Mon. May 18, 2020 – another week, home school, home work, home sweet home

Nice, sunny and cool.

Yesterday was cool to start, without much sun, then got hot and sunny, but turned into a picture postcard evening. Comfortable and a pretty pink sunset, with breezes for cooling. Nice.

I got a couple of things done moving toward having a work area in the back corner of the garage. Moved some stuff out of the way (20+ coleman lanterns of all fuels and vintages), and added some plywood to the back of a shelf. The plywood will be a tool board eventually. It’s all a bit fussy and low criticality, but that’s about all I’m feeling up to at the moment.

I did cut the grass, and was soaked through when finished. Looked at the gardens a bit, but don’t have the weekly report until tomorrow.

Breakfast was instant hash browns with a BB date in 2016, seasoned and served under fried eggs… yum. Also chocolate chip muffins from mix. Dinner was one of the ready to eat main courses from Costco. We eat a lot of the lamb shanks, but this time it was mexican grilled chicken thighs. Added half a can of corn, a can of beans, and some tortillas for a nice and low effort dinner. I freeze the main courses so it takes a bit longer than 7 minutes in the microwave, but they last much longer that way.

The news that several sailors tested positive for Covid-19 after having previously tested negative more than once, and returning to duty, is alarming to say the least. We’ve had other reports of similar cases, but there was always a way to deny it. They are arm-waving that the tests may not be good, etc. but it looks like pretty strong evidence you CAN get this a second time, or that it doesn’t go away but just goes dormant for a while. This is very bad if that is the case. Think about what will happen if it becomes undeniable that we WON’T get immunity, and that the second time can be worse (as we see in Korea and China). Pretty much everyone’s plan for getting back to normal involves immunity in one form or another. We don’t currently have a lot of time with the people who have recovered to see what long term or even medium term consequences might be. We might be in for some more unpleasant surprises in the coming months.

Which means, keep prepping. Lots more bad stuff can be coming down the pike. This is a pretty good rehearsal and test of our systems. While the trucks are still rolling, and the system is still mostly intact, restock, stock up, and keep stacking.

nick

Author: Nick Flandrey

Mid 50s, stay at home dad, with two elementary school age girls. Love my family and my life.

50 thoughts on “Mon. May 18, 2020 – another week, home school, home work, home sweet home”

  1. Think about what will happen if it becomes undeniable that we WON’T get immunity, and that the second time can be worse (as we see in Korea and China).

    We will get useful data out of Korea on that, but China = fuggedaboudit. They have an agenda. WHO and The Gates Foundation too.

    I saw an article over the weekend about a fringe Italian politician calling for the arrest of BillG. About 25 years too late IMHO.

    Imagine what the world could have been spared if the standard Windows browser hadn’t been integrated with the operating system at the root/admin level.

    Marc Andreesen is widely credited with the “Windows as poorly debugged device drivers” quote that sent Gates into a tizzy in the mid-90s which gave us a browser running as admin, but I’ve also seen it attributed to Bob Metcalfe, who invented Ethernet. Maybe you’ve heard of it.

    https://web.archive.org/web/20060812205515/http://www.ianmurdock.com/

  2. Woke with no pain in my neck. Joy is the absence of once present pain.

    So don’t want to mess that up by spending a bunch of time in front of my computer until I’m sure it’s solid.

    n

  3. It won’t last today, but it’s better and it will last longer tomorrow.

    First named storm of the season. Yikes. TS Arthur off the Carolinas.

    That should be a nice wakeup call for everyone here on the Gulf Coast.

    It’s always something…..

    n

  4. “First named storm comes early” – this is all over the news. WTF?

    Tell me that the criteria for naming storms haven’t changed over the decades. Tell me that, before widespread satellites and weather radar, storms were spotted as early and reliably as they are today.

    It’s just part of the drumbeat about climate change. Also, I have some great swampland to sell.

  5. Tell me that the criteria for naming storms haven’t changed over the decades. Tell me that, before widespread satellites and weather radar, storms were spotted as early and reliably as they are today.

    I would call Arthur a late season Nor-easter, but that doesn’t fit the climate change agenda.

    Not that Nor-easters are minor events. The most significant hurricane-type weather to hit Tampa Bay in the last 30 years was the March 1993 “No Name” storm.

    The press wants a bad *hurricane* to hit the US this year to add to Trump’s problems.

  6. 40 years ago today Mount St. Helens (in WA State) blew her top and erupted sending a plume of ash around the world and leaving ash inches to feet deep throughout the Northwest.

    In the late morning, I was putting together a metal shed in our backyard when ash started falling on me. It was like nothing I had ever seen or felt. The ash cloud overhead looked like black upside-down broccoli heads hanging in the sky to me. Soon the ash fall was so thick and chocking I had to stop work. Ash fell heavily for the rest of the day and for a couple of days afterward. We got over 2-inches of ash.

    There was a positive side to ash, it enriched the soil. Those of us gardeners who worked it into the soil were rewarded with many years of exceptional crops. The farmers also knew this and were quick to till the ash into their fields. Some were smart enough to take and store the mountains of ash that others were dumping.

    On to a current topic:
    Our police force is finally getting tired of the gang foolishness and rivalry going on in these times. They had been holding back and using Tazers, but this weekend must have been the last straw as Deadly Force was used to great effect. Hooray! Too bad that it creates a bunch of paperwork and days off for the Officers and of course the gang community is already crying that it was unnecessary. BS, aim a gun or a knife at a Cop, take a hostage, kidnap someone, destroy property, and be prepared to have a bad day.

    Stay safe, stay happy, and most of all stay vigilant and prepared for the worst.

  7. Sigh, my incompetence knows no bounds. Fixed the posting.

    And who is Svengoolie ?

    MeTV’s take on the classic local B horror movie host. Svengoolie was the local host in Chicago, went off the air in the 90s, and then returned in the last decade before going national.

    https://svengoolie.com/

    It wouldn’t surprise me if the “Over the Hedge” artist is a fan.

    BTW, “Gargoyles” is a classic “so bad it is good” flick, most notable for Bernie Casey as one of the creatures.

    I grew up with Dr. Paul Bearer in Tampa so watching “Svengoolie” is like reliving a piece of my childhood. Every TV market had a host like this at one time.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kllQdd3m4G4

  8. How about Elvira?

    Elvira is semi retired as a horror movie host. Svengoolie might be the last one standing, but when we saw him speak at C2E2 last Spring, Sven/Rich indicated that he has received inquiries from local stations who were interested in reviving the tradition and wanted to know where to start.

    Of course I got an autograph and a picture!

    Local TV still makes money. The reason the horror hosts went away had more to do with broadcasting politics than lack of interest. The local station in Tampa aired “Creature Feature” in some form every Saturday until the host died, even when the quality of the movie packages available in syndication got *really* bad in the 90s.

  9. In the Bay Area we had Bob Wilkins, the KTVU weatherman, doing Creature Features. _Night of the Living Dead_ was only a few years old. Oy!

    ****
    I’m writing this at a bus stop and I was just approached by someone with a petition to end organ harvesting in China. I don’t think the progressive, liberal, PC left has any idea just how tolerant true libertarians are. I wouldn’t sign it because it’s their country so let them do whatever the hell they want! The little Chinese woman with the clipboard looked like she was going to spit on me.

  10. I like watching Svengoolie. Yes, cheesy. Some of the movies are actually fun to watch. Many look re-mastered as in not grainy like I remember. But the history he gives of the actors and locations is great.

    And besides, ain’t no StarTrek on Saturday night.

  11. Aim a gun or a knife at a Cop, take a hostage, kidnap someone, destroy property, and be prepared to have a bad day.

    In other words, "Don't throw shit at an armed man!"
    And
    "Don't stand next to a man throwing shit at an armed man!"

  12. Did I mention it got hot today? 106F inthe sun in my driveway. 94F in the shade.

    Freaking hot.

    n

  13. Here we go. Medicare XXXXXXXX Medicaid for all ™.

    Nothing will get done until January at a minimum.

    A decent segment of the population doesn’t want to go back to their dead end jobs even if the McJob offers benefits. That’s the real employment problem of the virus.

  14. The initial human test of the Modena SARS-CoV-2 vaccine went well. All the patients had immune responses at or above that from COVID-19 recovered patients. Phase 3 trial in July. Only side effect seen is soreness at the injection site for some. (Which seems to be the universal side effect for injections of any kind. Duh.)

  15. I like watching Svengoolie. Yes, cheesy. Some of the movies are actually fun to watch. Many look re-mastered as in not grainy like I remember. But the history he gives of the actors and locations is great.

    And besides, ain’t no StarTrek on Saturday night.

    “Star Trek” is on right after “Svengoolie”. Same channel.

    Weigel’s other network, H&I, gives you five hours of “Star Trek” every other night, and there is always CBS All Access streaming if you need a fix 24/7.

    Universal has been pretty good with providing clean copies of their classic films to “Svengoolie”. Even “Munsters Goes Home” airs with a new print, and it is a minor piece of film history since that’s the last time their house facade was filmed still intact after the series ended on the Universal back lot.

    (Later Munster reunion specials and series either used house footage from “Munsters Go Home” or a miniature. If you want to see the current state of the house facade, watch the end of “Supertroopers 2”, during the flashback to the “Fred Savage” incident. That’s the house in the background, razed to one story and painted to match the “neighborhood”.)

  16. How about Elvira?

    Indeed. How ’bout Elvira! 😀

    (I’m tempted to add “hubba hubba” …)


  17. “Star Trek” is on right after “Svengoolie”. Same channel.

    True but out of sequence with the shows on H&I.

  18. Trivia: Whenever I see the FIFO acronym I associate it with the age old computer meaning we are all well used to. There is however another set of words that can end up having that acronym: Fly In Fly Out. It is used to describe the working patterns of people contracted by the mining and petrochemical companies based in Western Australia.
    Heh, I suppose you could also apply to this the former meaning as well.

  19. I spent a lot of time flying out to a customer site, then flying home. I commuted to Calgary, Alberta every week for about 3 months one year… and there were A LOT of others doing the same (BP had offices there and Houston.) One Friday when I asked the gate attendant about an upgrade, she looked then told me there were 33 platinums ahead of me already (I was also platinum and was pretty used to getting upgraded at that point.)

    I spent 9 months commuting to Lafayette LA every week, and there were dozens of other places too. One week I flew to Lafayette LA, and in the middle of the week, flew from there to LA, CA for an overnight service call, and then back to Louisiana…. and in a day or so, home.

    n


  20. A decent segment of the population doesn’t want to go back to their dead end jobs even if the McJob offers benefits.

    Root, hog, or die.

  21. Here we go. Medicare XXXXXXXX Medicaid for all ™.

    Nothing will get done until January at a minimum.

    A decent segment of the population doesn’t want to go back to their dead end jobs even if the McJob offers benefits. That’s the real employment problem of the virus.

    But their unemployment will run out in October. Mama (Mom or wife) will be very unhappy.

  22. I received my letter from the SS folks. The Americans, not the 3rd Reich volk.

    I did it all on-line. Start in August because, well, y’all take your time, I’m not in a rush. I just happened to be with reach of my phone when they called. I don’t know why I answered, the number isn’t in my contacts. After a few ID type questions she said I would be getting $x.xx a month starting the 4th Wednesday in September.

    The letter in today’s mail says almost $100 more per month.

    Not a huge amount that can make a car payment on top of the rest of the normal bills like property tax, car insurance and electricity plus Internet and phone. Oh, and groceries. But if/when I’m here alone in a paid for house, even if my 401k vanishes, I’m going to be fine. And that’s really all I need.

    Sling and Amazon Prime will go away. The TV has an antenna and I have seven shelf feet of LaserDiscs plus at least five hip high stacks of DVDs. “Something to watch” is not a problem.

    Well, another piece into the puzzle.

  23. “A decent segment of the population doesn’t want to go back to their dead end jobs even if the McJob offers benefits. That’s the real employment problem of the virus.”

    But their unemployment will run out in October. Mama (Mom or wife) will be very unhappy.

    If they’re like my in-laws, everyone lives off of Grandma’s Social Security and company pension.

    I doubt Congress will do much of anything after the Memorial Day recess. Then comes 4th of July, the delayed primaries, conventions, and Labor Day, the beginning of the Fall fun.

  24. Time to buy a battery.

    The Yanmar tractor has a Group 24 battery. The Mahindra has a Group 51. Specs printed on the batteries are about the same.

    The manual for the Yanmar is vague… “60ah” is all it says about the battery. Nothing about CCA at 32F and 0F. The battery tray looks large enough to hold a Group 27. Yes, the monster battery a 1974 Imperial needed. Oh, and a 1975 Cordoba. Er, and a 1976 Cordoba. And more!

    Looking at NAPA and other sites, just shoot me. All I know is that the tractor was new in 1982 and they don’t list Yanmar as an option.

    Other than physical size, Group 24 and the smaller Group 51 seem to be about the same.

    I can get either size at the local NAPA for about $108. Plus core charge. Add about $50 for maintenance free. But hey, it’s a tractor…. set the throttle, pull the decompression lever, hit the starter to spin the engine and release the decompression lever. Cloud of soot, small puff actually, and it’s running.

    Shopping around? Hmm. Wal-Mart has Group 24 batteries for $55. Sure, a 1 year, not 2 or 3 year warranty. But for the price, for a tractor battery?

    Easy decision.

    The now dead battery is mumble mumble years old. I know I’ve been doing the routine every Spring with the 1 amp motorcycle charger for a couple of days before using the 6 amp charger for another day, but unplug and let it rest a day when it feels warm, for at least five years.

    Same routine. But yesterday? Who turned the ignition key to on? After a trickle and then 6 amp followed by a couple of days of resting, my 6 amp charger pegs the meter.

    Or actually, who left the key on? You stop the engine by closing the throttle. So it’s been sitting since last October with the key turned on.

    Good times. 🙂


  25. The letter in today’s mail says almost $100 more per month.

    Are they pulling out Medicare premiums for part B and/or part D? That may make a difference. Current premiums are about $144 for part B and about $13 for part D.

    But if/when I’m here alone in a paid for house, even if my 401k vanishes, I’m going to be fine

    That is about where we are. Home is paid, no debts. We could live on SS entirely if needed, not well, but OK. That along with my VA money and retirement money, which I don’t see going away, we can survive. The only issue is a major medical issue requiring long term care. From experience with my aunt that will bleed someone dry very quickly. Any money the state pays they will want back by placing liens on all property involved.


  26. Are they pulling out Medicare premiums for part B and/or part D?

    When does the Medicare start? I’ll be 63 end of October. I’m pretty stupid about this stuff. I hear it starts at 65.

    That is about where we are. Home is paid, no debts.

    I think the biggest problem will be inflation. Sure, the property taxes are locked at 65. But if a loaf of bread goes to $4, well… I’ll figure it out as it happens.

  27. I made “sort of” enchiladas last night. “Sort of” as in making layers and not rolling the tortillas.

    Mexican Lasagna?

    Hey, we always cut out chunks anyway. Because I forget which way I laid the enchiladas.

    Cooked in a 9×14 or so Pyrex dish. One end was meat, the other end was cheese. With a gap in the middle of the pan.
    The meat was from a 10oz can of taco meat I bought from the clearance cart at HEB. Best by 2017. I could have eaten the entire can… And yes, I did simmer it before tasting.

    The cheese was American. A block from HEB. American cheese for Mexican food? Well, I asked at a couple of restaurants and that’s what they use. Not Cheddar because it breaks down into grease. It works. Pain in the you know where to grate but worth it.

    And in the middle of the pan? I heated a can of refried beans, watered a bit runnier than bean dip. And poured that in. Top it all with several homemade nacho slices. Covered the pan with foil and baked at 350 for almost an hour. Pulled the foil and covered it all with more cheese, another 10 minutes. And once out of the oven, 20 minutes to stop bubbling.

    My best attempt to date…

  28. Time to buy a battery.

    I have had good experience with Walmart branded batteries, now the only line they carry. Have not tried the cheap one-year one. For about double the price, they have a better one and a best one. The price difference between the two is small, so I have bought the best one. So far, all have given good life, at least six years.

    Their batteries are made by Johnson Controls, and feature a “S” designation, which is for South. These are supposedly a little better for hot weather that the other (N?) ones. I bought one a year ago, and there were country of origin stickers from several countries: none, Czech Republic, Israel, Mexico, but not China. Since two I have had success with were from Mexico, I chose that one. It seems quite good at a year young.

    Last I checked, Napa brand batteries are also made by Johnson Controls. I have one of those that came with my 94 Dodge PU, and it is about 7 years old and strong.

    As for size, I have standardized on the size 34. That fits all my cars, but is not as tall as a 24. Note that in Walmart at least, the 34, 24, and 27 have very similar CCA ratings, which is to me the most important rating. None of my running cars puts much starting stress on a battery.

    My $0.02.

  29. Hey Paul, your take on enchiladas sounds great. My wife makes something similar, but of course different. And different every time. I must be hungry!

  30. I think the biggest problem will be inflation. Sure, the property taxes are locked at 65. But if a loaf of bread goes to $4, well… I’ll figure it out as it happens.

    I think the biggest problem will be inflation. Sure, the property taxes are locked at 65. But if a loaf of bread goes to $10, well… I’ll figure it out as it happens.

    Fixed that for ya.

    Of course, the expense will be New Dollars which will be exchanged at ten to one. Or maybe 100 to one.

  31. Barnyard mix egg update.
    I set 17 of the 24 on 04/26/2020. 3 failed to develop, and one of the greens I could never tell (candler not powerful enough to see thru shell) that hadn’t pipped by day 22. 12 healthy bouncy chicks in the brooder, 13th that is weak and I’m keeping in the incubator for a few more hours. Not a great hatch rate however for Facebook eggs from an unknown source for $22, good enough.
    Cutie patooties. They’re currently sitting on top of my washer / dryer in the house. I’ll move them into a long term brooder inside the hen house later this week, so their copious poo can be more easily managed.

    No word on my Chantecler eggs. It would be ideal if they arrived this week.

    Four out of five rabbits are moved into their permanent accommodations. I received the ‘rabbit nipples’ Saturday and got my automatic watering system set up Sunday. Today I observed all of the rabbits using the nipples so I removed the water crocks. Yay!

    I need to make some hay feeders and decide what I want long term for pellet feeding – exterior mounted troughs to minimize opening / closing doors? Or the stainless steel bowls I’ve been using. Advantage of the bowls is they are so easy to pop into the dishwasher to clean. Advantage of the troughs is I can mount the hay feeders above them to catch the loose hay and minimize waste.

    I think I’m going to go with the stainless steel bowls. I like opening the cages and scritching the rabbits. It’ll be a bit harder for kiddo to participate in feeding (her hands have a tough time with the latches) but we can work through that.

    I’ve got most of my parts gathered to extend the roof of the chicken run to accommodate the final two rabbit cages. A friend is going to pick up the 12′ polycarbonate sheet for me since it won’t easily fit in our vehicles and $80 to transport it a mile is ridiculous. Once the roof is extended and the last two cages arrive, I’ll be able to have all the rabbits in one easily cared for setting. Rabbits urinate 10-12 ounces a day – more than my soil can reasonably absorb – so I think I’m going to implement the tarp / rubbermaid urine collection system I saw on YouTube. It’ll be a hassle dealing with the urine however it should be more hygienic and less smelly. Keeping odors (and flys) to a minimum is important in an urban setting.

  32. “Fauci vs. Trump – who’s right?” by Pat Buchanan
    https://www.wnd.com/2020/05/fauci-vs-trump-right/

    “Pat Buchanan quotes JFK on how the president is the one who ultimately bears responsibility”

    “Fauci may be the best at what he does, but he is still only an adviser. As John F. Kennedy said after the Bay of Pigs, it is the president who ultimately bears responsibility for what he does and fails to do, while “the advisers may move on to new advice.””

    “Believing he can do no more than his White House is now doing to contain the incidence of cases, hospitalizations and deaths, Trump has decided his primary job is to prevent the nation from a catastrophic economic collapse from which it might take years to recover.”

    Yup.

  33. Shopping report: Went into Sam’s Club to pick up the mother-in-law’s drugs. (Why my wife keeps getting them filled there is beyond me, but whatever.) While I was there with Miss Small Fry I picked up a few things. (Not much as I’d stopped at the restaurant supply store on Saturday and gotten 67 pounds of meat and with what I already had the freezer’s a bit on the full side, I have more than my weight in flour and rice, and I’m running out of space to store #10 cans. Not a bad problem to have.)

    Household paper products were well-stocked; I didn’t look to see if there was a purchase limit. Freezers have most of the products that were there four months ago, if not quite as many of each. Fresh meat is still low, and price is up considerably. Produce is scarce, not as much variety as before and not as much supply of each. Dry goods are roughly the same availability as before and price is up some.

    It was the canned goods that had the biggest change. There were a few boxes of soup, like eight one-meal cans in a box, but almost all of the available canned goods were #10 cans. There were a few others, like 66oz cans of chicken chunks. Spaghetti sauce was still available in jars of around 24 ounces, several to a package. The two #10 canned products which were the same as at the restaurant supply were 15-20% more expensive, for what it’s worth.

    Sam’s Club had most but not all customers wearing masks. All employees had cloth masks, not necessarily covering nose and mouth.

    The chain grocery store we went to next was mostly well stocked, but with some gaps. Flour was completely gone, as was yeast. There was at least 500# of white sugar but only a few 1# bags of brown sugar. Meat in the coolers and produce were well-stocked, with prices up a bit more since a couple weeks ago. Soups were in short supply, as were dry “meal” packages like rice-a-roni — just one lonely box of the latter sitting on a shelf. Frozen heat-n-eat meals were well-stocked. This is what I’ve seen for the past month or more. At first I thought people who can’t cook were buying soup and such because the restaurants were closed, but now I deduce that people are filling their larders in case of later shortage, which isn’t a bad thing.


  34. When does the Medicare start? I’ll be 63 end of October

    Medicare Part A starts at 65. If you have group insurance they will force you on Part A, which is hospital. Part B, doctor visits, surgery, is optional. Group insurance still covers that portion. Once you no longer have private insurance you can get Part B for doctors and surgery. That will require you pay premiums for the coverage. If you are not on SS you pay out of pocket every three months. If on SS the premiums are deducted each month from your SS. Part D covers prescription medicines and is optional. There is Part C which is like an HMO and may have premiums. Medicare only pays 80% so a supplemental policy is really a good idea.


  35. Sure, the property taxes are locked at 65

    Varies by state and county. There is no tax break for me in my county in TN.

  36. It was the canned goods that had the biggest change. There were a few boxes of soup, like eight one-meal cans in a box, but almost all of the available canned goods were #10 cans. There were a few others, like 66oz cans of chicken chunks. Spaghetti sauce was still available in jars of around 24 ounces, several to a package. The two #10 canned products which were the same as at the restaurant supply were 15-20% more expensive, for what it’s worth.

    Plenty of spaghetti sauces, but Members Mark pastas are in really short supply in the Sam’s Clubs around us, particularly penne which can be used for ziti and other casseroles.

  37. Sam’s Club had most but not all customers wearing masks. All employees had cloth masks, not necessarily covering nose and mouth.

    I went to Sam’s Club today also and scored some Charmin Soft TP (32 rolls, not the normal 35 roll case at Sam’s Club). Limit 1. They also had Member’s Mark TP (45 rolls) and Northern TP. No Bounty or other PT (paper towels) though. How odd.

    I was wearing a mask playing Kabuki. Many of the employees were wearing masks over their mouths and pulled down below their noses. Heh ! They are playing Kabuki too !

    BTW, Angelsoft TP is neither angelic or soft. Just my opinion. Hopefully I will not buy anymore. Vouge (Mexican) TP is crap according to the wife.

  38. Forget that silly virus. Here’s something to really worry about. The next Ice Age Cometh.
    https://www.foxnews.com/science/evidence-suggests-sun-entering-solar-minimum-stage-reports.amp

    We are still in an ice age, no matter what the main stream media idiots say. An ice age is defined as when one of the poles is frozen. Both poles are frozen now, a rare occurrence for history.
    https://wattsupwiththat.com/2020/01/03/earths-ice-ages/

    “In fact, out of the last 550 million years, the earth has had permanent ice caps on one or both poles only nine percent of the time.”

    Pray that the ice age does not get worse and the glaciers advance back into the lower 48 states of the USA. That would suck.

  39. Glaciers were a block from my mom’s house, about 12K years ago, south of Chicago. So yeah, ice age would suck.

    n

  40. @Jenny: Thanks for providing all the info on chicks and rabbits.

    I am saving it just in case I ever get around to doing something like that. If that ever happens, I know were to go to for experienced support. 🙂

Comments are closed.