Fri. Aug. 14, 2020 – what, where did the week go?

Hot and humid.  Nasty.

Yesterday was very nasty outside.  Really hot and really humid.  I sweated through my shirt just going into the garage to get dinner out of the freezer.

So I didn’t get any work done outside.

I did get to the chiropractor and get my wife’s honda’s battery replaced.  Now I need to find my windshield washer fluid and fill that up.  Wish she’d have mentioned that earlier.

I had some issues with windows 10 yesterday, and Marcelo asked about commenting to remind me that patch Tuesday was here again.  Um, Yes Please!   ANYONE who has something to share that fits with the spirit and history of this place, and the interests of the people hanging out here is welcome.  Especially if it’s in an area I don’t cover well or at all.

I realized I’ve transitioned from ‘playing with computers’ to ‘using software ON the computer to do other real life stuff.’  In other words, I don’t see ‘computers’ as a hobby anymore.   In fact I often see them as a hindrance to getting work done or an annoyance.  That’s likely equal parts me aging, and most of the stuff to do with ‘computers’ becoming “good enough”.   It’s not necessary to even be aware of most of the things we used to consider basic knowledge- startup files, boot files, config files, interrupts, comm ports, cables, drives, terminators, performance tweaks, regedit, command line, etc.    In the way NASA made spaceflight boring, MS made computer use dull.

That’s probably a good thing for most people and uses.  It is a bit sad when you realize that your powerful and esoteric knowledge does you no good anymore, except to leave you with the certainty that things used to be different and that stuff should be possible that isn’t any longer.  But the wheel keeps turning, and complaining about it is like trying to command the tide.

I’ve got a couple of things to do outside the house today, and the usual list of stuff to do in and around it.   Or I can waste time on the internet with my friends. . .   hmmmm.  What should I choose?

 

n

 

PS- keep stacking, the world isn’t going away!

Author: Nick Flandrey

Mid 50s, stay at home dad, with two elementary school age girls. Love my family and my life.

63 thoughts on “Fri. Aug. 14, 2020 – what, where did the week go?”

  1. Lets see, why would a guy wax for an anime show ? Not playing a furry.

    Bunny. Think Hef, not Furry. Completely club regulation. I’ve left the house in worse, including a James Corden-style cat outfit, and I was able to look at details on female cosplay outfits which normally makes them self conscious; I got away with a *lot*. This year was going to be Matt Smith “Doctor Who”, however — go too outrageous and getting a quick lunch at Schilo’s (the best part of any trip to San Antonio) is out.

    Furry is a Robert Francis thing if the stories I’ve heard are true. We probably see him at those shows and don’t realize it. It seems like Texas has an order of magnitude more Furries running around shows than other places we’ve lived. Even the big horror movie shows have Furry contingents.

    BTW, my wife got a call from his organization last night, conducting a poll. I hung up as soon as the B-word got out of the woman’s mouth. “I’m calling on behalf of B–0 O’R …”

    Click.

    Probably for “Doors”.

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  2. Pre-covid I did give serious thought to reusing the bunny gear to meet John Cleese in Dallas, a riff on “How Not To Be Seen”.

    Making a Python laugh would rank high on my list of life achievements.

  3. In the way NASA made spaceflight boring, MS made computer use dull.

    *NASA* hasn’t flown any manned missions since retiring the last Shuttle.

  4. I was on the bleeding edge of computers for decades. From the homebrew kits of the 70s to the water cooled gaming systems of the 2000s. I was on the internet when it was DARPA net and used BBN routers when packet technology was new. I loved the early days of networking when Ethernet ran on coax and Token Ring was a serious option.
    But the last decade I have worn out. Before I retired I realized that I couldn’t care less about computers. My wife bought me a great used gamer PC and multiple monitors for me to play with in my retirement but it’s still sitting in the box. Just no interest in putting it together. Maybe some day.

  5. Something similar Harold
    More, trying to get out, now, every PHB, but since at least 2000 or before, thinks that his nephew is a genius on computers because he cleans windows and free!! why you bother ??
    So, this job now is plumbing in 60s/70s (not now, there isnt qualified plumbers, and i respect a lot plumbers), and time to go. Or late host saw it a lot of time ago, I remember stating study plumbing etc etc to some people.
    Well, I am getting old surely

  6. I loved the early days of networking when Ethernet ran on coax and Token Ring was a serious option

    Long live Banyan Vines.

    Well, that didn’t last long.

    The biggest problem with Token Ring was the cost of the cards. In excess of $300.00 when an ethernet card could be had for $100.00. Do the math.

  7. Just got a $25.02 check from RMG TCPA which is from a class action lawsuit against Carnival Cruise Lines for calling and offering cruises. I am certain the law firm got several million. Me, I get to go to Chick-fil-a for lunch.

  8. @ray, that’s the way those suits always go. The injured party gets a dime, the vultures get new houses and private jets.

    Wow, I’m beat. Just starting my day. At 3:18am that was enough gunfire, and it was loud enough to get me up. My wife says our whole part of the neighborhood was taking about it on FB. That messed up my sleeping big time. I really wish there was a civilian version of the ‘shotfinder’ system. It’s very hard to know what direction the sound comes from when you’re inside the house.

    And my back is worse today than yesterday. That sucks. Don’t carry heavy things while recovering I guess.

    Daughter 1 has an online orientation/meet and greet with her school this morning. Of course she couldn’t connect with the school issued laptop. So she’s sitting in the kitchen on our home machine. Don’t know where my wife is working, she normally sits at the same desk the home machine is on. Currently the kids are having a dance contest.

    Aye, que loco.

    n

  9. Ah, wife’s working on the front porch.

    Kids are having a scavenger hunt.

    And we seem to be marching to war.

    n

  10. If you’ve got the time, take a look around your areas and see if you see anything similar. I feel a need for some ground truth reporting, either yea or nay.

    The cars look too high end. I wouldn’t put it past The Mail to take pictures of school technology distribution lines and run them as vehicles lining up for food.

    Chromebook lines here in Austin look like that. Parents line up even if they have perfectly adequate computing hardware at home.

    Of course it could be just be about “free”. People around here are such pieces of cr*p when it comes to free, Chromebooks, food, or anything else. Why would Dallas be any different.

    In Portland, the Chinese relations would drive 30 minutes into the Lloyd District, spend another 30 minutes looking for parking, and endure whatever wait was necessary when the Franz bakery would hand out free loaves of stale bread during big city-wide events, including the infamous “naked” bike ride.

  11. Play stupid games, win stupid prizes, entry number 12,453,741 —

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8627533/Member-pointing-guns-penis-Facebook-group-shot-himself.html

    A member of a Facebook group where men post photos of themselves pointing loaded guns at their genitals has shot himself in his privates and documented his painful and bloody ordeal on social media.

    The bizarre incident took place on Tuesday in San Diego, California, landing the trigger-happy Facebook user in the hospital to be treated for injuries to his scrotum, as Vice first reported.

    According to the media outlet, the man is a member of the Facebook group ‘Loaded Guns Pointed at [B]enis,’ which was created in May to get a rise out of responsible gun owners by showcasing photos of men pointing loaded firearms with the safety off at their privates.

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  12. that’s the way those suits always go

    Almost always. Once in a while you’ll hear about a judge rejecting a settlement in which plaintiffs got $5 coupons with a total value of $800K while the lawyers got $1M in cash, or forcing the law firm to take coupons instead of cash. Very rare, though, rare enough to be newsworthy.

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  13. re that food bank thing: Long before the shutdown, one of our local churches has done an occasional “Feed the 5,000”, giving away thousands of boxes of food to whoever drives up, no questions asked. In our county of 38,000, they have always had bumper-to-bumper lines at least a couple miles long for it. Has nothing to do with need, people just love free stuff and everybody has to eat so free food appeals to all marketing targets.

    In the same vein, someone posted this about 30 minutes ago in a group I belong to, from “Ross Rant Publications” newsletter last week:

    “In the US credit card debt is down 11%-$85 billion, since February. While many asked for forbearance on student and credit card debt, in the end they did not take the deferral and paid down their balances. Late payments are down 1/3 due to consumers using the $1200 + the $600 a week to reduce debt. Ignore the press headlines that 80% can’t pay their minimum payment. It is a lie as we see from the real data. As debt went down, savings went up to new record high levels, putting consumers in very good shape generally, which bodes well for when unemployment declines and people are out spending again. There are now tighter lending standards by banks, so we will not have a debt crunch for consumers despite all the frantic and fake stories in the media about evictions and debt. The anecdotes about people starving without the $600 will continue in the press, but it is pure anti-Trump political rhetoric. People were getting evicted before the virus, and some people needed food bank help. Nobody is starving.”

  14. FWIW doing a little quick math, you likely get ~210 cars in one mile (25foot/car) so four lines of cars = 840 cars /mile. The line could stretch “miles” ie, 2, and have less than 2000 vehicles. which is pretty close to “thousands” of cars, I guess.

    n

  15. Scanner has a surveillance team working a crew that either robs ATMs or robs people at ATMs. They were following them last night too.

    The crew uses a second vehicle to spot surveillance.

    That’s pretty sophisticated compared to most of the crooks they’re following.

    n

  16. Been a little busy. Nick, regarding your Costco Interstate battery, it seems you got a new one under the 42 month free replacement warranty. That is a good deal. What I want to address here is just how good (or not) the Costco Interstate battery might be, especially for those in the market for a new flooded battery. AGM batteries, which might be required for newer cars, are not included in this discussion. I have used them with mixed results, and am back to serviceable flooded batteries.

    I bought a size 34 Interstate branded battery from Costco a little over three years ago, and it has been in our most frequently driven car since. So far, so good, but it has one unusual characteristic: its full charge rested voltage is approximately 0.25 volt lower than other flooded batteries. Normally, this means a lower specific gravity electrolyte, and is often done to get longer life by sacrificing some capacity, which is great. This seems odd in these consumer spec driven days. Note that this is after a variety of charging methods, including equalizing, which forces the voltage higher than normal for a short time; not recommended unless you are very careful. Voltage is always measured after “resting” which for those unfamiliar is usually 24 hours after charging to full charge. A good way to determine resting voltage is to take measurements every few hours and watch for it to stabilize.

    I have a “conductance” tester, which measures the AC impedance of a lead acid battery. This is a quick way to measure a battery’s condition without load or discharge testing. Consistently used, it is convenient, accurate, and doesn’t stress the battery like discharging it 80% or more. This battery has been stable for the year I have owned the tester. Still, I am suspicious of it, and am keeping an eye on it: my wife drives the car it is in, and she deserves a dependable battery. Embarrassingly, she seems to be the one who usually suffers failed batteries, but then, she drives more short trips than I do. I bought that conductance tester to try to catch failing batteries before they die. Too soon to tell.

    I bought the Costco Interstate battery as an experiment, and because it was the lowest price for a “good” battery. It was about $83. A year ago, the same battery was $85, compared to the Walmart EverStart Maxx at $120. I bought the Walmart battery a year ago for a very similar car. Why? A story…

    Over the last three years, I have updated my car battery information. As I have said here before, I have a long history with them, and love to hate them. Few things can ruin a day like a battery that dies without warning, especially in today’s cars, which need a good battery, and stress them unmercifully. Some of my information comes from a friend who operates a small business with a variety of vehicles and equipment. Some of his stuff sits for months at a time, and some is operated daily. Spoiler: he and I recommend Walmart EverStart Maxx batteries.

    One big factor is that our nearest Costco is 100 miles, and Walmart is just 2. Another factor is that I don’t let those shops touch my cars. Our local Super Walmart has no auto shop, a condition the local shops lobbied for. Costco is OK with carry-out, and of course so is the local WM. Suits me.

    I got curious about Interstate, so I finally looked it up. The company has always been a reseller of batteries from various manufacturers. Of course, they have a good reputation, as evidenced by having been a long time advertiser on Paul Harvey’s long gone radio program. I do miss Paul… Anyhow, that $85 Costco version does not exactly compare to the one sold by Interstate, Interstate’s similar product lists at $168, and has a 30 month (probably pro rated) warranty, compared to Costco’s 42 month free replacement warranty. So, if you have a nearby Costco, it is a great deal, especially if you could get a free one every two years. Yes, I know, some warranties might not work that way.

    My Costco Interstate battery is made by Johnson Controls in Mexico. My newer WM battery is also made by JC in Mexico. When I looked a year ago, the WM batteries (only the EverStart Maxx) were made in several countries including Mexico. But, there is more. There are really just two big US based battery manufacturers, and they make something like 90% of the popular car batteries we find on the shelves. I don’t think either puts their own name on any batteries. Instead, they make them for other brands, to the seller’s specs. So, is an Interstate the same as a Costco Interstate? Is the WM battery that looks exactly like several other brands, with just a different name sticker the same as them? I don’t know. Worse, if I like a battery because it lasted several years, should I buy the same one? Good luck finding it, because they change all the time.

    A word about dealer batteries. If your Yugo came with a Yugo branded battery, and you liked it, then check how much a new one costs. It might be a very good battery. Or… A relative bought a battery from their Volvo dealer on recommendation, by the dealer, of course. I noticed it looked like a common battery. It did not last very long. It was expensive. The warranty was poor. Lesson, but there are good stories, too.

    A word about parts house batteries. Sometimes, auto parts stores will hassle customers over warranties, so be sure it is a local store you trust. Again, YMMV.

    Does any of this tell how to get a “good” battery? If you have read this far, no.

    One last story. In 2000 I bought two Delco batteries at our local WM (not the newer Super WM.) They were $26 each, including core charge, which was zero. Wow. Unfortunately, they were made in China. I saw that before I bought them, but the price was good enough that I gave them a try. They lasted several years, not much better or worse than other batteries I had back then. That was before the lead smelters were shut down in this country, partly the reason today’s prices are so high.

    There must be other reasons prices are so high, but I don’t know them. Curious that Lithium Iron Phosphate batteries can come close to competing with lead acid for stationary applications. We live in interesting times.

  17. Jenny, from yesterday: I started working on getting the webcam working again for the lodge. I got the camera spun up (air gap resistors are a nuisance), got the software and firmware up to date.

    What are air gap resistors in this context?

  18. Marcelo, thanks for the Windows Update tips. One of my complaints about Mint Linux is that updates occur several times a month at very sporadic times, instead of MS Patch Tuesday. Many of the updates seem unimportant, but disrupt my use nonetheless. My Linux boxen won’t update unless I let them, but if I don’t allow some updates for a few days, the systems will lock up and require a restart, often corrupting files. Aaaargh.

    Computers used to be more useful than that. There is no perfect OS. Change is constant. Software never wears out. [Insert favorite platitude here.] There are no good instructions. That last one was from my wife, who always wants detailed instructions. Good luck with that.

  19. Regarding credit card debt, My Discover account just offered me 0.9% interest for six months, for the asking. Really? Never seen that without signing up for a new account. Still too high for me. I have never paid a cent of CC interest or fees.

  20. @JimB

    “compared to Costco’s 42 month free replacement warranty. So, if you have a nearby Costco, it is a great deal, especially if you could get a free one every two years. Yes, I know, some warranties might not work that way.”

    –in fact costco’s warranty has changed. They now only do 36 months on new, and the warranty doesn’t extend to the replacement, ie. you buy new, replace under warranty at 2 years, your new battery is only covered for an additional year. They track it all internally so you don’t have to keep receipts. You get 4 years of use across two batteries for the price if my experiences hold up.

    I am not surprised to find the costco sold interstate batteries are not the same as ones direct from interstate. I had that same experience with the win10 Dell machine I’m b!tching about above. The manufacturers have to shave something somewhere to get to costco’s pricing… that does make me wonder about the Michelin tires…

    I went thru batteries in AZ too, it’s the heat. Houston is notoriously hard on car batteries. Phoenix was too.

    n

  21. @JimB
    What are air gap resistors in this context?
    The power cord for the POE to Ethernet device was unplugged. Not apparent for this specific event until I laid my hands on the power cord and physically traced it. Eyeballing it the first time I thought it was plugged in. Cord went down behind the cabinet, back up, plugged in. Dim room, saw dim light on device, thought it had power. Dim light was reflection. Hands on and a flashlight and grunting the cabinet a few inches out of the way revealed the air gap resistor. After I finished beating my head against the wall I plugged in the blasted thing and hallelujah the angels sang and the camera started streaming.

    Wasn’t the first time I’ve missed that, regrettably and shamefully won’t be the last. Dork moments in IT. In my defense, there were about eight potential failure points, and the lighting was inadequate. Plus brain.

  22. I am not surprised to find the costco sold interstate batteries are not the same as ones direct from interstate. I had that same experience with the win10 Dell machine I’m b!tching about above. The manufacturers have to shave something somewhere to get to costco’s pricing… that does make me wonder about the Michelin tires…

    I have Michelin from Sam’s on my old car which leave a lot to be desired in terms of road noise. Something definitely changed in the last few years there because the previous three sets of tires all came from Costco or Sam’s without complaint.

    We put Firestone from Firestone on my wife’s Exploder the first time we replaced tires on that vehicle. No problems.

  23. Thanks, Jenny. We used to have a cartoon at work. It showed three people scratching heads over something on a test bench. No caption. Trace the cords, and the only things plugged in were the soldering iron and the coffee pot, NOT the item that wasn’t working. 🙂

    As for dim places, one word: FLASHLIGHTS!!

  24. Our school district is opening up. Over half of the kids (35,300 total) are going to be at the schools on Monday. And they just presented a bond election of $793 million to be voted on in November. Guess what I am going to vote against ?
    https://www.fbherald.com/news/lcisd-calls-for-792-5-million-bond-election/article_71bccdfb-8649-52e0-8900-8ea776b95e3a.html

    “The new high school, which would be the seventh one in the district after Randle High opens next year, would help with the coming overcrowding at Fulshear and Foster high schools.”

    “The new high school is estimated to cost over $161.1 million.”

    “With a new high school, there is also a need for a new stadium that will complement Traylor Stadium for LCISD athletic competitions. The stadium facility is estimated to cost around $82.7 million, which would make it the most expensive high school stadium in Texas.”

    “Other items in the bond includes funding for building a junior high school ($77.1 million), a middle school ($34.7 million), a new transportation building ($27 million) and a police station for the newly created LCISD police department ($5.5 million). It also includes $31 million for purchasing land for the new facilities.”

    Wow ! $161 million for a new 2,000 student high school ? And a $83 million football stadium ? Are you kidding me ?

  25. @jenny

    Dr. Pournelle used to state that a high percentage of computer/network failures are caused by bad cables.

    And, regarding FLASHLIGHTS, might I suggest a few strap-on headlamps. There are some 5-LED ones that work quite well. I see them in WalMart in the camping section for about $1 each. Great for mucking about in dark spaces under cabinets, and such. Or camping. Fun to let the kids wear them in the dark while playing tag.

  26. Wow ! $161 million for a new 2,000 student high school ? And a $83 million football stadium ? Are you kidding me ?

    HOK has already been paid for the stadium. Yes, there are alternative companies, but HOK is the status symbol firm.

    Hopefully, they provide more details on what $161 million buys at the high school.

    The police department for the ISD needs its own building? Don’t tell me there isn’t idle commercial space somewhere that would work nicely.

  27. Regarding tires, I seldom wear out tire treads; they usually fail because of age. Lately, with the trend to “retire” tires that are over six years old, I have a lot of “rollers,” storage tires, that I give away. I have had poor luck with several brands until I switched to genuine Made in Korea Kumho tires almost twenty years ago. Now, Kumho manufactures some tires in the US, so not sure if those are good. We have some workplace chemical phobias that are not present in Asia, and this impacts ozone and UV resistance. I have also heard that some Chinese tires resist deterioration better for the same reason. Michelin (I think, or maybe Goodyear) has some RV tires designed to resist weathering, but not in sizes for passenger cars.

    The US Army Rock Island Arsenal pioneered ozone and UV resistance treatments before WWII. Some of those WWII and Korean war tires are still around, and still hold air. All I have seen are stamped “Mil OZ” on the sidewall. The chemical has to be compounded into the tire at manufacture, not applied to the surface later. It is carcinogenic, hence its disuse. Other substitutes so far are inferior.

    I first noticed that Kumho was the predominant brand on cars owned by car nuts at events, so I asked around, and was told that was the hot tip. I will say I have had fewer problems with manufacturing defects and ozone cracking. Their web site is also very good. They rate tires in several areas, including noise, for comparison. I like this better than taking advice from the tire store. Those folks will say whatever they stock is best. Really.

  28. Dr. Pournelle used to state that a high percentage of computer/network failures are caused by bad cables.

    And power supplies. The situation is better now than 10 years ago, however, when Core 2 was new and the 12 V lines didn’t supply the spec-ed current the manufacturers claimed.

  29. Just bought me a SunJoe SPX3000 pressure washer, per yesterday’s recommendations. Stumbled across it while buying other things, cheaper than what I’d seen online.

    It’s still in the box. Don’t want to get too, you know, ambitious. Don’t want to clean anything because that’ll make something else look dirty and it never ends. No, much better to leave it in the box forever and never even pretend to try to clean anything.

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  30. My SunJoe has worked well for me.

    Make sure you tighten all connections before each use. And make sure the nozzle you are using is on tight (it’s like a pressure hose fitting). Last time I used it, I had a loose pressure hose connection, and it blew out with a very loud noise. Almost scared the crap out of me.

    Although it would have been easy to clean if it had.

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  31. …building a junior high school ($77.1 million), a middle school ($34.7 million)…

    What’s the difference? In my state those are synonymous.

  32. …building a junior high school ($77.1 million), a middle school ($34.7 million)…

    What’s the difference? In my state those are synonymous.

    Junior high is grades 7-9? With “elementary” as K-3 and “middle” as 4-6?

    They’ll do that in serious overcrowding situations. Round Rock ISD will have to consider it since my daughter’s high school graduating class is planned as 2000, and the middle school (6-8) they attended was severly overcrowded despite new schools opening half empty.

    California influence. When that fails, then the year-round schooling starts — six weeks on, six weeks off, everybody has two weeks off at Christmas and various other holidays strategically placed through the year.

    If your region doesn’t have a serious “undocumented” immigration situation overloading your schools like CA or parts of TX, just wait. I figure about 10-20 million will show up from China and the Subcontinent as soon as being in the country illegally is decriminalized.

    Ironically, I doubt the numbers will change much from points south.

  33. …building a junior high school ($77.1 million), a middle school ($34.7 million)…

    What’s the difference? In my state those are synonymous.

    I could be wrong… But working backward, grade 9 through 12th is High School. 7 and 8 was Junior High for me. Middle School seems to be (from what I see around here) 5th and 6th grade. Elementary is 4th and down.

    I suppose it’s a way to “need” more support staff from Principal to folks mowing the grass. Or maybe I have a bad attitude.

    Edit: Because portable buildings are for some reason considered bad and demeaning to the teacher.


  34. …building a junior high school ($77.1 million), a middle school ($34.7 million)…

    What’s the difference? In my state those are synonymous.

    The junior high school is grades 7 and 8. The middle school is grade 6. The elementary schools are K – 5. The high school is 9 – 12. Makes for enormous complexes. This is a middle school, junior, and senior high complex across FM 762 from my house. Holds about 5,000 kids.
    https://www.google.com/maps/@29.5171281,-95.6919593,1117m/data=!3m1!1e3

  35. “A Guilty Plea in the Durham Investigation” by Rush Limbaugh
    https://www.rushlimbaugh.com/daily/2020/08/14/a-guilty-plea-in-the-durham-investigation/

    “And we now have it. Kevin Clinesmith, a corrupt FBI lawyer who deliberately fabricated evidence to justify spying on Carter Page getting the FISA warrant — that’s what got this all started. They needed a way to spy on the Trump campaign, and they had Carter Page who had been making trips to Russia in the context of doing other work. He was actually an American agent. He was not a Russian agent. He was not anything that the leaders of this coup cast him as.”

    “But Kevin Clinesmith, one of the FBI lawyers who deliberately fabricated evidence to justify spying on Carter Page and getting the FISA warrants, is going to plead guilty to federal charges of falsifying evidence. So it is something. And as the attorney general said, it’s not a gigantic thing, but it does mean that the grand jury that Durham impaneled has been doing work and that there are indictments.”

    Draining the swamp one crooked FBI lawyer at a time is a small start. They need to be charging 100 crooked FBI lawyers at a time, starting with James Comey.

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  36. Draining the swamp one crooked FBI lawyer at a time is a small start. They need to be charging 100 crooked FBI lawyers at a time, starting with James Comey.

    Comey. Nah. FBI Directors know things.

    Besides, if the Dems win it all goes away. Comey may even be rehired to serve out his remaining 10 years. The new President will fire all the current prosecutors.

    It may or may not be Plugs. The Convention hasn’t happened yet. I remember 1992 and the Dem convention opening with doom and gloom before Perot appeared to go bonkers on … Tuesday of that week? … and suddenly it was “Don’t Stop Thinkin’ ‘Bout Tomorrow”.

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  37. BTW, I still dislike the thumbs down. I don’t have a clue if the mysterious thumber downer person dislikes the message or wants me to jump off a cliff.

  38. It may or may not be Plugs. The Convention hasn’t happened yet. I remember 1992 and the Dem convention opening with doom and gloom before Perot appeared to go bonkers on … Tuesday of that week? … and suddenly it was “Don’t Stop Thinkin’ ‘Bout Tomorrow”.

    It is gonna be Plugs with Kamala carrying him across some sort of line, probably not the finish line. I had forgotten that Kamala jumped out of the dumbocrat prez race even before the first primary.

  39. BTW, I still dislike the thumbs down. I don’t have a clue if the mysterious thumber downer person dislikes the message or wants me to jump off a cliff.

    I get them often. NBD. You have to figure that people find this space through copies of our late host’s Home Scientist books since the information doesn’t really go out of date beyond supplier lists.

  40. “Carter Page: Corrupt FBI Attorney Kevin Clinesmith ‘Put My Very Life At Risk’”
    https://thefederalist.com/2020/08/14/carter-page-corrupt-fbi-attorney-kevin-clinesmith-put-my-very-life-at-risk/

    “Kevin Clinesmith ‘put my very life at risk,’ Carter Page told The Federalist on Friday, after Clinesmith was charged by DOJ with fabricating evidence to justify illegal spy warrants against Page.”

    “The Federal Intelligence Surveillance Court, or FISC, authorized four separate warrants to spy on Page. What Clinesmith and the FBI failed to disclose in the application for the spy warrants, which were based primarily on false claims from a foreign agent working on behalf of the Hillary Clinton presidential campaign and the Democratic National Committee, was that Page had actually worked on behalf of U.S. intelligence authorities from 2008 through 2013 to investigate actual Russian intelligence agents working to harm the United States.”

    Isn’t it against federal law to out a CIA agent ?

  41. I take Thumb Down as a “well, I just read the stupidest thing on the ‘net today” and well, it does let you know /someone/ thought enough to spare an extra click. 🙂 If they were really offended they would speak up.

    That’s my theory.

    It’s like FB needs a Meh button…. like I looked at your crap but Like isn’t the needed word.

    Temps made to 109F today. I went out to feed the critters and there was a decent breeze. Some of the cats are sitting in the shade and panting. It’s now 107F and… the a/c is cycling. The newish windows make a difference.

    Battery stuff, interesting.

    Northern Tools is a bit scammy on prices. I bought a couple of the battery tenders for about $25. Ok, get one for each tractor. Nope. Price went to $29. Then $35. Their e-mail the other day had it for $29. Now I wait for $25.


  42. Isn’t it against federal law to out a CIA agent?

    Technically, yes. For us. For others with private mail servers, not so much.

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  43. Whew, it’s hot. Weather station says 111F in the driveway. Sunny and clear though so that part is nice. In a fry your head kind of way….

    Ordered takeout pizza so I’m waiting for that atm.

    Driving around today I passed 3 or 4 covid testing setups and they were empty. Not a single car. I don’t know where in TX the increased testing is taking place, but it’s not on the west side of Houston.

    n

  44. Driving around today I passed 3 or 4 covid testing setups and they were empty. Not a single car. I don’t know where in TX the increased testing is taking place, but it’s not on the west side of Houston.

    If you listen to the County Judge in Fort Bend County, he implies that over half of the county of 820,000 people have COVID-19. The paper said that we passed 10,000 people infected yesterday and that number started back in February. We are at 102 dead with an average age of somewhere between 70 and 80.

  45. “Huge Gun Victory in 9th Circuit Court. Send Thank You Notes to 1600 Pennsylvania Ave.”
    https://pjmedia.com/news-and-politics/victoria-taft/2020/08/14/huge-gun-victory-in-9th-circuit-court-send-thank-you-notes-to-1600-pennsylvania-ave-n793961

    “California’s high-capacity magazine limitations for guns “infringes on [the] fundamental right to self defense” and is therefore unconstitutional, according to a three-judge panel of the 9th U.S. District Court of Appeals. Yes, the court previously known as the “9th Circus” for being the most Leftist, most overturned, and most wrong court in the land, ruled in favor of the rights of gun owners on Friday afternoon.”

    “California deemed that the use or sale of magazines with a higher capacity than ten bullets (LCMs) are illegal. Voters passed the measure. The three-judge panel in the 9th Circuit Court ruled that the limitation is unconstitutional.”

    “The Court said in its opinion that it was “keenly aware” of gun violence and the tragedies therein, and the decision has nothing to say about “issues not before us,” such as “assault weapons” bans.”

    Elections have consequences.

    Hat tip to:
    https://thelibertydaily.com/

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  46. Driving around today I passed 3 or 4 covid testing setups and they were empty. Not a single car. I don’t know where in TX the increased testing is taking place, but it’s not on the west side of Houston.

    If Texas manages to keep the bars closed through Labor Day, the numbers will fall off a cliff. I’m beginning to wonder if that is why we don’t see any MJ Hegar Senate commercials.

    So what was the end result of your client’s 4th of July party? Any cases?

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  47. So what was the end result of your client’s 4th of July party? Any cases?

    We spoke briefly this week about the work, and he didn’t mention any problems. He’s currently on a trip with his wife. No concerns there.

    My sometimes partner who got it gave it to his wife and college age daughter, but they had mild cases and have all recovered. He works in a hospital administrator position but probably got it playing in the church band. Churches with singing seem to be a recurring thread in spreading wu-ping cough.

    This is interesting–

    UPS Readies Freezer Farms to Ship Virus Vaccine — If We Get One

    United Parcel Service Inc. is building two giant freezer farms capable of super-cooling millions of vials of a Covid-19 vaccine, preparing for the day when it will need to deliver the medicine at high speed across the globe.

    The facilities, under construction in Louisville, Kentucky, and the Netherlands, near UPS air hubs, will house a total of 600 deep-freezers that can each hold 48,000 vials of vaccine at temperatures as low as -80 Celsius (-112 Fahrenheit). That’s on par with some of the coldest temperatures in Antarctica. Continue reading on Bloomberg.

    -the implication late in the article is that UPS is paying for it themselves. That’s a big gamble.

    n

  48. If Texas manages to keep the bars closed through Labor Day, the numbers will fall off a cliff. I’m beginning to wonder if that is why we don’t see any MJ Hegar Senate commercials.

    People in Texas are getting very tired of this crap. I’ll bet that at least half of the supposed COVID deaths are misdiagnosed with other prevalent issues like my father-in-law who is hanging on by a single thread. A ten mile per hour wind could take him out. I am dreading him going back to the nursing home tomorrow or Sunday, I think that we will have the ambulance running him back and forth to the hospital weekly.

    BTW, due to nursing home shutdown, my father-in-law has been denied communion from his church since March 12. One of the church members always showed up on Sunday afternoon and brought him communion. I am really unhappy about the nursing home lock down continuing this long.

    I wonder how many other seniors out there who are barely hanging on and going to kick off in the next month or so due to natural causes. 1% of the population dies every year in the USA and the leading edge of the baby boomer wave turns 75 this year, many of whom are over weight with heart issues and diabetes.

    My church is planning on reopening on Sept 6 (Labor day weekend). I can hardly wait. I wish that they were reopening this Sunday. I did get a letter begging for more money (something we never do) so obviously the shutdown is hurting.

  49. -the implication late in the article is that UPS is paying for it themselves. That’s a big gamble.

    I will guarantee you that UPS has a PO from the White House and the invoice is ready. Those guys do not do anything without somebody paying them. We had a corporate account with UPS for two decades and paid $10 per week for them to show up daily to pickup our send outs. That was on top of the actual shipping charge. We do so little shipping now that we take packages to the mailbox place around the corner.

  50. The FBI has issued an advisory for the Health Care Sector that a new scam is going around. The health care facility gets contacted by someone who has PPEs for sale, but the buyer has to give personally identifiable information to an “FBI asset verification line” (which isn’t the FBI at all.) The seller then steals the buyer’s info, and possibly money and/or delivers counterfeit PPEs or nothing.

    I mention it here because I know there are members of the “healthcare sector” that read or get info here passed to them. The info is supposed to be widely distributed within the sector, but not outside the sector. FWIW.

    n

  51. 111F here today. Humidity in the teens to tweens. Air full of smoke from the big Ranch Fire about 10 miles away.

    I saw a NASA van rolling by, so I waved them down to see what was up. They said they were using my neighborhood to calibrate the reference ground instruments for the Parker Solar Probe…

  52. -the implication late in the article is that UPS is paying for it themselves. That’s a big gamble.

    UPS is heavily unionized. They’ve been told that mandatory vaccination is coming and the Teamsters will get to “wet their beaks” to offset the loss of work from Amazon delivering their own packages using non-union labor and trucks with specific dimensions designed to skirt Federal work rules.

    IIRC, Fauci indicated that a 50% effective vaccine would be considered acceptable for certification by the FDA. How much do you want to bet that one appears shortly after the election.

    The Post Office will be busy finding ballots in crashed mail trucks throughout November and December.

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