Sun. Aug. 8, 2021 – headed home this morning or later, but today for sure

By on August 8th, 2021 in personal, WuFlu

The constant howling wind off the lake does seem to keep it cooler and more comfortable here than in Houston. On the other hand, it’s been a cooler summer than usual with temps below 80F most nights so if you only sat on the patio at night in front of a fan on high, you might feel comfortably cool even at home. During the day it is definitely more comfortable here, at least in the shade and once the wind starts back up. Oh, it’s LOUD too with the waves crashing into the bulkhead.

It has been a nice break and I would have enjoyed a couple more days of it, but that doesn’t change the fact I’ve got stuff I’m not doing.

And I feel like time’s a wasting.

Do a mental and physical inventory of what you need and what you have.

Stack some things.

nick

58 Comments and discussion on "Sun. Aug. 8, 2021 – headed home this morning or later, but today for sure"

  1. Greg Norton says:

    Or, more likely: Apple is under massive pressure by the government. If a private company searches your stuff, they don’t need a warrant, because you clicked “agree” on the ToS. Overzealous law enforcement and wannabe totalitarian regimes (but I repeat myself) are drooling at the possibilities. Likely, this tech already exists, because it is required in places like China – they just want to introduce it everywhere.

    The US Government has a documented problem with kiddie porn on military computers and networks. It wouldn’t surprise me if they were the party pressuring Apple to limit the sharing via iPhoto, but having a popular service filled with potentially lucrative images makes Apple’s servers a target.

    Unlike Google, Apple still syncs images directly to the file system in My Photo Stream.

  2. MrAtoz says:

    I wonder if we will ever hear if anybody got COVID at Obola’s super-spreader event. He didn’t invite me, jerk.

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  3. drwilliams says:

    Any invite he sent me went two levels below the Spam folder, through Septic and direct to Waste Field.

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  4. MrAtoz says:

    R.I.P. Markie Post.

  5. Greg Norton says:

    R.I.P. Markie Post. 

    Seriously?

    Her “Buck Rogers” episode is coming up in the MeTV rotation in a few weeks.

    One of the streaming services ordered “Night Court” back into production at some point in the last year, as a continuation of the original series, not a reboot, complete with John Larroquette’s Dan Fielding still toiling in the DA’s office and Melissa Rauch in the lead role as Harry’s daughter.

    (No word on other characters, but I thought all the surviving cast would at least put in cameos. And I’ll be disappointed if Brent Spiner doesn’t show once — his “Night Court” appearances made his career long before “Star Trek”.)

    I imagined Markie Post’s Christine Sullivan as sitting on the Supreme Court, with an office filled with Princess Di memorabilia, much to Fielding’s annoyance.

    And, no, Melissa Rauch is too old to be plausible as the offspring of Harry-Christine. Rauch was 12 when “Night Court” ended, which would require a lot of explanation. Harry as 80s deadbeat dad is easier to pull off now that we are all “woke”, Bill Cosby’s been to prison, and Harry Anderson has passed.

    UPDATE: NBC ordered the “Night Court” to pilot.

  6. brad says:

    The US Government has a documented problem with kiddie porn on military computers and networks. It wouldn’t surprise me if they were the party pressuring Apple to limit the sharing via iPhoto

    Absolutely. There’s just this tiny little problem that the government is supposed to have some evidence of wrongdoing, in order to get a warrant, in order to search your stuff. Having the search done first – that’s turning the whole justice process on its head.

    And anyone who thinks this search will stay restricted to kiddie-porn hasn’t been paying attention. It will be immediately expanded to look for various kinds of wrong-think. Confederate flag on your phone? Climate skeptic? Object to the idea of gender transitions for children? Reading the wrong news sites?

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  7. Greg Norton says:

    Absolutely. There’s just this tiny little problem that the government is supposed to have some evidence of wrongdoing, in order to get a warrant, in order to search your stuff. Having the search done first – that’s turning the whole justice process on its head.

    Regardless of where the process is currently heading, going back 20 years, the problem in the US military wasn’t tiny. Dig around for lectures by Jesse Kornblum, who I believe is the inspiration for McGee on “NCIS” except he worked for the Air Force investigation unit, OSI, for many years.

    Kornblum definitely looks like McGee except with darker hair.

    Kornblum currently works for Facebook IIRC. His lectures used to be common on YouTube prior to his stint at Google.

  8. Nick Flandrey says:

    Getting ready to head home. Only an hour and one half.

    n

  9. ech says:

    It’s true that some measurements were taken confirming breakdown products of CFC’s. Not unexpected, since the breakdown was caused by UV. But the only breakdown product in the chemical cycle of the model was chlorine, and chlorine from CFC’s is indistinguishable from other sources.

    They found more than chlorine. They found other CFC components, not just chlorine.

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  10. drwilliams says:

    They found more than chlorine. They found other CFC components, not just chlorine.

    Immaterial. It is only the chlorine atom that takes part in the chemical cycle posited to breakdown ozone.

     

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  11. ~jim says:

    File under “Wishing Don’t Make it So”:

    These Algorithms Look at X-Rays—and Somehow Detect Your Race

    The money quote:

    Radiologists like him don’t typically think about race when interpreting scans, or even know how a patient self-identifies. “Race is a social construct and not in itself a biological phenotype, even though it can be associated with differences in anatomy,” Yi says.

  12. SteveF says:

    My preferred phrasing: Race is a social construct until you need an organ donor.

    Related: Reality is the thing that doesn’t go away when you close your eyes and yell “la-la-la I don’t see you!”

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  13. nick flandrey says:

    Home safe and sound.  Not a bad drive home.  3 cars with flats and a semi too,  one ladder, one tire, one racoon, and 3 chunks of ductwork  on the freeway though.  That’s in active lanes.   There was more stuff on the shoulders.

    n

  14. drwilliams says:

    Refrigerators used R12 as a refrigerant gas for decades. Cheap, safe, and effective. It was replaced by R134A, which was much more expensive, not as safe, but effective. It’s worthwhile to note that along the way the Energy Star push made compressors smaller, which reduced the amount of refrigerant needed. It also made them work harder and fail more often.

    The current push is to replace HFC’s with gases that are even less safe–isobutane is at the top of the list. Great Britain, for example, is ahead of the US in that respect. A few years ago a refrigerator exploded in London and the ensuing fire killed twelve people–not something that ever happened with R12. The fire department policy that seems to have evolved there is to get the people out but not expose firefighters to the risk (ie, not fight the fire aggressively).

    As someone pointed out, ammonia is still used in some industrial applications. The difference, of course, is that you, your family, and your pets are not sleeping there.

    There’s another difference, too. Unlike the 1970’s, all of these less-safe refrigerants are being sold in refrigerators manufactured in a country with a proven track record of lying, cheating, stealing, cutting corners, and generally producing the most shoddy merchandise that they can possibly get away with.

    Sleep tight, folks.

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  15. Alan says:

    And anyone who thinks this search will stay restricted to kiddie-porn hasn’t been paying attention. It will be immediately expanded to look for various kinds of wrong-think. Confederate flag on your phone? Climate skeptic? Object to the idea of gender transitions for children? Reading the wrong news sites?

    …Or posting on the wrong blogs.

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  16. nick flandrey says:

    Starting to feel like that.

    n

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  17. Greg Norton says:

    Home safe and sound. Not a bad drive home. 3 cars with flats and a semi too, one ladder, one tire, one racoon, and 3 chunks of ductwork on the freeway though. That’s in active lanes. There was more stuff on the shoulders.

    German grocery getters?

    BMW X5 is the one getter I see the most on the shoulder of the roads around me.

    Is Munich building those in an old Yugo factory in the Czech Republic?

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  18. nick flandrey says:

    FAR too late for some of us.  Most of us.  As I’ve noted before when the question of becoming known to them because of training, and getting on lists, well, you are already on the lists.

    n

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  19. JimB says:

    He didn’t invite me, jerk.

    You would have politely declined.

  20. JimB says:

    Unlike Google, Apple still syncs images directly to the file system in My Photo Stream.

    I have relatives who invited me to see their photos. I cautiously (wisely) checked into it and found out I would have full control, which meant I could have deleted all their photos, or even uploaded bad stuff to their account. No way. I searched for a read only option, and couldn’t find any.

    I sent them a polite email explaining this folly, and suggested they use something more secure. They said that was what they liked about it. Can’t fix stupid. That was about five or more years ago. No idea if it has been improved.

  21. drwilliams says:

    A bit about the techniques of photo examination through data reduction:

    https://rentafounder.com/the-problem-with-perceptual-hashes/

  22. ~jim says:

    I want one of those thumbs-down. It’s not fair that you got one and I didn’t, Steve!

    I’ll believe that race is a social construct when you show me an oriental at the ER presenting with priapism due to sickle cell anemia.

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  23. lynn says:

    Vehicles – give me a good SUV any day, over a truck. We use the flexibility a lot: haul a bunch of stuff one day, passengers the next, and in between (most of the time) the dogs. Being able to re-configure the inside – and have a lot of space when you do – is huge.

    For us, an EV will definitely be the way to go. With rooftop solar, the fuel will be basically free. Maintenance should be seriously reduced. Switzerland is small, so range will rarely be an issue. Just waiting for the model we want…

    Dunno how they’ll work out in the US. Y’all are used to it, but when we last visited, it really struck me how far apart everything is. My cousin lives in an area of huge plots, north of DFW, and drives 45 minutes to go shopping. It’s a very different world.

    Here in the States, the equivalent SUV is 25% more than a truck. I just could not justify the extra cost when the truck was $40K + TTL. The fancy factory camper top and independent rear suspension are nice but not necessary.

    I would not get a pure EV here or anywhere. You are dependent on the grid being up anywhere that you want to go.

    ADD : Isn’t the Swiss grid tied to the German grid ? If the German grid goes down will you lose power at your house and thusly your solar install ?

  24. lynn says:

    I want one of those thumbs-down. It’s not fair that you got one and I didn’t, Steve!

    I shared one of mine with you. I have many !

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  25. lynn says:

    Getting ready to head home. Only an hour and one half.

    n

    Bummer, you really need a week at a place to check it out for long term likability.

  26. lynn says:

    He didn’t invite me, jerk.

    You would have politely declined.

    I would have counted the invitation as a Kenyan scam and ignored it.

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  27. lynn says:

    “AT&T Completes DirecTV Spinoff, Will Launch DirecTV Stream”
    https://www.cordcuttersnews.com/att-completes-directv-spinoff-will-launch-directv-stream/

    I don’t miss that $150/month bill and the crappy service that AT&T gave when they fired all of the DirecTV call centers. http://www.FuboTV.com at $70/month has the channels that we want and does a good job.

  28. JimB says:

    I would have counted the invitation as a Kenyan scam and ignored it.

    I wasn’t awake when I wrote my earlier remark. I should have observed that it would be presumptuous  to even think one of us would get an invitation. There, fixed it for myself. 🙂

  29. Ray Thompson says:

    I see where the Olympics are over. Excellent. Some of the sports disciplines seem bizarre. And how many different swimming events can be conceived? Synchronized swimming! Ugh. Same with running events. Skateboarding can be eliminated as can BMX. Basically BMX whomever gets the jump on the start, wins. Might as well be an eight foot course.

  30. MrAtoz says:

    The Texas Dumbocrat suit suing Gov. Abbott is a perfect example of why we need tort reform in the FUSA. What a frivolous lawsuit playing the race card. Whatever judge should dismiss if an make the Dumbo’s pay a boatload of cash to the State coffers.

  31. JimB says:

    I don’t miss that $150/month bill and the crappy service that AT&T gave when they fired all of the DirecTV call centers.

    Oof. Didn’t know that. Haven’t had a need to call them in several years.

    I need the satellite to get the bandwidth to watch TV. As soon as I get Starlink, I will try to drop DTV, although the wife might not be happy. I never know. She loooves the control she has with her DVR.

  32. lynn says:

    “SpaceX stacks Starship atop massive booster for 1st time to make the world’s tallest rocket”
    https://www.space.com/spacex-starship-super-heavy-booster-stacked-1st-time

    “It’s taller than NASA’s Saturn V moon rocket.”

    Wow, I would have liked to have seen that for real.

  33. nick flandrey says:

    Puppy is home and the pack is complete.

    n

  34. ech says:

    Immaterial. It is only the chlorine atom that takes part in the chemical cycle posited to breakdown ozone.

    It’s not “posited” to break down ozone. It’s been shown to directly. And bromine also does the same.

    Sea salt chlorine is not a factor in the ozone hole. First, it doesn’t make it above the lower atmosphere, because it gets taken up by rain and snow. Second, it’s a steady-state process and wouldn’t suddenly cause the ozone holes. The importance of finding CFCs and CFC breakdown products in the Antarctic stratosphere (and in all the layers in between) is that is shows that CFCs were the source of the free chlorine. The science here was very carefully done and the whole chain from lower atmosphere to stratosphere was sampled and traced. (Unlike AGW, which has significant issues and is dependent on models.)

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  35. nick flandrey says:

    Does this mean if someone were to call Bidden “N!*** Joe” in an article, he’d have to go?

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9869041/University-Wisconsin-removes-rock-seen-sign-racism.html

    The boulder was described using the n-word in a Wisconsin State Journal story in 1925.

    ~100years ago an article called it n*gg** rock and now it has to go?  Wow.  So we’re down to the last .999% of racism.   Glad to know that.  Wonder if anyone marching in the 60s, who suffered from real racism would be proud?

    n

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  36. pecancorner says:

    Consumer prices rising the most in these U.S. cities

    Houston/The Woodlands/Sugar Land is #15, Dallas/Ft Worth/Arlington is #2. In Texas, it’s all driven by energy/transportation costs. Gas prices always seem to rise in Texas before they do anywhere else… very twitchy!

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  37. Greg Norton says:

    I don’t miss that $150/month bill and the crappy service that AT&T gave when they fired all of the DirecTV call centers.

    AT&T call centers are unionized and the company faced a serious strike threat in 2009.

    When I trained for scab duty in a call center in Van Nuys in February of that year, we were told that we would be required to upsell the landline customers to the TV and wireless services. However, we would not get the same spiffs as the union reps, which, in some cases, added $2000-3000 dollars/month to a really aggressive rep’s gross.

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  38. ech says:

    Gas prices always seem to rise in Texas before they do anywhere else… very twitchy!

    Depends on the time of year. Gas has skyrocketed on the West coast. It was over $4/gallon in Las Vegas last week.

  39. Greg Norton says:

    Here in the States, the equivalent SUV is 25% more than a truck. I just could not justify the extra cost when the truck was $40K + TTL. The fancy factory camper top and independent rear suspension are nice but not necessary.

    With the 4Runner/Tacoma, 4Runners are made in Japan while the Tacoma is made in San Antonio until Toyota can teach the Mexican line how to make the trucks decently.

    I still have mixed feelings about trading my wife’s 4Runner over the rack and pinion replacement. The swap is known to be a several thousand dollar dice roll, but that engine and transmission still ran like new at 130,000 miles.

    I took the Exploder up to Belton today so my son could see the costume contest at the comic show. My wife is gone for the week, and the vehicle needs to run. I will concede that the Ford has the better ride driving long distances.

  40. nick flandrey says:

    My sibling had a 4runner for a while.  Small inside.  Rough ride. Really uncomfortable seats.

    n

  41. lynn says:

    “Michael Mann Issues Traditional COP26 Last Chance Climate Warning”
    https://wattsupwiththat.com/2021/08/08/michael-mann-issues-traditional-cop26-last-chance-climate-warning/

    “Following on from his “last chance” warnings in 2015, another 2015 and 2020, Michael Mann wants us to understand that COP26 really is our last chance to address the climate crisis.”

    All together now, “We are all going to die !”.

  42. Greg Norton says:

    My sibling had a 4runner for a while. Small inside. Rough ride. Really uncomfortable seats.

    Oh, yeah. I drove ours from Orlando to Portland in three days. My butt let me know the downside of that.

    I still miss the vehicle. I don’t think we are going to see the same mileage out of the Exploder. At 5000 miles almost precisely, the throttle body went, a common problem for that model year, and we had to scrounge for a Ford dealer in the boonies who had the part.

    I did insist on a real V6 and not the EcoBoost four.

    At the time we opted for the Exploder over another 4Runner, my wife wanted a real third row of seats. After a couple of years of being the go-to parent for hauling Girl Scouts since the Subcontinent parents favor tiny Nissan or Honda sedans, the novelty wore off real quick.

  43. drwilliams says:

    @ech

    Immaterial. It is only the chlorine atom that takes part in the chemical cycle posited to breakdown ozone.

    It’s not “posited” to break down ozone. It’s been shown to directly. And bromine also does the same.

    Sea salt chlorine is not a factor in the ozone hole. First, it doesn’t make it above the lower atmosphere, because it gets taken up by rain and snow. Second, it’s a steady-state process and wouldn’t suddenly cause the ozone holes. The importance of finding CFCs and CFC breakdown products in the Antarctic stratosphere (and in all the layers in between) is that is shows that CFCs were the source of the free chlorine. The science here was very carefully done and the whole chain from lower atmosphere to stratosphere was sampled and traced. (Unlike AGW, which has significant issues and is dependent on models.)

    The original part of my statement that you were taking to issue with was:

    “But the only breakdown product in the chemical cycle of the model was chlorine, and chlorine from CFC’s is indistinguishable from other sources.”

    1 “Posited” applies to the phrase “chemical cycle”.

    2 I made no claim that chlorine from the ocean “suddenly” caused the ozone holes.

    There is no data on ozone holes before the early 1980’s, no data on column atmospheric ozone before the early 20th century, and only scattered measurements before satellite data became normal.

    3 CFC’s break down in the atmosphere and produce chlorine. That is a qualitative conclusion. It is not a quantitative proof that all the chlorine that takes part in depleting ozone comes from CFC’s.

    See:

    https://www.soest.hawaii.edu/GG/ASK/volcanic_chlorine.html

    which includes:

    “So, does volcanic chlorine affect the ozone layer or not? Well, possibly it does, since even if only a small amount of the total chlorine input to the atmosphere from this source makes it to the stratosphere, it could still be a significant portion of the total amount of reactive chlorine-bearing compounds there. ”

    My original statement was:

    ” Surprisingly, no funding for investigating other sources was made available, despite a significant source in the world oceans. In the decades since the reality of stratospheric injection by volcanoes has been confirmed.”

    Which is a statement about funding to look at possibilities, not a statement about causation.

     

  44. drwilliams says:

    @Lynn

    Michael “Upside Down” Mann

    https://climateaudit.org/2009/10/14/upside-side-down-mann-and-the-peerreviewedliterature/

    Not a Nobel Prize winner.

    Neither was AlGore.

    Yet both claimed to be.

  45. drwilliams says:

    @Nick

    IIRC, the term “n*gg**head” appeared in Huckleberry Finn.

  46. ~jim says:

    Ohfercryinoutloud, just say nigger.

    “Offense cannot be given, only taken, and some people hunt for it like a pig after truffles.”

  47. Marcelo says:

    Ohfercryinoutloud, just say nigger.

    “Offense cannot be given, only taken, and some people hunt for it like a pig after truffles.”

    There you go. I thought they used dogs to go after truffles…

  48. lynn says:

    “Forbes: “Forget About Peak Oil – We Haven’t Even Reached Peak Coal Yet””
    https://wattsupwiththat.com/2021/08/07/forbes-forget-about-peak-oil-we-havent-even-reached-peak-coal-yet/

    “Despite all the heavy dissemination of narratives and talking points about a “climate emergency” and the “energy transition” during 2021, the ongoing economic recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic proves that the world still heavily relies on fossil fuels to provide its constantly growing energy needs. Indeed, as the pushers of Peak Oil demand theory try in vain to revive their own always-wrong narrative, it now appears that the world has yet to even meet the peak of demand for the least environmentally friendly fuel of all, coal.
    This is especially true in China, India and much of Asia, where thousands of coal-fired power plants have seen record usage levels in the face of a major heat wave this summer. Bloomberg reported last week that China’s enormous demand for coal this summer has caused commodity prices to spike to the highest level seen in 2 months, briefly climbing above 900 yuan/ton (roughly $139.31 at current exchange rates) on Friday.
    The global futures price for coal set a new record high in May as supplies ran low. Australian coal – China’s main international supplier – hit $150 per ton in July, the highest level seen since 2008. The demand is so high in China that it has even led to implementation of electricity rationing in some parts of the country as supplies run short.”

    And Peak Natural Gas is hundreds of years in the future.

  49. Greg Norton says:

    “Forbes: “Forget About Peak Oil – We Haven’t Even Reached Peak Coal Yet””

    When we lived in Vantucky, the BNSF (Berkshire Hathaway) trains carrying wheat and coal to the ports seemed to run day and night.

  50. nick flandrey says:

    When in doubt, with profanity, obscenity, or “bad words”, I follow the precedent set by RBT and his reasoning for it, which is to avoid triggering the ‘nanny filters’ that were prevalent at the time.

    It’s a habit adopted by most of the long time commentors and picked up by most of the newer ones too, kinda like the in joke about FLASHLIGHTS.

    Yeah, in the case of the sometimes synonym for ‘negro’ it’s admittedly cowardly and counter productive, in that it imbues the word with even MORE power.  Given current cancel culture, and having better things to do than fight a public battle with angry snowflakes, and having no desire that my family pay for my ‘misdeeds’,  I will obfuscate in public discourse.  (see also ‘founder of Papa John’s run out of company’ and ‘professor fired for using n-word in quote’, as well as dozens of young white girls destroyed socially for singing along with the radio…)

    They moved a ROCK that someone 94 years ago described with that word.  A fuking ROCK.  I’m not doing Chris Rock’s “I hate N****s” routine any time soon.

    n

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  51. Greg Norton says:

    Not a Nobel Prize winner.

    Neither was AlGore.

    Yet both claimed to be.

    One thing I’ve always wondered about Al Gore — How exactly does one flunk out of divinity school?

    Washing out of law school I can kinda-sorta understand.

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  52. nick flandrey says:

    “How exactly does one flunk out of divinity school?”

    –not a sodomite?

    n

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  53. Marcelo says:

    One thing I’ve always wondered about Al Gore — How exactly does one flunk out of divinity school?

    And the big boss speaketh: Al, you gotta be kidding me. NOT gonna happen!.

     

  54. ~jim says:

    –not a sodomite?

    Or a catamite? 🙂

    I only say that because you reminded me of my favorite opening line of any book. It’s from Anthony Burgess’ _Earthly Powers_.

    “It was the afternoon of my eighty-first birthday and I was in bed with my catamite when Ali announced that the archbishop had come to see me.”

  55. Nick Flandrey says:

    That is a great opening line!

    n

  56. Nick Flandrey says:

    “Washing out of law school I can kinda-sorta understand. ”

    –I had a neighbor in LA that was pretty nuts. He’d taken and failed the bar exam 5 times. He was still studying and intended to try again…

    n

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