Sun. Nov. 26, 2023 – less than a month ’til Christmas…

Cool and clear, sunny. Yesterday was pretty dang nice. Some clouds, and overcast at the Ren Faire most of the afternoon, but nice temps. It would be great if today was the same.

My summary of my day at the Texas Renaissance Faire is in comments yesterday. I enjoyed it. Not a cheap day out, but a day out in the woods, and there was certainly plenty to look at. D2 enjoyed it, which was the main point.

Today I’m hoping to get some Christmas decor and lighting set up. I’ve got a bunch of new lights and some other stuff for this year, and I don’t have a clear idea of what I have or how to use it best, so I have some experimenting to do. I’m also looking at getting a bunch of cheap artificial trees and setting them up outside as part of the display. A forest of Christmas trees, as it were. We’ll see what I end up with. Figuring it out on the fly is part of the fun for me.

I think that public participation in the rituals and traditions of our culture is vitally important, not only for my own kids, but for the continuation of our culture in general. We celebrate a secular version of Christmas, not a religious one, and yeah, I get the issues with that, but it’s what we do… and Americans basically invented most of that from the whole cloth, or stole bits and pieces shamelessly to suit ourselves. It works for us and provides a framework for the coming month. It builds family memories and traditions too. These ARE the ‘good old days’ so do your best to make sure they are “good”.

We are fighting for our very existence culturally. I’ll take every thing I can that helps.

Stack it up, go the extra mile, be the force for change.

nick

95 Comments and discussion on "Sun. Nov. 26, 2023 – less than a month ’til Christmas…"

  1. SteveF says:

    Trigger warnings are for the woke.

    I was going to say that they’re for the feeble-minded, the weak, and the childish, but we’re saying the same thing.

    We are fighting for our very existence culturally.

    The fight is made more difficult by traitors.

    Remember: If you’re faced with an enemy and a traitor and you have only one bullet, shoot the traitor.

  2. Greg Norton says:

    Far more old people than I expected, some aging hippies, but more that were just 10 or more years into retirement, and most of them were dressed up.   Lot of puffy males that had “Austin techie” written all over them.   An astounding number of kilt wearers.

    Last weekend’s theme was “Highland Fling”, and I counted at least three vendors selling the same Hecho en China kilts. A large number of people were buying.

    This weekend was “Celtic Christmas”, probably with some wardrobe selection overlap depending on kilt pattern.

    Not that wardrobe selection really matters. Anything goes at those events for the most part as long as it meets the minimum rules. I avoid being a freak at a place like TRF, but if a anime con puts vendors on the open floor selling tentacle porn, I consider the venue fair game.

    I don’t worry about my personal safety at the area cons or ren fairs, but, like I said, Pedos and other deviants are out in force anyplace around Austin which advertises as a “family friendly” attraction. Watch the kids.

  3. Greg Norton says:

    My summary of my day at the Texas Renaissance Faire is in comments yesterday. I enjoyed it. Not a cheap day out, but a day out in the woods, and there was certainly plenty to look at. D2 enjoyed it, which was the main point.

    BTW, a new Buc-ee’s is about 10 miles from the TRF grounds on 290 and we always stop before heading back to Austin.

    Last Saturday night, however, most of the fountain drink selections were out, much like New Braunfels was the day after 4th of July with the masses tubing on the river.

    Mixins. TRF isn’t far enough from Austin to avoid the Bacchanalia and there is the Louisiana influence overlapping.

    The cooler always gets its own tube for the river. No disposable containers allowed.

  4. lynn says:

    It is 56 F and it has been raining on the West side of the Brazos River this morning.  The varmints are very unhappy about the wet grass.  

    Miss Varmint, aka Lily, slept on my legs at 6am.  She must have been cold since she was trying to push me off MY bed.

  5. Greg Norton says:

    Remember: If you’re faced with an enemy and a traitor and you have only one bullet, shoot the traitor.

    The lesson of Rolf Gruber in “The Sound of Music” used to be reinforced with airings of the movie on NBC every Easter.

    The danger is that I’d estimate about half of the white population of the US, Canada, and Europe aspire to be Rolf. The pandemic pulled back the curtain on that previously latent desire with people turning in their neighbors for gathering too many people during lockdown in places like California and eagerly anticipating door-to-door volunteer jab squads.

    The desire hasn’t gone away but just faded into the background.

    Yes, your neighbor doesn’t care if you ended up being loaded into a boxcar as long as the next owner of the house keeps the grass cut properly.

  6. lpdbw says:

    re: pointy things

    My let’s-call-him-stepson is a 25-year-old student of HEMA, Historical European Martial Arts, and will be attending  a sword tournament in Finland this Winter.

    There is much formal training and technique involved.  It’s not just whomping and stomping.

  7. Nick Flandrey says:

    57F with some seriously gusting wind.  No rain yet, but it is darkish and grey out.

    The “metal on metal” fight show at the Faire was mostly bash and grapple, but it didn’t look like they were holding back much.   Serious padding under armor, and I can’t imagine doing it in 90F+ heat.

    Celtic Christmas… ok that explains a lot of it.     The whole little Greektown area is still a mystery.

    Did anyone see reports of fighting or camping out overnight for Black Friday sales?   I didn’t and I’m usually watching for t hat stuff.  No demand?  No good sales?

    WRT chinese crap, I’m pretty sure that any “damascus” knife or sword for sale outside of a specialist shop, with youtube vids showing the process, is chinese crap.   There are metric tons of it for sale all of a sudden, like  those “rambo” survival knives used to be everywhere, the ones with the hollow handle….and the big saw teeth on the back.  “Damascus” in a knife is like “granite” in a home listing used to be.  Had to be there even if the result looked like cheap cr@p.

    mmmmm coffee is ready.

    n

  8. Greg Norton says:

    We watched the first Doctor Who special this evening. The trans  normalcy pushing was obvious and expected. The disabled/wheelchair a little less so.

    Still, I enjoyed the story. I don’t expect the next two to be any less preachy. But Tennant and Tate can overcome a lot of bad script material.

    At least they didn’t try to pass off the trans individual as a biological girl and genetic offspring of Catherine Tate.

    Disney influence was obvious. I could probably reconstruct the passed production notes perfectly.

    To be fair, a year ago, I doubt anyone at Sony or the BBC, the production partners, imagined Disney becoming the dumpster fire that it is right now.

  9. Nick Flandrey says:

    The monkeys at disney have been engaged in growth thru buying all the things.   We’ve seen other companies do the same, when there is no organic growth  because they have lost their way or lost their market, FAKE the growth and profit by buying other assets.

    Strip mine the assets.   Discard.   Crash and burn when you run out of cash or credibility.

    The clues were there if anyone had eyes to see.   All the way back to the Tatiana and the frog thing….

    n

  10. Brad says:

    We’ve seen other companies do the same, when there is no organic growth

    Growth isn’t necessary. Thinkingvhat it is, is kind of a perversion of cspitalusm, and winds up driving these stupid M&A activities.

    Take something prosaic like your local garbage collection company. The market is pretty much a fixed size. Likely they make decent money. There’s no reason not to just do that, year after year.

  11. Greg Norton says:

    All the way back to the Tatiana and the frog thing….

    You mean the movie or the retheming of Splash Mountain with a storyline involving “Princess” Tatiana which cribs from the controversy over the origins of Tobasco sauce?

  12. Nick Flandrey says:

    The original pandering movie.

    n

    Or even farther back, replacing the Magical Light Show with the white light washed out pale version celebrating that greek mythology movie that no one saw.   At least someone had the sense to undo that mistake and bring back the beloved colorful parade.

    Or watch the making of video about the Himalaya attraction.   The chief imagineer is so high on the smell of his own farts he makes tesla owners look level headed.

  13. Nick Flandrey says:

    Little piece of my childhood died…

    Marty Krofft has died age 86: TV producer and the pioneer among many iconic children’s shows sadly passed due to kidney failure 

     

    The TV producer, who is famed for being behind Land Of The Lost, H.R. Pufnstuf and Donny And Marie, sadly passed due to kidney failure.

    n

  14. Nick Flandrey says:

    Talk about convoluted… 

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-12791761/Pennsylvania-homeless-shooting-charged-killing.html 

    Pennsylvania homeless advocate Tom Niarhos devastated after teenage son, 15, is charged with shooting dead itinerant, 39, who he accused of raping his girlfriend, 16, behind a dumpster

    • Thomas James Niarhos has been charged with first degree murder after shooting dead Jeremiah Waylon Hawkins 
    • According to investigators, the motive in the shooting may be related to an alleged sexual assault of Niarhos’ girlfriend four months earlier 
    • Speaking to DailyMail.com, Niarhos’ father has called the incident ‘a tragedy’ as his son was remanded into custody at a youth center

    – that is some F’d up writing and editorial choices right there.   WTF is the focus on t he father?   Rather than the raped girl, or the tragedy of the son taking justice in his own hands?   Some sort of attempt to play on the irony of the father being a homelessness supporter and his son killing a homeless man?  The original headline…

    Pennsylvania homeless advocate is left devastated after son, 15, ‘shoots and kills vagrant, 39,’ who he accused of raping his girlfriend, 16, behind a dumpster

    “vagrant” changed to “itinerant”   – nice.   

    n

  15. Greg Norton says:

    My son’s computer came home from college with him for what I thought would be a simple hard drive swap but the machine won’t POST ever since replacing the drive.

    I put the old drive back to no avail.

    The cause may be the second AMD A320 chipset motherboard I’ve lost in the last two years running the same CPU. I think heat from the first gen Ryzen eventually kills the boards regardless of manufacturer.

    The next board will be an Asus. We’ll see how long that lasts. I don’t want to give up on the box because a paid OEM license for Windows 10 is tied to the CPU, and I won’t be able to replace that now that Redmond has decided to deprecate Windows 10 in favor of 11.

    Temporarily, he took my newest system with Windows 11 to use through the end of the semester in two weeks. He’s mostly using the desktop for Steam.

  16. lpdbw says:

    Apparently there was a shooting in the parking lot at the Katy Mills Mall last night.

    It’s not exactly close to me, but I go there often in the Summer to do my exercise walks in the air conditioning.  

    Of course, I won’t be hanging out there after 9 PM on a Saturday.  

    Remembering the rules of stupid:  Don’t do stupid things at stupid places at stupid times around stupid people.

  17. Nick Flandrey says:

    For several years we watched the fireworks on the 4th from the parking lot at Katy Mills.    It was a good place to watch from, we met friends who drove in from the other direction, and there was enough room it didn’t feel crowded.    I’ve written here about it before.

    Everything is changing…

    n

  18. Nick Flandrey says:

    Growth isn’t necessary.  

    – I agree.  It’s anathema to modern economics and business, but how often have you seen a successful business destroyed when “just keep doing what we have been doing well for decades” changes to “we can make a lot more money by growing!”

    Some European countries were well on the way to upgrading vs expanding before the lefties decided they needed to grow the population by importing savages.   Italian machine tool makers are a good example.   German manufacturers were particularly good at it, as are the Swiss.   

    You can’t win by racing to the bottom.

    n

    added- I should say that “growth” defined as “more of the same or much more of a lesser thing” vs growing by increasing the VALUE rather than the NUMBER of things.
    n

  19. MrAtoz says:

    Little piece of my childhood died…

    Yep, Land of the Lost was a fav. All of it was good.

  20. drwilliams says:

    The Universe Isn’t Living Up to Our Science Fiction Expectations

    There are millions of galaxies out there each with hundreds of millions of stars but based on our current understanding of physics we’ll never meet any of them. Anything outside our own galaxy might as well be infinitely far away. If there are aliens living in Andromeda, we’ll never know.

    Even the size of our own galaxy is pretty daunting for creatures that only live about 80 years. If the speed of light is the universal speed limit for human beings then the volume of space we can visit and explore isn’t terribly large, especially if you plan on returning home. Even having a conversation with someone is basically impossible beyond the nearest stars. Imagine sending a message and waiting a decade for the answer. Maybe we’re not actually alone in the universe but we probably are functionally alone.

    https://hotair.com/john-s-2/2023/11/25/the-universe-isnt-living-up-to-our-science-fiction-expectations-n594599

    Writer John Sexton has an interesting article up to a point. His review of aliens in sf is somewhat entertaining, but in the second paragraph above he shows that he does not fundamentally grasp the problems of distance, much less of time. (I do give him credit for writing without bringing up that fantasy in service of wishful thinking, the unscientific Drake Equation.)

    Five fundamental problems:

    Too far away to detect broadcast radio waves

    A short time window when a technological civilization broadcasts radio waves to announce their existence.

    A limited technological (as we know it) civilization lifetime

    Lack of payback or positive reinforcement to efforts to look, much less efforts to reply.

    The incidence of earth-like planets seems to be low.

  21. dkreck says:

    https://www.powerlineblog.com/archives/2023/11/disney-fesses-up.php

    Further, consumers’ perceptions of our position on matters of public interest, including our efforts to achieve certain of our environmental and social goals, often differ widely and present risks to our reputation and brands.

  22. drwilliams says:

    @SteveF

    Remember: If you’re faced with an enemy and a traitor and you have only one bullet, shoot the traitor.

    But if you have time line him up in front of the enemy. If you have enough cartridge you might get a bonus.

  23. drwilliams says:

    @lpdbw

    There is much formal training and technique involved.  It’s not just whomping and stomping.

    Heinlein was told he had the wrists for it but started too late.

  24. drwilliams says:

    @Nick

    WRT chinese crap, I’m pretty sure that any “damascus” knife or sword for sale outside of a specialist shop, with youtube vids showing the process, is chinese crap.

    Bill Moran’s “rediscovery” of damascus steel in the early 1970’s was followed by a stampede of experiments by American knifemakers. The pattern-welding techniques made pretty blades but did not employ the crucible steel used to make damascus. The easy availability of powered hammers, commercial alloys, and powder metal technology have allowed many makers, even at the amateur level, to produce blades that are showy and sell for big bucks. Those high-end products have the fit and finish to the rest of the knife that one would expect. 

    The reality is that few of them can approach the functional performance of  a properly forged billet of a commercial knife alloy. And a further advantage of the respected large volume producers is their quality control in the final stages of heat treating and sharpening. 

    100% chinese crap is easy to identify, as the fit and finish of the rest of the knife is lacking. Not so easy is the chinese crap blade given a custom look to misrepresent that low quality as something it is not.

  25. Lynn says:

    I’ve just finished book 6, and will start book 7 today. Then I’m going to have to see what *else* is on Lynn’s 6-star list that I haven’t read. Can’t be a lot left…

    Just let me know if you want me to post it again.

  26. Greg Norton says:

    Little piece of my childhood died…

    Marty Krofft has died age 86: TV producer and the pioneer among many iconic children’s shows sadly passed due to kidney failure 

    The Krofts were the original occupants of the atrium in what became the CNN Center in Atlanta.  The space opened in 1976 as a combination indoor amusement park and production facility for their company.

    The park and production facility closed after six months, but the giant escalator … and some would say the fishbowls of cocaine … remained in place when Ted Turner took over.

    The Krofts had been active again recently.

    CNN has been consolidating operations back at the old “plantation house”HQ, the former country club where the network started. The plan is to totally vacate the building by the end of the year.

  27. Nick Flandrey says:

    D2 loves “Forged in Fire” and every d!ckhead with delusions of competence and a heat source is making “damascus”, usually “canister” but almost as often just layers of steel imperfectly forge welded together once or twice.   The result isn’t the “100 layer damascus” the host of the show fawns over, or rather it IS what he fawns over, but it’s not actual damascus.

    IIRC the magic of true damascus was the inclusion of carbon, partly from case hardening, that the layering technique caused to be incorporated into the iron, creating steel during the forging process.   It wasn’t just about layering high carbon steel multiple times.

    But then our language is continuously degraded, and now “damascus” seems to only mean “poorly incorporated layering, revealed by  acid etching” as often as not.

  28. Nick Flandrey says:

    Not so easy is the chinese crap blade given a custom look to misrepresent that low quality as something it is not.

    nick’s checklist for chinesium…

    razor sharp edges that should be eased and smoothed

    handles made from something layered, so the shaping reveals the layers

    unnecessary jimping

    mosaic pins in the handle scales

    warps, twists, or bends in the metal

    heavy black indentations between the layers

    sloppy pommels or  pommels that don’t match the design of the rest of the blade 

    exaggerated size

    n

  29. Greg Norton says:

    D2 loves “Forged in Fire” and every d!ckhead with delusions of competence and a heat source is making “damascus”, usually “canister” but almost as often just layers of steel imperfectly forge welded together once or twice.   The result isn’t the “100 layer damascus” the host of the show fawns over, or rather it IS what he fawns over, but it’s not actual damascus.

    TRF had blacksmith booths set up last week where newbies could try hitting a piece of hot metal. Did you get around to that section of the faire?

    The lines were surprisingly long to try the hammer.

  30. Nick Flandrey says:

    Five fundamental problems: 

    a sixth, if you don’t make it off your rock during your first high tech phase, all the easy to access resources are used up, and the second ‘re-birth’ will be MUCH harder.    I think Musk sees that and is pushing hard to get off the rock before the collapse.

    n

  31. Nick Flandrey says:

    blacksmith booths 

    – yep the lines were very long though, and there was an upcharge, although the lines alone kept me from looking at  the price.  

    Funny to see the “hello world” of blacksmithing, the railroad spike knife, for sale.   Railroad spikes were used by so many because they were cheap and plentiful.   Not anymore…

    n

  32. SteveF says:

    the unscientific Drake Equation

    What are you talking about? The Drake Equation is the perfect exemplar of modern science:

    • Formula which looks scientific and plausible but which was just pulled from the outlet end of the digestive system
    • Variables which are filled by made-up values
    • Values which are easily manipulated to provide the desired outcome
    • No pesky real-world checks to invalidate scientists’ claims
    • Simple enough to present to simple-minded politicians and other policy makers
  33. SteveF says:

    I had good results with cutting and grinding automotive leaf springs to make blades. The result was springy (duh) and took an edge well enough. I don’t know how well they kept the edge, as I torture-tested. “Let’s see how far we can bend this blade before it breaks!” It would have been smarter to have tried the bending trick on a length of spring before going to the effort of making a blade from it but, for all my world-class awesomeness, I can be pretty dumb sometimes.

  34. Lynn says:

    Yes, your neighbor doesn’t care if you ended up being loaded into a boxcar as long as the next owner of the house keeps the grass cut properly.

    Ah yes, The American Way !

  35. lpdbw says:

    but, for all my world-class awesomeness, I can be pretty dumb sometimes.

    Quoted for truth.  Perhaps universal truth, with wider application.  I see quite a bit of myself in that.

  36. Nick Flandrey says:

    I can’t be the only one… 

    Anyone else here open a drawer or move something and find a computer they completely forgot about?   I found a laptop in a drawer today, and I have no idea where it came from or when the last time I used it was.   It’s a very small lappy, atom based, running winXP.   I fired it up and it has a problem with the mouse pausing mid movement, which I seem to remember from a long time ago.

    I’ll have to see if I can get a linux distro or maybe a ham radio distro installed on it.  I’ve got no patience for a tiny lappy that has mouse issues.

    n

  37. Nick Flandrey says:

    Disney’s ‘Wish’ Is A Theatrical Bomb And The Latest In A String Of Woke Failures

    by Tyler Durden

    Sunday, Nov 26, 2023 – 01:35 PM

    Is it time to declare the Disney brand dead?  Only a couple weeks ago the entertainment giant suffered one of its worst box office showings ever with the failure of The Marvels, a feminist driven girl-boss movie which was widely applauded by social justice advocates but ignored by the vast majority of the public.  The film is expected to lose $200 million to $300 million once receipts are totaled and marketing costs are accounted for.

    In a bizarre attempt at maximum cope, the media is hailing The Marvels as the largest ever theatrical opening by a black female director.  When, in fact, the movie is actually the largest box office bomb made by a black female director.

    Now, Disney’s animated ‘The Wish’ is set to top that failure, falling well below box office predictions and bringing in only $32 million over a five day period including the once lucrative Thanksgiving weekend. 

    -aye carumba

    n

  38. lpdbw says:

    Just watching John Campbell’s latest YT video, an interview with Dr. Clare Craig, author of “Expired”, 

    I may need to buy that.  She details how she noticed the discrepancies about Covid reporting in early 2021, and made some modest posts about it, and her career was attacked as a consequence.  Just from the interview alone, I learned a lot about the 1918 Spanish flu epidemic that I hadn’t known before, and how it applies to Covid.

    A few minutes in, and I learned a new Nobel prize winner quote:  “Science advances one funeral at a time.” – Max Planck.

    She points out that public health “science” has been in the hands of one man – Fauci – for most of the current careers of most of the public health doctors in the world.

    There’s a funeral I look forward to.

  39. Nick Flandrey says:

    The footage, which was shared by Palestinian freelance journalist Yousef Alhelou, shows people going about their daily lives in the northern part of the territory before the conflict ensued. One clip shows adults and children swimming in the sea and playing on the beach, while others show people playing fooball on an astro-turf pitch, shopping for fruit at an outdoor market and men fishing in the ocean from a boat.

    – Footage you wouldn’t have seen before, as it is counter to the narrative of “refugee camp”…  but now that all those pictures of collapsed concrete multistory buildings have put the lie to the narrative, they are going with “see how the meanies have destroyed our little paradise”…   FFS.

    n

    \

    Inside Gaza as you have never seen before: Palestinians share footage of people swimming on the beach, shopping at markets and playing football in a rare glimpse of what life was really like in the city before October 7

    Yah, NEVER SEEN BEFORE https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-12792527/inside-gaza-israel-hamas-war-video-palestine.html

  40. JimB says:

    Steve, auto springs manufactured after approx 1974, the first energy crisis, are made from low temperature heat treated steel, and can’t be annealed and re-hardened like the older high carbon steels. They are said to be unsuitable for tool making.

    I only know this from reading. I am not very well acquainted with metallurgy. All my fabrication is mild steel.

  41. Nick Flandrey says:

    Mark Stoops is staying in Kentucky amid links to Texas A&M… Aggies’ coach search continues after Jimbo Fisher’s firing and $75 million buyout: ‘I have a great job at a place I love’ 

     

    ‘I know there’s been much speculation about me and my job situation the last couple of days,’ Stoops said on X. ‘It’s true I was contacted about a potential opportunity this weekend.’

  42. Greg Norton says:

    Now, Disney’s animated ‘The Wish’ is set to top that failure, falling well below box office predictions and bringing in only $32 million over a five day period including the once lucrative Thanksgiving weekend. 

    -aye carumba

    On Thanksgiving Day, the per screen average for Eli Roth’s low budget “Thanksgiving” horror flick exceeded that of “Wish”.

  43. Lynn says:

    “Funny How the Price of Turkey Became No Big Deal” By Froma Harrop

        https://www.creators.com/read/froma-harrop/11/23/funny-how-the-price-of-turkey-became-no-big-deal

    “Biden now has his hands full leading the West through two dangerous wars. But old Joe is doing this with care while simultaneously overseeing a robust economy. He seems the opposite of impaired, age-wise or otherwise.”

    “And so, this Thanksgiving, I’m giving thanks that Biden is in charge.”

    Oh Froma !  Pudding head is not in charge, the kids in the White House are in charge.

  44. drwilliams says:

    @SteveF

    “Let’s see how far we can bend this blade before it breaks!” It would have been smarter to have tried the bending trick on a length of spring before going to the effort of making a blade from it

    The inherent properties of the steel are expressed by heat treating and the conditions are somewhat different for a spring and a knife. With rudimentary equipment you can draw the temper, work the material in a soft condition, then heat treat the blade to give a tough backbone of moderate hardness and a less tough but harder edge.

    Wayne Goddard’s $50 Knife Shop is a good place to start.

    And Peter mentions machete’s from vehicle springs and has some other good comments here:

    https://bayourenaissanceman.blogspot.com/2017/01/useful-information-for-knife-novices.html

  45. drwilliams says:

    @JimB

    Steve, auto springs manufactured after approx 1974, the first energy crisis, are made from low temperature heat treated steel, and can’t be annealed and re-hardened like the older high carbon steels. They are said to be unsuitable for tool making.

    I only know this from reading. I am not very well acquainted with metallurgy. All my fabrication is mild steel.

    The older springs were made from  5160 family steel alloy. As the auto makers lightened their products for fuel economy, they found they could cut corners. 5160 was one corner. I would do a little research to see if some of the foreign manufacturers (Mercedes comes to mind–see Peter’s comment. I’d also look at Volvo and Saab.) might still be using decent steel, and I suspect that truck springs might have retained some better material specifications.

    Sawmill saw blades are another oft-cited source of “good steel”, but not so much in practice.

  46. Alan says:

    >> Beating the dead horse here.

    A little research, and it looks like the 51% rule still applies.  It’s a felony to carry in a 51% establishment, although a defense is the case where there was no sign properly displayed.

    And most places seem to “lose” their signs.

    A dive into the “amusement park” issue reveals 2 things. First, the amusement park must CHOOSE to post 30.06 and 30.07 signs, or else carry is legal.

    Second,  the very definition of “amusement park” has requirements, like being open at least 120 days in a year, being bigger than a particular size in acres, and must have “rides” of some kind.  So I’d say it’s at least slimy to hide behind the State using the amusement park excuse.  Especially when they already have the 30.06 and 30.07 signs in force.  They recognize that the only way to promote it to felony level offense is if they get to call themselves an amusement park.

    Their property, their choice.  I’ll just avoid them and hope for the day when there’s a law that says “Hey, it’s your property, your right.  Just recognize that when you remove people’s sovereignity to provide for their own personal defense, you assume full legal responsibility for their complete safety.”   

    I’m no lawyer, so do your own research on all this.

    It’s the web so of course there’s a discussion forum… https://forum.texas3006.com/

  47. SteveF says:

    auto springs manufactured after approx 1974, the first energy crisis, are made from low temperature heat treated steel, and can’t be annealed and re-hardened like the older high carbon steels. They are said to be unsuitable for tool making.

    I (we) did this in the mid- to late-1980s, I think, using the spring from an old car. Probably pre-1974.

    Drwilliams’s book and video suggestions are noted, with the note that I’ll probably have time to get to them around the turn of the century.

    Related to that last point, have I mentioned my latest plan to ruin my life? After I divorce my not-yet-ex wife, whether before or after The Child turns 18, I’ll start another family and have more kids and more drama and more expense and more distractions. Because (as mentioned above) I have a sequence of bad decisions ruining my life and I’d hate to break the chain.

  48. lpdbw says:

    re: chains of bad decisions

    Some random observations for you.

    You don’t have to marry them.

    Vasectomies are much cheaper than children.

    Consider epigenetics vs. genetics.  IOW, just because you’re predisposed to something doesn’t mean you’re destined to it.

    Or, alternatively, learn from flatworms.  Even flatworms turn away from pain.

  49. MrAtoz says:

    Related to that last point, have I mentioned my latest plan to ruin my life? After I divorce my not-yet-ex wife, whether before or after The Child turns 18, I’ll start another family and have more kids and more drama and more expense and more distractions. Because (as mentioned above) I have a sequence of bad decisions ruining my life and I’d hate to break the chain.

    LOL, you are my anti-mentor, sir. We can all learn from you.

  50. Alan says:

    >> It is posted 30:06 and 30:07 at the gate to the property (faded sign) and the entrance to the attraction area.   There were signs about lining up for a bag search, but no search was done, and no search of my person, or anyone else’s that I saw.  Saw ONE sheriff deputy in the whole place.  Which is HUGE btw.   Could have carried if I wanted to.   I think a lot of places are unsure what they can and can’t prohibit since constitutional carry passed.   Since someone who does not have a LTC isn’t licensed under state law section 30:06 I don’t think the signs apply to them so they can legally carry.  I am licensed under 30:05 or 30:06 so I think I still need to obey the sign, technically.

    It comes down to TPTB on the ground and whether they politely, but firmly, ask you to leave the grounds or do the impolitely “invite” you for a ride in the back seat of a Crown Vic. The decision could come down to someone in authority remembering your face from a ‘meatspace’ meeting.

  51. JimB says:

    I’ve got no patience for a tiny lappy…

    Fixed that for me.

    Every time I have to use my wife’s notebook for routine maintenance, I am reminded of the compromises for portability. Since neither of us has a real need for portability, this is insanity. Next time, I am going to suggest she go back to a desktop, which she will probably accept without issue. She has stopped taking the notebook on trips. I will probably sweeten the deal with a BIG screen and a modern premium keyboard, although she doesn’t use much more of a keyboard than the keys needed for typing. Her biggest complaint is her 15.6” screen. I have the settings turned up so everything is bigger, but she still complains. Now there is less room, so she has to run most things full screen, and she has trouble switching between windows. Attempts to teach her how have failed.

    I have been thinking about a new (probably refurb) computer for myself, and I would get something similar for her. I want a single larger display to replace my current 23” display, and this would also be good for her. This might be an ultrawide format, with a pixel density (per inch) a little greater than my current display. I need to consider this carefully. I do not want a multiple screen setup, especially for my wife.

    I probably won’t get to this for another year. By then, we will know how hard it is to keep running Windows 10. I have always lagged such changes, and am determined to not repeat that mistake.

  52. RickH says:

    Her biggest complaint is her 15.6” screen.

    Which is why my last three laptops have all been HP’s with 17″ screens. And a laptop because I don’t sit at a desk anymore.

  53. paul says:

    Related to that last point, have I mentioned my latest plan to ruin my life? After I divorce my not-yet-ex wife, whether before or after The Child turns 18, I’ll start another family and have more kids and more drama and more expense and more distractions.

    Well.  Watch out for ancient mother in laws.  But you know that.

  54. paul says:

    There’s a funeral I look forward to.

    Hopefully with the deceased wearing a rope necklace.  And maybe it will be done right.  Strangled and not neck snapped.

  55. paul says:

    Monitors:  I have this: https://www.provantage.com/asus-vp32aq~7ASUM0EY.htm  I really like it.  The sound quality is Meh but sort of good enough.

    For a PC, I have three of this:  https://www.newegg.com/neosmay-ac8-jasper-lake/p/2SW-006Y-00003?Item=9SIBDYFHWZ7094  I liked the first one I bought.  Went for a second.  And someone was wanting New too “but what I have is fine just fine”.  I’m a dolt most of the time but I’m not that dense.

    Win11 Pro is installed.  Kill your wi-fi and don’t connect it with Ethernet when setting it up.  It makes it much easier to not have to have a Microsoft account and login.   I just want a local account.  But I’m full of hate and whatever else and I don’t store shi(r)t on anyone’s cloud.  Once you have it set up, connect the Ethernet. and let Win11 update.  

    And… you can hang the PC on the back of the monitor.   Which is kind of neat for desk clutter.

  56. Nick Flandrey says:

    I have dual 22″ dell monitors on my desk for my main pc, a viewsonic 24″ above the center for the linux security cam nvr, and an old HP 24″ to the left for my dad’s old machine.  It is thick, heavy and runs REALLY hot so I was thinking today that I might replace it with one of the monitors I have in the attic.  I really only use it to access his FB and email accounts and clean them out every so often, and to play solitaire when I’m missing him.

    There really isn’t much screen space difference between the 22s and the 24s.  They are all native HD with windows set to 125% sizing.  Much bigger and you are turning your head all the time at a normal viewing distance.

    n

  57. JimB says:

    Which is why my last three laptops have all been HP’s with 17″ screens. And a laptop because I don’t sit at a desk anymore.

    Oh, I strongly suggested that, but got a veto. She even thought the 15.6” was a bit big to carry. She has carried it only a few times, and that was only on car trips.

    If I really needed to carry and USE a computer, I would consider something like a NUC or a cheaper imitation, plus a keyboard and conventional monitor. My wife usually sets her notebook up at our destination, and doesn’t move it until we leave. At home, she doesn’t move it at all: it sits on a small table. I suggested she could lounge with it on a sofa, but she never tried that.

    One of my complaints about notebooks is that the keyboard and screen are attached. I like a low keyboard and high, close screen. Just me. Just to repeat, I especially don’t want to add a bigger monitor and keyboard to a notebook. Not because of the cost, just because I have no need to take a computer away from home.

  58. Ken Mitchell says:

    SteveF says:

    I had good results with cutting and grinding automotive leaf springs to make blades.

    When I was in the Philippines (1987-1989), Filipino craftsmen would make swords made from auto spring steel for the American servicemen and tourists. I bought several, and still have two; I gave one to my younger brother who now lives near Plano who was active in the SCA.  He loved it, and probably still has it.  It’s as heavy as you’d expect a long sword to be, but the only thing I’ve ever slashed with it have been pumpkins. It works impressively well on pumpkins, and would probably do a number on any burglar who got within sword range.

  59. drwilliams says:

    @SteveF

    Drwilliams’s book and video suggestions are noted, with the note that I’ll probably have time to get to them around the turn of the century.

    Related to that last point, have I mentioned my latest plan to ruin my life? After I divorce my not-yet-ex wife, whether before or after The Child turns 18, I’ll start another family and have more kids and more drama and more expense and more distractions. Because (as mentioned above) I have a sequence of bad decisions ruining my life and I’d hate to break the chain.

    As a stopgap measure, I’d suggest evaluating your anticipated need for edged tools and simply being on the lookout for good buys. I’ve seen several local auctions with 100-200 lots of knives. The “collectible’ stuff gets the attention, but the value for the prepper is in the good quality less collectible out-of-package or lightly used tools.

    As to your latest plan, it would be more efficient to use the classic approach: find a woman you do not like and buy her a house.

  60. drwilliams says:

    Or you could just find a well-off widowed lady with grown successful kids and tell her that you don’t want to cause any worry and will sign a pre-nup if things get serious.

  61. JimB says:

    @paul, I tried a monitor like yours at a friend’s home, it felt very natural. I also tried an ultrawide curved monitor, and think I could like it for extended use; that surprised me. I didn’t have trouble turning my head from side to side, as Nick mentioned. That’s why I said I need to consider choices carefully. If I had my druthers, I would have a really big hi res screen so I could arrange lots of windows all over. The one thing I don’t like is multiple screens. I had that once, and didn’t like it. The only thing it excelled at was low cost, but now big screens are very affordable. Multiple screens remind me of trading stations, but I don’t do trading, and want more flexibility. Having a continuous big screen seems like a nicety that is now affordable.

    @paul, I remember saving a reference to your little computer. I should have one for fun, but right now I have a lot of computers, and not much time for computer fun. A friend has a NUC he still has in the box. I am determined to not do that sort of thing. I have some other things sitting, waiting for me to get the interest to play with them.

  62. SteveF says:

    LOL, you are my anti-mentor, sir. We can all learn from you.

    There’s a saying along the lines of, If you can’t inspire with your successes then at least you can be a bad example and show people what not to do.

    Well.  Watch out for ancient mother in laws.  But you know that.

    Not a problem. I’ll make sure that my next wife’s mother is younger than I am. If I do it right, her grandmother will be younger than I am. Maximize the drama! Maximize that bad example!

  63. SteveF says:

    Consider epigenetics vs. genetics.  IOW, just because you’re predisposed to something doesn’t mean you’re destined to it.

    and

    As to your latest plan, it would be more efficient to use the classic approach: find a woman you do not like and buy her a house.

    and

    Or you could just find a well-off widowed lady with grown successful kids and tell her that you don’t want to cause any worry and will sign a pre-nup if things get serious.

    I think y’all are missing the point. My plan wasn’t to have companionship or to find happiness or anything like that. No, the plan was to ruin my life. If I follow any of your advice, my life won’t be thoroughly ruined, and then where would I be?

  64. Lynn says:

    LOL, you are my anti-mentor, sir. We can all learn from you.

    Me too.  I don’t want to wake up dead with a pillow on my face.  She would do it too. I was warned before we got married. Her mother thought it was hilarious.

  65. Lynn says:

    I probably won’t get to this for another year. By then, we will know how hard it is to keep running Windows 10. I have always lagged such changes, and am determined to not repeat that mistake.

    Windows 11 is ok, not great.  I just got a command restored that I had before in Windows 10.

    Is that tiny lappy a 32 bit only machine as Windows 11 is 64 bit only ?

  66. Greg Norton says:

    I think y’all are missing the point. My plan wasn’t to have companionship or to find happiness or anything like that. No, the plan was to ruin my life. If I follow any of your advice, my life won’t be thoroughly ruined, and then where would I be?

    Get some extensive neck tattoos and consider taking up weed.

    You may even want to move to Oregon, near the state’s shroom dispensary in Salem.

    Moving to Portland alone is a really good way to ruin your life. I speak from experience.

  67. Nick Flandrey says:

    Got some Christmas lights up.   Decided to start with simple white outline of the roof edge and one of the dormers.   three of my immediate neighbors have gone that way this year, so it looks like a theme.  Not much colored light or exuberance out there this year.   I’ll add some color as we go along.  Hung some wreathes too.  It’s a start and I don’t feel quite so slack.    

    Took a walk around the block while having a tiny little fire…  Some other neighbors have done interesting things with their lights.   I’ll have to look around some more for inspiration.

    Dinner was leftover turkey and fixins.   Wife is not feeling well and has been napping all day.  Kids have been occupied in their rooms.. . nice quiet day.

    n

  68. Ray Thompson says:

    If I really needed to carry and USE a computer, I would consider something like a NUC or a cheaper imitation

    I have been pleased with my 13″ MacBook M2 Air. I took it to Europe and found it fit nicely on a plane, was not too heavy to carry, and just worked. I also take it locally to the school and church and find the size quite nice for my needs. I run Windows 11 ARM in Parallels for some Windows software I need.

  69. Nick Flandrey says:

    Is that tiny lappy a 32 bit only machine 

    – I believe so, with an atom chip and soldered in ram.   They were the windows answer to chromebooks and they were not great.  

    n

  70. Lynn says:

    Dinner was leftover turkey and fixins.

    Me too.  In fact, the wife says that she is planning on cooking a 3 lb turkey breast and making more giblet gravy and stuffing next week as she and our daughter want more.

  71. Greg Norton says:

    Dinner was leftover turkey and fixins.

    Me too.  In fact, the wife says that she is planning on cooking a 3 lb turkey breast and making more giblet gravy and stuffing next week as she and our daughter want more.

    If you have Aldi near you, the weekly specials this week include their private label turkey breasts.

    I may try to get to the Georgetown store before the special ends on Tuesday.

    I’ve never had a problem with Aldi’s private labels.

    It was much easier to watch the ads when I worked near Aldi in Temple. I don’t think that the store was there due to economic conditions as much as the large number of German wives at Fort Hood.

    The Temple Aldi had a lot more German foods in the store than elsewhere I’ve seen.

  72. Lynn says:

    “Israel has made a huge mistake”

        https://alexberenson.substack.com/p/israel-has-made-a-huge-mistake

    “The terms of this ceasefire couldn’t be better for Hamas. Unless (and this is unlikely) Israel has reached secret side deals with Arab countries to destroy Hamas, it has made a terrible mistake.”

    “How to suffer humiliating national defeat in three easy steps:”

    “1: Sat., Oct. 7: Hamas fighters break out of Gaza, overrun Israeli army bases and villages, brutally kill over 1,000 Israelis – and bring almost 250 hostages back to Gaza.”

    “2: Sat., Oct. 28: Israel invades the Gaza Strip, Hamas’s home territory. The invasion and air attacks kill thousands of civilians and stir worldwide outrage, but do not bring Israel close to its stated goal of destroying Hamas.”

    “3: Friday, Nov. 24: Hamas agrees to release 50 hostages (but keep almost 200) over a four-day period. In return, Israel stops its invasion for those days and releases 150 Palestinian prisoners. But wait, there’s more: after the first days, Israel will continue the ceasefire for up to another week, as long as Hamas releases 10 hostages a day.”

  73. JimB says:

    Here’s something I either didn’t know or forgot. The intel Atom processor supports 64 bit operations. It seems some Atom versions are 64 bit only, but are installed in chipsets that only support 32 bit operation. That is puzzling. It seems that low power consumption was more important than 64 bit operation.

    I have three Atom-based computers. One is a single core CPU, and the others are dual core. The dual cores are still operational, but I don’t allow them Internet access, because they run an older version of Linux Mint. One is devoted to running a scanner, but that is about to change. The other is my former desktop, and it can run on the LAN when I disable outside access.

    I found these little computers to be a pretty good experiment. They preceded the NUC, and were much cheaper. They were essentially a cash register MB in a small case. Everything was custom, and highly integrated, except the case, which supported an internal HD and one front accessible drive, such as a DVD. They were quite adequate. They are only 32 bit, so I can’t run later versions of Linux.

    The main reason I played with them was to experiment with Linux distros, where having two or more side-by-side computers was handy to compare distros. Although performance was OK, they were not as power frugal as I had hoped. The ones I have drew almost as much power as my HP Xeon workstation computer when both are idle. That is actually a testament to the Xeon! Intel rocks on power management.

    @paul’s little “Velcro” computers are much better than those Atoms, and I would try one if I needed it. The price is about the same. Designs like these are used in lots of embedded and custom applications. Next time you go to a doctor’s office or a store, discretely look for whatever powers the computer or cash register. Sometimes the “computer” is a separate box, and sometimes it is inside the bigger cabinet. Also notice (discretely, so as not to get the wrong attention) any heat near exhaust ports. Do this enough, and you will be impressed. These things are everywhere.

  74. JimB says:

    If I really needed to carry and USE a computer, I would consider something like a NUC or a cheaper imitation

    Ray, my point was that I don’t need a notebook, and really hate the form factor. If I wanted something to take on a trip, it would be a desktop to be set up at the destination. I have an older notebook, and did use it in airports and hotels. It was OK for that, but the hassle of having to have it inspected by the TSA (at the time) was too much for me. I take really good care of my stuff, and hated to risk it to handling by others. I switched to a phone, and have never looked back.

    Another reason is that I go for enjoyment, and taking a computer encourages work. I can get everything done with my phone.

    I have also stopped carrying a camera (like you.) My phone is good enough, and draws less attention. When I took my big camera some years ago, I was twice asked to not take pictures. That wouldn’t have happened with a phone.

  75. drwilliams says:

    a bit more on heat treatment of steel:

    As steel is heated it starts to glow and progresses from red to orange to yellow. Before thermocouples, pyrometers,  and infrared thermometers, the temperature of steel being heat treated was determined by color, which varies according to the alloy being worked. Most artisans become very familiar with the heat colors of their favorite steel.

    Steel is differentiated from iron in having carbon as an alloying element. As @JimB noted above, low-carbon steels (less than 0.3% C) are not heat treatable. Higher-carbon steels are heat treatable, which is a broad term than entails the use of temperature, heating rate, soak time, and cooling rate to manipulate the migration of carbon in the steel to form desirable phases (see ferrite, austenite, cementite, pearlite, etc.), which are basically variations in the crystal structure.

    Carbon steel is magnetic–it is attracted to a magnet and can be magnetized by the alignment of tiny magnetic domains in the material. But as steel is heated it reaches a point where thermal energy prevents alignment of the magnetic domains. This temperature is called the Curie Point, and for steel is about 1420°F. This is easily demonstrated by magnetizing two 16p nails (low carbon steel) in opposite directions, so the heads attract. Hold one head-down in a pair of pliers, stick the other nail to it, and then heat the middle of the lower nail with a propane torch. As the nail heats it starts to glow red, and further heating causes the glow to expand toward the ends. About the time the red-orange gets to the head, the lower nail will drop off–the magnetic domains can no longer be ordered by a magnetic field.

    Testing hot steel with a magnet is another method of estimating temperature and the progression of heat treatment.

    The ferrite phase of steel is magnetic, whereas the austenite phase is not. As steel is heated the temperature reaches a point where ferrite converts to austenite by a rearrangement of the atoms into another crystal structure. From zero carbon to about 0.75% carbon the phase change takes place at lower temperatures as the carbon level increases. Above 0.75% the phase change temperature increases. Between 0.4% and 0.9% carbon the phase change takes place at a temperature below the Curie Point, and the steel is no longer magnetic. The minimum temperature is about 1360°F at 0.75% C. Thus by accurately measuring the temperature at which a steel demagnetizes, an estimate of the carbon content can be made, or rather, two estimates, one on either side of the minimum.

    A reminder: Always wear personal protective equipment when experimenting, have adequate ventilation, and don’t play with fire without adult supervision.

  76. Ray Thompson says:

    If I wanted something to take on a trip, it would be a desktop to be set up at the destination

    Whatever works. I needed the laptop so I could watch movies on the plane. Ten+ hours in an aluminum tube is boring. Watching movies on a phone is an exercise in misery in my opinion. Setting up a desktop on an airplane would be difficult, although certainly unique.

    Additionally, there is no setup for a laptop at any destination other hooking up power to recharge. I use the USB-C ports on the MacBook to charge my phone and watch. That way I only need one charger for the laptop. Cuts down on what I have to carry. Just one charger and a three cables.

  77. Ray Thompson says:

    don’t play with fire without adult supervision

    Sounds like my teen years, M-80’s, burning piles of brush using gasoline (setting a forest fire that I put out using our bulldozer), burns on my hands from blowtorches, pants on fire from acetylene torches. And I survived. We didn’t need no stinkin’ adults in the ‘60’s.

  78. Lynn says:

    Steel is differentiated from iron in having carbon as an alloying element. As @JimB noted above, low-carbon steels (less than 0.3% C) are not heat treatable. Higher-carbon steels are heat treatable, which is a broad term than entails the use of temperature, heating rate, soak time, and cooling rate to manipulate the migration of carbon in the steel to form desirable phases (see ferrite, austenite, cementite, pearlite, etc.), which are basically variations in the crystal structure.

    In my college Materials course, we also played with cold rolling and hot rolling steel sheets.  I do not remember the carbon content.  It was cool to look at the resulting steel sheet under a microscope to see the alignment of the crystals after rolling.

  79. Greg Norton says:

    Here’s something I either didn’t know or forgot. The intel Atom processor supports 64 bit operations. It seems some Atom versions are 64 bit only, but are installed in chipsets that only support 32 bit operation. That is puzzling. It seems that low power consumption was more important than 64 bit operation.

    There are performance concerns. 32 bit pointers are smaller and allow more code and data in cache, which benefits some specific applications.

    Linux has runtime support for the x32 ABI which is often floted as a deprecation candidate before certain three letter agencies step in and squash that kind of talk since they have a keen interest in a particular type of application which could benefit from 32 bit pointers while having 64 bit floating point capability and extra registers available.

    If you have an old Atom board with 32 bit EFI but x86_64 support, you can usually graft Debian’s 32 bit EFI module from their ISO into similar flavors of Linux install images and boot newer versions of 64 bit Linux.

    I’m not sure I’d recommend it. I have an old Atom MiniITX board around somewhere which ran my home server for a while. Great board for cool-and-quiet needs since the server runs in my home office/guest room, but Intel crippled memory support for the Atom at 2GB, even with the 32-bit address space offering 4GB.

    If you want a more modern equivalent but with plenty of memory capacity, find an A-series APU from AMD such as the A6-9500 I currently run in my home server. That has the same CPU core as a PS4 but chipset support for up to 64 GB RAM if you are willing to lose memory clock.

    I run 8 GB in my server which balances out the performance with the cool-and-quiet requirement.

    Power consumption is no longer 5W like the Atom, but modenr Linux really isn’t happy in 2 GB RAM.

  80. Greg Norton says:

    Additionally, there is no setup for a laptop at any destination other hooking up power to recharge. I use the USB-C ports on the MacBook to charge my phone and watch. That way I only need one charger for the laptop. Cuts down on what I have to carry. Just one charger and a three cables.

    Look into an Anker 7 series charger. I carry a 735 in my laptop bag which can charge anything I might carry on the road, including my MacBook Pro 13 M1. 

    The 735 is a lot smaller than the Apple USB-C charger for the MacBook Air, and the newest 7 series ups the port count from 3 to 4 while offering > 100 W of charging capability. 

  81. Greg Norton says:

    Whatever works. I needed the laptop so I could watch movies on the plane. Ten+ hours in an aluminum tube is boring. Watching movies on a phone is an exercise in misery in my opinion. Setting up a desktop on an airplane would be difficult, although certainly unique.

    I installed VLC on a Kindle Fire 7 via FDroid and throw movies on an SD card which goes into the Kindle Fire. VLC, unlike the Amazon software, will play just about anything, including most popular torrent formats.

    Lately I’ve been traveling with a Noco jump start battery in the laptop bag so anytime the Kindle Fire starts to get low on battery charge, I plug it into the Noco. 

    When I get to the rental car, the Noco is the fist thing to get charged if I used the battery on the plane.

    I don’t travel with the MacBook M1 because the newness hasn’t worn off. I don’t have to worry about losing or breaking the Kindle Fire.

  82. Nick Flandrey says:

    My wife uses the jump start battery when she’s on a Girl Scout weekend.  It will charge her phone and whatever else she needs,  flashlights, etc. and it’s very compact.  She actually has 2 that are just used for that.  We’ve also got one in each vehicle as a jump pack, although I forget to charge them.   Actually got the ranger to start with one a week or two ago, first time for that.  Should have read the instructions…

    n

  83. drwilliams says:

    Sounds like my teen years, M-80’s, burning piles of brush using gasoline (setting a forest fire that I put out using our bulldozer), burns on my hands from blowtorches, pants on fire from acetylene torches. And I survived. We didn’t need no stinkin’ adults in the ‘60’s.

    And now we have a hard time buying strike-anywhere matches.

  84. Nick Flandrey says:

    I’m sure this won’t escalate or become a casus belli.   Because history rhymes.   And some of us remember.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-12794147/Houthi-rebels-MISSILES-Yemen-American.html 

    Iran-backed Houthi rebels fire MISSILES at US destroyer off Yemen in ‘significant escalation’ after American troops freed Israeli-linked tanker from pirates

    • The USS Mason warship responded to a distress call from the commercial tanker, named Central Park, in the Gulf of Aden that had been seized by armed rebels 
    • The tanker, which had been carrying a cargo of phosphoric acid, was identified as the Central Park by the vessel’s company after its seizure on November 26 

    n

  85. drwilliams says:

    @Greg

    Look into an Anker 7 series charger. I carry a 735 in my laptop bag which can charge anything I might carry on the road, including my MacBook Pro 13 M1. 

    The 735 is a lot smaller than the Apple USB-C charger for the MacBook Air, and the newest 7 series ups the port count from 3 to 4 while offering > 100 W of charging capability. 

    The 735 is on sale for $33 at Amazon and elsewhere for CyberMonday.

    Thanks for the recommendation.

  86. Ray Thompson says:

    Look into an Anker 7 series charger. I carry a 735 in my laptop bag which can charge anything

    I have and instead opted for the Apple 35 watt dual USB-C charger. Not a fast charger but does my MacBook Air quite nicely. I can hook up the watch and iPhone if necessary. Although I just use the MacBook to charge the phone and watch. The Anker charger was larger and the shape was more bulk in my laptop bag. I do have an Anker charger but it stays in the drawer. It works well but no folding plugs. I am too cheap to buy another.

  87. drwilliams says:

    Iran-backed Houthi rebels fire MISSILES at US destroyer off Yemen in ‘significant escalation’ after American troops freed Israeli-linked tanker from pirates

    • The USS Mason warship responded to a distress call from the commercial tanker, named Central Park, in the Gulf of Aden that had been seized by armed rebels 
    • The tanker, which had been carrying a cargo of phosphoric acid, was identified as the Central Park by the vessel’s company after its seizure on November 26 

    And gee, it’s just fake news that FJB is supplying Iran with billions of dollars to buy arms to attack our own military.

    How about we dump each of the pirates in a barrel of phosphoric acid and save one each for every member of the traitorous Biden clan?

  88. drwilliams says:

    I looked at the Apple 35 watt dual USB-C charger, on sale for $44.

    At $33 the Anker 735 with 65 watts and an additional USB-A, compatible with older devices seemed like a better choice. YMMV.

  89. Lynn says:

    I’m sure this won’t escalate or become a casus belli.   Because history rhymes.   And some of us remember.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-12794147/Houthi-rebels-MISSILES-Yemen-American.html 

    Iran-backed Houthi rebels fire MISSILES at US destroyer off Yemen in ‘significant escalation’ after American troops freed Israeli-linked tanker from pirates

    • The USS Mason warship responded to a distress call from the commercial tanker, named Central Park, in the Gulf of Aden that had been seized by armed rebels 
    • The tanker, which had been carrying a cargo of phosphoric acid, was identified as the Central Park by the vessel’s company after its seizure on November 26 

    Wow, the USS Mason is a big girl.  Looks to be at least 300 feet long.

    Lets try 510 feet long with a 66 foot beam.  Big, big, big girl for a destroyer. Some people would call her a light cruiser.

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Mason_(DDG-87)

  90. Lynn says:

    “How one rabid kitten triggered intensive effort to contain deadly virus”

        https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/other/how-one-rabid-kitten-triggered-intensive-effort-to-contain-deadly-virus/ar-AA1kxBhi

    Yeep !

  91. Lynn says:

    I just took out a very full and heavy 100 gallon trash can.  Our trash days are Monday and Thursday so we got skipped on Turkey Day.  This may be the first time that trash can has been super full.

  92. Nick Flandrey says:

    Heavy trash came on Friday, but normal trash did not.   I forgot to put it out Saturday, so I missed it.   We generally only have a single bag in the can each week, so there is plenty of room, and it’s cold enough it won’t stink.

    Trash collection is a marvel of civilization.   

    n

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  93. brad says:

    Wow, Sunday was (is) a long discussion thread!

    After I divorce my not-yet-ex wife, whether before or after The Child turns 18, I’ll start another family and have more kids and more drama and…

    Does The Child know about this forum? And read what SteveF writes? If she does, and she hasn’t murdered him in his sleep, he has raised her right. I.e., to put up with his cynicism 😉

    Having a continuous big screen seems like a nicety that is now affordable.

    I guess it’s what you’re used to. At work, on the new hot-desks, they have one massive curved screen. I dislike it: open a program, and it often takes over the whole screen, which is just ridiculous. With multiple screens, apps that maximize themselves only take over one screen.

    Of course, the hot-desk setups at work are generally a mess. The huge monitors are also the USB-C docking stations for our laptops, providing power and networking. But they have no web-cams and their only USB plugs are occupied by keyboard and mouse, with zero extra. So you wind up relying on the little laptop off to the side anyway, not only for the web-cam, but for anything else you have (headset, graphics tablet) that needs to plug in somewhere.

    Hamas agrees to release 50 hostages (but keep almost 200) over a four-day period. In return, Israel stops its invasion for those days and releases 150 Palestinian prisoners.

    Yeah, I don’t get it. Reward the people who took hostages. It’s like any kind of ransom demand: the absolute worst thing you can do, is to give in and pay. Doing so just provides proof that hostage-taking works. So it will happen again.

    The only way forward is to turn the tables: As long as hostages are held, keep marching through Gaza, leveling it from North to South. Want it to stop? Release the hostages. Still have hostages? Keep marching. Make sure the Gaza population knows exactly why it this happening.

  94. Gavin says:

    Regarding screens, I prefer multiple displays, so I can full-screen an application on one and still be able to access multiple applications on the other. This was useful when I was doing some development and support, and I got used to it. I agree bigger is better, especially since my eyes are gradually catching up to my actual age. Had a couple of good decades where that wasn’t the case.

    My main issue currently is (was) that watching videos on Facebook in my preferred browser, Firefox, crashed my machine from once a week (or longer) to many times daily. I suspect the video driver was not compatible with Firefox’s rendering somehow, possibly because I’m still running Windows 7 and have not been able to update the video drivers for some time. The failure rate increased as I periodically updated Firefox, but the machine has not crashed at all since I started using Chrome exclusively for accessing Facebook, and Firefox for everything else.

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