Tues. Aug. 10, 2021 – stuff to do today, and kids at home

By on August 10th, 2021 in culture, gardening, march to war, prepping, WuFlu

Hot and humid, chance of rain for parts of Houston. Yesterday didn’t get as hot as some days last week, but still crossed 100 in the sun. It wasn’t much cooler in the shade either. Stayed mostly sunny all day at my house. I’m thinking today will be pretty much the same. We do have a disturbance headed for Cuba, that might make it to the Gulf in a week, but it seems early to call that one.

Spent the day getting caught up on office and household stuff. Cut the back yard, restocked some of the cabinets. I need to do some shopping pretty soon too.

I’ve got a couple of pickups that need to be done, and no good route to combine them, small things for the house mainly. I like to combine trips for gas and time savings. Can’t always though.

Kids are at home this week so that limits me too.

I’m still pretty sore and stiff from swimming and jumping off the rope swing at the lake. My manboobs are aching. I’ll say it again, and maybe it will finally sink in that “I really need to start stretching again.” Before I can do any exercise, I need to get the planks of wood tenderized into bending again.

No way I will be doing any running or jogging, and especially no rucking, but it would be nice not to be so stiff. Just moving through my day isn’t enough any more. When to find the time though…

Garden is still producing tomatoes, although they are golf ball and racquetball sized. Caterpillars made their appearance and tried to eat what was left of my grape vine. I got them sprayed and might have saved something. No peaches again this year. Cabbage is still one plant with a baseball sized head, and two with just leaves. Collards are trying to grow, but not vigorously. At least the herbs are doing well, oh, except for the rosemary. I have killed another rosemary bush. We use a lot of rosemary too so I’ll be replacing that as soon as possible. Blueberries were done last week, and I’ll be able to take the bird netting down. Apple tree is still ok, no fruit, but the branches are thickening. I need to think about the fall garden soon, despite the 100F days.

There is always more to do and to be done. Somewhere near or in the back yard there is a dead rat. I can smell it, but can’t find it. Joy. I put poison in the garage after finding a box of Mountain House that had been nibbled on, so I’m looking forward to a dead rat in there too. Almond joy.

On top of all the daily normal stuff, and the backlogged stuff, I should know what my brakes and suspension work will cost later today. I’d like to have the Ranger back so I can get the body work done too. Or use it to move auction stuff around town. I need it done and back to work.

So much to do, so little actual desire to do it. I know I need to. I know I’ll feel better ticking the boxes off as the stuff gets done, but I’m weary of the grind. Worst possible time for that too. Oh well. Grinding away is something I’ve got plenty of experience with. It’s just not always the quickest way to get through the list.

Speaking of lists, besides knowing who would rat you out and who might help you, you might want to cast an eye around looking for resources too. If nothing else, it will help you see the area around you the same way the opportunists and criminals will. Start putting stuff away, and making your place less attractive to violence or bad actors.

And stack the stuff you like- buy it when you see it, and get out and look for it. Don’t count on anything being there at the same time you want it. Those days are probably gone for a while.

nick

90 Comments and discussion on "Tues. Aug. 10, 2021 – stuff to do today, and kids at home"

  1. Denis says:

    Thumbs up for “Almond joy”. Good luck!

  2. Greg Norton says:

    On top of all the daily normal stuff, and the backlogged stuff, I should know what my brakes and suspension work will cost later today. I’d like to have the Ranger back so I can get the body work done too. Or use it to move auction stuff around town. I need it done and back to work.

    Body work places are really backed up here due to the hail storms at the end of April. My wife’s Exploder just went into the shop yesterday, and, even paintless, the process will take a week.

    I also had the garage door repair out yesterday, and the tech informed me that no one makes our springs anymore so they will have to completely rebuild the door lift system. $300. They are also behind so the door will remain broken for at least another week.

    I will let the qualified repair people handle the garage door. When the spring broke last week, the force bent the structural supports for the door on one side, and the noise made me think the neighbor’s AC system blew up.

  3. brad says:

    So much to do, so little actual desire to do it.

    I feel this. I can’t decide if it’s part and parcel of getting older, or if I need a longer break from things. Now well into the work for Fall semester, but it’s a slog. I normally like teaching and I like programming, and teaching programming is the best of all worlds. But this year…just not feeling it.

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  4. ITGuy1998 says:

    I will let the qualified repair people handle the garage door. When the spring broke last week, the force bent the structural supports for the door on one side, and the noise made me think the neighbor’s AC system blew up.

    Agreed. I was home when a spring let loose at our old house. Much louder than you think it would be. Luckily, there was no other damage. I know how to deal with them, I just choose not to…

  5. SteveF says:

    Don’t take Vox seriously. He has his axes to grind, and has zero problem misrepresenting data (e.g., lying) to support his viewpoints.

    Now swap out “Vox” and put in “Fauci”, “CDC”, or “NIH”.

    he gets really pissy when you call him on this.

    Ditto.

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  6. Greg Norton says:

    Now swap out “Vox” and put in “Fauci”, “CDC”, or “NIH”.

    he gets really pissy when you call him on this.

    Ditto.

    Fauci never actually practiced medicine. He is like the extremely wealthy students who were in classes with my wife who now sit in administrative jobs or practice non-surgical dermatology.

    “Yup. Looks like a melanomia. Let me refer you out to a plastic surgeon for a biopsy.”

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  7. Alan+Larson says:

    Or…are people eating wet dog food?

    In 2006 or 2007, I worked for a national pet specialty retailer, and in their yearly trade show in San Diego, Dick VanPatton, who was the owner of “Natural Balance” pet food company, illustrated its quality and palatability by dressing up as a chef, dishing it out, and letting all who dared taste the canned dog food. It was pretty good, taking into account the lack of salt.

  8. SteveF says:

    Fauci never actually practiced medicine.

    Yah. Some people at work worship the ground he stands on and take his every word as gospel. They get pissy when I point out that I’ve probably treated more injuries than he has and almost certainly have saved more lives.

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  9. CowboySlim says:

    I have seen this stuff about Freon getting released into the atmosphere and partially destroying the ozone layer. One example is how that reduction in ozone allowed greater amounts of solar radiation components to penetrate the atmosphere and cause blindness to cows in the Andes Mountains of Chile in South America.
    However, having received a BSChemEng, I thought that I was an expert in the phenomena of Mass Transfer, molecular diffusion. OTOH, I have never read that the cows in Colorado, Wyoming, Montana, Idaho or Alberta were blinded as such. Consequently, if I understand molecular diffusion correctly, there must have been a far greater amount of Freon released in the Southern Hemisphere as opposed to the Northern.
    Lynn?

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  10. dkreck says:

    HS students in Oregon don’t need to know nuttin’

    https://hotair.com/jazz-shaw/2021/08/10/oregon-removes-reading-writing-math-requirements-for-high-school-graduation-n407779

    It’s racist.

    As to the reason for dropping all of these critical standards, it’s based on allegations of racism, of course. The governor’s deputy communications director said that dropping the requirements “will benefit Oregon’s Black, Latino, Latina, Latinx, Indigenous, Asian, Pacific Islander, Tribal, and students of color.”

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  11. Greg Norton says:

    Yah. Some people at work worship the ground he stands on and take his every word as gospel. They get pissy when I point out that I’ve probably treated more injuries than he has and almost certainly have saved more lives. 

    At the last job, we hired a Number One Son whose parents sent him to MIT to study Biology with the intent of going to Harvard Med, but he didn’t have the grades to become an MD even at a lesser school so he ended up in IT after a stint at NASA as a low-level control room grunt on the KBR payroll and a PD Masters in CS from Rice.

    Of course, before lockdown in 2020, he was the group “expert” in Trump’s failures to get the tests going and quoted Fauci all day long. Too bad he didn’t put the same kind of effort into pre-med … or his work for us — his title is still explicitly “Junior Software Engineer”.

    (Gotta love my T Therapy-fueled former management’s ability to dish out the humiliation. One manager’s dosage was so high his hands shook all the time.)

    I find it interesting that the people I’ve encountered who quaff deepest from the Fauci Kool Aid are ethnic Chinese. Some of my wife’s extended family quote him too. Whether or not they are from the mainland, there is the soft authoritarianism in the culture from the Number One Son as family “boss” meme.

    Is Fauci an only child or Number One?

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  12. JimB says:

    They get pissy when I point out that I’ve probably treated more injuries than he has and almost certainly have saved more lives.

    Probably true, but you have also probably caused more more injuries. 🙂

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  13. JimB says:

    I have seen this stuff about Freon getting released into the atmosphere and partially destroying the ozone layer.

    I have no love for DuPont. Thank you for using their trademark for R12 instead of one of the many others. It is clear that only their brand is responsible for ozone depletion. Too bad all the other chemically identical products were also defamed. 🙂

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  14. SteveF says:

    CowboySlim, IIRC the reasoning — ie, rationalization — was that the Peruvian cows are up higher and so there’s less atmosphere protecting them but the situation is worsening and so they’re the cownaries in the coal mine.

    My cynical take on the mater is that the cows in Wyoming can easily be checked by Americans and their lack of blindness would be widely publicized. Peruvian cows are conveniently remote and there’s a language barrier, so the watermelons could claim the cows were being blinded, sterilized, and misgendered and few Americans would know any better.

    you have also probably caused more more injuries.

    Depends on what you’re measuring. If you figure that the typical mugger mugs 100 people in his career (a gross underestimate) and injures a tenth of the victims (pure guesswork) and that I interrupted them at the mid-points of their careers (simple assumption), then I prevented five times as many injuries as I caused. Go me!

  15. Brad says:

    @SteveF: no argument there. The CDC seems to have done a despicable job of communicating. FWIW that’s pretty much only a US problem. It doesn’t help, though, that people like Vox muddy the waters by deliberately misrepresenting data.

    Of course, it *also* doesn’t help when researchers present their data in a way that lends itself to misinterpretation. I had to dig a long time to find the actual number of COVID deaths, when they should have put that front and center, to make misuse more difficult.

  16. ~jim says:

    HS students in Oregon don’t need to know nuttin’

    https://hotair.com/jazz-shaw/2021/08/10/oregon-removes-reading-writing-math-requirements-for-high-school-graduation-n407779

    It’s racist.

    We need another smiley face indicating a facepalm.

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  17. Nick Flandrey says:

    90F and only 71%RH under partly cloudy and overcast sky.

    Plan for today was to dump the kids at the pool. Their mood is altered dramatically when they watch shows all day, and not in a good way. So wife and I decided a whole lot of physical exercise was in order. So of course it’s threatening rain.

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  18. Greg Norton says:

    Plan for today was to dump the kids at the pool. Their mood is altered dramatically when they watch shows all day, and not in a good way. So wife and I decided a whole lot of physical exercise was in order. So of course it’s threatening rain.

    Keep the anime at a minimum. Sony’s Funimation is consolidating a monopoly in the genre, and some of the messages in the US translations are highly disturbing.

    Definitely monitor whatever your kids watch.

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  19. Nick Flandrey says:

    They’ve been binge watching “Fuller House” a Full House reboot. It’s complete with “foreigners” with comic accents, ‘cute’ kids that can’t act, sitcom plotlines, and so much estrogen I’m PMSing just from walking by the TV.

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  20. Nick Flandrey says:

    Keep the anime at a minimum”

    –no anime at all.

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  21. ech says:

    Well I had Moderna. Will we see those studies soon?

    The actual paper is very different than what Vox is saying, as Brad pointed out yesterday. If you look at the summary that was linked to, they lay out what the deaths were from. The vaccinated people had deaths from cancer, infection with shigella, heart attacks, etc. which have nothing to do with COVID. Same for the placebo group. The protection against getting COVID or illness is quite high. From the abstract:

    VE against COVID-19 was 91% (95% CI 89.0‒93.2) through up to 6 months of follow-up, among evaluable participants and irrespective of previous SARS-CoV-2 infection. VE of 86%‒100% was seen across countries and in populations with diverse characteristics of age, sex, race/ethnicity, and COVID-19 risk factors in participants without evidence of previous SARS-CoV-2 infection. VE against severe disease was 97% (95% CI 80.3‒99.9). In South Africa, where the SARS-CoV-2 variant of concern, B.1.351 (beta), was predominant, 100% (95% CI 53.5, 100.0) VE was observed.

    BTW, the beta variant that was listed last was of concern – it appeared to be more lethal than baseline or delta, but delta has crowded it out due to it’s greater infectiousness.

    TBH, Vox has expressed some very racist opinions in the past and has a collection of grudges that would fill a stadium. If he wrote that the sky was blue, I’d go outside to check.

    Please, please take anything from the vaccine skeptics with the same grain of salt that you do for the CDC.

  22. drwilliams says:

    The Jeffrey Epstein Memorial Suite is being prepared. Next year’s #1 t-shirt:
    Andrew Cuomo Did Not Commit Suicide

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  23. Greg Norton says:

    They’ve been binge watching “Fuller House” a Full House reboot. It’s complete with “foreigners” with comic accents, ‘cute’ kids that can’t act, sitcom plotlines, and so much estrogen I’m PMSing just from walking by the TV.

    In other words, exactly the same as the 80s/90s series.

    I just saw the trailer for the “Doogie Howser” reboot. Another gender swap in the lead of a reboot, featuring the same actress who was the lead in Disney’s way-too-woke “Andi Mack”.

    Even Neal Patrick Harris is staying away from that one.

    Also coming to a streaming service near you, a reboot of “The Wonder Years” which premieres next month. This time, the family is African American.

    The syndication value of the original “The Wonder Years” has been nil since the series finale so the reboot could crib heavily from the earlier series and still seem fresh.

    And, no, Paul from “The Wonder Years” did not become Marilyn Manson. Josh Sorvino went to Yale Law … whiich may be worse depending on your point of view.

  24. Nick Flandrey says:

    Never saw a single ep of Dougie Houser or Wonder Years.

    I missed a lot of tv growing up. Don’t miss it now.

    n

  25. drwilliams says:

    Next week on Dr Phil:

    Chris Cuomo, brother of disgraced ex-governor Andrew Cuomo, weeps as he reveals childhood abuse:

    ”He’d steal my favorite jammies.”

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  26. Mark W says:

    I think the reboots are an awful idea. Why do women/minorities/whatever only get reboots and not new, great, shows of their own?

    I will watch at least one episode of Wonder Years though. That looks like it could be good.

    Also, if we care about minorities, where is the show about the illegal immigrant Irish bricklayer in NYC?

     

  27. Mark W says:

    Re the Covid vaccine study. Page 15 shows just how effective the vaccines are. After about 10 days, the red line (infections in the vaccinated group) basically goes flat while the blue line (placebo) continues upwards at 45 degrees.

  28. Nick Flandrey says:

    At least they mention the experimentation….

    This from EPIC, a CDC newsletter aimed at medical affiliated people.

    Health equity is when all members of society enjoy a fair and just opportunity to be as healthy as possible. Public health policies and programs can promote health equity by responding to the specific needs of communities.

    CDC continues to focus its health equity efforts on populations with the highest rates of infection, severe illness, and death from COVID-19. You or your organization can join the effort to ensure that all communities have access to the resources they need for good physical and mental health, including COVID-19 vaccinations.

    COVID-19 Vaccine Equity for Racial and Ethnic Minority Groups

    Vaccine equity is when everyone has fair and just access to COVID-19 vaccination. Many social, geographic, political, economic, and environmental factors can create challenges to vaccination access and acceptance, which often affect racial and ethnic minority groups. Some of these factors include:

    Education, income, and wealth gaps
    Job access and working conditions
    Racism and other forms of discrimination
    Gaps in healthcare access
    Transportation and neighborhood conditions
    Lack of trust as a result of past medical racism and experimentation

    Because of these and other challenges, some Black or African American people and Hispanic or Latino people are less likely to be vaccinated against COVID-19 than people in other racial and ethnic minority groups and non-Hispanic White people.

    Ways to Promote Vaccine Equity in Your Community

    With COVID-19 rates once again rising across the country, community- and faith-based organizations, employers, healthcare systems and providers, public health agencies, and policy makers all play a part in promoting fair access to health. By setting examples of healthy behaviors and promoting CDC’s guidance and local community protocols, we can support public health efforts against COVID-19.

    Many of the resources available can be tailored for racial and ethnic minority communities to:

    Help build vaccine confidence
    Share clear and accurate information to educate people about COVID-19
    Raise awareness about the benefits of vaccination and address common questions and concerns
    Adapt key messages to the language, tone, and format that will resonate with communities
    Understand community needs regarding COVID-19 vaccines

    Any time I see or hear the word “equity” outside of the union “Actor’s Equity”, I immediately discount the message. It’s the modern ‘white man’s burden’ helping all those poor darker skinned folks to see the light… and get what they deserve.

    n

  29. MrAtoz says:

    AOC is playing the drama queen again. Discussing the capital riots and her first term in Congress. Painting herself as a victim of long past racial issues. Basically blaming her stupidity and ineffectiveness on everything, or everybody, other than the real point of failure, herself.

    LOL, Mr. Ray got downvoted by some SIMP. Shot Girl ™ is the worst.

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  30. Nick Flandrey says:

    Huh, as a data point, it looks like one of the best general interest trade mags I get just went to electronic only… “Announcement: To better serve needs of subscribers, starting with the September 2020 issue,
    Machine Design’s digital edition will be published in PDF format. ”

    If they can’t make it, that is real trouble in the manufacturing sector.
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  31. Nick Flandrey says:

    Tropical cyclone SIX is headed for PR and FL. Sat arrival in FL….

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  32. MrAtoz says:

    We spent the night in El Paso. Picking up a colleague in the pm and on to Las Cruces for the rest of the week on a gig.

    We pulled into a Famous Dave’s parking lot and a silver F150 promptly backed out into the Subie. Scraped the right front good. Bumper may or may not be repairable, headlight lens is scraped good, hood slightly buckled and right front 1/4 panel buckled. If none of that is repairable, the cost will go way north of $2K.

    I called the non accident PoPo number and a squad was to arrive in 15 minutes. An hour later (it’s 101 outside) no car. I called and got the you’re on hold for 10 minutes. The truck driver and I agreed I’d call again at 1.5 hours and if no answer, we’d exchange into and be on our way. No answer, so we exchanged info. The PoPo called me 4 1/2 hours later, “Are you still waiting….” Geez. I told them it was too hot to wait any longer and what we did. The caller said “sorry, we’re really busy” he could have at least called earlier instead of us standing around.

    I used the USAA app to upload the details and photos. USAA called this morning to start an investigation. They couldn’t fine the guy via driver’s license # or plate (Colorado). I gave them the guys name and phone and they are trying to track him down.

    The car is drivable, so we are continuing on the gig. It’s funny when you think a couple of minutes either way and the fender bender would have been missed.

  33. Greg Norton says:

    Health equity is when all members of society enjoy a fair and just opportunity to be as healthy as possible. Public health policies and programs can promote health equity by responding to the specific needs of communities.

    And make those who test positive camp their happy a**es at home until cleared by a negative test.

    There are places in the country where that is being tried. My wife’s friend has an ex-husband who lives somewhere in the boonies of North Carolina, and, since diagnosis, he’s been under local orders to stay home until he stops testing positive. He doesn’t pretend to be “asymptomatic”, acknowledging that he feels ill and has a fever, but his patience is being sorely tested in the last few days since he ran out of beer and can’t get it delivered.

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  34. Ray Thompson says:

    LOL, Mr. Ray got downvoted by some SIMP

    I sometimes down vote myself to get a jump on MrAtoz.

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  35. SteveF says:

    The vaccinated people had deaths from cancer, infection with shigella, heart attacks, etc. which have nothing to do with COVID.

    If CDC et al had honestly reported from covid deaths for the past year and a half, that might be a good argument. As it is, sauce for the goose.

    If he wrote that the sky was blue, I’d go outside to check.

    Funny you should mention that. Falsus in uno, falsus in omnibus.

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  36. Greg Norton says:

    We pulled into a Famous Dave’s parking lot and a silver F150 promptly backed out into the Subie. Scraped the right front good. Bumper may or may not be repairable, headlight lens is scraped good, hood slightly buckled and right front 1/4 panel buckled. If none of that is repairable, the cost will go way north of $2K.

    Parking lot. Private property. The insurances will split it 50-50 unless the other guy wants to be decent.

    Sealed LED headlight module or something more traditional?

    Paint will be $2000 if they have to spray the hood and quarter panel.

    The backup camera is not a solution to the trucks and SUVs turning into behemoths. I doubt many people can see well from the driver seat of a new F150-class truck. I know my wife can’t see well in her Exploder, but, then again, neither can the Austin cops, who I regularly saw hit the curbs making turns downtown in their SUVs.

    Get the car fixed. You won’t like what nanny features get installed in the new Subarus, including a system that tries to determine when you aren’t watching the road.

  37. Nick Flandrey says:

    Just got the rest of the estimate for my Ranger.

    Upper control arms, both sides. Lower ball joint both sides. ~$800 incl labor. Proceeding with that work. Brakes were ~$330. Rotors and pads.

    Love that truck, need to keep it running and safe.

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  38. Nick Flandrey says:

    Subie is low, truck is high. I’ve backed my RANGER into stuff that I didn’t see behind me, including a VAN. Sometimes, it’s just the driver and not the vehicle.

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  39. Nick Flandrey says:

    https://www.thegatewaypundit.com/2021/08/breaking-new-york-governor-andrew-cuomo-resigns-amid-sexual-harassment-scandal/

    Huh. Pierced nipple guy harasses women. Funny that you can kill thousands of grannies, make sure your friends don’t have any legal liability for it, graft and extort your way to power, but start to play grab ass and you’re going down…

    What a crazy ol world…

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  40. Nick Flandrey says:

    bTW, anyone thinking NEwsome will be recalled– I was in AZ when we recalled the governor. At the last minute he’ll just resign, and the LT GOV will take over. Nothing will change, and while Nuisance will be gone, his cadre will all still be in place.

    n

    added- on the plus side, it will take him off the national stage too.

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  41. ech says:

    If CDC et al had honestly reported from covid deaths for the past year and a half, that might be a good argument.

    CDC was quite clear on their dashboards that they were reporting “with COVID” in their stats. The excess deaths page had that in the notes explaining their data. NB: there is no doubt that there were 100s of thousands of excess deaths since the pandemic, most caused by COVID.

     

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  42. Nick Flandrey says:

    Our entire medical establishment has been shown time and again, and by their own admission, to be liars. Prevaricators. Barracks lawyers, spin doctors, and worse.

    Their initial carefully parsed and worded statements that mislead and misdirected turned into sloppy and loosely worded statements that misled and misdirected.

    They no longer have ANY credibility. Anyone who assumed that every word out of their mouths is a lie would be justified. That throws the baby out with the bathwater, because even a liar can speak the truth if he wants to, but I think at this point it’s safer to make the assumption, and then go looking for the truth.

    Appeal to authority as a rhetorical technique was always suspect. As a basis for public policy it’s even more suspect.

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  43. JimB says:

    Sometimes, it’s just the driver and not the vehicle.

    Wow, you are the only hooman on the planet to acknowledge this. OK, there are a few others, darn few.

  44. Nick Flandrey says:

    CDC was quite clear on their dashboards that they were reporting “with COVID” in their stats.

    — not always, not at the beginning when the policies were put in place. Lots of other places were fast and loose with their counts too.

    It was months before anyone even uttered the phrase “excess deaths” and that was only after people started looking hard at the numbers and saw issues with the reporting. They were looking for a more ‘honest’ number than what was available.

    Looking at excess deaths was a REACTION to the situation as it was.

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  45. JimB says:

     

    Nothing will change, and while Nuisance will be gone, his cadre will all still be in place.

    n

    added- on the plus side, it will take him off the national stage too.

    I’ll take it. A good start.

    I was also thinking it is high time the citizens started removing various officials who did such horrible things before and during wuflu. Maybe witch hunts aren’t so bad.

  46. Greg Norton says:

    bTW, anyone thinking NEwsome will be recalled– I was in AZ when we recalled the governor. At the last minute he’ll just resign, and the LT GOV will take over. Nothing will change, and while Nuisance will be gone, his cadre will all still be in place.

    Nah. Perkins Coie already has the paralegals in the West Coast offices working overtime, filling out the mail-in ballots that will actually be counted.

    Every registered voter will receive a mail-in ballot for the recall to make the race look legit. Newsom signed the mail-in voting extension in February, when no one was paying attention.

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  47. Nick Flandrey says:

    Vox has expressed some very racist opinions in the past and has a collection of grudges that would fill a stadium.

    –not illegal to be a racist, and not an indication of a lack of intellect. Lot of historical leading scientists and certified geniuses had ‘racist’ beliefs. It’s just name calling.

    –grudges? Lot of people have said similar. I don’t read the guy, but I read people that have issues with him and people who don’t. You don’t have a blog like his without something to say though.

    — both are ad hominem, which again, as a rhetorical technique is suspect. “if you can’t argue the facts, discredit the witness” is a cliche’ it’s so common.j

    –I know you later address the facts too, and that’s what is needed. The problem is the ‘facts’ are promulgated by known liars with agendas of their own.

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  48. Nick Flandrey says:

    filling out the mail-in ballots

    –that would be the ‘print at home’ ballots?

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  49. Nick Flandrey says:

    I was also thinking it is high time the citizens started removing various officials who did such horrible things before and during wuflu. Maybe witch hunts aren’t so bad.

    –if the jabs sterilize people, or start killing them in 3 years, or giving them heart attacks, or any other poor outcome starts to become apparent in the next several years, the streets will run with blood*. Because THAT’S how they’ll be removed from office, and this mortal coil.

    n

    *unless there is rope or fire involved, then the blood stays inside.

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  50. MrAtoz says:

    It’s laughable watching the ProLibTurds scramble to carry Cuomo’s water. Even the “believe all women” crowd. Two years from now he’ll get a multi-million dollar advance for “What Went Wrong Part Deaux”. How to grope and get away with it.

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  51. Alan says:

    Is Fauci an only child or Number One?

    One older sister…

    Denise, three years older than Dr. Fauci, went to St. John’s University. She became a teacher before she stopped to raise her children. She married John (Jack) M. Scorce and last we knew they lived in Alexandrea, Va.

    https://roundballdaily.com/2021/02/15/before-anthony-fauci-became-a-doctor-he-grew-up-as-a-sports-junkie-and-was-captain-of-the-regis-high-school-basketball-team-1/

  52. Greg Norton says:

    “One older sister…”

    Denise, three years older than Dr. Fauci, went to St. John’s University. She became a teacher before she stopped to raise her children. She married John (Jack) M. Scorce and last we knew they lived in Alexandrea, Va.

    Still, Number One Son.

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  53. dkreck says:

    If Screwsome resigns the Lt Guv only serves out his term so a recall win would end that term and the replacement would take over.

  54. ayjblog says:

    @cowboy slim

    we dont have an epidemy of blindness cows in Patagonia no Tierra del Fuego

    BR

     

  55. lynn says:

    Pearls Before Swine: Eat, Pray, Love
    https://www.gocomics.com/pearlsbeforeswine/2021/08/10

    Uh, oh my. Zebra needs to upgrade to a better neighbor.

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  56. Greg Norton says:

    If Screwsome resigns the Lt Guv only serves out his term so a recall win would end that term and the replacement would take over. 

    IIRC, the Lt. Governor in CA is Obama money, his Ambassador to Hungary.

    Newsome’s money people put in way too much time/effort with him to back down now. They may actually land Robert Francis in the Texas Governor’s Mansion next year, putting “The Mexican Bobby Kennedy” into the Electoral Calculus for 2028, maybe even before then.

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  57. Alan says:

    Right hand, meet left hand (but wash for 29 seconds first)…

    Florida requests 300 ventilators from federal government as COVID cases keep rising

    Gov. DeSantis says he isn’t aware of that request

    https://www.local10.com/news/local/2021/08/09/florida-sets-another-covid-case-record-as-hospitals-face-sheer-exhaustion/

  58. Greg Norton says:

    Right hand, meet left hand (but wash for 29 seconds first)…

    “Florida requests 300 ventilators from federal government as COVID cases keep rising

    Gov. DeSantis says he isn’t aware of that request”

    Channel 10 in Tampa is Tenga. Gannett. USA Today. Beyond left wing.

    UPDATE: Channel 10 WPLG Miami — even worse — Berkshire Hathaway. The Geico Gecko.

    UPDATE 2: WPLG is a former Graham family holding. If the Florida Dems are serious about winning next year, they will run Gwen Graham for Governor. Things that make you say “Hmmm…”

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  59. lynn says:

    I have seen this stuff about Freon getting released into the atmosphere and partially destroying the ozone layer. One example is how that reduction in ozone allowed greater amounts of solar radiation components to penetrate the atmosphere and cause blindness to cows in the Andes Mountains of Chile in South America.
    However, having received a BSChemEng, I thought that I was an expert in the phenomena of Mass Transfer, molecular diffusion. OTOH, I have never read that the cows in Colorado, Wyoming, Montana, Idaho or Alberta were blinded as such. Consequently, if I understand molecular diffusion correctly, there must have been a far greater amount of Freon released in the Southern Hemisphere as opposed to the Northern.
    Lynn?

    I ain’t never seen no blind cows in Texas or even the Rockies. Nor blind horses.

    My partner who passed away in 2020 was an a/c tech as a young man before he got his BS and PhD in Chem Eng at Rice U. He and his buddy were working on a hotel one day and managed to blow a 300 ton R22 system to atmosphere. They went back to the shop, got a few bombs of R22, returned to the hotel, fixed the problem, recharged the system, and presented the guy with a bill for labor plus a recharge of R22. He paid the bill and they went on their way. You would not be surprised how many times that happened and still does. And way more in the northern hemisphere of Earth.

  60. Greg Norton says:

    My partner who passed away in 2020 was an a/c tech as a young man before he got his BS and PhD in Chem Eng at Rice U. He and his buddy were working on a hotel one day and managed to blow a 300 ton R22 system to atmosphere. They went back to the shop, got a few bombs of R22, returned to the hotel, fixed the problem, recharged the system, and presented the guy with a bill for labor plus a recharge of R22. He paid the bill and they went on their way. You would not be surprised how many times that happened and still does. And way more in the northern hemisphere of Earth. 

    When I briefly worked a real EE job manufacturing circuit boards in the early 90s, we had a Freon “fountain” free flowing 24/7 in the test area of the assembly line. Board not passing the Genrad/ICT test? Wash the backside with Freon and run it through again. About 90% of the time, that would work.

    As soon as 93 hit and the Clintons took office, the Freon fountain went away. The replacement cleaner was a citrus-based product and not nearly as good.

    Only very high end limited run boards get populated in this country anymore. What production tightening environmental regulations didn’t drive offshore disappeared into the Tyco debacle. I know three plants that simply vanished into that disaster.

  61. lynn says:

    Lock ’em up…

    https://www.zerohedge.com/political/texas-supreme-court-rules-deserting-democrats-can-face-arrest-upon-return

    Put them in a cage on the House floor. Potty breaks require the formation of a chain gang. Leg chains too, there are a bunch of runners in that group.

    Or, put a Portapotty in the middle of the cage.

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  62. lynn says:

    “2021 31 July, Record for Annual Fatal Bear Attacks already Tied”
    https://www.ammoland.com/2021/08/2021-31-july-record-for-annual-fatal-bear-attacks-already-tied/

    I blame global warming.

    I really blame people people feeding bears. Never feed a wild animal unless you want to be responsible for it.

  63. lynn says:

    “Senate approves infrastructure bill with excise taxes on petrochemicals”
    https://www.ogj.com/general-interest/government/article/14208424/senate-approves-infrastructure-bill-with-excise-taxes-on-petrochemicals

    “The Senate passed a $1 trillion infrastructure bill that would revive Superfund excise taxes on 10 of the most common petrochemicals while spending large sums on roads, ports, public transit, passenger rails, airports, electric grids, and internet access.”

    “The revived taxes, to terminate Dec. 31, 2031, would apply to all US production and imports of methane, butane, benzene, toluene, xylene, ethylene, propylene, butadiene, butylene, and acetylene. The rates would be $9.74/ton for all except methane, whose rate would be $6.88/ton.
    The $9.74 rate would be double the previous rate. The American Chemistry Council in a July report warned of harmful economic effects.
    “Reinstating the Superfund chemical excise taxes at these new levels would impose a $1.211 billion per year cost on American chemistry,” the report said. “For specific chemicals and specific plant operations, the added costs from the taxes could exceed profit margins.””

    But, but, but, they said that this bill did not have any new taxes …

    Enjoy your new taxes. Yes, they will show up at your gasoline pump and natural gas meter.

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  64. Nick Flandrey says:

    Or, put a Portapotty in the middle of the cage.

    –put a 5 gallon bucket in the middle of the cage, and a C Span live feed focused on the cage.

    n

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  65. CowboySlim says:

     “You would not be surprised how many times that happened and still does. And way more in the northern hemisphere of Earth.”

    That’s how we would fix car ACs in my driveway back then.  Open up tubing, replace the bad parts, connect a vacuum pump to pull out all freon and air from the system, then recharge with freon.  So it wasn’t like replacing a water pump where you replaced only the partially discharged water and antifreeze.
    JimB?

  66. lynn says:

    “You would not be surprised how many times that happened and still does. And way more in the northern hemisphere of Earth.”

    That’s how we would fix car ACs in my driveway back then. Open up tubing, replace the bad parts, connect a vacuum pump to pull out all freon and air from the system, then recharge with freon. So it wasn’t like replacing a water pump where you replaced only the partially discharged water and antifreeze.
    JimB?

    I used to have a BB machinegun. The propellant was an R12 can. Worked great until the can froze up. Was totally inaccurate, about a three foot spread at twenty feet.

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  67. Greg Norton says:

    “Senate approves infrastructure bill with excise taxes on petrochemicals”

    But, but, but, they said that this bill did not have any new taxes …

    Enjoy your new taxes. Yes, they will show up at your gasoline pump and natural gas meter.

    Didn’t Stretch insist on having the $3 T bill passed by they Senate before they would look at the $1 T bill?

    And, IIRC, a lot of Dems still want to see the SALT deduction restored as part of this bill.

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  68. Ray Thompson says:

    put a 5 gallon bucket in the middle of the cage

    Legislators are so full of shirt(-r) that a 5 gallon bucket is woefully inadequate.

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  69. JimB says:

    When I briefly worked a real EE job manufacturing circuit boards in the early 90s, we had a Freon “fountain” free flowing 24/7 in the test area of the assembly line.

    People, people, people. Freon is a TRADEMARK.

    It belongs to E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (DuPont,) later named Chemours. It is often used with an additional suffix to denote a specific compound. Examples of refrigerants are Freon 22, Freon MO99, Freon 39TC, and Freon NU-22B to name a few. There are examples of other compounds that use the Freon name with a suffix, such as solvents. Don’t call R-134a Freon; Chemours calls it Suva, another of their trademarks. Again, there are other Suva names with their own set of suffixes. Confusing!

    The original name, simply Freon, was applied to a refrigerant, dichlorodifluoromethane, or CCl2F2. It persisted in the marketplace for decades. It was originally invented as a low toxicity nonflammable refrigerant, but became widely used also because it was one of the more efficient refrigerants in terms of the energy required to pump a given amount of heat across a common temperature change, such as for a refrigerator or air conditioner. It is also compatible with common hose materials.

    It is also known as R-12. Refrigerants are named in a standard numbering system that was first developed by the DuPont company and was released for use in 1956. Since then, ANSI/ASHRAE has adopted this numbering system. Sometimes CFC is used instead of R, but only for chlorofluorocarbons, a needless complication.

    There is also a CAS (Chemical Abstracts Service) numbering system, but I will leave this as an exercise for the reader. You need something fun to pursue!

    The Freon “fountain” was a cleaning tank filled with Freon TF (DuPont,) a once very popular solvent used to clean electronics and many other delicate products. It also goes by Freon 113, Frigen 113 TR, CFC-113, or simply 1,1,2-Trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane, also called trichlorotrifluoroethane. Phew! It is also no longer used, but the substitutes are beyond my area of expertise. I do know that when I worked for Collins Radio a long time ago we had a vapor cleaning system similar to what you described. It might have used the same solvent, but the boards were only subjected to vapor, which was boiled from the tank, and condensed by the cooler upper walls. It was considered very safe for the products and for people. This looks like it: https://www.techspray.com/vapor-degreasing-the-quick-guide

    I think I beat this to death. Now for dinner. 😛

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  70. JimB says:

    So it wasn’t like replacing a water pump where you replaced only the partially discharged water and antifreeze.
    JimB?

    Yup. Antifreeze and water on concrete evaporate in a day or two. Refrigerant is much faster. Nobody knows it was there, except the earth.

    Favorite quote, from High Road to China: The oxen are slow… but the earth is patient.

  71. Nick Flandrey says:

    I thought it was 1,1,1 trichloroethane? we used that as a solvent for grease and a cleaner for electrical contacts… or I could be missing a syllable .

    n

  72. Nick Flandrey says:

    Quite a brisk trade in banned refrigerants. Since it’s a federal crime to sell to the unlicensed, even finding old cans in a garage can be problematic. The feds run stings all the time on craigslist and facebook.

    Easy conviction.

    n

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  73. JimB says:

    I thought it was 1,1,1 trichloroethane?

    Different stuff. I am not a chemist (!) especially organics, so I always quote sources. This one was in Wikipedia, so blame them.

  74. SteveF says:

    Here we are, more than twelve hours after my cownaries pun, and no one has remarked on it. -sigh- I am depressed.

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  75. lynn says:

    I thought it was 1,1,1 trichloroethane? we used that as a solvent for grease and a cleaner for electrical contacts… or I could be missing a syllable .

    n

    That was great stuff for cleaning parts. Until a moron was smoking in the shop while cleaning parts and it blew up in his face. Luckily, the cleaning rig was built to collapse when it caught on fire and he was not burned very badly. I never did hear who it was but only ten or so of the maintenance guys smoked including both of the lathe operators. We got a new cleaning rig with a lean oil in it that did not work very well.

    And no, I was not the moron. I did not smoke.

  76. lynn says:

    I am running the benchmarks (regression testing) yet again due to making changes in stuff that ripples through our calculation engine like bad milk. I’ve been watching each benchmark as they are invoked in the Windows Task Manager. Would you believe that with our current slovenly memory usage habits, our largest benchmark now takes 1.33 GB of ram to run ! Unbelievable !

    The old days of the Univac 1108 with 32K words of data space and 32K words of code space are so far behind us that I can barely remember them. However, I do remember the continuous scramble to find any piggish Fortran code and convert all arrays into dynamically allocated memory. We stopped doing that about 1985, thank goodness. But we still have thousands of dynamically allocated arrays in our Fortran code. Makes debugging very exciting at times.

  77. Nick Flandrey says:

    twelve hours after my cownaries pun

    –I was going to remark on the cownaries in the cowmine…. but you missed that opportunity!

    n

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  78. drwilliams says:

    @CowboySlim

    I have seen this stuff about Freon getting released into the atmosphere and partially destroying the ozone layer. One example is how that reduction in ozone allowed greater amounts of solar radiation components to penetrate the atmosphere and cause blindness to cows in the Andes Mountains of Chile in South America.
    However, having received a BSChemEng, I thought that I was an expert in the phenomena of Mass Transfer, molecular diffusion. OTOH, I have never read that the cows in Colorado, Wyoming, Montana, Idaho or Alberta were blinded as such. Consequently, if I understand molecular diffusion correctly, there must have been a far greater amount of Freon released in the Southern Hemisphere as opposed to the Northern.
    Lynn?

    @Lynn seems to have skipped over this part. Mind if I try?

    I seem to have restarted the ozone discussion a few days ago with:

    “HFC refrigerants. Replaced CFC’s which allegedly destroyed the ozone layer. But HFC’s are greenhouse gases. Whoops! What has DuPont patented lately that we could change to?”

    Later I posted a follow-up that included:

    “It’s true that some measurements were taken confirming breakdown products of CFC’s. Not unexpected, since the breakdown was caused by UV. But the only breakdown product in the chemical cycle of the model was chlorine, and chlorine from CFC’s is indistinguishable from other sources. Surprisingly, no funding for investigating other sources was made available, despite a significant source in the world oceans. In the decades since the reality of stratospheric injection by volcanoes has been confirmed.

    There were two major problems with the models:

    1 South Pole data were not consistent with the known behavior of atmospheric transport or atmospheric pollutants across the equator.

    2 The models did not accurately predict the behavior of the thinning of the ozone layer over the South Pole after the enactment of the Montreal Protocols. Then years later when the mapping of sources of CFC’s from satellite became available, it became obvious that India, China, and Russia continued to manufacture much more R12 and other “banned” CFC’s than they were permitted, making the models even more inaccurate.”

    CFC’s are obviously associated with industrialization, which is mostly associated with the Northern Hemisphere.  So why doesn’t the Arctic have a bigger ozone hole?

    First, Sherwood (properly F. Sherwood “Sherry” Rowland–I could never do Sherry) did some follow-up research on atmospheric transport that showed N-to-S diffusion was rather faster than anticipated.

    If you look at some of the atmospheric concentration graphs for different CFC’s they show lower concentrations in the SH for a few years after Montreal, then they converge and show a nice linear downslope.

    (Personally, I think those graphs are doubtful, based in part on the continued manufacture of CFC’s in the NH well above treaty limits and well into the 21st century.)

    Second, and most importantly, it was recognized early on that the atmosphere over the two poles is very different. Specifically, the Antarctic has a polar vortex that is more stable, drier, and colder. All of these contribute to keeping the chlorine atoms looping around in a cycle, merrily destroying ozone. But a number of years in the 21st century have been unusual, in that conditions have promoted a more stable Northern Polar Vortex, and during those years the ozone depletion was higher.

    Three comments about the politics involved:

    1 As with many other “greenie” fantasies (DDT, AGW) the hue and cry to “do something” started immediately and long before substantial follow-up research could be done. The public was convinced they were going to get burned to death, and the Montreal Protocol was signed in 1987. Sherwood got his Nobel Prize in 1995.

    2 Just as with those other greenie fantasies, there is no backing off. Whatever contrary evidence comes to light, it’s doom, Doom, DOOM all the way down. (And it’s only coincidence that every regulation is designed primarily to handcuff the economy of the most successful nation on earth)

    3 Professor Rowland was a giant in his field. Remember Feynmann’s discussion of the Millikan Effect? There have been numerous research results that point to other contributions to ozone depletion. I mentioned volcanoes earlier. There are others. But few want to author a paper that claims that those other contributions are significant. ( Dr. Lu at the University of Waterloo makes a good case for cosmic rays, which got him on the climate denier list, donchaknow?)

    One last comment: 70% of the earth’s surface is ocean, and almost 2% of salt water is chlorine. The facile answer is always: “It gets rained out.” My answer remains as always: What’s the chlorine flux across the water-troposphere boundary, and how many 9’s after 99.% does it take before you can claim that there is no flux across the troposphere-stratosphere boundary?

     

  79. drwilliams says:

    @Nick

    CFC-113 aka Freon TF went out the door first in the 1980’s

    Electronics manufacturer’s are still using the Fluorinert family as replacements, after the latest update (remember the liquid-cooled bitcoin engines?)

    1,1,1 trichloroethane (not to be confused with trichloroethylene, both called “trike” for short”) went in the mid-1990’s, replaced by citrus-based solvents.

    They’ve been trying to get methylene chloride (dichloromethane) away from the furniture strippers for years, but have been fought off so far.

    ADDED: I was at a sale a while back and scored unopened containers of 1980’s Formby’s Furniture Refinisher and Tung Oil. The FFR of that era was 10-15% MC with toluene, methanol and other good stuff. (Ran some through a mass spec every couple years, and mixed my own by the gallon)

    There are a number of other useful things worth looking for in estate sale garages. Strike anywhere matches. 3M Scotchguard (pre-2000 with the original formulation) come to mind.

  80. lynn says:

    @Lynn seems to have skipped over this part. Mind if I try?

    Please go for it. I suck at chemistry. All I know is that water may be the universal solvent but every single mixture has different solubilities of water, except for vapor. And hydrogen wants to be free ! And hydrocarbons like to combust with an appropriate amount of oxygen. And even though oil tanks are kept at a slight vacuum, oxygen seems to continuously sneak into them.

    BTW, Lynn tried to say that there is no way that there were more Freons released in the southern hemisphere than the northern hemisphere. First, the Freons were invented in the northern hemisphere and used extensively there long before the southern hemisphere started using air conditioning in any significant quantity. Second, the northern hemisphere is much more industrialized than the southern hemisphere. Third, every space shuttle takeoff dropped over a million pounds of CFCs in the atmosphere (not consequential, just cool that the LOX/LHY tanks used temporary external insulation that sloughed off on takeoff).

  81. nick flandrey says:

    I can buy ohio blue tip strike anywhere matches at the HEB grocery in town, but they don’t seem as sturdy as the old ones.  I remember striking them with a thumbnail, one handed as a kid, but that just fragments them now.   Ditto for striking one head on another.

    I’ll keep my eyes open for the formbys and scotchguard.   I can always tell I’m in one of ‘those’ guys garages when my nose wrinkles and my skin puckers.  I’m certain there is a cabinet full of brown glass bottles with the labels gone.  The old man saved “the good stuff” for the serious infestation.  Funny that he never needed it though.  I get out of those soon to be superfund sites as quickly as I can.

    Man you can just smell the poisons from 10 feet away.

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  82. lynn says:

    1 As with many other “greenie” fantasies (DDT, AGW) the hue and cry to “do something” started immediately and long before substantial follow-up research could be done. The public was convinced they were going to get burned to death, and the Montreal Protocol was signed in 1987. Sherwood got his Nobel Prize in 1995.

    BTW, the next global emergency is being talked about and may be coming to forefront soon. Mankinds waste heat is growing at a fairly constant rate of 2.3% per year. Our contribution to the heat energy of the Earth is still several magnitudes lower than good ol’ Sols but that compounding of the 2.3% becomes significant in a few decades or so. Still, several people are starting to talk about energy usage limits per person at a way less rate than the USA currently uses. No cars, no air conditioning, no heating.

    Unless, the Chinese decide to release their Omega variant of the Covid.

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  83. Alan says:

    Of course Tony can…

    Elon Musk offered SpaceX’s services to help NASA make its next-generation spacesuits, after a watchdog report on Tuesday said the agency’s current program is behind schedule and will cost more than $1 billion.

    “SpaceX could do it if need be,” Musk wrote in a tweet.

    https://www.cnbc.com/2021/08/10/elon-musk-spacex-could-make-new-astronaut-spacesuits-for-nasa.html

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  84. JimB says:

    3M Scotchguard (pre-2000 with the original formulation) come to mind.

    @drwilliams, didn’t know about that. My wife says she has a hard time finding any Scotchguard in stores, but just bought some in our Home Depot. She likes shopping in stores, and declined my offer to check online. Is the new stuff any good?

  85. Greg Norton says:

    That was great stuff for cleaning parts. Until a moron was smoking in the shop while cleaning parts and it blew up in his face. Luckily, the cleaning rig was built to collapse when it caught on fire and he was not burned very badly. I never did hear who it was but only ten or so of the maintenance guys smoked including both of the lathe operators. We got a new cleaning rig with a lean oil in it that did not work very well.

    And no, I was not the moron. I did not smoke.

    It seemed like everyone except me smoked at my only real EE job. The *only* reason that smoking was banned on the assembly line was that Sun griped about the 10 mil surface mount leads on SPARC not properly adhering to the boards populated by our facility. The Vietnamese inspector who checked the board prior to the CPU being soldered into place would blow cigarette smoke all over the boards while he worked, and management’s suggestions about how he might want to reconsider his approach to the job were regarded as interesting suggestions.

    The novelty of doing real EE work wore off after about a month and I started looking for another job. My hardware engineering career lasted about six months before I found my first software gig. Fortunately, smoking was banned in offices in Florida by then.

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  86. brad says:

    blind cows…

    My memories of the whole ozone thing: it was like any other climate issue. Yes, there was a problem. Yes, it needed to be addressed. However, the panic-makers turned everything up to eleven. I doubt any livestock anywhere had any eye problems.

    Today (and for the past 20+ years) it’s been the same with global warming. It’s probably not a great idea to be pumping so much CO2 into the atmosphere. And really no one can object to genuinely renewable energy. But the continual eleventy!! we’re all gonna die!!! gets really tiresome. The past few months have been especially bad, with one “tipping point” article after the next.

    Deserting-Democrats

    In the pic, they look like they think they’re being clever. Really, it’s simple dereliction of duty. If they can’t do their jobs properly, at a minimum they should be removed from office.

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