murthy declined to provide figures but argued that the “most important job of vaccines is to save your life and keep you out of the hospital.”

    2
    1
  62. nick flandrey says:

    Watched the new version of Clifford the Big Red Dog tonight because youngest was vibrating with anticipation.  It's copyright  2021 and must have just wrapped principal filming in NYC just before covid hit.  Lot of CGI as you might imagine, so a year in post or more makes sense.

    5 credited writers.

    There is no mention of the dad.  Emily Elizabeth is bullied at her "rich kids' school" in NYC because she's on a scholarship.  Mom is a paralegal, but they rent a 2500 sqft apartment near Central Park.   Wacky cast of brown people and stereotypical immigrants abounds.   Villain is a white male.  Hero is a suave chinese billionaire.     The denouement involves a five minute anti-bullying message, and some grrl power.

    Basically they ruined it.   Even John Cleese couldn't ever quite get comfortable in his role (as the magical source for Clifford).

    Lots of chinese surnames in the production credits.

    And NYC has never looked so bright and sparkly, or had streets so empty.  Weird.

    n

  63. nick flandrey says:

    I love it that FauxXi's financials are out there.  Maybe now some of the self dealing will get wider traction.    There've been articles about the rest of the congress getting rich on stock trades too.  Crenshaw made more than Pelosi last year.  Maybe that explains some of his recent comments.

    n

  64. lynn says:

    "12 Signs You Have a Fake N95, KN95, or KF94 Mask"

        https://www.nytimes.com/wirecutter/blog/12-signs-you-have-a-fake-n95-kn95-or-kf94-mask/

    "Whether it’s an imposter mask claiming to be from an established brand or a newcomer purporting to be highly protective, the problem is a matter of consistency. In September 2020, ECRI (a nonprofit that advises hospitals and health-care agencies on product safety) reported that 60% to 70% of KN95s it tested did not filter the 95% of particles that they promised to. Federal agencies seized a total of 21.2 million fake N95s that year, and the problem carried over well into 2021. Last May, investigators confiscated 2 million fake masks purchased and used by unsuspecting hospitals in Portland, Maine."

  65. SteveF says:

    12 Signs You Have a Fake N95, KN95, or KF94 Mask

    "It's made in China" wasn't on the list.

    1

Comments are closed.