Mon. July 9, 2018 – another week begins

A bit earlier than normal. 75F at 530am. Not usually up at this hour, so no real idea if this means HOT or just normal hot today. Pretty sure the humid is a given.

Oldest at sleep away camp, youngest trying to test out of this grade level in math today, and I think one of the barriers is to keep everyone from trying is to make the test earlier than normal school. It would have weeded me out….

Anyway, gonna be a long day.

n

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63 Responses to Mon. July 9, 2018 – another week begins

  1. Ray Thompson says:

    Currently about 68 f and humidity has fallen with a dew point about 67 f. It will not last as the humidity will return with a vengeance along with lower 90’s toward the end of the week.

    Heading back to the son’s house at the end of the week. He will be moving on the weekend and I have to finish up replacing the outlets and switches in the upstairs portion of the house. I have replaced 28 outlets downstairs and probably 16 switches. I have about 26 outlets upstairs and probably 14 switches. Of those 30 switches 13 of them are three way switches with some of the boxes very crowded.

    All of the old devices are back-stab connection which I despise. His wife wants the color changed so it is a good time to replace everything with Leviton devices which have actual screw terminals in addition to back-stab. A screw connection is much more secure and in my opinion is better at handling the current.

    Not a difficult process, just tedious and time consuming. Finding the correct breaker has proven to be a challenge as the breaker panel is not within earshot of some of the devices. Lot of trial and error as previous home owner did not mark the breaker panel. I have yet to be shocked as I carefully check each outlet and switch before I work on the device.

    Plus we are working on some additional changes and minor repairs in the house before they move in this weekend. They hired movers so the big stuff is being handled by someone else. It is just too much for me to be doing anymore and some of the stuff has to go up stairs. I am beginning to realize my limits and heed my doctor’s advice. Sometimes it is better to pay someone with the right equipment and experience than halfway kill oneself.

    I will probably have to transport some stuff in my truck that the movers will not handle. Items such as the riding lawnmower and some yard equipment. His new house is only 5 miles as the crow flies from his old house. But due to rivers and limited bridges the trip becomes 20 miles.

  2. Nick Flandrey says:

    Nice turn of phrase:

    ” Instead, we have people saying “thank god for abortion” and treating it like a sacrament in the religion of statism.”

    https://gunfreezone.net/

    other sacraments- gender dysphoria, pedophilia, sexual extremism, narcissism

    n

  3. jim~ says:

    Ray,

    What’s a *back-stab”?

    I love a good pair of wire strippers. I use a whiteout pen to measure 3/8ths of an inch from the tip, as well as to put a dot on the hole for 18 gauge wire.

  4. Nick Flandrey says:

    @jim, that’s the design where you just ‘stab’ the stripped bare wire into a hole on the back of the device. A little spring loaded tab keeps it in place, but they never feel secure.

    BTW, almost every device has a stripping length guide molded into the body, if you can’t do it by eye, you are meant to lay the wire on the device and use that to mark your cut.

    The holes in your stripper (if threaded) are meant to shear screws to length, and if not threaded, are used to quickly make the hook for attaching the wire. (which I only learned recently, but used to great effect on my closet remodel.)

    n

  5. ITguy1998 says:

    Back-stabbing outlets – hate it. It’s not done because it’s better, it’s done because it saves the junior electrician a small amount of time per outlet, which translates to money.

    Our current house, built in 2010, has had two outlets fail. When I replace them, I use the screw terminals – they definitely feel more secure.

  6. JimL says:

    78º and sunny. Will get into the lower 80s today. Not bad for living in a northern town.

    I’ve seen the back-stabs, and have been tempted. But I’ve never actually used them, as I agree with Ray – they just don’t feel right. Not to mention the fact that it just seems too easy to screw around and do something wrong.

    Being “Not a professional”, I try to be as careful as I can, as it’s MY HOUSE with MY KIDS inside. And if it’s something I don’t do well enough, I also hire experts. That’s why they exist – so I don’t have to do something dumb.

  7. Nick Flandrey says:

    When I was a young man, learning from my dad (who often cut corners) I used the back stabs. Now I know better. I use the screws, and I wrap the finished device with e-tape to COVER the screws. It’s not failsafe when opening up the box in the future, with power on, but it’s a LOT more safe than not. ESPECIALLY if using metal boxes, I think the time taken to wrap the device is well worth it.

    @ray, I hope you are marking the circuits as you go! I write the circuit number on the romex if possible, and on the back of the face plate. I’ve also done a map of my house with every outlet labeled with a circuit number. In attic and garage, I write the circuit on the visible side of the faceplate.

    n

  8. ITguy1998 says:

    I’ve also done a map of my house with every outlet labeled with a circuit number.

    Damn, one more thing on my list of things to do Real Soon Now.

  9. Greg Norton says:

    “Van life” or intentional homelessness, continues to expand in the public consciousness

    The big Episcopal church in Downtown Austin seems to be looking the other way if folks camp in their car using the church’s on-street parking after 7 PM or so.

    Sooner or later, we will have to wise up and pass taxes on foreign money in residential real estate transactions in major tech cities, similar to what was done in Vancouver, BC. As I’ve stated here before, based on my personal observations, no one should ever underestimate how much money a Chinese or Indian family can deliver if they can put a Number One Son into a decent house in a hot US real estate market. They consider it to be, simultaneously, a good investment and a status symbol.

    The rising number of car campers in Austin along with the new H1B-targeted neighborhood near our house makes me wonder if it isn’t already too late for the region. The real estate taxes are already at the point where we will have to consider getting out once our kids are out of high school.

  10. Greg Norton says:

    Adult sippie cups. As if the oblivious manchildren riding scooters around Austin weren’t already bad enough. They don’t need more distractions.

    https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2018-07-09/starbucks-becomes-first-major-us-restaurant-chain-phase-out-plastic-straws

    Where did this fatwa against straws come from? It seemed to come up really suddenly.

  11. Nick Flandrey says:

    When we moved in, I pulled multiple drops of cat5 to all the places I thought we’d need it. I’ve got 8 under the “home” office area, 6 in my office (not enough), 4 behind the tv (not enough), and doubles scattered thru the bedrooms. They are all labeled, tested, and have good keystone jacks on faceplates. They all go to the managed switch in the attic.

    When I use my agilent verifier, I usually get a pass for cat6 performance, even with cat5e cable and ezrj45 ends.

    I’m upgrading my main switch, wifi, and the switch for the cams, as soon as I can get to it (have the switches and WAP sitting here.) The NVR software I’m running on this computer saturates the 100mbps connection I have thru my current main switch, and the cameras are on a mix of individual POE injectors and a smaller POE switch. Moving to a dedicated gigabit POE switch for the cams, and another for the rest of the stuff is overkill (could just do one gigabit 48 port POE switch for everything) but it will help me organize things physically, and I have the switches to spare. I have an open frame rack in the attic that holds all the gear.

    n

  12. Nick Flandrey says:

    From my visits to the Houston Arboretum last week and all their eco-weenie displays, plastic straws are the new bugabear for the armchair warriors. TWO wall displays about how many straws are poisoning sea life, and how many tons end up in landfills. They acknowledge too that there is no real effective recycling for plastics, but they also repeat the lie of the 400 year breakdown time. We can see with our own eyes that plastic in the sun, near chlorine, or in salt water break down much quicker than that.

    Previously it was “micro-beads” but since the main source of those was young lady’s makeup and cleansing products, that ban seems to have gotten nowhere.

    I note too that despite all the hand wringing about plastic in the sea, no one is calling out the illegal dumping of trash in the sea. Like gun control, they blame the straw, not the chinese waste companies that are dumping trash into the sea. Or acknowledging the truth about where most of the trash is coming from (third world nations that use rivers as sewers.)

    n

  13. Greg Norton says:

    I note too that despite all the hand wringing about plastic in the sea, no one is calling out the illegal dumping of trash in the sea. Like gun control, they blame the straw, not the chinese waste companies that are dumping trash into the sea. Or acknowledging the truth about where most of the trash is coming from (third world nations that use rivers as sewers.)

    I know the Chinese stopped taking the contents of American curbside “recycle” bins due to contaminants. In San Antonio, the city has a problem with Pampers going into the bins despite a publicity campaign.

    Walking through a marina in a fancy lad resort near our hotel last week, I saw several plastic water bottles in the water, floating near seven-figure boats. The water was fairly static so I assume the refuse didn’t stray far from the source. Isn’t that the same crowd who lecture us about straws and the ocean garbage patches?

  14. RickH says:

    WRT to tracing electrical outlets back to the breaker box, you might find this tool useful: https://www.harborfreight.com/circuit-breaker-detective-96934.html .

    It is a ‘fox/hound’ for electrical wiring. Stick one part into a electrical outlet, and use the other part at the breaker box to find the correct breaker. Pretty easy to use, and accurate.

    I used it to identify the circuits I wanted to put on the generator bypass switch. And the cost is reasonable – $20 (plus shipping, if you don’t have a Harbor Freight nearby).

  15. Greg Norton says:

    We can see with our own eyes that plastic in the sun, near chlorine, or in salt water break down much quicker than that.

    My wife’s Rollerblades sat in our garage in FL and didn’t move for about 10 years. When I went to pack them for our move to Vantucky, I accidentally dropped one, and the skate body shattered like glass.

    The media has done a really good job generating guilt over the giant garbage patch in the Pacific, but I’d be willing to bet that the majority of that plastic did not originate with US consumers.

  16. nick flandrey says:

    Nor did the ozone hole or the current “thinning of the ozone layer”– I guess the hole closed???

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-5932567/Report-accuses-China-firms-ozone-depleting-gas.html

    n

  17. lynn says:

    I have figured out what the horrible smell in my air conditioning on my 2005 Expedition is. It is radiator fluid. Looks like I have a heater core leak and it is cooking on the heater core when I shut down. I wonder why breathing that crap is doing to my lungs ?

    I will be taking it for a new heater core tomorrow. This sucks.

  18. nick flandrey says:

    ” I wonder why breathing that crap is doing to my lungs ?”

    Nothing good, you can be sure of that.

    n

  19. Greg Norton says:

    I’ve got 8 under the “home” office area, 6 in my office (not enough), 4 behind the tv (not enough), and doubles scattered thru the bedrooms.

    I speak from experience when I say that MOCA works (70 Mbps at my house) if you need extra capacity between points linked by your house coax system. The only caveats:

    1) You will want to install a MOCA filter on any line to an antenna or back to the cable company, even if the connection is protected with a shared key. The filter not only keeps your data from leaking outside the house but minimizes external interference in the MOCA spectrum range.

    2) Your coax system needs good grounding. What the cable company provides may not be enough.

    3) The output terminal of a MOCA adapter cannot be the feed for your cable modem.

    I’ve also had decent luck with power line adapters for Netflix on Roku, but much beyond 30 Mbps through that kind of connection is iffy.

  20. JLP says:

    The easy answer to Starbucks plastic straws, utensils, cups, etc is: Don’t go to Starbucks. Solved it for ya.

    I see no reason (for me) to go to a coffee shop except under great duress. I make 1/2 pot at home in the morning when I wake up. That costs me ~$1 for coffee, water, and electricity. At work we have free use of a single cup coffee machine that uses “pods” that are disposed of in a compost bucket.

    At home and work I use a mug so no waste. The mug at work says “Back off, I’m doing science!” and hasn’t been washed in months. It now has a protective patina on the inner surface that I think challenges my immune system and keeps me strong.

  21. CowboySlim says:

    ” Instead, we have people saying “thank god for abortion” and treating it like a sacrament in the religion of statism.”

    Do they state their thanks while kneeling in a traditional christian church?

  22. ITguy1998 says:

    I will be taking it for a new heater core tomorrow. This sucks.

    If they have to pull the dash (and there are precious few cars where that isn’t necessary), then it’s going to be expensive. Just bypass the heater core until the winter, or sell it in the fall…..

  23. nick flandrey says:

    whooohhooo thunder and lightning, rain came down….

    n

  24. Greg Norton says:

    I will be taking it for a new heater core tomorrow. This sucks.

    You won’t need heat for another 4-5 months.

    I bypassed the heater core in my 85 Dodge Colt before selling the car in 1993. I ran it like that in Tampa for about a year. The only big downside is that, due to the way Mitsubishi designed the AC system, the core prevented the AC coils from freezing solid in high humidity so I had to be mindful on long road trips to vent outside air through the system every 4-5 hours, about how often I would stop for gas driving that car.

    With a 1.6L engine (?), the heat never really worked in that car for short trips (< 20 minutes) anyway, even when new. I didn't miss having heat.

    Dunno about F-150-base trucks heat/AC systems. Never owned one, but, living in the South, it should be easy to find a second opinion on what to do with an older vehicle beyond a dealer's $ervice deparment's recommendation.

    I got my 2001 Solara through inspection before leaving for FL. Woohoo! I get a year reprieve to look for another car.

  25. paul says:

    Having the heater core replaced isn’t cheap. I had to have it done on the truck after I bought it. Supposedly the carpet was wet with antifreeze because the core went bad but she had it fixed. I don’t know where she had the work done but the truck still leaked antifreeze from the a/c drain.
    The final total was almost $1000. But… from memory… $45 to capture the freon and $120 for a new core. Plus about $180 for a flap and a motor as the air would only come from the dash vents. The parts came from the dealer. And in someone’s infinite wisdom, if you disconnect the wiring harness from the brake light switch, you get to replace a $25 switch. The switch caused another trip to the repair shop.

    It all works like new.

    So, yeah, $800, easy. But the leak will be fixed and the a/c will have a fresh charge.

  26. Greg Norton says:

    If they have to pull the dash (and there are precious few cars where that isn’t necessary), then it’s going to be expensive. Just bypass the heater core until the winter, or sell it in the fall…..

    In addition to being expensive, when I’ve had anything done behind the dash on my previous cars, the mechanics always miss a minor detail on the reinstall resulting in a squeak/rattle which the service managers never hear on a road test.

  27. Mike G. says:

    @Nick,

    One man’s journey with Enterprise-grade WiFi, etc.

    What I’ve learned from nearly three years of enterprise Wi-Fi at home

    .mg

  28. nick flandrey says:

    Holy cow, listening to the scanner, and they’ve got a guy on a traffic stop (stop and look) who they believe to be the killer in a double murder. He’s given a fake name, which comes back clean, so they can’t grab him. They are trying to get a unit that has their finger print reader instant id system, but can’t in time. So they’re letting him go.

    He’s under surveillance for something, and there are ‘reasons’ they would let him go, even if they got his real id.

    yikes.

    n

    oh, a fair amount of encrypted traffic late last night on the tac channels… but otherwise a quiet weekend

  29. Clayton W. says:

    It now has a protective patina on the inner surface that I think challenges my immune system and keeps me strong.

    DON’T wash the Chief’s coffee cup! He spent years getting the patina right and it doesn’t taste right if you clean it!

  30. nick flandrey says:

    Thanks MikeG, that was interesting. I’ve deployed some ubiquiti gear and I’m pretty happy with it. The only thing that consistently sucks is their version of POE will bite your butt. You NEED their injectors or routers for their radios. Their routers won’t work with other people’s cameras. It’s a mess and they should fix it.

    It IS very easy to over complicate the setup too.

    I’m looking to simplify, so I should go to one switch for everything, and maybe a VLAN for the cams, BUT, it’s easier to just use two switches, since I have them. The new AP has been sitting here long enough I’ve forgotten what it is.

    n

  31. dkreck says:

    The wife takes it upon herself to clean my cup at times. I’m particularly annoyed when I find it sitting in the sink full of dish soap and utensils. The other day she said ‘I’d rather slit my throat then drink from your cup’. So I asked ‘Well which is it?’ I’m about healed.

  32. lynn says:

    and holy cow, 700,000????

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5932107/Migrants-wait-Libya-cross-Mediterranean-Europe-Italy-turned-boats-away.html

    The amount of people wanting to get into the west (Europe and USA) is infinite. The immigration gumball talk that was posted here many days ago is so relevant. “Immigration, World Poverty and Gumballs – NumbersUSA.com”
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LPjzfGChGlE

  33. lynn says:

    In addition to being expensive, when I’ve had anything done behind the dash on my previous cars, the mechanics always miss a minor detail on the reinstall resulting in a squeak/rattle which the service managers never hear on a road test.

    Maybe they will fix the current two dash rattles.

    My truck has the constant flow heater core. I had both heater doors replaced a couple of years ago for $1100 (there is a door for each side of the cab). I must have heat starting in November (blood thinners and in my annual trip to Norman, OK in February, was 8 F one year).

    When I elevated and crawled under my truck Sunday, there was green fluid all under it. So I am supposing that the heater core is leaking. Green fluid is radiator fluid, right ?

    I am trying to get two more years out of this money pit and then relegate it to backup vehicle status, we do not have a backup vehicle at the moment.

  34. dkreck says:

    Green fluid is radiator fluid, right ?
    or Aliens

  35. SteveF says:

    Lot of trial and error as previous home owner did not mark the breaker panel.

    Could be worse. It could be marked wrong, as was the case in every house whose electricity I’ve worked on.

    The holes in your stripper

    I wish to call attention to the fact that I am not the one who brought the level of discourse crashing down.

    As if the oblivious manchildren riding scooters around Austin weren’t already bad enough. They don’t need more distractions.

    Grr. The people riding the rental powered scooters and their own powered skateboards in Charlotte are pissing me off. Those riding rental bikes ditto, though less so. People who ride their own bikes in a city generally have done it enough that they’re not totally stupid about cutting in front of moving cars, and generally paying enough attention that they won’t be killed. The dingleberries on the scooters zip all over the place, on roads and on sidewalks, not paying attention, and almost always wearing headphones. One buttmuncher came up past me, on my bike, as I was stopped at a red light, and pulled immediately in front me, so close I couldn’t even weave to the side to get around him. I told him that he’d damn well better move fast when the light changed or he’d get plowed. He didn’t hear me because of the headphones, which were blasting loudly enough that I could hear the “music”. The light changed, he didn’t move at all let alone fast enough because he was checking his phone, he got plowed — me, my backpack, and my bike come in at over 300 pounds, and I was pissed off.

  36. jim~ says:

    @Nick & @Ray

    The holes in your stripper
    Excuse me?

    Oh, so that’s what a back-stab is! Like the stupid wires going into my stereo. I always strip, twist and solder them. No fuss and no worry after that.

    I suppose there are markings on my wire cutters somewhere, but it’s just easier to use a white-out pen on the last and only good stripper I’ll ever need.

    Take that any way you’d like. At least *my* heater core doesn’t need replacing!

  37. paul says:

    Green fluid is radiator fluid, right ?

    Yeah. Most of the time. I hope. When the truck came back from the shop the antifreeze was tan. I wet a finger and it smelled and tasted like the green stuff. I need to ask the shop.

    I was reading (shock!!!) the owner’s manual last week. Nice surprise… power steering fluid is the same as the transmission fluid. But it’s not the same transmission fluid my ’96 Stratus used.

    Yep. Went to the dealer and bought a quart of the official stuff for the Stratus a few years ago. Used half a cup, if that. And when I sold it at almost 150K the car still shifted and ran like the day I bought it.

  38. lynn says:

    Yeah. Most of the time. I hope. When the truck came back from the shop the antifreeze was tan. I wet a finger and it smelled and tasted like the green stuff. I need to ask the shop.

    Please, please, please do not taste antifreeze. Ethylene Glycol is a very serious poison.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethylene_glycol_poisoning

    “Poison control centers often use more than a lick or taste in a child or more than a mouthful in an adult as a dose requiring hospital assessment.”

    I would like to see us move to PEG (propylene glycol) due to the much, much, much lower toxicity.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Propylene_glycol

    There was a case a couple of years where two doctors at MDACC had an affair. He broke it off and she put ethylene glycol in his coffee. He nearly died. She is in jail.
    https://www.houstonchronicle.com/news/houston-texas/houston/article/Convicted-of-poisoning-her-colleague-turned-5783778.php

  39. paul says:

    I bought a Portacool Cyclone 110 at Tractor Supply yesterday. $399. But I had a 10% off coupon. And their system did ag exempt on the sales tax.

    It seems to work ok. I haven’t messed with it today. Yesterday was so humid you could see the haze. It’s not very loud. But loud enough to drown out the various birds chirping around the house. The Trager grill knock-off I have is about as loud, just on a more annoying frequency.
    It seems to sit low in front. I need to check the wheels, maybe add shims.

    The GFCI in the cord seems to run hot. Even with the Portacool turned off. I shot the infrared gun at it today. Everything was in the shade, all day. The deck read 86F, the GFCI read 100 to 115F. Seems a bit hot to me.

    I googled and who knew? GFCIs make heat. So I shot the temps on a few outlets in the house and nearby wall. Plain outlets have the same temp as wall. The GFCI in the bathroom read 6 degrees warmer.

  40. paul says:

    It was just a damp fingertip, spit, rinse with beer (because that was handy) and spit that. No swallowing. At all.

    When the truck was leaking I ran a water hose to wash the drippings away. I have cats and dogs wandering around. I’d rather deal with mud than a sick or dead critter any day.

  41. JLP says:

    I’ve always seen PEG refer to polyethylene glycol. Usually PEG xxxx where xxxx is the average molecular weight. I’ve used it frequently in drug formulations.

  42. ech says:

    Previously it was “micro-beads” but since the main source of those was young lady’s makeup and cleansing products, that ban seems to have gotten nowhere.

    IIRC, there is a ban in place in the US for cosmetics.

    Where did this fatwa against straws come from? It seemed to come up really suddenly.

    A combination of a couple of things. Some press releases from the eco groups, and a figure of “500 million plastic straws per day used in the US” getting publicity. It was a number that a 9 year old kid came up with by a phone survey of manufacturers. Is it valid? Who knows?

  43. SteveF says:

    spit that. No swallowing.

    I’m starting to get irritated. Usually I’m the one who drags the conversation into the outhouse, making all decent people run away, shaking their heads. But here I’ve been skunked twice today.

    I’ve always seen PEG refer to polyethylene glycol.

    That’s what I thought, too, but I wasn’t sure so I’m glad someone who knows what he’s talking about (ie, not me) said something.

    I would like to see us move to PEG (propylene glycol) due to the much, much, much lower toxicity.

    I thought you could just swap it in for the old stuff any time you like. Make sure to drain and flush your cooling system before putting in the new, as they don’t play nice together. However, when I checked online to confirm I got such a mish-mash of results that I don’t have a clue whether they’re safe to swap, safe to mix, or safe to use as mouthwash. (OK, fine, I made up that last bit. Don’t use antifreeze as mouthwash.)

  44. ech says:

    On our house:
    – it is in a 55+ community in Fulshear, west of Houston, south of Katy, called Bonterra.
    – it is a couple of miles from the 500 year floodplain per the maps I looked at.
    – we have our house in Meyerland for sale, have cut the price some
    – we completely fixed it up after the flood.
    – most of the houses on our street are either repaired or getting final repairs now. About a third didn’t flood due to being built up or outside the flood area. One or two are set for demolition at some point.
    – the house to the West got torn down. The owners were in Europe during the storm, their AC failed, and it sat hot and wet for about 10 days before they could get back. They were going to build a 2 story McMansion but got quoted prices of $275-300 per square foot according to a neighbor. The neighbor to the West of them bought the lot, put a fence on it, and is holding it to sell later.

  45. Ray Thompson says:

    500 million plastic straws per day used in the US” getting publicity. It was a number that a 9 year old kid

    The population of the U.S. is 325 million as of 2017. 500 million plastic straws per day would mean that every man, woman, and child is using about 1.5 straws per day. I have only used three straws in the last week and I suspect most people are about the same.

    So where did the 500 million figure arise? Probably pulled out of someone’s posterior orifice and every one believes the number. Even reporters don’t bother to check facts and figures anymore. Too much effort in the race to be first with news, even if the news is wrong, stupid, or just flat out idiotic. The press is becoming as unreliable as FaceBook.

    I suspect the real number is about 10% of the reported figure. More like 50 million straws a day. But that is not as sensational as 500 million. Why not just round up to a cool billion straws a day.

  46. SteveF says:

    The press is becoming as unreliable as FaceBook.

    If I might suggest, that should be the other way around.

    The news — which is to say, lies, propaganda, thinly veiled social engineering, and thinly veiled corporate press releases — from the newspapers and TV has been unreliable and downright fake since well before Facebook came along. Since well before I came along, in fact. It’s just that we didn’t realize it.

    The can’t-ignore-it eye opener for me was during Gulf War I, 1990 or 91. One of the CNN liars, I think Wolf Blitzer, was on location in Israel, wearing his chemical protective gear because the entire population was in fear of Iraqi chemical attack at any moment. Very dramatic … until the camera showed a bunch of people just watching the CNN guy or going about their business, all in regular clothes, none looking especially fearful. One may assume that the cameraman was fired over that, but the damage was done.

  47. nick flandrey says:

    Hah, I was unemployed and watched gulf war 1 extensively. I especially liked watching the ‘pool’ coverage come in late at night. Completely unedited, b roll stuff, and some interviews. The interviews got news people in trouble. Some of the answers they aired didn’t fit the narrative.

    Later Bernie and Wolf admitted they knew Saddam was a bad guy but didn’t report it because they thought their “access” was more important. Tell it to the guests at the rape hotel, scum buckets. About the same time, Christiana Amanpour admitted in an on camera interview that she thought it was her job and calling to bring down Bush. That’s when I stopped watching CNN.

    seems I was just a bit ahead of the curve there.

    Now the truth is coming out about a lot of historical news coverage, and it’s clear they were pursuing their own agenda all along.

    n

  48. SteveF says:

    and watched gulf war 1 extensively

    Watched CNN convulsively. Got it.

  49. Spook says:

    ”I have figured out what the horrible smell in my air conditioning on my 2005 Expedition is. It is radiator fluid. Looks like I have a heater core leak and it is cooking on the heater core when I shut down. I wonder why breathing that crap is doing to my lungs ?

    I will be taking it for a new heater core tomorrow. This sucks.”

    My experience with a heater core failure (admittedly in a much simpler truck) was all about debris in the cowl plenum rotting out the heater core.
    Might I suggest cleaning out the cowl plenum? Again.

  50. Spook says:

    ”The can’t-ignore-it eye opener for me was during Gulf War I, 1990 or 91. One of the CNN liars, I think Wolf Blitzer, was on location in Israel, wearing his chemical protective gear because the entire population was in fear of Iraqi chemical attack at any moment. Very dramatic … until the camera showed a bunch of people just watching the CNN guy or going about their business, all in regular clothes, none looking especially fearful. One may assume that the cameraman was fired over that, but the damage was done.”

    It was a running joke in the hazardous materials clean-up business that you’d be there, on some site full of all sorts of chemical horrors, scared silly in your moon suit, and some local dweeb would walk up in shorts and flip-flops and ask “Hey guys. What’s goin’ on?”

  51. Greg Norton says:

    About the same time, Christiana Amanpour admitted in an on camera interview that she thought it was her job and calling to bring down Bush.

    I’m old enough to remember the backstory for Christiane Amanpour.

    You’ll go far in life if you work hard, go to the right schools … and play house with JFK Jr.

  52. lynn says:

    I’ve always seen PEG refer to polyethylene glycol. Usually PEG xxxx where xxxx is the average molecular weight. I’ve used it frequently in drug formulations.

    Oops, incompetent again. I would not listen to me. Except, don’t drink EG.

  53. Greg Norton says:

    As Dr. Pournelle used to say: Well, Sooprise!!

    https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/hbo-employees-face-tough-year-akin-childbirth-warns-at-t-executive-1125574

    My boss’s boss at the Death Star quit when our division was moved under Stankey’s reporting chain. That time was pretty much the beginning of the end of my career there since the replacement was an old school Labs guy who was paid to contemplate the topology of his navel.

  54. lynn says:

    On our house:
    – it is in a 55+ community in Fulshear, west of Houston, south of Katy, called Bonterra.
    – it is a couple of miles from the 500 year floodplain per the maps I looked at.
    – we have our house in Meyerland for sale, have cut the price some
    – we completely fixed it up after the flood.

    Cool. Sounds good.

  55. lynn says:

    My experience with a heater core failure (admittedly in a much simpler truck) was all about debris in the cowl plenum rotting out the heater core.
    Might I suggest cleaning out the cowl plenum? Again.

    I looked. Completely clean under the cowl.

  56. Greg Norton says:

    There was a case a couple of years where two doctors at MDACC had an affair. He broke it off and she put ethylene glycol in his coffee. He nearly died. She is in jail.

    Nice. I have a story about our personal experience with the nurses working the transplant program at UT Southwestern in Dallas that will make your hair stand on end.

    Whatever happened to “Do no harm”?

  57. Mark W says:

    I used to listen to NPR a lot (I was naive). Then one day I heard one of the senior correspondents say “we…um…um…er…that is…um… the democrats…” and that opened the floodgates.

    Other notable lies… NPR asking for domations based on their coverage of 9/11, when in reality the local station was playing a loop of the news from hours before. Jimmy Kimmel crying on TV about his child and how we all needed ObamaCare, when he had obviously paid for his child’s care since it received out-of-protocol treatments. And of course, Rachael Maddow deliberately misquoting the ACA draft in order to mock the R’s.

  58. Nick Flandrey says:

    Anyone who finds NPR outrageous and biased should try Pacifica Radio- they are 10 times the crazy and don’t even pretend to be unbiased.

    That’s where I listen to Farrakaan’s local lieutenant when I’m driving, he’s got his own show.

    n

  59. JimL says:

    I listen to NPR at least twice/week. I do believe in hearing different sides. Occasionally the “reporting” beggars belief. You _can_ make this stuff up, as evidenced by their stories.

  60. Nick Flandrey says:

    They live in an different world, that only intersects ours in a few places. That is one of the really scary things about any upcoming ‘unpleasantness’ is that they believe very strongly in their alternate reality.

    n

  61. SteveF says:

    They live in an different world

    Which would be fine except for their line items in government budgets and their preferential treatment in spectrum allocation and licensing terms. Neither the US federal government nor any states should be paying for the broadcast of communist propaganda.

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