Fri. Aug. 27, 2021 – early to rise…

By on August 27th, 2021 in ebay, march to war, prepping, WuFlu

Hot and humid. Rain in the forecast. Certainly that was true for yesterday. Hot and hot, with humidity and rain in various places throughout the day.

Did my errands, including cutting my hair. I don’t know if I’m any better at it, but I’m quicker. Looks good OK from the front :-). Loaded a bunch of stuff for my convention and swapmeet.

Truck is full.

After I get the girls out of the house to school, I’ll be finishing the load, getting ice for the water and drinks, and heading to a hotel to help with setup. Then I’ll help other folks get loaded in, and maybe sell some early bird stuff.

Before I can do that though, I need to mount the cargo platform on the hitch. I can’t fit 3 coolers in the truck. And I had to replace the broken hinges on one cooler. I have a small bucket full of cooler repair parts. Drives me nuts that people just throw them out when the hinges, drain, or handle break. Saves me money to scoop them up though, so I shouldn’t complain. Saves money and time to have the repair parts standing by.

Yep, I’ve got a bunch of coleman coolers. Igloo too. Different sizes, styles, and ages, but enough to keep at least one freezer’s worth of stuff cold temporarily. I mostly use them for icewater and soda at gatherings. Speaking of coolers, I picked up another 12v travel cooler/fridge. If you have meds that need refrigeration, get one of the small coolers so you can run it off a car battery if needed. (or solar longer term) They are pricey new, but are common at estate sales. I grabbed one at the goodwill outlet this time. I think I’m up to four? Maybe 5 and I’ve got one or two of the bigger ones too.

Coolers are very ‘dual use’. You can claim camping use, or sodas for youth sports, or just cold drinks at a party, but you and I know they are preps. Fire pits, gear for open fire cooking, cast iron cookware– also stealth preps. Backpacking water filters, kamp toilets, gas stoves and lanterns, even freeze dried foods are solid preps that you can get a lot of other use out of. I’ve got a lot of ‘camping stuff’ even though we never go. “oh I bought that when the kids were little, but we never seemed to find the time.” ” Oh, we used to go more often but now we’re so busy.” Anyone who sees it doesn’t have to think “prepper”.

If stuff ends up in short supply, you might want innocuous reasons for all the gear and preps in your storage area. I hope it doesn’t come to that, but hope isn’t a prep.

So keep stacking, keep building networks, and keep working to improve your position.

nick

62 Comments and discussion on "Fri. Aug. 27, 2021 – early to rise…"

  1. Greg Norton says:

    “Supreme Court Strikes Down Biden Eviction Moratorium”

    Kavanaugh and Roberts couldn’t ignore the obvious. The “optics” will still be bad.

    LA realtors this time.

  2. pecancorner says:

    Based on their statements and prior reporting, the FDA’s main concern is overdosing due to vet meds being labeled for large animals.

    Some of the stuff has more than Ivermectin. For example, you probably do not have liver flukes.
    This seems to be a good explanation: https://www.barnhardt.biz/ivermectin/

    What the media and talking heads are clueless about is that people who raise large animals have always used veterinary meds to treat themselves and their families for garden-variety ailments – of which, on the farm, there are a great many. They have it on hand, they understand the illness, and they are accustomed to calculating dosages by weight. So they’ve probably already dosed themselves over the years with Ivermectin for its usual purposes. And they probably already knew from experience with the animals that it works real well against some viruses.

    Even in the pets world, lots and lots of people have called their vets for a prescription, antibiotics or some such, to treat a 175 lb dog… oh not Prissy, but a “new dog” they just adopted.

     

  3. Nick Flandrey says:

    77F and 89%RH this morning at 6am.

    https://www.thegatewaypundit.com/2021/08/kill-list-biden-regime-provided-taliban-names-americans-afghan-allies/

    U.S. officials in Kabul gave the Taliban a list of names of American citizens, green card holders and Afghan allies to grant entry into the militant-controlled outer perimeter of the city’s airport

    “Basically, they just put all those Afghans on a kill list,” said one defense official, who like others spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss a sensitive topic. “It’s just appalling and shocking and makes you feel unclean.”

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  4. pecancorner says:

    . … You can claim camping use, or sodas for youth sports, or just cold drinks at a party, but you and I know they are preps. Fire pits, gear for open fire cooking, cast iron cookware– also stealth preps. Backpacking water filters, kamp toilets, gas stoves and lanterns, even freeze dried foods are solid preps that you can get a lot of other use out of. I’ve got a lot of ‘camping stuff’ even though we never go. “oh I bought that when the kids were little, but we never seemed to find the time.” ” Oh, we used to go more often but now we’re so busy.” Anyone who sees it doesn’t have to think “prepper”.

    If stuff ends up in short supply, you might want innocuous reasons for all the gear and preps in your storage area.

    Really good points.    Easy to explain away for those folks with annoying relatives or nosy-Parker neighbors.

    Good luck and have fun at your convention, Nick.

  5. pecancorner says:

    Finally, someone answers the question.

    Who Are the Americans Stuck in Afghanistan?

  6. Nick Flandrey says:

    https://www.americanpartisan.org/2021/08/ivermectin-treatment-protocols/

    –I link purely for informational and entertainment purposes. I don’t know anything about the bona fides of the sites involved. If you are sick, see a Dr. We’re grid up. Take advantage of that.

    If we were grid down, or the security situation was really bad, or all the RNs walked to avoid the jab and Urban Memorial Hospital looks like a Korean War MASH unit, or a third world VD clinic, for Pete’s sake, do the math properly. Perhaps even double check against someone else’s math….

    n

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  7. Greg Norton says:

    Even in the pets world, lots and lots of people have called their vets for a prescription, antibiotics or some such, to treat a 175 lb dog… oh not Prissy, but a “new dog” they just adopted.

    Our vet has a new-ish sign up stating that they must see the animal at least once to establish the patient relationship before calling in any prescriptions.

    The problem the FDA will face with any common drug they approve to treat Covid — or even look the other way — without proven 100% efficacy is that Americans will make it unobtainium and quickly exhaust the world supply, whether stockpiling for personal use “just in case” or arbitrage. Further studies would be impossible, and, worse, any patients depending on the meds to live, such as Lupus patients taking Hydroxychloroquine would face a dire situation.

  8. ech says:

    Note that the second letter is the extension of the Emergency Use Authorization, which seems a strange thing to do if the vaccine has been “fully approved”.

    There are several facets to this. I’ve read the FDA letter. I’m not sure the author at American Thinker has.

    First, they did approve the Pfizer drug “Comirnaty” for use in everyone age 16 and old. Full stop. It’s completely approved under the FDA regulations. Looking for followup data on side effects is not uncommon in an approval. To say that it isn’t approved is a misunderstanding or an intentional misstatement.

    Second, the EUA was extended so that existing stocks of the vaccine can continue to be used. Without that, all the existing vaccine would have become useless when the previous EUA ran out. Why is the EUA extended if the drug is approved, you ask? Because the FDA approval only applies if the drug is properly labeled as “Comirnaty” and has the FDA-approved package insert with the vials. As the FDA letter says, the two drugs, “Comirnaty” and “Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccine” are identical in content and interchangeable in use. (From the letter: “The licensed vaccine has the same formulation as the EUA-authorized vaccine and the products can be used interchangeably to provide the vaccination series without presenting any safety or effectiveness concerns. The products are legally distinct with certain differences that do not impact safety or effectiveness.“)

    Third, the EUA for the existing vaccines for children 12 to 15 was extended and Comirnaty added to it. Pfizer has been preparing a full approval package for children 12 to 15.

    Fourth, the FDA reiterated that it has not authorized use of the vaccine in those under 12. Pfizer is doing trials in those under 12.

    Fifth, the liability issue is incorrect. “The drug-manufacturers were granted immunity from liability for the drugs produced under the EUAs.  The granting of the license re-applies the customary liability for injury and death caused by the product. ” Congress passed a law called the PREP Act (and later amendments) that allows HHS Secretary to declare a pandemic emergency and to shield manufacturers and providers of pandemic medical supplies (including drugs and vaccines) from liability during the emergency. Such a declaration was made in March, 2020 and has been extended as each 90 day period expired. A separate law extended that protection to COVID items (and treatments not included in PREP) until 2024 or the emergency is ended. So, the immunity issue is a red herring.

    Finally, the name issue. “COMIRNATY seems like an unusual name for anything, much less a cutting-edge-technology gene therapy. ” Grasping at straws much? There is a procedure used by an independent committee to come up with the generic names for drugs (i.e. Certirizine for Zyrtec). The procedure used by Pfizer for the brand name is here: https://www.pfizer.com/news/hot-topics/part_2_what_s_in_a_brand_name_how_drugs_get_their_names

    In short, another “motte and bailey” by the anti-vaxxers.

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  9. Greg Norton says:

    In short, another “motte and bailey” by the anti-vaxxers.

    Both sides are playing with numbers and parsing words very fine right now. The real ugly will start after Labor Day, when the C-suite and HR departments return from their beach vacations and start making decisions about how much they have to kow-tow to the visibly flailing Biden Administration with regard to vaccine mandates.

    No one in Corporate America is going to go along with a President headed out the door, but nobody has the answer with regard to “What’s next?”

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  10. Mark W says:

    @ech is right based on my reading of the FDA docs I found in a quick link-following spree. Comirnaty is the new brand name for the Pfizer-Biontech vax. Comirnaty is approved and the EUA is extended on existing Pfizer-Biontech batches.

    I suspect some of the FUD is deliberate, but also, the FDA docs are written by lawyers and are difficult to decipher.

  11. Ray Thompson says:

    Therapy really hurt this morning. I still have pain, mild, but still there. Makes sleeping difficult. Asked the doctor, well his staff, to see if he can prescribe some medication for pain, non narcotic, that can help me sleep. Knee is still noticeably warm which indicates still healing. Intertubes indicate at least 12 weeks, I am on week 5.

  12. MrAtoz says:

    Hang in there, Mr. Ray. That knee will heal and you’ll be back to kickin’ people to the curb in no time!

  13. drwilliams says:

    @ech

    So what is your explanation for:

    1) omission of links to the docs on the FDA announcements page

    2) absence of any discussion as to the months of non-approved EUA vaccine in the pipeline

    The discussion here and elsewhere has been that the absence of FDA approval has been the only thing holding up employer mandates. The FDA statement combined with the media Coverage leads to the inescapable conclusion that these things have been crafted to deliberately deceive the public

     

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  14. Chad says:

    Therapy really hurt this morning. I still have pain, mild, but still there. Makes sleeping difficult. Asked the doctor, well his staff, to see if he can prescribe some medication for pain, non narcotic, that can help me sleep. Knee is still noticeably warm which indicates still healing. Intertubes indicate at least 12 weeks, I am on week 5.

    I recommend switching to a gluten free diet, putting some essential oils in a diffuser every night, and rubbing a little CBD oil into the joint every morning. That should have you 100% in a day or two.

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  15. drwilliams says:

    I tried earlier to repost Nick’s link to the Israeli study announced yesterday along with some comments. Despite multiple edits, I couldn’t get past ISE hell.

    The most important comment is this: Any mandate for vaccination that does not exempt people who have had the virus is going to be successfully challenged in the courts.

    Another comment is that if mandates are predicated on an approved vaccine, any attempt to force employee vaccinations before the formally approved vaccine is available will be similarly challenged.

    If liability is indeed a “red bailey” or whatever, then there is an explanation for the FDA not seeking approval from Congress to “approve” the existing stocks and temove the objection.

    And it needs to be more convincing than “the vials don’t have the right labels and the insert isn’t in the package”. I can understand why the same fools that laid the foundation for vaccine resistance by claiming that Trump could not deliver the vaccine in record time might think that adding a slip of paper and restickering the vials might require five years after multiple rounds of bidding, but most people know horsepucky when they smell it.

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  16. SteveF says:

    Chad, you forgot to mention that Ray should place crystals around his bed at locations corresponding to chakra points.

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  17. Ray Thompson says:

    Ray should place crystals around his bed

    I tried humming Gregorian Chants and hired a witch doctor. Does that count?

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  18. SteveF says:

    Only if the witch doctor told you to put the lime in the coconut.

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  19. ech says:

    @ech

    So what is your explanation for:

    1) omission of links to the docs on the FDA announcements page

    The press release, near the bottom, has a link to the page below, which has the approval letter, package insert, and more. So, it was available. Just had to click a link, which I guess was too hard for some.
    https://www.fda.gov/emergency-preparedness-and-response/coronavirus-disease-2019-covid-19/comirnaty-and-pfizer-biontech-covid-19-vaccine

    2) absence of any discussion as to the months of non-approved EUA vaccine in the pipeline

    The discussion here and elsewhere has been that the absence of FDA approval has been the only thing holding up employer mandates. The FDA statement combined with the media Coverage leads to the inescapable conclusion that these things have been crafted to deliberately deceive the public

    No, it’s being distorted by some with agendas.

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  20. Ray Thompson says:

    Only if the witch doctor told you to put the lime in the coconut.

    Silly you. This is East Tennessee. All he knew was “put the shine in the mason jar”.

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  21. ech says:

    And it needs to be more convincing than “the vials don’t have the right labels and the insert isn’t in the package”.

    The label and insert are required by law and regulation for FDA approved drugs. They don’t have any choice. All FDA-approved drugs have to have an NDC number on the packaging, and placed on pill bottles when dispensed out of the initial package. So, I picked up a prescription today that has the NDC code on it. There are other legal issues associated with the drug being FDA approved vs. EUA status and my example was not exhaustive, because IANAL.

     

  22. Mark W says:

    The press release, near the bottom, has a link to the page below, which has the approval letter, package insert, and more. So, it was available. Just had to click a link, which I guess was too hard for some.

    That’s how I found the (obtuse) explanation of the reason for the continuing EUA and the approval of Comirnaty.

    https://www.fda.gov/media/150386/download

    The name change has been used by some to claim that the Pfizer-Biontech vax was not approved, but it has been, under a different name.

    There are plenty of reasons to be cautious. This isn’t one of them.

     

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  23. ~jim says:

    I’m getting old(er) and I have a beautiful Japanese chef’s knife which I bought about 25 years ago. It’s the right length, it’s the right weight, it balances perfectly in my hand, and because it’s carbon steel it takes an edge like nobody’s business.

    I’ve been keeping it sharp with a Lansky kit, but the process is laborious and so most of the time the knife is never as sharp as I’d like.

    But because it’s rather soft carbon steel I’ve been cautious about overdoing it so I don’t whittle down to nothing.

    Well, I realized a couple days ago that’s just stupid because the knife will outlive me and so I ordered a diamond coated steel from Amazon. Actually, I ordered two: #800 grit and #1200 grit. I don’t know which will work better but I’m looking forward to finding out, as well as having a razor sharp knife every time I go to slice a tomato.

    Just thought I would pass that insight along. Life is too short to sacrifice the pleasure of a really sharp knife.

     

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  24. Greg Norton says:

    The name change has been used by some to claim that the Pfizer-Biontech vax was not approved, but it has been, under a different name.

    There are plenty of reasons to be cautious. This isn’t one of them.

    The name change prevents grey market reselling of vaccine doses already paid for by the government.

    Private clinics can buy and charge for vaccination of the name brand, but charging for the EUA doses would be fraud.

    Plus Pfizer can now break out the hookers and steaks, like the marketing of the sketchy Alzheimers drug.

  25. Mark W says:

    Hookers and steaks is small-time for the amount of money generated by these vaxes.

  26. RickH says:

    Speaking of knives – what mid-priced knife set would you recommend? Should contain the usual basic knives used in food prep, plus eight steak-type knives, and a wood block for storage.

    And what blade material is best at keeping a sharp edge under normal but sometimes-not-careful usage, including dishwasher cleaning? (Although I do have an electric knife-sharpening device that does coarse and fine sharpening with the proper angle.)

  27. ~jim says:

    Speaking of knives – what mid-priced knife set would you recommend?

    Probably Henkel’s. I’ve never bought a set, but when my roomie wouldn’t take care of my carbon steel I bought him a nice stainless steel chef’s knife he could abuse all by himself.

    Come to think of it, back in the Cretaceous era I bought one for myself when I opened a shish kebab stand and had to prep lots of stuff. Nice knives. I’d probably still have it if it hadn’t been, ahem, nicked.

  28. Greg Norton says:

    Hookers and steaks is small-time for the amount of money generated by these vaxes. 

    Nah, I’m talking about Bern’s in Tampa or places in New York where a tab for 20 could easily be $10,000 due to the wine.

    The last time we went to an old school marketing event at Bern’s, some of the doctors got into the special section of the alcohol list, featuring items like amaretto brought up from a Galleon wreck in the Gulf. $200/ounce IIRC.

    The ex-stripper (obvious) drug company rep did intervene when the doctors started eyeing a $10,000 bottle of wine from the basement of a chateau in france dating back to the end of WWII.

    I drank Coke.

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  29. Greg Norton says:

    Probably Henkel’s. I’ve never bought a set, but when my roomie wouldn’t take care of my carbon steel I bought him a nice stainless steel chef’s knife he could abuse all by himself.

    IIRC, Henkel’s had some kind of falling out with Amazon, documented in one of the many books covering The Legend of Jeff (TM). I believe some caution is necessary when buying their knives on Big River.

    And MacKenzie drove the Bronco, all through the day and night …

    Puget Sound shouldn’t lack for Henkels dealers even if you have to go into Downtown Seattle. I’ll bet they even have a store in the fancy lad shopping near UW to take advantage of Canadians looking for a break on the GST.

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  30. ech says:

    Speaking of knives – what mid-priced knife set would you recommend?

    Go to your local restaurant supply house and price knives there. You can find good deals on knives, cookware, etc.  I got my offset serrated knife there. Not expensive, can go in the dishwasher if I really wanted to do that.

     

  31. ech says:

    You only need a few knives:
    – a chef’s knife or two (one large, one small)
    – a paring knife
    – a boning knife
    – an offset serrated (for bread and fragile things like tomatoes)
    – a Santoku is a nice add on

    Most good knife manufacturers strongly advise against dishwashing. Some can’t be put in the dishwasher at all. Consider getting the knives a la carte and buying a separate set of steak knives.

  32. Ray Thompson says:

    Really ticked off. Truck is back in the hospital. Same issue, brakes dragging. This time it is the left front. When I got to the dealer and pulled into the service area the brakes were smoking. Only 137 miles since the dealer “fixed” the brakes. I suspect new calipers on the front, new rotors, new pads, possible new bearings, and new hoses. Both sides. The brake rotor was over 700 degrees when I arrived at the dealer. That destroys a lot of stuff. The dealer has stated they will make it right. I expect no labor charge and dealer cost or less on parts. Even no charge for anything would not be out of line in my opinion.

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  33. ~jim says:

    Go to your local restaurant supply house and price knives there.

    That’s probably a really good idea. There’s some manufacturer, I think the name starts with an r (Russell?), who makes indestructible chefs’ knives with a white handle. They will know what you’re talking about. Butchers use them, too. And get a steel, like they do. You won’t need a serrated knife for tomatoes if your knife is sharp.

    Gerber makes beautiful sets of steak knives. Bet you can find something unused on eBay which you can probably give to your kids. You won’t want to use them on nice china though.

    Personally, I never got the hang of a santoku knife. And the only serrated knife I own is for bread.

    ***

    Remember WinRAR? The Android app is just as easy to use. Just now I happily paid the $0.99 to dismiss the nag screen. I would have paid three or four times that.

  34. drwilliams says:

    re:knives

    @~Jim

    Henkels is a good recommendation. Wusthof is on a par. A caveat for both is that they have Balkanized the market. No more low, middle and high-end, there are celebrity endorsements, four or five handle materials, the alloy de jure, Japanese this-that-the-other, etc.

    Then you get into the truly high-end Swedish meteor steel…

    I saw some Sabatier in an estate sale last year. Name only–total crap.

    With regard to steels, the traditional steel does not sharpen, it aligns the edge. I’d suggest using the traditional version after every use, and a 4000-grit to touch up between sharpenings.

    And then there’s always Ginsu…

    ADDED: I went to the estate sale of a well-known professor of metallurgy a few years ago. I wanted his technical library, but it was not available. He had a well-appointed kitchen, so I thought I would add to my knife collection. He had some great knives that had been mistreated and beat to shiite. Couldn’t have been much worse if he had used them to chop sections out of bolts to mount and polish. I bought two 12″ German knives and spent hours refining them by hand. One has a 1/4″ crack near the bolster that is “just a feature, not a defect” at this point.

    @RickH
    A dishwasher will destroy the edge on a good knife as fast as chopping on a granite surface plate. Serrated blade steak knives with dishwasher-safe handles are about as far as I would go.

  35. ~jim says:

    I saw some Sabatier in an estate sale last year. Name only–total crap.

    You’d have to pry my Sabatier 4″ paring knife out of my cold dead hands! I’ve had that for a coon’s age, too. I got suckered on a phony buying one for a friend, too. We all know where that came from!

    With regard to steels, the traditional steel does not sharpen, it aligns the edge. I’d suggest using the traditional version after every use, and a 4000-grit to touch up between sharpenings.

    #4000? I really don’t know anything about grit specs, but that sounds leather strop fine. I’m not going to get that fancy, but I do want to use a steel whenever I lose the scalpel sharp edge.  I’m going to play around with the #800 and #1200 diamond (not traditional) steels when I get them. Will let you know.

    *****

    I can’t seem to set Amazon Music as my default music player under Android 10. I hate Spotify and Pandora. Any wild guesses? I’ve Googled without much luck.

  36. drwilliams says:

    @~Jim

    ” There’s some manufacturer, I think the name starts with an r (Russell?)”

    A.G. Russell?

    One of the best ways to learn about knives is to use them. Find a local cooking school that has been around for a while and chances are you can take a class and get your hands on a number of “working knives” and get some opinions from professionals.

  37. ~jim says:

    One has a 1/4″ crack near the bolster that is “just a feature, not a defect” at this point.

    I’ve got a Herder I bought in Munich about 10 years ago with a walnut handle slightly separating (1/16″) from the rivets.

    https://www.windmuehlenmesser.de/en/product/series-1922-cooking-knife-large-plum-wood/

    It will outlive me for sure but I keep thinking I should carefully dry it out, file out the gap ever so slightly, and fill it with epoxy. Not a defect at this point, either. How do you plan to proceed?

  38. Nick Flandrey says:

    Home from my show. Good day. Sold some stuff, including stuff I’d forgotten I had that I grabbed at the last minute. Price was good for a bunch of stuff, and some I’m just trying to get out of mistakes.

    Tomorrow starts early, and I’ll have the kids.

    Need to find some food….. hungry!

    n

  39. drwilliams says:

    @ech

    “my example was not exhaustive”

    That’s sounds almost like that “Mott the Hoople” thing.

    “The press release, near the bottom, has a link to the page below, which has the approval letter, package insert, and more. So, it was available. Just had to click a link, which I guess was too hard for some.”

    I’m sure there was a reason to make it harder to find than in a blog post. After all, it just wouldn’t make sense to have the link to the approval letter in the paragraph announcing the approval.

    “The label and insert are required by law and regulation for FDA approved drugs. They don’t have any choice.”

    So, no possibility of going to the the folks that write the laws and say, “Gee, we have billions of dollars invested in this stuff in the pipeline and we’d like to get the law amended in this emergency to allow us to square up the paperwork.” I’m surr-prized they didn’t just order it thrown out and start over.

     

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  40. Marcelo says:

    I can’t seem to set Amazon Music as my default music player under Android 10. I hate Spotify and Pandora. Any wild guesses? I’ve Googled without much luck.

    I use VLC both in Windows and Android. Not that I use it much…

  41. drwilliams says:

    @~Jim

    “How do you plan to proceed? ”

    Use it as-is. It doesn’t affect the function.

    I can’t conceive of an application of force that would cause such damage, and doubt that any use would make it worse. If it were sans handle, I would suspect it was an artifact of heat treating. As it is, both knives show some damage that leads me to suspect some sort of testing. It wouldn’t surprise me if the estate sales people found the knives in his office paper-clipped to his consulting report and returned them to the kitchen where they “belonged”. It was disconcerting, kind of like finding frozen Twinkies in Gordon Ramsay’s freezer.

    I’m not clear from your description what is separating on your knife. Are the scales (handles) loose? The rivets?

     

  42. ~jim says:

    I’m not clear from your description what is separating on your knife. Are the scales (handles) loose? The rivets?

    The wooden handles have shrunk slightly away from the bolster/shaft, even though I’ve kept the knife meticulously dry and never ever run it through the dishwasher (God forbid!). I’ve even kept them oiled from time to time. They’re not loose, nor do they affect the function, it just offends my sense of aesthetics. Especially when you consider my grandfather’s butcher knife is probably 80 years old and from the same manufacturer and shows no sign of deterioration. Beautiful knives, but I doubt this one will last 80 years or more.

    I ought to write them one of my patented “gripe” letters, lol. I once wrote to the makers of Charmin, complaining that the perforations weren’t good enough causing me to use more toilet paper than I wanted, and subtly implying that they did this on purpose. It was all carefully worded. I got a coupon for 4 or 8 rolls. 🙂

  43. Nick Flandrey says:

    500 ate my comment,

    I use a KAI Damascus 8″ chef for almost everything. https://shun.chefknife.info/shun-classic-series-by-kai-kershaw-new-shun-classic-8-chef-knife-dm0706.html

    The rest of the block is a set from wustof or henkels.

    I use specialty knives rarely other than paring and bread, but I have them for when they are needed.

    n

  44. drwilliams says:

    @~Jim

    I’d probably leave them as-is. Getting the crack clean enough for an epoxy to bond would require taking things apart, and you’d have to use a modified epoxy for impact resistance.

    A filled CYA would bond but fail because of moisture.

    If you have to fill the gap, look at 3M 5200 Marine Adhesive. The regular, not the fast-setting. One-part polyurethane with a long working time. Most of the colors are not available in the small tubes, but you need such a tiny amount that a couple milligrams of umber pigment blended into a single drop with a palette knife would do the job.

    You’d have to do each side separately, dam the sides with a bit of tape, and keep it level for 24-hours so it cures without running out.

  45. Marcelo says:

    Upgrade to Windows 11:

    https://www.thurrott.com/windows/windows-11/254865/microsoft-keeps-windows-11-hardware-requirements-but-will-placate-enthusiasts

    Microsoft is making two sets of concessions. First, and publicly, Microsoft admits that it will allow a tiny subset of older Intel-based PCs—those with Intel Core X-series chipsets, Xeon W-series chipsets, and some with select Intel Core 7820HQ chipsets, like Surface Studio 2—to upgrade to Windows 11. No older AMD-based PCs will be allowed to upgrade.

    More importantly:

    However, it is quietly making a second concession you won’t find in its post about this topic: Behind the scenes, Microsoft will allow enthusiasts who wish to upgrade non-compliant older PCs to Windows 11 to do so. These upgrades will not be officially supported, but those who wish to manually upgrade a PC to Windows 11, either by keeping it in the Windows Insider Program or by manually creating Windows 11 install media with the Media Creation Tool, will be allowed to do so. (This might be seen as similar to the quiet but ongoing ability to use a Windows 7 or newer product key to clean install and activate Windows 10.)

    More interesting info in the article. The latter quoted statement is what I thought from the beginning would actually happen given the Win 7 precedents. Not automatic, but if you are game, you can install it although if there are issues they will not really be looked into. Fine by me.

  46. Marcelo says:

    More info from:

    https://www.neowin.net/news/microsoft-leaves-a-loophole-for-enthusiasts-to-install-windows-11-on-unsupported-hardware/

    However, the company still requires PCs to have TPM 1.2, 64GB storage, 4GB RAM, and a dual-core CPU. If you fulfill these requirements, then you can still install Windows 11 via ISO, but you will be notified that your upgraded device will be in an unsupported state.

    SurfacePro 3 onwards should be OK with that. 🙂

     

  47. drwilliams says:

    The Science of Masking Kids at School Remains Uncertain
    By David Zweig

    At the end of May, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention published a notable, yet mostly ignored, large-scale study of COVID transmission in American schools. A few major news outlets covered its release by briefly reiterating the study’s summary: that masking then-unvaccinated teachers and improving ventilation with more fresh air were associated with a lower incidence of the virus in schools. Those are common-sense measures, and the fact that they seem to work is reassuring but not surprising. Other findings of equal importance in the study, however, were absent from the summary and not widely reported. These findings cast doubt on the impact of many of the most common mitigation measures in American schools. Distancing, hybrid models, classroom barriers, HEPA filters, and, most notably, requiring student masking were each found to not have a statistically significant benefit. In other words, these measures could not be said to be effective.

    In the realm of science and public-health policy outside the U.S., the implications of these particular findings are not exactly controversial. Many of America’s peer nations around the world — including the U.K., Ireland, all of Scandinavia, France, the Netherlands, Switzerland, and Italy — have exempted kids, with varying age cutoffs, from wearing masks in classrooms. Conspicuously, there’s no evidence of more outbreaks in schools in those countries relative to schools in the U.S., where the solid majority of kids wore masks for an entire academic year and will continue to do so for the foreseeable future. These countries, along with the World Health Organization, whose child-masking guidance differs substantially from the CDC’s recommendations, have explicitly recognized that the decision to mask students carries with it potential academic and social harms for children and may lack a clear benefit. To date, the highly transmissible Delta variant has not led them to change this calculus. (Many experts I spoke with told me that while the Delta variant represents a major and concerning new development in the Covid pandemic, it probably shouldn’t change our thinking on a mask requirement for schools.)

    https://nymag.com/intelligencer/2021/08/the-science-of-masking-kids-at-school-remains-uncertain.html

    Based on the evidence, there is no uncertainty: masking school children in the classroom does not have a benefit.

    The CDC guideline is counter to the research funded by the CDC.

    Control, control, control.

    5
    1
  48. Alan says:

    The most important comment is this: Any mandate for vaccination that does not exempt people who have had the virus is going to be successfully challenged in the courts.

    So what will be the standard to definitively determine that someone has had the virus?

  49. Alan says:

    So, no possibility of going to the the folks that write the laws and say, “Gee, we have billions of dollars invested in this stuff in the pipeline and we’d like to get the law amended in this emergency to allow us to square up the paperwork.”

    Surely you jest – right now you couldn’t get the two sides to agree that 2 + 2 = 4.

  50. Marcelo says:

    I was reading an article regarding WD and Samsung playing games with the NAND they use in some of their SSDs replacing them with cheaper and considerably slower NAND chips. The article has at the beginning a couple of CrystalDiskMark sets of values. It reminded me that I had an old version of the software installed so I ran it on my laptop that has and older Samsung SSD and a WD disk drive.

    Wow, 50 to 100 times slower. 🙁

    With PCs and laptops becoming good enough quite a while ago, one forgets the periodical I/O checking and upgrading of a couple of components one used to do that can really make a difference to a system’s behaviour: memory and disks. With SSDs now being affordable it seems an upgrade could make a huge difference for quite a low cost.

    Beware of fudging though:
    https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2021/08/samsung-seemingly-caught-swapping-components-in-its-970-evo-plus-ssds/

  51. drwilliams says:

    @Alan

    “So what will be the standard to definitively determine that someone has had the virus? ”

    1) A positive PCR test. Note that I purposely omitted specifying the number of cycles. If your 40-cycle test is good enough for the goobermint to count in the case numbers, it must be good enough to get you out of mandated vaccination.

    2) A positive antibody test. Come to think of it, this could also be the alternative to a vaccine passport.

    “Surely you jest – right now you couldn’t get the two sides to agree that 2 + 2 = 4.”

    The FDA should be doing their job, not expecting that congress won’t do theirs.

  52. Nick Flandrey says:

    @marcelo, I have put SSDs in several older machines and the difference is stunning. Barely usable to seamless. Old hardware, win7, not more than 8G of ram, and they ran like new. Especially for laptops and SFF pcs, the difference is night and day. They used to spec some very low end and slow storage to save battery life.

    n

  53. Nick Flandrey says:

    This might be seen as similar to the quiet but ongoing ability to use a Windows 7 or newer product key to clean install and activate Windows 10.

    Last time I tried this, I couldn’t find it and make it work. I thought it was stopped long ago. Anyone done it in the last year?

    n

  54. Greg Norton says:

    More interesting info in the article. The latter quoted statement is what I thought from the beginning would actually happen given the Win 7 precedents. Not automatic, but if you are game, you can install it although if there are issues they will not really be looked into. Fine by me.

    I’ve seen strange behavior from older Nvidia hardware since Microsoft implemented changes to Windows 7 and later for Spectre.

    Since Microsoft is under pressure to make the video driver stack more secure to eliminate Windows as the streaming service piracy tool of choice, Redmond is essentially telling users with old hardware that they are on their own installing Windows 11 but they can still proceed.

    Graphic card arbitrage is most likely the real problem in allowing more widespread supported upgrades of Windows 10 to 11. Cards that should be $100 bargain bin items are $500, and Nvidia is clear that the supply problem won’t go away before the end of the year.

  55. ~jim says:

    If you have to fill the gap, look at 3M 5200 Marine Adhesive. (not fast!)

    Cool. I’d actually thought about asking you before the knife discussion came up because you know a lot about glues & stuff. I was also thinking of sprinkling it with sand or something slightly less gritty- still debating.

    Might be a fun project for a winter’s evening. I can’t see that it would do any harm. A lovely knife, btw. Slightly more robust than the Japanese knife. Steel’s a bit harder, too.

    https://www.tapplastics.com/product/repair_products/adhesives_glues_sealants/marine_adhesive_sealant_5200/55/134

  56. Marcelo says:

    This might be seen as similar to the quiet but ongoing ability to use a Windows 7 or newer product key to clean install and activate Windows 10.

    Last time I tried this, I couldn’t find it and make it work. I thought it was stopped long ago. Anyone done it in the last year?

    Even Bing finds heaps of references…

    From: https://www.intowindows.com/activating-windows-10-after-a-clean-install/

    Clean installing and activating Windows 10
    Here are steps you need to follow while clean installing Windows 10:

    Step 1: Download Windows 10 ISO from Microsoft using the Media Creation Tool.

    Step 2: Prepare bootable USB of Windows 10 or prepare bootable DVD of Windows 10, and boot from the bootable media by making appropriate changes to the BIOS/UEFI.

    Step 3: While installing Windows 10, you will see the following screen, where you are asked to enter the Windows 10 product key. Since you don’t have a product key of Windows 10, follow the instructions in the next step.

    Activate Windows 10 after clean install

    Step 4: Since you’re clean installing Windows 10 after successfully upgrading from Windows 7 or Windows 8.1 and activating your copy, you should leave the product key box blank, and click the Skip button instead to proceed further.

    Step 5: Complete the installation. That’s it! Your Windows 10 will activate online automatically once your PC is connected to the internet. If you are unable to activate or getting an error, use the official Windows 10 Activation Troubleshooter.

    Note that above mentioned method is provided by Microsoft itself.

    Even Bing finds that…

    So the only thing you should need is the Media Creation Tool:
    https://www.microsoft.com/en-au/software-download/windows10

    I have only done Updates so it is a bit easier.

    Added: The article is September 2020 so fairly recent and I am sure there is an en-us site also. 🙂

  57. drwilliams says:

    @~Jim

    The 5200 is amazing stuff. I was adhesive shopping and talked to a marine engineer that said the only defect was it’s impossible to remove a porthole that has been installed with it without doing a lot of damage. Apparently it’s a well-known problem in the industry.

    I used it primarily as an adhesive to bond dissimilar materials that got a lot of water exposure. The application wasn’t visible, and I ended up buying the teak color as they were sold out of white. The 4200 fast cure would have been more convenient, but it didn’t perform as well in my application.

  58. Nick Flandrey says:

    Even Bing finds that…

    –no matter what the directions said, last time I tried (2 years ago) it wouldn’t complete the install. I just left everything at win7 which I like better than win10 anyway. I was going to do it for my daughter too, but school gave her a chromebook.

    n

  59. Marcelo says:

    –no matter what the directions said, last time I tried (2 years ago) it wouldn’t complete the install. I just left everything at win7 which I like better than win10 anyway. I was going to do it for my daughter too, but school gave her a chromebook.

    No wonder you complain about updates… It was becoming a real pain to do patching in Windows 7 a loong time ago. One of the many reasons I upgraded. Kept only one really old laptop because of Windows Media software which of course I have not used in ages…

    I did quite a number of upgrades to 10 from 7 and 8 and do not recall any problems. I think I did at least one from CDs but USB is faster.

    Perhaps it was a driver issue for you…
    Hmm. Did you disconnect the Internet during the install? It is implied above and maybe that does a difference. Complex software not easy to diagnose, especially without the machine to hand. 🙂

  60. Lynn says:

    This might be seen as similar to the quiet but ongoing ability to use a Windows 7 or newer product key to clean install and activate Windows 10.

    Last time I tried this, I couldn’t find it and make it work. I thought it was stopped long ago. Anyone done it in the last year?

    n

    Yes. From a ground up windows 10 x64 pro using a windows 7 x64 pro key on an existing motherboard with a new ssd drive. Worked just fine until the motherboard fragged itself the other day. Now I have a new motherboard, cpu, case, etc when I get the energy.

  61. Nick Flandrey says:

    As Jerry P used to say, it takes n+1 PCs to keep n PCs running.

    n

    2

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