Mon. Aug. 8, 2022 – still at the BOL working

By on August 8th, 2022 in decline and fall, lakehouse, personal

Of course it’s hot and humid.   Less so than Houston, but still…

 

Lake level continues to drop.  Down about 24 inches from normal.  It really would be nice to get some rain, but NOT a hurricane.

Spent yesterday working on the master bath.  Made progress.  It’s nice when I can focus on a task for a few hours even if that task is back breaking and tedious.

Today I’ll keep working on getting the toilet install finished.   If I can do that and a couple of smaller things I’ll feel pretty good.  Then it’s home to dump a load of trash and do all the normal things, plus we’re starting ‘back to school’ stuff.  Hard to believe we’re almost done with summer.

Time flies when you’re having fun.  Or something.

I realized I don’t have any sewing supplies up here.   One more thing to add to the list.

Keep stacking.  And figure out where your gaps are.  Then work on filling them.

nick

75 Comments and discussion on "Mon. Aug. 8, 2022 – still at the BOL working"

  1. ~jim says:

    Sailors needles, both big and curved, are handy for all kinds of things.

    Don’t forget the thimbles!

    ~jim
    Minding the gap…

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  2. Greg Norton says:

    August 29. SLS may yet fly once.

    If anyone is tempted, the last time we were there, the area had seen better days and the hotels were kinda creepy. Orlando is an hour away by toll road or about 90 minutes by the twisting SH50, with better food and lodging options.

    IIRC, the state is planning to make part of SH50 tolled as well, however. “The Cheney Highway”.

    I’m not kidding.

    https://www.tampabay.com/news/florida/2022/08/06/100000-expected-for-nasas-moon-launch-from-floridas-space-coast/?itm_source=parsely-api

  3. Greg Norton says:

    Anyone who believes that this forum is a hotbed for tax fraud, here’s your chance to be a hero.

    Of course, it isn’t an anonymous cheap shot when you actually turn someone into the IRS rather than suggesting it might be appropriate for regulars around here to be audited as a strawman in part of some weird dead French philosophy tactic to make this site boring.

    (Guessing. I have a cr*p education, remember.)

    I used this form to turn in my landlords in WA State.

    https://www.irs.gov/individuals/how-do-you-report-suspected-tax-fraud-activity

  4. Ray Thompson says:

    Anyone who believes that this forum is a hotbed for tax fraud, here’s your chance to be a hero.

    I do not recall anyone here stating anything about tax fraud. There have been discussions about dealing with IRS, standing your ground against the IRS, not being intimidated by the IRS, errors by the IRS. Nothing about anyone committing fraud. No one here would be stupid enough to admit committing fraud.

    Someone who is constantly disrespecting others for making false statements, just made a big bone-headed, blatantly false statement themselves. If you can’t clean your own kitchen, don’t complain about the mess in others kitchens.

  5. Pecancorner says:

    I looked yesterday to see if I could find industry info but couldn’t.  Maybe someone here has insight:

    I understand why the stores are all trying to move shoppers to self- checkout.  

    But why are the grocery stores changing their check out stands to have very short conveyer belt areas or counters? They are replacing  approximately 4 ft consumer-side conveyers/slide areas with some that are about 24 inches or less.  This has happened in the two local stores that have replaced their counters. It actually makes it difficult to check out.   

    The ADA recommendations are a minimum of 36″ for accessibility.    None of the new counters, not even the self-check ones, meet this. 

    The first was was Big Lots, and the local store manager actually thought corporate had sent him the wrong counters when they arrived. There is no space to unload goods – the new counters are like those for an express store than only sells 1 – 3 items per customer.   

    The second one is Brookshires, which has revamped their stores to give them a new upscale look. Among the improvements are significantly widened aisles, new carts, and different organization.  But their new check out counters leave only about 24 inches  for me to unload my cart.

    In both of these stores, checkout has become a serious problem for me – so much so that I have reduced my purchases despite them previously being favorite stores for full-cart shopping.  Their managers do not know what purpose the reduced counter space serves.   

  6. Greg Norton says:

    I understand why the stores are all trying to move shoppers to self- checkout.  

    Minimum wage escalation in many states. I know that Florida embarked on a program to increase to $15/hour from the current $10 within the next five years. WA State was … $12 … when we left and recently voted to move that higher.

  7. Alan says:

    >> But why are the grocery stores changing their check out stands to have very short conveyer belt areas or counters?

    My regular store is an Albertsons which has motorized circular checkout counters instead of linear belts. I presume this is an older store design. Each checkout lane splits into two lanes with the second lane going behind the cashier to allow them, or a bagger, easy access to the cart. Also, no self-checkout, but almost always one express lane open, and not uncommon to see the store manager jump in himself to open an additional lane when it gets busy. 

  8. Nick Flandrey says:

    @pecan corner, I haven’t seen anything about shorter counters, but I’ll keep my eyes open.  I can’t think of a good reason unless it’s to provide more impulse buy area…

    87F this morning.  Still humid.  Sunny.

    Woke stiff and sore.  Went back to sleep.    Woke stiff and sore.  Got up.   Had to do my home brew chiropractic back adjustments to walk without pinching.    As satisfying as it was to push thru and finish the job yesterday, and as much as it maid  scents  from a cleanup pov,*  there is atoll to be payed.

    plan for the day remains the same.

    Hope y’all are having a good Monday.

    n

    *THAT couple of sentances should trigger a few people… 🙂

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  9. Greg Norton says:

    Covid hit everyone at my house over the weekend. I believe this is the second time for me, possibly third.

    Regardless, interestingly, my wife and kids are much sicker than I am, and I remain part of the control group without any jabs. I also have a big co-morbidity with asthma.

    A big phlegm ball came up last night and that was the end of it for me. We are all getting tested this afternoon after my wife came up positive with an antigen test this morning.

    If I’m positive, I will try the Ivermectin experiment.

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  10. Pecancorner says:

    Covid hit everyone at my house over the weekend. I believe this is the second time for me, possibly third.

    Regardless, interestingly, my wife and kids are much sicker than I am, and I remain part of the control group without any jabs.

    I hope that you don’t get sick, and that the rest of the family are all well soon!

    My dad finally came down with Covid.  He’s had the shots etc.  He was negative at first, so at the walk in clinic (not his regular Dr),  they treated him for a “bad sinus infection” for an entire week before he went back because he wasn’t better, and this time tested positive.  

    He is as sick as he ever gets , and has had a few days having to stay in bed. Of course the fact that he is building on to the house and worked on the new addition all week has nothing to do with him still being “puny” as he calls it. 

    Midweek he picked me up when I dropped off the truck for the new shocks, then carried me to pick it up a couple days later. He sounded bad so I didn’t hug him but now every sniffle makes me reach for another zinc or Vit D pill LOL

    Whatever variety is going around here is mild enough that hardly anyone is ever hospitalized with it: 189 positive this week in the county, Zero in hospital.   

    But if I get sick we will have to figure out someone to stop in a couple times a day and look after Paul. The family all will as long as they are not sick themselves. Home health could come in.   I’m sure the folks at the little store/cafe/gas station would run us a tab and holler at whoever is there to bring him a breakfast taco and a burger for supper.   🙂 

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  11. Pecancorner says:

    If I’m positive, I will try the Ivermectin experiment.

    Oh I forgot about that.  If I catch it, I’ll ask Daddy to bring me a squirt of one of their unopened tubes. They have a pile of it on hand all the time for the horse. 

    Were two horses, but his 35 year old roping horse passed away last month. Not the first horse he’s lost to old age, but he really misses Chief.  Red’s a good horse, but hasn’t shared as much life with him (yet). 

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  12. lynn says:

    “List of Tax Hikes in Democrat Reconciliation Bill”

        https://www.atr.org/list-of-tax-hikes-in-democrat-reconciliation-bill/

    “$6.5 Billion Natural Gas Tax Which Will Increase Household Energy Bills”

    “$12 Billion Crude Oil Tax Which Will Increase Household Costs”

    “$1.2 Billion Coal Tax Which Will Increase Household Energy Bills”

    “Corporate Income Tax Hike on U.S. Businesses Which Will Be Passed on to Households”

    “$124 Billion Stock Tax Which Will Hit Your Nest Egg — 401(k)s, IRAs and Pension Plans”

    “95% Federal Excise Tax on American Pharmaceutical Manufacturers”

    “$52 Billion Income Tax Hike on Mid-Sized & Family Businesses”

    “Supersizing the IRS to Increase Audits – $124 Billion”

    That is a lot of new taxes.

    Hat tip to:

        https://www.drudgereport.com/

  13. Ray Thompson says:

    That is a lot of new taxes.

    It will kill inflation because no one will have excess money to spend. No spending, no inflation.

    The democrats solution to almost any problem is more government spending, more taxes.

    I would not be surprised if buried somewhere on page 24,904 there is a line for pay raises for congress critters to offset the increase in taxes. Congress critters never lower their standard of living.

  14. Greg Norton says:

    Oh I forgot about that.  If I catch it, I’ll ask Daddy to bring me a squirt of one of their unopened tubes. They have a pile of it on hand all the time for the horse. 

    If your doctor won’t give you the pills and you live in Texas, it is time to find a new doctor.

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  15. Greg Norton says:

    It will kill inflation because no one will have excess money to spend. No spending, no inflation.

    The democrats solution to almost any problem is more government spending, more taxes.

    Don’t Reconciliation bills have to be revenue neutral?

    When Obamacare passed via Reconciliation, a follow up bill early the following year nationalized the student loan program to support the healthcare plan.

    We had to pass the bill to find out what was in it.

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  16. Nick Flandrey says:

    Every ad  for me on zerohedge is for pex repiping today.

    I suppose it could be coincidence, but I’m guessing not.

    I caution commentors to pull back the nasty a bit more.   you can make your point and provide a link without getting nasty.  

    n

  17. paul says:

    You see ads on Zerohedge?  I don’t.

  18. lynn says:

    I caution commentors to pull back the nasty a bit more.   you can make your point and provide a link without getting nasty.  

    I don’t follow anything that a certain commenter comments on.  I find him / her / it not to be trustworthy.

    And I hope that I have not been nasty.  If so, please tell me so.

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  19. Ray Thompson says:

    In Arstechnica there is an article stating that 58% of human diseases are made worse by climate change.

    https://arstechnica.com/science/2022/08/58-of-human-infectious-diseases-can-be-worsened-by-climate-change/

    When I see numbers that precise I question the entire article. 58%? Why not 60% or 50%? Only thing that would make it worse is if they stated 57.32%.

    Numbers that odd indicate pulling from the sky to make a point without any real research. Some of the stuff they claim is caused by climate change, such as rats coming into communities, could be because cities are expanding. In the case of New York, becoming trashier. Some spread of diseases could be caused by the influx of vermin carrying humans from third world countries.

    However, that is not the desired result. Instead take events that will cause increase in human diseases and attribute those events to climate change. Never mind that climate may not be the primary factor.

    When a study conceives a result, then looks for ways to justify the result, that is not a study. It is junk. I would also wager there was a lot of money involved.

  20. Ray Thompson says:

    And I hope that I have not been nasty.

    Nope, nasty was the phlegm ball that was horked up.

  21. paul says:

    I don’t know how long flour tortilla mix keeps.  Tomorrow’s Project.  It’s not buggy, it still has that baking powder taste.  Use by May 2020.

    If the stuff has gone flat, it’s only about three cups of wasted mix.  I have more.  Vac sealed and frozen for a week.  It should be like new.  I opened a five pound bag of Aunt Jemima corn bread mix a few months ago and without reading the date you wouldn’t know the expire date was over three years ago. 

    I don’t make pretty tortillas.  Not enough practice.  But about five inches across and shaped like Ohio works for me.  They are fresh and taste great.

    Science! or something along with “Use what you stack”.

  22. Greg Norton says:

    Nope, nasty was the phlegm ball that was horked up.

    Apologies.

    I got the Wuxu Flu. I just tested positive.

    I actually felt the worst on Saturday morning, when I did not want to get out of bed.

    I’m not the type to let that stop me, though. Power on. 

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  23. Pecancorner says:

    I don’t know how long flour tortilla mix keeps.  Tomorrow’s Project.  It’s not buggy, it still has that baking powder taste.  Use by May 2020.

    If the stuff has gone flat, it’s only about three cups of wasted mix.  I have more.  Vac sealed and frozen for a week.  It should be like new.  I opened a five pound bag of Aunt Jemima corn bread mix a few months ago and without reading the date you wouldn’t know the expire date was over three years ago. 

    I don’t make pretty tortillas.  Not enough practice.  But about five inches across and shaped like Ohio works for me.  They are fresh and taste great.

    Looking forward to hearing how they turn out!   I’ve had cornbread mix go flat (those small packages), so nowadays if it’s more than a year old, I just put in some fresh baking powder, or some baking soda then add a tablespoon of vinegar to the milk. 

    Tortillas never care what they look like!  Good for you making your own. That is the best kind. 

  24. Nick Flandrey says:

    You see ads on Zerohedge?  I don’t.

    only on my phone, where I also don’t have a spell checker or autocorrect when using a bluetooth keyboard, and text is scaling strangely so I can’t even read some of what’s on the page… 

    n

  25. Nick Flandrey says:

    Home.   Missed a rainshower.   Must have felt like a storm, for a few minutes anyway.  Rain gauge says 0.06 inches but there is water in the gutters.

    Power blinked too.

    Traffic was light coming home, but heavy the other way.  Strange for the time of day.

    Got the toilet seat installed, and found what I though was the problem with the flush flapper leaking.   But it is still ‘running’.   Next visit.   Until then I just turned off the water.

    n

  26. CowboyStu says:

    @lynn  – sorry to see you go. Any particular reason? Your insights into the oil/energy business have been interesting.

    YUUUP! I agree Rick.  My interpretation is that lynn is tired of NaN belittling him.  IM(not so)HO, lynn is exceptionally intelligent.  This is because I have a similar education and totally agree with all his posts regarding science and technology.

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  27. EdH says:

    Someone gave me an old laptop.

    And by ‘old’ I mean 13.5 pounds of ca. 2005 HP running WinXP in 2G of ram…if I can get it to boot.

    Its kind of like getting a smilodon for a present.  There is an even heavier docking station.

  28. Rick H says:

    I don’t think a comment should be deleted because of a disagreement with the comment. (I just roll my eyes and move on.)

    If the comment is offensive or a personal attack on another commenter or their family, then deletion is OK. No matter who it is from. Anyone.

    I refresh this page several times an hour because I enjoy the wide variety of comments.If I don’t agree with a comment, I will move on. But any offensive/personal attack, no matter who it is from, should be (and usually is) removed from the site. Not immediately, but it will be removed.

    I don’t want to get to a point where every single comment needs to be approved. And I don’t think that is necessary. 

    OK to disagree politely. Or ignore comments you don’t agree with. But keep it civil. All of you.

  29. Nick Flandrey says:

    @EdH,  there are light weight linux distros that might run on it.   I’ve got one XP machine still here to run my vinyl cutter… but it normally sits turned off.  One day it won’t boot and I’ll have to resurrect another old machine….

    I hate the idea of replacing perfectly good hardware (the cutter) because windows aged out and they didn’t write new drivers for more modern OSs.

    n

  30. Rolf Grunsky says:

    @Pecancorner

    Some of the supermarkets here (Toronto) have the short check out conveyor belts.  The local Sobys has but there are two lanes with two checkouts end to end for a total of four cashiers. It’s also a small store. The Metro in College Park has the short checkouts but there are only three but a lot of self-checkouts. There is seldom more that one cashier.

    I saw the circular checkouts in a small store in Victoria (B.C.) several years ago but that was only place in at least thirty years.

    No minimum wage cashiers here, they are all unionized.

  31. Nick Flandrey says:

    I have a cousin who started as a bagger at 16, joined the union, and retired as a cashier, 20 years later with a nice pension…. she wasn’t the sharpest tool in the shed, but nice enough.

    n

  32. EdH says:

    @Nick:  Yes, I used  to use puppylinux as a rescue disk, back in the days when computers used disks.

    I have a friend that wants to run dosbox for some very old educational software (abandonware mostly). I think I mentioned it a while back. My recommendation was to not use their main machine, but another, so they came up with this.

    It may suffice for that, though the 17yo spinning rust is problematic. And the clock battery is probably dead. 

    Amusingly there is a sticker by some IT department identifying it as a MacBook Air. Ok…

  33. Nick Flandrey says:

    @EdH, I remember the request, don’t remember the answer, but doing it on old hardware seems like a better solution than jumping thru hoops to get it to work on modern stuff.   Those old machines were so resource constrained that programmers used to cheat all the time and do undocumented/unapproved things to get performance gains, or even just to get stuff to run.   

    Just look at the games on MAME, where clever programmers ‘cheated’ to get a game running, and now it won’t run correctly on MAME because of their clever hack.

    Of course, WAY back in the TRS-80 days, we played games with a transistor radio sitting next to the computer, tuned to hear the noisy chips in their timing loops providing “sound” for the games.   Clever monkeys!

    n

  34. Greg Norton says:

    Someone gave me an old laptop.

    And by ‘old’ I mean 13.5 pounds of ca. 2005 HP running WinXP in 2G of ram…if I can get it to boot.

    Its kind of like getting a smilodon for a present.  There is an even heavier docking station.

    Try installing CentOS 4.x 32 bit. That should fit into the hardware specs.

    Isos are here:

    https://vault.centos.org/4.9/isos/i386/

    You may have to dig around for information about how to set up yum properly to update such an old release.

    The last set of binaries of Linux NetClient I made were built on CentOS 3/4. I think it would still be possible to get those running on a modern Linux if IBM hadn’t deprecated the public keys. Still, there are ways around that problem too.

    I honestly doubt that the Death Star has the source around anymore.

  35. Rick H says:

    I will assume, lacking specific knowledge, that any search of any home (even an ex-presidential home) meets proper legal requirements. That’s not to say there can be (or has been) abuse, but overall, it seems to be proper. IMHO.

    I am not a ‘he can do no wrong’ person. It seems to me, even if politically motivated, that the information from that investigation has proven that there is some need for consequences for his acts and opinions.  I am not sure what those consequences are, but there appears to be some damning evidence of impropriety or perhaps even treasonous actions in regards to the election and aftermath.

    IMHO / YMMV. But that’s the nice thing about this place. We can express our own opinions without seeing that as a personal attack just because we may not agree on something. We don’t attack people, but provide our opinions. (Attacking people because of their opinion is not appropriate. No matter who does it.)

    I heard someone say that he hates to lose. And he will blame anyone or anything for any loss. Even if that blame is totally bogus.

    IMHO.

  36. Ed says:

    We can express our own opinions without seeing that as a personal attack just because we may not agree on something
     

    I’m sorry, but I’ve come to realize that’s no longer true. I’ve seen recent examples where legitimate comments are deleted because people don’t seem to like what they say. You shouldn’t stifle legitimate discourse, and if you keep it up, it’s likely that others will leave, too. 

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  37. Nick Flandrey says:

    Hi Ed. I’m not deleting comments because of content I disagree with. I am deleting comments with attacks against other commentors here, by a person who has demonstrated ill will and bad faith on many occasions. I will continue to do so because his comments attack the foundation of what we have here, a “safe” space for lack of a better term. He has repeatedly mined the site AND OTHERS for information he can use against commentors he doesn’t like, including me.

    He has been informed on many occasions WHY his comments are offensive, and it isn’t that he disagrees with someone, it’s HOW he disagrees.

    I’m not “stifling” anything. I’m cleaning up after ONE person feels like they can piss on my parlor floor, and tell me how silly I look mopping it up.

    I will not let one person change the tone of this place to something toxic.

    If you’d like to see some of the content that was deleted, including personal attacks on family, email me from the email you used to comment.

    nick

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  38. Ed says:

    I’m not deleting comments because of content I disagree with

    I struggle to accept that as true. There was a post earlier today, and it pointed out how an article Lynn linked to might have been incomplete or misleading. Instead of letting discourse about it develop, it looks like you (or maybe Rick or other admins) deleted EVERYTHING related to that “thought thread”. 

    More concerning, it looks like you deleted or redacted posts AFTER Lynn said he was done here. You are creating an inaccurate, misleading trail of posts.

    My belief is that you need to stop deleting posts simply because one person makes them, start enforcing your comment guidelines rigidly and against EVERYONE, and resist the urge to make this a “safe space” where posts that buck the norm are deleted simply because you (or others) don’t like to see them. 

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  39. Nick Flandrey says:

    Nope.    Not gonna happen because then it  just turns into endless barracks lawyering. 

    Stay or go, up to you.  If you liked the way it was before, I find it hard to believe you like it now with the toxicity and inside baseball… and want to make it even worse by accentuating those aspects.

    FWIW  I agree that some of his posts did raise counterpoints, and I regret (a tiny bit) deleting those, but he only did so when pushed, and couldn’t keep himself from adding attacks against the original commentor.  He was warned many times that I won’t tolerate him doing that.

    nick

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  40. Ed says:

    I guess to make it even more clear: Lynn seems have left because someone made a comment suggesting he didn’t like having his assumptions challenged. 
     

    I feel the exact opposite: people SHOULD be okay having their assumptions challenged, and they should be prepared to respond by defending them or by being willing to adapt or change them. But simply running away because you don’t like hearing things you don’t want to hear? To me, that is the sign of a weakling. 

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  41. Ed says:

    I disagree, Nick. I saw posts that you (again, or Rick?) later deleted that didn’t include personal attacks. Maybe I refresh too often, but thats because I’m used to how things used to be here. 

  42. Alan says:

    >> Anyone who believes that this forum is a hotbed for tax fraud, here’s your chance to be a hero.

    I lost all my tax returns when I accidentally dropped them in the river. Of course getting harder to do happen with these receding water levels. 

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  43. Ed says:

    If you liked the way it was before, I find it hard to believe you like it now with the toxicity and inside baseball

    No, I really don’t. Truth be told, I wish you, Rick, etc. would keep the blog closer to what Bob did. The constant “doomsday prepper” doom and gloom and MAGA-type enthusiasm is too much, and I think it’s contributing to turning people off. There’s a lot of good (and great) news being reported that I feel like doesn’t get commented on here because everything is filtered through a very conservative political lens. The James Webb telescope, advancements in medical technologies (mRNA vaccines proving their value, etc) are all ignored because they don’t fit the narrative that “everything is bad and only getting worse”. 

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  44. Ed says:

    Nope.    Not gonna happen because then it  just turns into endless barracks lawyering. 
     

    I don’t know what exactly you’re saying “nope” to, and I don’t know what “barracks lawyering” is, but, if you’re saying that you won’t uniformly apply neutral editorial policies, then I am DEFINITELY concerned about the future of this place. I think you’ll see more and more departures until it turns from an echo chamber into a party of one. 

  45. Nick Flandrey says:

    @Ed, see there you go.

    I guess to make it even more clear: Lynn seems have left because someone made a comment suggesting he didn’t like having his assumptions challenged. 

    === Lynn and I objected to the comment because it was made as an attack on him and his family.  And it wasn’t someone  it was nAn.  

     

    I feel the exact opposite: people SHOULD be okay having their assumptions challenged, and they should be prepared to respond by defending them or by being willing to adapt or change them. 

    – the basic assumption that we are a convivial group that won’t play gotcha games or use personal details that are shared to attack us later is the one I’M defending here.

    But simply running away because you don’t like hearing things you don’t want to hear? To me, that is the sign of a weakling. 

    and there you go, edging toward name calling. 

    n

  46. Ed says:

    Lynn and I objected to the comment because it was made as an attack on him and his family

    How? What do you define as an attack?

    the basic assumption that we are a convivial group that won’t play gotcha games or use personal details that are shared to attack us later is the one I’M defending here.

    I agree. My point is that I’ve seen comments that DON’T do these things get deleted. That is my concern. 

    and there you go, edging toward name calling. 

    I apologize. I didn’t mean to name-call. What I meant was that people should be prepared to have assumptions challenged.

  47. Nick Flandrey says:

    I don’t know what exactly you’re saying “nope” to,

    nope to your proposal.   

     and I don’t know what “barracks lawyering” is, 

    – google is your friend.  see also “shithouse lawyer”

    but, if you’re saying that you won’t uniformly apply neutral editorial policies,

    – I will do what I feel best serves the needs of the site.  I’m not neutral, and am under no obligation to be, or to tolerate behavior I don’t like, as I’ve said many times.

     then I am DEFINITELY concerned about the future of this place. I think you’ll see more and more departures until it turns from an echo chamber into a party of one. 

    ah, concern trolling.  Working your way thru the list?

    n

  48. Nick Flandrey says:

    I haven’t had to delete any comments in 4 years (with I think possibly 2 exceptions) until nAn showed up.   It’s not a thing I wish to spend time or energy on.  

    Don’t say shitty  things about people here, don’t offend ME, don’t attempt to dox anyone here, assume good intent.

    Pretty simple.   

    (and the other two people I deleted, you should have gotten email explaining why, and offering to put it back if you really want to.)

    n

  49. Ed says:

    This is the part that concerns me: 

    I will do what I feel best serves the needs of the site.  I’m not neutral, and am under no obligation to be, or to tolerate behavior I don’t like, as I’ve said many times.

    Earlier, Rick said: 

    If the comment is offensive or a personal attack on another commenter or their family, then deletion is OK. No matter who it is from. Anyone.

    I refresh this page several times an hour because I enjoy the wide variety of comments.If I don’t agree with a comment, I will move on. But any offensive/personal attack, no matter who it is from, should be (and usually is) removed from the site. Not immediately, but it will be removed.

    So, and I ask this honestly: which is the policy? Is it “everything is at Nick’s discretion” or “we use Rick’s uniform, neutral approach”? I guess the basic question is, who (Nick or Rick) is actually in charge now? 

  50. Ed says:

    don’t attempt to dox anyone here

    Could you elaborate on what happened here?

  51. Nick Flandrey says:

    I apologize. I didn’t mean to name-call. 

    -accepted in good faith.  sorry for the cross post.

    What I meant was that people should be prepared to have assumptions challenged.

    – interesting.  Why?   While we do go back and forth, and there are a wide variety of opinions and experiences, and reasons for commenting, why assume that people want or need to be “challenged” on everything they comment on?  Why particularly would you assume that on a comment seeking information about medical help for a sick child?

    This is something in art as well, the idea that it’s not great art if it doesn’t “challenge” the audience.   I think it’s just easier to attack people or p!ss them off than entertain or enlighten.   Easier to break than build.

    n

  52. Nick Flandrey says:

    Could you elaborate on what happened here? 

    – no

    n

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  53. Ed says:

    don’t offend ME

    RBT once said something along the lines of, the only person to offend me used a two-by-four to do it. I think his willingness to accept criticism (instead if deleting posts) is what made his blog very, very different. 

  54. Ed says:

    Could you elaborate on what happened here? 

    – no

    n

    I think I know what you are referring to, and I think the problem is that you don’t know the full content of the blog you have taken control of. There’s more here than you think, to be blunt. 

    Easier to break than build.

    I’m surprised to see you say that, since nearly all of your posts are negative. 

  55. Nick Flandrey says:

    @ed, or whoever, 

    Free icecream.   

    Do what you want.   I already stated my position about trying to use Bob as a weapon.  Show some proof you ever knew him.   Email exchange forwarded to my address will work. 

    I’ll let you know if you offend me.

    n

  56. Nick Flandrey says:

    Ah and Nanny reveals himself.     

    n

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  57. Alan says:

    >> But why are the grocery stores changing their check out stands to have very short conveyer belt areas or counters? They are replacing  approximately 4 ft consumer-side conveyers/slide areas with some that are about 24 inches or less.  This has happened in the two local stores that have replaced their counters. It actually makes it difficult to check out. 

    Iirc, our Target has just shelf space, maybe 24″ wide, enough to set down a few items. Last time I was at Wally Mart the self-checkouts had a narrower/shorter conveyer belt. Target (ours at least) has no scale built into the bagging area so if I have a cart I don’t unload it at all, instead grabbing items from the cart, scanning and then dropping them into a bag. Full bags go from the bag rack into the cart. Wally has scales, but I don’t go there for full-cart shopping. 

  58. Ed says:

    Ah and Nanny reveals himself.     

    n
     

    Is this directed at me? If so….what?

  59. Alan says:

    >> I’m sure the folks at the little store/cafe/gas station would run us a tab and holler at whoever is there to bring him a breakfast taco and a burger for supper.

    @Pecancorner, what’s in their breakfast tacos? Always looking for new breakfast ideas. Thanks. 

    Btw, I just make mine with cake 😉 

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  60. drwilliams says:

    @Lynn posted this earlier:

    “List of Tax Hikes in Democrat Reconciliation Bill”

        https://www.atr.org/list-of-tax-hikes-in-democrat-reconciliation-bill/

    “$6.5 Billion Natural Gas Tax Which Will Increase Household Energy Bills”

    “$12 Billion Crude Oil Tax Which Will Increase Household Costs”

    “$1.2 Billion Coal Tax Which Will Increase Household Energy Bills”

    “Corporate Income Tax Hike on U.S. Businesses Which Will Be Passed on to Households”

    “$124 Billion Stock Tax Which Will Hit Your Nest Egg — 401(k)s, IRAs and Pension Plans”

    “95% Federal Excise Tax on American Pharmaceutical Manufacturers”

    “$52 Billion Income Tax Hike on Mid-Sized & Family Businesses”

    “Supersizing the IRS to Increase Audits – $124 Billion”

    That is a lot of new taxes.

    The first paragraph in the link is:

    The bill imposes a regressive tax on American oil and gas development. The tax will drive up the cost of household energy bills. The Congressional Budget Office estimates the natural gas tax will increase taxes by $6.5 billion.

    I spent some not-so-quality time with the CBO document 

    https://www.cbo.gov/system/files/2022-08/hr5376_IR_Act_8-3-22.pdf

    (which is fiction in my not-so-humble-opinion, based solely on the fact that it purports to analyze a bill of obscene length and totally unknown origins in a weeks time. bullshit) and found this 

    Subtitle A. Air Pollution
    Sec. 60113 Methane Emissions Reduction
    Program

    on page 32, with a 2022-2031 total of $6.35 billion for “increases in Revenues” aka taxes.

    I suspect that is the origin of the “$6.5 billion”  as quoted above.

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  61. Ed says:

    I read that comment and others after it. You’re being misleading. 
     

    The link about the 6.5 whatever goes here, and that document (a letter to a senator?) says nothing about a gas, oil, or whatever tax. 
     

    The earlier comments (I don’t know by who, because it’s all been deleted) were correct in pointing out the flaws. The fact that you found something else that, maybe if you squint at it, looks like 6.4 (which is not 6.5), doesn’t matter. The original article that Lynn copied completely without critically considering was wrong, wrong, wrong, and you know it. 

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  62. drwilliams says:

    This commentary is purposefully separated from the previous post, because intemperance beckons.

    NaNo took a cursory look at the CBO report, couldn’t find a crayon trail to the $6.5 billion, threw a hissy fit and attacked Lynn. Again.

    This time I did his homework–it took all of five minutes–and posted it above to show that he is a febrile idiot. Is it conclusive? Take a vote. If I wanted to verify I’d send an email and ask. Feel free.

    This is just the latest example of an anonymous cretin shitting up the place.

    You know what happens when they find one turd floating in the public pool? Right. Everybody out of the pool. So do any of you with the keys to this place really have any doubts about what the objective is? Did you ever? If you guys can’t figure out how to handle it I’m in the wrong place.

  63. drwilliams says:

    Ed says:

    I read that comment and others after it. You’re being misleading. 

    No, Ed, I’m not being misleading. And I didn’t have to squint hard at all. I’m using Reading Comprehension to comprehend the meaning of “The Congressional Budget Office estimates the natural gas tax will increase taxes by $6.5 billion.” and looking for the actual estimates, which are clearly in the document on the linked page as:

    Estimated Budgetary Effects of H.R. 5376, the Inflation Reduction Act of 2022 

    The original article that Lynn copied completely without critically considering was wrong, wrong, wrong, and you know it. 

    I’ve shown my work. If you believe it’s incorrect, why don’t you try to prove it? Send the email and ask where they got the number. Or have a better idea and follow-up. “wrong, wrong, wrong” just looks like repetition without content.

  64. Greg Norton says:

    Well, the dems went nuclear…  

    Another Nothingburger.

    The US Government owned the compound for a while, but they could never adequately secure the grounds for use as a Presidential retreat ala Camp David.

  65. drwilliams says:

    @RickH

    I will assume, lacking specific knowledge, that any search of any home (even an ex-presidential home) meets proper legal requirements. That’s not to say there can be (or has been) abuse, but overall, it seems to be proper. IMHO.

    “Proper legal requirements” is getting a search warrant application signed off by a judge. The problem here is past performance proving conclusively that this process is deeply flawed and has been abused specifically to target President Trump. The example of the fraudulent applications to the FISA court are conclusive.

    In a larger sense, the same players have shown the objective of protecting the corrupt Biden Crime Family through overt action (Project Veritas) and inaction (Hunter Biden’s laptop).

    If you follow similar abuses at state and local levels of government, you find the same patterns: government abuse of process, often based on downright fraud or violations of constitutional protections, coupled with a total lack of curiosity and an obstinate refusal by most of the media to acknowledge or report.

    I won’t claim that it’s always Democrats, but I don’t recall the courts/DOJ/FBI following the above pattern for any Republican president.

    And, yeah, anniversary of Ruby Ridge, Where murders got medals.

    ADDED
    National Archives? You mean the professionals that are finding trigger phrases in our founding documents. Give me a break. They’d certify a grocery list as government property to get Trump. I doubt there is a single president in the last fifty years that hasn’t taken “classified” documents (the lowest level) out the door when he left. We know that Hillary Clinton did as SoS, but I don’t recall any search warrant and safe breaking. I’d wager that Hunter Biden’s laptop contains some classified information.

    And how about the strange case of Sandy Berger stealing documents from the National Archives and smuggling them out in his pants? Or the “mysterious” theft from the National Archives of two terrabytes of Clinton-era documents, while Hillary was SecState?

  66. Alan says:

    >> In a larger sense, the same players have shown the objective of protecting the corrupt Biden Crime Family through overt action (Project Veritas) and inaction (Hunter Biden’s laptop).

    Don’t forget the diary, the showers, the hair fetishes. 

  67. drwilliams says:

    the diary, the showers, the fetishes was Project Veritas

  68. Alan says:

    >> I think the problem is that you don’t know the full content of the blog you have taken control of. There’s more here than you think, to be blunt. 

    @Ed, can you explain? 

  69. Kenneth C Mitchell says:

    Running on ancient hardware;  I think it was one of the CNET threads about 3 weeks ago said that ChromeOS is an excellent choice for getting SOME use out of older hardware.  I was planning on trying that, but haven’t yet. 

    Of course, my oldest laptop is a Sony Vaio, that still runs Win98, and I keep it because there’s an old game that ONLY ran on that OS. 

  70. Nick Flandrey says:

    I’d wager that Hunter Biden’s laptop contains some classified information.

      – huma abedeen’s pervert husband had classified info on his laptop, and no reason to have ever had it.

    n

  71. Nick Flandrey says:

    My winME lappy failed to boot last time I tried.   It was the oldest running machine I had on the desk.  I had it set up with the IDE for the arduino when I thought I might have time to mess around with that.  A long time ago 🙂

    n

  72. Nick Flandrey says:

    Someone mentioned cornbread in a cast iron pan.   Yep, I’ve had really good luck with that.  It’s one way to start the seasoning of a pan after rehabbing it too.   Lots of oil, cornbread mix, heat, cool, eat.

    n

  73. brad says:

    I’m watching the interwebs explode over the FBI raid of Trump’s estate. On the one hand, I assume they wouldn’t raid a former president without being absolutely certain that their warrant is solid. On the other hand, this is serious political theater, and the timing (shortly before elections) is unlikely to be coincidence.

    On the gripping hand, I find it hard to believe this is about 15 boxes of missing documents. That makes no sense, for lots of reasons. Bet: they’re looking for something else entirely, and the boxes of documents are subtle (and successful) misdirection.

    – – – – –

    My tech blogs are ranting about Amazon buying iRobot. I hadn’t thought much about it, until commenters pointed out that Roombas not only map your house, but are able to map all of your WiFi (and probably Bluetooth) devices.

    That’s a lot of valuable, personal data that Amazon is about to acquire.

    – – – – –

    Meanwhile, it’s thesis time. Here, bachelor students have to do a large, solo project, write up their results in a formal thesis, and then defend this in a formal presentation.

    There are amazing differences, even between good theses. I had one student today who gave a 30-minute presentation, short and to the point. He doesn’t have to hand in the written thesis until Friday, but I suppose it will be much the same.

    Meanwhile, I have another student who planned his presentation to be 60 minutes, and went massively overtime. His thesis document is three times the recommended length. The content is good, but why use one word when twenty will do? He’s going to become one of those managers whose employees struggle to say awake in his endless meetings.

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