Mon. Jun. 27, 2022 – rain last night

After a quiet and hot  day, it rained late last night.  Temps dropped, moisture fell from the sky.   NO idea what effect it will have on today’s weather, but I’m guessing it’ll still be hot and humid.

Did some small thing yesterday but mostly hid from the heat and continued my convalescence.  No point in taking a step back because I pushed too hard.

There were a bunch of piddle around things to do, so I did some of them after dinner.   Unboxed and set up the new string trimmer, a couple of small ottomen, brought the tv in from the garage and set it up.

The TV powers on, has internal menues but no channels, and can’t see the external blueray player, so more to do there.    I have an amplified antenna, but may not set it up.  TV isn’t a priority for us, and especially not here but having the ability to watch a movie would be nice.  As to no picture, the TV could have a blown input card, the blueray player might be NFG or, most likely, the HDMI cable is bad.  Everything came out of my junk box, and I didn’t bring spares.   I guess I could try the wii console later, if I get motivated.

Today’s plan will depend on how I feel, and the weather.   I would like to cut the grass before it gets too hot.  And I can do more sprinkler work if I go slow.  Or there is plumbing inside that needs attention… we’ll see how it goes.

Seems like summer riot season started a bit late this year, but I suppose it’s getting in full swing.   Keep your awareness up, and avoid trouble.

You should be able to stay away from trouble, if you’re prepped up….

More than one reason to stack all the things!

Seriously though, stay safe out there.

nick

65 Comments and discussion on "Mon. Jun. 27, 2022 – rain last night"

  1. brad says:

    Ah, some students are still good for surprises. One student, rarely did any useful homework, paid little attention. Turns out he was bored – turned in a nearly perfect exam for programming-1. OTOH another student who asked lots of good questions, I thought was putting in the work – nope, failed dramatically.

    Of those who took the test, about 60% passed. We lost maybe ⅓ of the class along the way. Of those who passed, only a fraction have the potential to be really good. I always say about 10%, but might be 15% or 20% in this particular group. The rest will be contributing to this problem.

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  2. Greg Norton says:

    Of those who took the test, about 60% passed. We lost maybe ⅓ of the class along the way. Of those who passed, only a fraction have the potential to be really good. I always say about 10%, but might be 15% or 20% in this particular group. The rest will be contributing to this problem.

    Your numbers are consistent with my experience in the US.

    Twitter bought their app back in the day. That’s their “moat” against competition. God only knows what most of the 2000 developers noted in the article actually do with their time.

  3. Ray Thompson says:

    The rest will be contributing to this problem

    I used to write really tight code. So did my accomplices. We tried for bragging rights to make the code as efficient as possible. No wasted CPU cycles. Bragging rights were on the line.

    In the banking industry when dealing with processing checks it was necessary. There was a finite amount of time between reading the MICR line until the pocket had to be selected. Miss that time and pocket select error occurred and required manual intervention that was costly in time. With three reader/sorters running timing was critical. Such that it was necessary, and allowed, to place the CPU in a state where only the code was allowed to run, no interrupts allowed from other peripherals. Get the MICR information, enter control state, determine pocket, exit control state.

    I learned my lesson though. Much of the code was extremely difficult to read, even more difficult to change. Tricks such as modifying instructions in memory to avoid having logic to make decisions later. Storing data in left over space from instructions. Short literals were stored in instructions (a common practice, and a good practice). In some cases that left 2, 3, 4, or 5 digits of space within the instruction not used so store something there as it was faster to access.

    For a reader/sorter operation it was necessary. For other programs, nope. But I still persisted in that mindset for a few years. Then I had to go back and make some changes to some of my code. What a freaking obfuscation of the task.

    I learned my lesson after many years. Why do in one obscure instruction what can be done in five understandable instructions? Especially when it meant that doing the five instructions made the code human readable and comments could describe each line if necessary. CPU time has gotten cheap, much cheaper over the years. People time has done the exact opposite.

    My last few years coding my goal was to make the code readable. Not only to me, but to anyone that would follow in my footsteps. If it takes an additional 2.85 milliseconds with more lines of code, so be it.

    I go back and look at code from my early years (I still have a few snippets) and my initial reaction is “WTF was I thinking”. Some of that code it would be faster to rewrite to fix a problem than to figure out where the problem is located and devise a fix.

    What I also practiced my last few years was that if some task was done more than once within the system, that task became a callable module. That required placing that code in a separate file. This resulted in many more files within the system. The code in the modules worked. A change in the way the operation needed to be accomplished only required changing one module.

    I also placed common constants in files. Files that were included during the compile process. Thus consistency throughout the system as the same named constant was used everywhere. The only exceptions were “I, N, Y, and Z” which were always relegated to local scope use in a loop or module with no guaranteed state or value outside the module or loop.

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  4. Alan says:

    >> Twitter bought their app back in the day. That’s their “moat” against competition. God only knows what most of the 2000 developers noted in the article actually do with their time.

    If Tony actually ever does buy Twitter I suppose many of those developers all of a sudden will be trying to figure that out. 

  5. Ray Thompson says:

    I really wish Comcast/Xfinity would get English speaking people. Speaking to some guy named “Ralph” with a thick Indian accent is just annoying. Almost impossible to understand what they are saying and the idiotic pandering sucks. So far today I have hung up on two support people because I cannot understand them.

    I was offered Top Gun (the original) as a free movie as part of Xfinity Rewards. Xfinity billed me for the movie. Jerks. After several calls they are giving me a “courtesy credit”. Uh, nope, should have never been on the bill.

    A scam by Xfinity hoping people will not notice. Or a really clueless and incompetent IT department and management. Or both. I wish I had an alternative.

    My son has Xfinity. His local power company is going to be offering symmetrical 1 Gig service no data caps in the near future. Xfinity is increasing his speed to 900 down, 25 up, still with a data cap. Xfinity is doing this because they know the power company is going to steal customers. My son can remove the data cap from Xfinity for $30.00 more each month. But that puts him $10.00 higher than the power company. A no-brainer.

    Chattanooga electric company is in the broadband business. Some of the cheapest rates Xfinity has to offer are in Chattanooga. Competition.

    My local area will not allow a ground-based competitor to Xfinity by contract with the city, thus no competition. Only other option would be satellite and their speeds are terrible and require a land line for uploads. Xfinity pays the city a lot of money in franchise fees to keep the exclusive access to poles and right of ways.

  6. drwilliams says:

    Yeah, ain’t it amazing how the pols are against price gouging unless they get their cut. 

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  7. ITGuy1998 says:

    I am so glad I don’t have to use Comcast anymore (I refuse to call them Xfinity). $55/month for 500 up and down with google fiber. They really want me to gig, but I have no need for it.

    I also have Death Star fiber available in my neighborhood. 

  8. drwilliams says:

    WUWT this morning has a contender for Best Headline of 2022:
    Protesters Learn French Police Don’t Use Glue Solvent
    (doubtless out of concern for the ozone layer)

  9. SteveF says:

    Protesters Learn French Police Don’t Use Glue Solvent

    “Warning: Graphic video”. Bah. “Graphic” would have been showing the protestors’ hands being cut off with hatchets.

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  10. brad says:

    Twitter bought their app back in the day. That’s their “moat” against competition. God only knows what most of the 2000 developers noted in the article actually do with their time.

    Is that a serious number? I mean, sure, the app needs some support, bug fixes, the odd new feature. iOS and Android, probably some support for old versions. Maybe a dozen developers? Backend could easily be another dozen. If they include the people responsible for actually running the infrastructure, maybe another dozen. Website, a fourth dozen. With 50 competent developers, of whom maybe 5 need to be top-quality, you’re done. 

    Ok, but Twitter is also a business, so I suppose they have some internal development work. Mostly SAP jockeys and such. So double the number to 100, and that includes internal IT support, networking, etc. – and you are definitely done.

    I note that Twitter increased their headcount by ⅓ last year, up to 7000. That’s at least 6000 too many. WTF do they all do?

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  11. brad says:

    Protesters Learn French Police Don’t Use Glue Solvent

    Anyway, his hand was “glued” to an asphalt road? I don’t know of any glue that sticks very well to asphalt. I think the guy was exaggerating for the camera. And no one really cares…

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  12. drwilliams says:

    SCOTUS ends the supremacy of the Establishment Clause, and Arizona sends a school choice bill to the governor’s desk that will make the NEA loose their minds. 

    Good start to the week. 

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  13. Ray Thompson says:

    I think the guy was exaggerating for the camera.

    Probably an ex-soccer player, where a simple bump becomes an agonizing level 10 pain event. For 11.37 seconds.

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  14. ~jim says:

    >> One student, rarely did any useful homework, paid little attention. Turns out he was bored – turned in a nearly perfect exam for programming<<

    Hey, I resemble that remark!

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  15. Nick Flandrey says:

    WTF do they all do?

    – you are forgetting all the profiling, tracking, data mining, bot development, and selling of access to eyes.  Twitter is not a messaging platform, it’s a propaganda organ, but first it’s an eyeball farm.

    Don’t forget factcheckers, and the algo tweekers to make sure the party line is safe.

    There is a sh!tton of stuff going on in the background to better harvest the suckers, who retweeted, to whom, what networks exist, who is at the nodes, who are all these people, what value can we assign them, how do we sort them, what new ways can we sell them……

    n

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  16. Nick Flandrey says:

    The day started a bit cooler after the rain, but it’s genuinely hot now.  Over 92F last time I looked, and unlike at my house, that is in the shade.

    Calm lake, surprisingly clear water, no breeze.   Lots of small fish in the shoals.

    Slept late, feel pretty good.  Only coughed a couple of times.   The coughs sound terrible but don’t hurt and do clear some crap.

    n

  17. MrAtoz says:

    – you are forgetting all the profiling, tracking, data mining, bot development, and selling of access to eyes.  Twitter is not a messaging platform, it’s a propaganda organ, but first it’s an eyeball farm.

    This in spades. Musk has brought a lot of this to the forefront. I hope he buys it just for the turmoil it would cause. And, fire 6,000 useless turds.

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  18. MrAtoz says:

    I didn’t know Houston had one of the biggest, but it makes sense with the crimmigrant invasion and leftovers from Katrina:

    Roe’s Final Hours in One of America’s Largest Abortion Clinics

    I can hear PLT tears hitting the ground from here.

  19. MrAtoz says:

    As the above “clinics” go out of business, a cottage industry will pop up on States borders for abortion mills. Maybe I should invest in some. With all the State dollars pouring in, I could become an “abortion millionaire.” Nah, I’ll pass.

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  20. drwilliams says:

    Anyone visiting a border clinic with an out-of-state plate that doesn’t anticipate LPR’s and cameras is living in a fantasy world. 

    ADDED: An entrepreneurial Uber driver would contract with such a clinic to meet out-of-state patients in a large parking lot and transport them the last mile.

    Countersurvellience would be necessary.

  21. SteveF says:

    MrAtoz, you’re thinking about it all wrong. What you want to do is go to work for some company which offers abortion benefits and then declare that you’re pregnant and need an abortion. -bam- $4000 in your pocket. Work for several companies simultaneously and get the abortion payout from each, say every other month. Mo’ money, mo’ money, mo’ money!

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  22. Alan says:

    >> Anyone visiting a border clinic with an out-of-state plate that doesn’t anticipate LPR’s and cameras is living in a fantasy world. 

    This…I mean when I lived in NY and it was close to July 4th, there’d be undercover NYS Troopers staked out at the PA/NY border on roads that passed by PA fireworks mega-stores, checking for cars with their trunks full fireworks that were illegal in NY. Confiscated on the spot.

  23. Alan says:

    >> ADDED: An entrepreneurial Uber driver would contract with such a clinic to meet out-of-state patients in a large parking lot and transport them the last mile.

    https://www.npr.org/2021/09/03/1034140480/lyft-and-uber-will-pay-drivers-legal-fees-if-theyre-sued-under-texas-abortion-la

  24. JimB says:

    Does any state that offers abortions care if a customer is from another state? No Uber or surveillance needed.

  25. Brad says:

    Does any state that offers abortions care if a customer is from another state? No Uber or surveillance needed.

    Exactly. If it’s up to the states, then…it’s up to the states. Mind, I’m sure some authoritarian idiot will try to prosecute across state lines, but that’s what authoritarian idiots do.

    In which vein: wouldn’t it be refreshing to eliminate all security details for politicians? It might bring them down to earth. Might also eliminate the need for term limits. One way or the other. 

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  26. dkreck says:

    Have you read Wilder today. 

    The radical Christians are found in the rural areas.  Their towns are defenseless, they have almost no cops and their firemen are volunteers.  They have to borrow cops and firemen from neighboring jurisdictions miles away in order to handle anything big.  And they think they’re safe out there.  Forget burning cities, cities are on our sides.  It’s time for the rural areas to feel the heat.

    As he points out – he could not write it funnier. Idiots!

    https://wilderwealthywise.com/civil-war-2-0-weather-report-special-rural-edition/

  27. lynn says:

    Of those who took the test, about 60% passed. We lost maybe ⅓ of the class along the way. Of those who passed, only a fraction have the potential to be really good. I always say about 10%, but might be 15% or 20% in this particular group. The rest will be contributing to this problem.

    The coding for our calculation engine started around 1965, we are not sure.  We (hundreds of engineers over 57 years) developed it on the UNIVAC 1108 (36 bit) at University Computing Services from 1969 to 1978.  I ported the engine code to the CDC 7600 (60 bit) in 1976.  Another guy ported it to the IBM 370 (32 bit) in 1977.  We got a Prime 450 (32 bit) in 1978 and upgraded to the Prime 750 in 1979 when just six users brought the 450 to its knees.   The Prime 750 was a one Mhz machine and perfect for us other than the 32 bit.  We ported to the IBM RS/6000 and Apollo Domain in 1988.  We ported to the 386 PC with MS DOS in 1987 but it was not popular yet.  We released the first version of our Windows user interface in 1989.

    So, code bloat is our middle name.  We added a dynamic variable storage system in 1978 using a common block that allowed our customers to model a lot of equipments or a lot of pure components (chemicals) in just one megaword of memory.   By 1985, we needed 1.5 megawords of memory.  Now our minimum footprint is around 30 megabytes, 7.5 megawords.

    Our calculation engine is currently 850,000 lines of F77, C, and C++ code.  It is a total mess.  Our user interface is about 450,000 lines of Win32 C++.  1.3 million lines of code to manage, all a mess.  And now we are slowly porting to 64 bit.

  28. lynn says:

    SCOTUS ends the supremacy of the Establishment Clause

    Sorry doc, you lost me.  You gotta explain these things to this simple old country boy. And a URL would be very nice.

  29. lynn says:

    WTF do they all do?

    – you are forgetting all the profiling, tracking, data mining, bot development, and selling of access to eyes.  Twitter is not a messaging platform, it’s a propaganda organ, but first it’s an eyeball farm.

    Don’t forget factcheckers, and the algo tweekers to make sure the party line is safe.

    There is a sh!tton of stuff going on in the background to better harvest the suckers, who retweeted, to whom, what networks exist, who is at the nodes, who are all these people, what value can we assign them, how do we sort them, what new ways can we sell them……

    n

    Yup, most software firms are their own best customer.

  30. MrAtoz says:

    Sorry doc, you lost me.  You gotta explain these things to this simple old country boy. And a URL would be very nice.

    Try Google. It comes right up.

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  31. lynn says:

    “Whoopi Goldberg Issues Warning to Clarence Thomas, Suggests the Supreme Court will Bring Back Slavery (VIDEO)”

        https://www.thegatewaypundit.com/2022/06/whoopi-goldberg-issues-warning-clarence-thomas-suggests-supreme-court-will-bring-back-slavery-video/

    Oh Whoopi !

  32. drwilliams says:

    @Lynn

    Check today’s drops from SCOTUS. 

    @JimB

    i should have been more explicit. I anticipate that it is likely that third-parties would be interested in building a list of clients of border clinics from adjacent states. 

    Either for immediate gain:”Gee, wouldn’t it be a shame if your patents/husband/etc found out?” Or for long-term speculation: “Interesting video of your wife visiting the clinic ten years ago, Mr Candidate. “

    If you think the latter is unlikely you haven’t kept up on the antics of the chicoms and their friends.

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  33. MrAtoz says:

    Do you want to date my grAvatar?

    Do you want to date my grAvatar?

    Do you want to date my grAvatar?

  34. MrAtoz says:

    “Whoopi Goldberg Issues Warning to Clarence Thomas, Suggests the Supreme Court will Bring Back Slavery (VIDEO)”

    She/it said the same thing when The Maverick was on The Spew. She/it didn’t call him a cracker to his face, though.

  35. Greg Norton says:

    Does any state that offers abortions care if a customer is from another state? No Uber or surveillance needed.

    No. Up until a few months ago, Florida was offering Covid antibodies to anyone who walked through the doors of the clinics, no proof of state residency required.

    And I’ve lost track of how many of my kids’ friends’ parents make frequent trips to the corner of SE Colorado, just across the Oklahoma panhandle from North Texas. They say that they do it for the “culture”.

  36. lynn says:

    And I’ve lost track of how many of my kids’ friends’ parents make frequent trips to the corner of SE Colorado, just across the Oklahoma panhandle from North Texas. They say that they do it for the “culture”.

    Buying pot munchies !

  37. Greg Norton says:

    I didn’t know Houston had one of the biggest, but it makes sense with the crimmigrant invasion and leftovers from Katrina:

    Roe’s Final Hours in One of America’s Largest Abortion Clinics

    Texas has a weird relationship with abortion. The procedure is about to be banned in the state, but some very prominent natives have been significant figures in the “industry”, most notably the daughter of Gov. Ann Richards who ran Planned Parenthood for a while.

    Less well known is the family of famed media Pediatric medical “expert” T. Berry Brazelton, who founded what was possibly the first abortion clinic in Texas. 

  38. SteveF says:

    Relevant to what I said above: https://twitter.com/JackPosobiec/status/1541527524878045185

    Great minds think alike-ish.

  39. drwilliams says:

    Q: What do you call a 48-inch can of whoop-ass?

    A: A Goldberg

  40. drwilliams says:

    @Lynn

    This is the case I referred to earlier:

    https://hotair.com/ed-morrissey/2022/06/27/breaking-scotus-upholds-right-to-private-prayer-at-school-functions-6-3-n479010

    Giving precedence to the Establishment Clause has has enabled the PLT’s to deny any demonstration of religion in a public place–unless, of course, it’s a non-Christian religion. 

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  41. Ray Thompson says:

    Q: What do you call a 48-inch can of dumb-ass?

    A: A Goldberg

    Fixed it for you.

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  42. Alan says:

    >> In which vein: wouldn’t it be refreshing to eliminate all security details for politicians? It might bring them down to earth. Might also eliminate the need for term limits. One way or the other.

    I get the advantages but on the flip side do we really want to get rid of what are probably strong 2A supporters who may remind their bosses how and how well they’re protected?

  43. paul says:

    Something not about killing babies…..

    I made a CD of .mp3 files for the truck.  650 Mb or so.

    I bought a 30 Gb USB stick, a really tiny thing.  Because where the USB port is and where clueless passengers sit, yeah, the “snap it off” factor seems high.    Anyway, it sticks out about an eighth of an inch.

    So.  Pissed around for a couple of days and basically made a mix tape.  But not on cassette.  Almost 5 Gb of .mp3 files.  Yeah, 855 files and whatever many folders.   Sure, I could do more but I’m going for tunes I want to hear while driving,   “Dark Side of the Moon” ain’t on the list.

    Stuffed it into the truck’s USB port and  it took several minutes for the radio to do anything but play the same three songs.

    It seems to have sorted it all out and is playing random tunes from the entire mix of folders and other tunes.

  44. lynn says:

    @Lynn

    This is the case I referred to earlier:

    https://hotair.com/ed-morrissey/2022/06/27/breaking-scotus-upholds-right-to-private-prayer-at-school-functions-6-3-n479010

    Giving precedence to the Establishment Clause has has enabled the PLT’s to deny any demonstration of religion in a public place–unless, of course, it’s a non-Christian religion. 

    Thank you.  I finally found it at ScotusBlog also.

        https://www.scotusblog.com/2022/06/justices-side-with-high-school-football-coach-who-prayed-on-the-field-with-students/

    “The court rejected the public school district’s argument that allowing Kennedy’s prayers to continue would have violated the Constitution’s establishment clause, which bars the government from both establishing an official religion and preferring one religion over another. And it pushed back against the argument that students might have felt obligated to join Kennedy’s prayers, stressing that “learning how to tolerate speech or prayer of all kinds is ‘part of learning how to live in a pluralistic society,’ a trait of character essential to ‘a tolerant citizenry.’””

    “The school district’s actions “rested on a mistaken view that it had a duty to ferret out and suppress religious observances even as it allows comparable secular speech,” Gorsuch concluded. “The Constitution neither mandates nor tolerates that kind of discrimination.””

    Yes, as a lifelong Christian, I have felt discriminated against several times in my own country.  My preacher has stated that he expects to be arrested for refusing to officiate at a gay marriage at some point in his lifetime.  Maybe this decision by SCOTUS will alleviate those concerns.

  45. Greg Norton says:

    Kinda hard to find the abortion clinic trivia associated with T. Berry Brazelton, but I knew I wasn’t imagining seeing it.

    After Dr. Spock retired, Brazelton was everywhere on TV from the 80s until a few years before he passed.

    https://www.chicagotribune.com/news/obituaries/la-me-t-berry-brazelton-20180315-story.html

  46. Alan says:

    So “they” can’t compete in women’s swimming so they resort to skateboarding. Must feel good to beat a 13-year old girl. 

    https://www.foxnews.com/us/los-angeles-trans-woman-29-beats-13-year-old-girl-first-place-nyc-womens-skateboarding-contest

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  47. Greg Norton says:

    So, code bloat is our middle name.  We added a dynamic variable storage system in 1978 using a common block that allowed our customers to model a lot of equipments or a lot of pure components (chemicals) in just one megaword of memory.   By 1985, we needed 1.5 megawords of memory.  Now our minimum footprint is around 30 megabytes, 7.5 megawords.

    Code bloat with Hot Skillz like container services implemented using Python venv environments is a serious problem since a lot of the library code goes unused. Just grab the library from “pip” and go.

  48. drwilliams says:

    an excerpt from an essay which is worth reading:

    Who Would You Kill?

    The moral question behind the Supreme Court’s abortion and gun control decisions.

    Mon Jun 27, 2022

    Daniel Greenfield

    The moral chasm between the premeditated murder of the innocent and the desperate self-defense of beleaguered men fighting for their lives is both damning and revealing of the fundamental flaws of victimhood utilitarianism and Marxist power dynamics as guides.  

    How did we get to the point where babies can be killed and murderers can’t?

    The answer lies in the reduction of individuals to classes and classes to victims. Feminist analyses reduced babies from human lives to tools of the patriarchy, lacking agency and able only to deprive women of their own agency. Abortion became a fundamental means of restoring feminist agency. The killing of children was celebrated as a revolutionary feminist act.

    The inherent violence of leftist radical politics made the murder of millions of children into a revolution against the patriarchy. Any attempt to limit, stop or roll back the federal mandate under which states were allowed to regulate everything except the killing of babies was an attack on this form of liberation on which all the “rights” of women and even men were said to depend. 

    A post-familial society defined by BAs, MAs and PhDs, by C-suites and lifelong careers, interrupted by awkward hookups and affairs terminating in #MeToo scandals and abortions depended on the “legal, safe, and convenient” mass murder of millions of unwanted babies much the way that cotton depended on slaves and iPhones depend on Chinese slave labor.

    Killing people to maintain a particular lifestyle is a common reason for genocide. 

    Even as feminist analyses were redefining abortion as a revolutionary act of liberation, class and racial warfare analyses were transforming crime into another tool of social liberation. 

    “Rape was an insurrectionary act,” Black Panther activist Eldridge Cleaver wrote. Race riots are now routinely redefined as “uprisings”. Fighting crime is a reactionary plot to stop the revolution.

    Leftist revolution was all about hurting and killing people, not just in the organized fashion of gulags and firing squads, but in private acts like a visit to Planned Parenthood or violent crime. Defending against these acts of violence was counterrevolutionary uniting pro-abortion and pro-crime, the license to commit violence in the name of bringing about a more just world.

    Gun control was never about preventing crime. Even as Democrats advocate for gun bans, they dismantle the criminal justice system, eliminating bail, freeing killers, thugs and drug dealers, and refusing to enforce even those laws, including gun laws, that are already on the books.

    The purpose of gun control is preventing people from defending their lives and freedoms.

    https://www.frontpagemag.com/fpm/2022/06/who-would-you-kill-daniel-greenfield/

    A partial quote from Oprah Winfrey led me to this longer version:

    “As long as people can be judged by the color of their skin, the problem is not solved,” she said, adding,”There are still generations of people, older people, who were born and bred and marinated in it — in that prejudice and racism — and they just have to die.”

    https://www.msnbc.com/politicsnation/oprah-old-racists-have-die-progress-msna213456

    The date is 2013.

    Many of you will recall Jerry Pournelle relating that as a young man he was considered liberal, and as he grew older he became conservative, not through changing his own ideals, but through the changes of the world around him. Color blindness was no longer enough, and would be entirely likely that were MLK alive today, he would be read out of the movement by the Egregious Woke.

    Makes you wonder how long Oprah, Goldberg, Sharpton, and the rest of the pb (professional blacks) would last if they were suddenly pink and expressed any of their carefully withheld from the public non-woke opinions.

    Marinated in the concept of two sexes, who needs to die, now, honey?

    I’ll end by invoking the name of a man wiki notes as:

    acclaimed by Time in 1965 as “one of the country’s foremost celebrated Negro comedians.”

    Godfrey Cambridge!!!

  49. drwilliams says:

    Yeah, okay.

    I trust that Greg will get the reference, but others, esp younger, not so much.

    It wasn’t a blockbuster movie.

  50. Nick Flandrey says:

    Nope.  Do your own work.

    n

    And maybe you want to explain to the class how restricting MY rights keeps a convicted felon, drug dealer, with a gun he can’t legally possess, from acting stupidly? Or why he’s not in jail where he can’t put others at risk?

    n

  51. Nick Flandrey says:

    HOw old is Whooopsi anyway?  Isn’t SHE of the generation that was ‘marinaded’ in racism?   Is she calling for her own death?

    Maybe she’d like to tell her friend Obbamma she want’s his granny dead.  Didn’t the lightbringer say she was a racist?

    I thought she was a pretty funny actress 40 years ago.   Maybe it was her marriage to Ted Dansen that soured her…

    n

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  52. drwilliams says:

    “Reasonably” does not appear in the 2A. It is a transparent attempt at setting up a straw man argument.

  53. drwilliams says:

    @Nick

    WG is annoyed that doors seem to be getting narrower.

    2
  54. drwilliams says:

    @Nick

    “I thought she was a pretty funny actress 400 years pounds ago”

    FIFY

  55. drwilliams says:

    flashback:

    https://www.latimes.com/archives/la-xpm-1987-09-16-fi-5318-story.html

    “After learning of Stafford and Duran’s cottage industry in New Mexico from an NBC television broadcast, Jordache filed suit in 1985 against the pair, alleging trademark infringement.”

    That would be SNL.

    BTW, if you search
    SNL Lardashe

    The first dozen or so hits are for Kim Kardashian on SNL.

    Maybe AI at Google is a real thing.

  56. Alan says:

    I guess they forgot to give Macron his little directions card like the one Joe gets…

    https://nypost.com/2022/06/27/biden-aide-interrupts-as-macron-spills-bad-news-about-oil-crisis/

  57. Alan says:

    And for today’s Word Salad special we have the following… 

    https://nypost.com/2022/06/27/cnn-gives-kamala-harris-the-easiest-layup-and-she-still-misses/

  58. Alan says:

    No Kamel, CNN isn’t the Cartoon Network channel… 

    https://nypost.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2022/06/kamala.jpg

  59. Jenny says:

    Busy day. 
    Volunteer work with husband in the morning, regular work in the afternoon, yard puttering chores before and after dinner. Then processed four rabbits with husband’s assistance. Processed rabbits were 3 lb 2 oz up to a whopping 3 lb 8 oz plus a bag of heart / liver / lungs / kidneys / nasty bits for the dogs to enjoy. And four sets of ears for a friend to freeze dry as more dog snacks.

    These were the boys from the same litter as the four I mentioned processing recently. Notably more body fat, enough that I was peeling off the excess. Confirms I had the timing right on the first batch. This batch had no more muscle than the first batch and all eating their heads off the last week or two accomplished was to waste feed. At fifty cents a pound I’m more aware of the waste than when it was thirty nine cents a pound.

    Many hands, light work.

    We will sleep well tonight.

  60. Jenny says:

    And though tempted, I did not process the buck that nailed me with his aerial urinary attack yesterday. 

    4
  61. Jenny says:

    @Alan

    make a change to a more track-ready braking system

    Yikes! Boiling away his brake fluid. Dang. 

  62. Greg Norton says:

    Explain to me how this maps onto whatever the hell you think “shall not be infringed” reasonably means.

    Typical AP. Lots of story details are missing in order to advance the agenda. I’m guessing that the firearm wasn’t legally purchased/registered.

    The audience for the Canadian papers you link must like their schadenfreude as much as the Brits who read the DM. I guess it eases the pain of living under the thumb of Wee Pierre.

  63. brad says:

    Explain to me how this maps onto whatever the hell you think “shall not be infringed” reasonably means.

    Typical AP. Lots of story details are missing in order to advance the agenda. I’m guessing that the firearm wasn’t legally purchased/registered.

    I read about that, but apparently with an informative article. The dad was a felon, so it was illegal for him to have a firearm in the first place. He stepped out, leaving the gun behind. Something to do with drugs, apparently. His kid found the gun, played with it, and shot through the wall. Sheer, stupid, awful luck that the bullet struck a toddler and killed a baby.

    So, yeah. Nothing to do with gun control, because the gun was there illegally to begin with.

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