Sunday, 15 May 2016

10:23 – As usual, Barbara read the paper this morning and then had breakfast, while Colin pestered me mercilessly to throw his toys for him. Then Barbara came into the den and asked what we were working on today. The two of them are a lot alike, wanting to work constantly. I told Barbara we both deserved a day off, so we won’t do much work on kit stuff today.

When I walked Colin, there were two or three dozen cows and calves near our back fence, including one calf that was lying right up against the fence. Colin did his usual, stalking toward them, staring at the calf as he approached it. Then he did something he does frequently when stalking squirrels, but never with the cattle. He apparently thought he was close enough to pounce the calf, so he made a dash toward it. Naturally, the calf went instantly from watchful to alarmed. It sprang to its feet and took off running away from the fence. Its mother and several other cows took off running with it. It wasn’t exactly a stampede, but there were several cows moving very quickly away from the threat. Those cows may outweigh Colin by a factor of 10 or more, but they know they’re prey and they recognize a wolf when they see one.

I didn’t yell at Colin. I can’t blame a herding dog for being a herding dog. But I really don’t want him bothering the cows, both for his sake and for theirs.


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54 Responses to Sunday, 15 May 2016

  1. OFD says:

    Multiply that German figure by a factor of three or four to start, because they’re lying about it, of course; that is what governments do. Then multiply it again by at LEAST a factor of three or four, maybe ten, for when it all comes here.

    “Officials based their estimates on 600,000 migrants arriving this year, 400,000 next year and 300,000 in each of the following years, the report said, adding that they expected 55 percent of recognized refugees to have a job after five years.”

    Let’s multiply these figures accordingly, too. They’re “officially” admitting to being about to take in a MILLION more this year and next and then, what, 300k per year after that, forever??? Auf Wiedersehen , Deutschland!

    Here it’s the camel’s nose under the tent; 100 down in Rut-Vegas (Rutland, former mill town, marble mining, etc.) Gee, we hope it works out as swell as the Bosnians, Serbs and Somalis who were “re-settled” in Burlap over the last few years. Assaults, robberies, rapes and murder, thus jacking up our Feebie and state cop crime stats.

    Of course if you crab about this with the libtards up here, you’re rayciss and mean-spirited and a reichwing-nut asshole. What will be sad is that when pushback does come, and it will, any persecution or violence is likely to be directed against the innocent and defenseless, rather than against the scumbag sons of bitches and bureaucrats, lawyers, judges and media enablers who run these scams. Thus the importance of acquiring and maintaining lists of names, addresses, and any other intel we can get on them.

    Who’s your local DA? Who are your judges? Your state reps and senators? The police chief and closest state police and Feebie units? Where do the media execs live?

  2. nick says:

    While I’m thinking about it, everyone should have a couple of coolers on hand for power outages. Ice is usually available after a couple of days in a local disaster, and it will work well to keep food cool.

    I will recommend AGAINST Thermos brand coolers. The parts that break are not available. In contrast, Colman cooler replacement parts are available at almost every sporting goods store, Walmart, etc. I’m also seeing cracks in the plastic skin on my Thermos cooler, vs no cracks on much older coolers from Colman.

    nick

  3. OFD says:

    Great minds think alike (and foolz seldom differ, haha).

    On my list of very minor tasks today, is to hose out and clean our large Coleman cooler. Also need to clean out our chest freezer in the cellar and the regular one at the top of our fridge and keep them packed with ice, if not much else.

    Mrs. OFD is in Sacramento, CA for this week, where it’s 78, and then the weekend and a couple of days with kids and grandkids, where we hope she doesn’t pick up another nasty bug from the germ soup out there. It’s 50 here with showers pending and clouds through Tuesday, looks like, followed by some sun. The yard and surrounding green world will be a jungle again very quickly. It doesn’t last long but while it does it’s something to see in a climate where we’re mostly used to the ‘bare ruined choirs’ and gray skies and ice at night.

  4. nick says:

    I’m headed out to our almost 7yo birthday party. We’ve got a line of severe thunderstorms headed our way, past Mr Lynn, so I hope they slow down enough we get the pool party done before they get here.

    nick

  5. SteveF says:

    nick, you should just hope that the thunderstorms pause over Lynn’s house. That way you have a nice party and Lynn doesn’t have to mow his lawn. Win-win!

  6. OFD says:

    From the Crypto-Gram in today’s email:

    “Amazon Unlimited is an all-you-can-read service. You pay one price and can read anything that’s in the program. Amazon pays authors out of a fixed pool, on the basis of how many people read their books. More interestingly, it pays by the page. An author makes more money if someone reads his book through to page 200 than if they give up at page 50, and even more if they make it through to the end. This makes sense; it doesn’t pay authors for books people download but don’t read, or read the first few pages of and then decide not to read the rest.

    This payment structure requires surveillance, and the Kindle does watch people as they read. The problem is that the Kindle doesn’t know if the reader actually reads the book — only what page they’re on. So Kindle Unlimited records the furthest page the reader synched, and pays based on that.

    This opens up the possibility for fraud. If an author can create a thousand-page book and trick the reader into reading page 1,000, he gets paid the maximum. Scam authors are doing this through a variety of tricks.

    What’s interesting is that while Amazon is definitely concerned about this kind of fraud, it doesn’t affect its bottom line. The fixed payment pool doesn’t change; just who gets how much of it does.

    http://observer.com/2016/04/how-amazon-kindle-unlimited-scammers-wring-big-money-from-phony-books/

    http://whatever.scalzi.com/2016/04/25/scammers-and-fixed-pots/

    A scam every minute nowadays; everyone’s on the take. Always gotta get over, and not just get over, but get over like a big dawg.

  7. OFD says:

    “Ever since our Neanderthal ancestors wandered out of the caves, white people have never been more confused than they are right now.”

    Not this one.

    http://takimag.com/article/the_week_that_perished_takimag_may_15_2016/print#axzz48knUQSw2

    Replete with all the usual rumpswabs, SJWs, progs, BLM types, and utterly rampant hypocrisy. My firing squads will be working overtime.

  8. Miles_Teg says:

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-05-16/manchester-united-match-abandoned-over-security-concerns/7416358?section=sport

    I wonder why they didn’t just use a drone to pick up the package and take it somewhere to be detonated, such as the nearest mosque. Now they have to reschedule the game.

  9. SteveF says:

    By “disposable drone”, you mean Britain’s Prime Minister or the incoming mayor of London?

  10. OFD says:

    “Now they have to reschedule the game.”

    We’re already seeing LOTS more of this kinda chit everywhere; ya know, if ya see sumthin, say sumthin. So empty bags blowing across a fucking parking lot, a cardboard box sitting by the Safeway loading dock…hey it COULD BE sumthin!

    “By “disposable drone”, you mean Britain’s Prime Minister or the incoming mayor of London?”

    Their PM’s have sucked as bad as our dear leaders since the days of the Stupid Party deities, Ray-gunz and Thatcher. And the new mayor of Londonistan is already pushing the hadji agenda every chance the midget goat-fucker gets.

    Bring back the ax to Tower Hill! The gallows at Tyburn!

  11. DadCooks says:

    So Hillary may pick a “Prominent Republican” (maybe a person identifying as a women, as Hillary does). I’ll leave it up to your imagination how if this was to happen just what might happen to Hillary.
    http://www.theblaze.com/stories/2016/05/15/political-analyst-predicts-clinton-will-choose-a-prominent-republican-to-be-her-running-mate/

    And in other news:
    http://theamericanmirror.com/sally-miller-hillary-and-her-coke-habit/
    I will attest to the fact that Hillary was doing this back in her High School days so this is not made up. Well more weed than coke, but the rest is true.

  12. MrAtoz says:

    So Hillary may pick a “Prominent Republican” (maybe a person identifying as a women, as Hillary does)

    Perhaps this fine lady for VP. She could be related to Mr. Miles_Teg.

  13. OFD says:

    Hmmm…if she does that, it will probably be a totally RINO witch who believes in the same stuff and acts the same way for the most part. Plenty to choose from. But what if…what if….Bruce Jenner??

    As for Sally Miller, she’s far from the only eyewitness to the various Cankles escapades over the years, all pretty much corroborated many times, including the countless stuff concerning Larry Klinton and his various accomplices, pals and whores. We’re talking classic dictionary definitions of psychopathic behavior, and what Ann Barnhardt calls “diabolical narcissism.” Plain and simple, they are evil human beings.

    As both RBT and Barnhardt have said, anyone who runs for office like this is by definition a psychopath, and in my and Barnhardt’s views, evil. So again, the argument about voting for the ‘lesser of two evils’ means we’re STILL voting for EVIL. Why would we do that???

  14. SteveF says:

    I dunno, Mr Atoz. Miles_Teg might find her scrumptious except for the tramp stamp. That right there might be a deal killer.

  15. OFD says:

    Throw in Cankles and Chelsea for a four-way and he’s all set. They’ll use him like a bar of soap for about a week and then he’ll be singing “Do That To Me One More Time” by the Captain and Tennille followed by the whole Barry Manilow ouvre.

  16. ech says:

    The last living actor from Casablanca, Madeleine Lebeau, died at age 92. Her story in getting out of Paris as the Nazis approached was similar to that of the movie. Her husband was the roulette croupier.

    One of the best films from the golden age of Hollywood.

  17. OFD says:

    I never saw that flick in its entirety; will have to one of these days.

    92 ain’t bad; then there’s 116:

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3028149/Gertrude-Weaver-world-s-oldest-person-dies-116-Arkansas.html

    Yikes. She was born only four years after my WWI vet grandpa.

    Meanwhile Mrs. OFD’s aunt Jane is 90 or 91 and drives a car, rides a bicycle and kayaks on the lake. She survived childhood TB, raised seven kids, and took care of her WWII vet husband (Pacific War) until he died a few years ago. Also a nurse most of her life. The woman on wife’s side of the family all live well into their late 80s and 90s up to 100 or so. The men croak early; rare diseases, railroad accidents, car accidents, etc. But I’m not related by blood so I’ll probably go to 120 or 130…uh…not really. My family’s three prime death causes are cancer, senility and gunshot. No lie. Maybe I’ll hit the trifecta!

  18. OFD says:

    No chit, Roger:

    http://freedomoutpost.com/roger-stone-if-someone-finds-me-dead-blame-hillary-video/

    Obola kills people overseas mostly, and thinks it’s great fun. But the Klintons killed regular Murkans, regularly, and with impunity.

  19. SteveF says:

    cancer, senility and gunshot. No lie. Maybe I’ll hit the trifecta!

    Zombie patriot, my good fellow. When your death is soon and certain but you are still somewhat functional, make your death mean something. Take a shotgun into a government office and shoot until you’re killed, or find some other purposeful death.

    (My former advice had been to go into a conspicuously oppressive government office, but that’s nearly congruent with “any government office” now.)

  20. H. Combs says:

    DadCooks – I worked for a national company based in Arkansas in the 80s. This company had a corporate Gulfstream I got to fly in on occasion. As a light aircraft pilot myself, I spent some time with the company pilot. He told me that once a month he did a “special” flight for the governor. He would fly to New Orleans, wait on the tarmac till a man showed up with a briefcase. He would secure the briefcase in the cockpit and depart for Searcy airport North of Little Rock. At Searcy, the aircraft would be met by an Arkansas State Trooper who would pick up the case and the pilot would fly the plane back to Harrison. I asked if he had ever looked in the case, he had once, he said that the Governor needed his nose candy.

  21. OFD says:

    “Take a shotgun into a government office and shoot until you’re killed, or find some other purposeful death.”

    It would be fah more purposeful than simply disposing of a few low-level clerks and overweight Paul Blart security guards. Think BIG, man, think big.

    “I asked if he had ever looked in the case, he had once, he said that the Governor needed his nose candy.”

    All true and all documented, with more unexplained or lied-about dead bodies down there, including two teenage boys left on the railroad tracks, plus the Gov himself having to do rehab more than once. How’s dat song go again…’…where every cop is a criminal…and all the sinners saints…’ Thick as thieves down there, a small-time criminal empire like the one in ChicagoLand, which both crime families brought to Mordor and kicked up a few notches.

    We are ostensibly ruled by psychopathic war criminals, perverts, thieves, serial rapists, drug dealers and users, and outright murderers. Someone explain to me how this is different from the Middle Ages or Byzantium or Rome.

  22. Miles_Teg says:

    SteveF wrote:

    ‘By “disposable drone”, you mean Britain’s Prime Minister or the incoming mayor of London?’

    Cameron, of course. Although I think he should be allowed to seek asylum in Germany.

  23. Miles_Teg says:

    DadCooks wrote:

    ‘So Hillary may pick a “Prominent Republican” (maybe a person identifying as a women, as Hillary does). I’ll leave it up to your imagination how if this was to happen just what might happen to Hillary.’

    I hear Bruce/Caitlyn is available and is a Republican. Although I’m told s/he is switching back to thinking of him/herself as male so won’t be eligible.

  24. lynn says:

    @nick, we got three inches of rain yesterday and an inch today. Looks like we will get another inch or five of rain tomorrow here in the Land of Sugar. The wife and I walked our two miles tonight when it slowed to a light drizzle so we did not take the dog with us.

    Had a horrible smell in the master bath linen closet yesterday. I found a small dead mouse on the second search. I have no idea how such a small mouse can make such a horrible smell.

  25. lynn says:

    I am thinking that the prominent repuglican is Little Mario.

  26. OFD says:

    We have a few light showers mixed with cloudy days until around Wednesday or whenever, so they say. Temps during the days are in the 50s and at night the high 30s.

    One small rodent can produce a pretty big aroma, esp. in a warm climate and/or building/house. Here they freeze and/or mummify pretty fast. But the cats usually eat most of them. Squirrels and larger will make more stink, of course. Also, the contrast in smell between the nice clean linen in that closet and the rotting mouse would hit your schnozz right away.

  27. OFD says:

    “I am thinking that the prominent repuglican is Little Mario.”

    Here’s the establishment media rumpswab view:

    http://nbcpolitics.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/06/03/18700047-as-two-prominent-gop-women-fade-a-question-of-how-to-woo-female-voters

    And here’s the patent-pending OFD view:

    “Who gives a shit?”

  28. Miles_Teg says:

    If Hillary chose Sandra Bullock I’d vote for her. (Sandra, that is. I’d writein OFD for Prez.)

  29. Dave says:

    While I’m thinking about it, everyone should have a couple of coolers on hand for power outages. Ice is usually available after a couple of days in a local disaster, and it will work well to keep food cool.

    I will recommend AGAINST Thermos brand coolers. The parts that break are not available. In contrast, Colman cooler replacement parts are available at almost every sporting goods store, Walmart, etc. I’m also seeing cracks in the plastic skin on my Thermos cooler, vs no cracks on much older coolers from Colman.

    I’m so caught up in the discard and replace mentality of the 21st century that I never even thought of replacement parts for a cooler.

    Another idea on the cooler theme. I think it was Ferfal wh0 said he freezes water in 1 liter jugs so that when the power goes out, he pulls the water jugs from the freezer to the refrigerator to keep its contents cooler for a little while longer.

  30. nick says:

    the additional thermal mass of the water is supposed to help in the freezer too.

    My freezer is usually full of FOOD though, so no room for water jugs. 🙂

    nick

    The parts that fail are hinges (plastic wears out) hinge screws pull out (when someone abuses the lid) and drain plugs get broken off or the plug breaks free.

    The latches sometimes fail, but you can do without latches. You can do without hinges too, but you will have to replace or make a temporary stopper for the drain plug.

    The parts are cheap and super easy to replace.

    for pulled out screws, replace with bigger screws, squirt some glue or epoxy in the holes and use the original screws, or add a plastic zip-it style drywall anchor and then use the screws. http://www.powers.com/product_02345.php

  31. JimL says:

    Sounds like Mrs. OFD might be a Howard.

    Say hello to Lazarus for me.

  32. lynn says:

    Sounds like Mrs. OFD might be a Howard.

    Say hello to Lazarus for me.

    Lazarus Long and Slipstick Libby are out on their tour of the Milky Way right now. They will be back after 2100 AD.

  33. OFD says:

    Youse guys lost me here; what’s this about a “Howard,”? I get the Lazarus Long character, but “Slipstick Libby,”?

    No clue. I gave up sci-fi in my teenage years, sorry.

  34. lynn says:

    The Howard Foundation in Heinlein’s books was established by a man named Howard who died of old age at the age of 48. His foundation started pairing people together whose great-grandparents were still alive. After a couple of hundred years, people in the Foundation lived to be 200 years old routinely.

    The first book in the series is:
    http://www.amazon.com/Methuselahs-Children-Heinlein/dp/0671655973

    Slipstick Libby is:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andrew_Jackson_Libby

    Lazarus Long is:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lazarus_Long

  35. OFD says:

    OK, I get it now. Actually Mrs. OFD, sad as it is to say, may check out before I do, although two years younger. She’s got a couple of major med issues, whereas I’m just a lunatic. She says she’d prefer it that way anyway as she already lost a husband and father too early, way too early.

  36. JimL says:

    I think Mr. @OFD missed out on some classic literature.

    Heinlein’s Future History (his Universe, if you will) is a pretty tight piece. His writing is as important in its circles as Shakespeare’s is in his. Heinlein is widely regarded as the best SF writer of the 20th century.

    I find myself re-reading his books more handily than any others.

  37. OFD says:

    Naw, I dint miss out; I read that stuff back then but never went back to it. It was OK, but then I got sucked into real history and the Western classics. Bowing to superior knowledge on these matters, how does Heinlein stack up against Bradbury? Or Le Guin?

  38. Robert Bruce Thompson says:

    Heinlein stands alone.

  39. lynn says:

    Jerry Pournelle calls him “Mr. Heinlein”.

    Mr. Heinlein critiqued Pournelle’s and Niven’s first two SF books which could be called prepper fiction. On their first published book, “Lucifer’s Hammer”, he gave them four pages of single spaced comments for improvements before publishing. Pournelle and Niven integrated them all into the story. The book sold four million copies in its first couple of years.

  40. lynn says:

    Mr. Heinlein also taught his fellow SF writers how to make money from their stories. First, he sold the serializing rights for his books to “Boy’s Life” or “The Saturday Evening Post”. Then he sold the hard back rights. Then he sold the paperback rights. All three sales were usually to different people.

  41. OFD says:

    OFD, being an open-minded and “hyper-literate” lunatic, at least, will make some time for Mr. H. if possible, and see, as has happened before with other reading, whether the passage of decades and age, not to mention decrepitude and senility, will render the words differently.

  42. nick says:

    Don’t grab just anything. He famously sold everything he ever wrote and some was pretty bad.

    I like “Friday” as a fairly modern book. Starship Troopers (nothing but title in common with the film) is a staple of liberty minded folks.

    Mr H was into some weird outside the mainstream sex. It seems like there’s a point in almost every book where the protagonist says “well, when in Rome” and jumps into bed, with himself in one case, but usually with at least one someone he normally wouldn’t be in bed with. The exceptions are his “juveniles.” No sex in there that I remember.

    nick

  43. lynn says:

    Good Heinlein books to start with:

    “Citizen of the Galaxy”
    http://www.amazon.com/Robert-Heinleins-Citizen-Galaxy-Lazaro/dp/1631403613/

    “The Moon is a Harsh Mistress”
    http://www.amazon.com/Moon-Harsh-Mistress-Robert-Heinlein/dp/0312863551/

    “The Star Beast”
    http://www.amazon.com/Star-Beast-Robert-Heinlein/dp/1451638914/

    Then read “Revolt in 2100” / “Methuselah’s Children”. Nehemiah Scudder’s legacy will run a shiver up your back.

  44. SteveF says:

    OFD, I suggest you read Heinlein’s adult novels from the 1960s and 70s, except for Stranger in a Strange Land. They’re consistently good. His “juveniles”, aka Young Adult, stories were mostly but not entirely good; I can give you a recommended list if you wish. His short stories were a mixed bag and some of his later novels, and SiaSL, got a bit strange. Not bad, but not something to recommend to someone to show the strength of his writing.

  45. lynn says:

    “Starship Troopers” is pure unadulterated military sf and libertarian p0rn. I am still of two minds about having to be a military veteran in order to vote in public elections or hold public office.
    http://www.amazon.com/Starship-Troopers-Robert-Heinlein/dp/0441783589/

  46. OFD says:

    “I can give you a recommended list if you wish.”

    Please do so, sir, at your convenience, of course. I may not get around to them for a few weeks as I have a little reading pile of my own already in-progress. Mrs. OFD reads a book in a sitting; I read a dozen at a time, but she’s starting to do that, too. I’d be curious to see if she gets a kick outta Mr. H.; IIRC, she also read sci-fi in the past, and was a history of science major at McGill for her BS. (she took calculus and analytic chemistry among other stuff, which is way beyond my piddly pay grade).

  47. lynn says:

    “I Will Fear No Evil” freaked me out when I read it at age 15. I’m not sure that I am ready for his concepts at the age of 55.
    http://www.amazon.com/I-Will-Fear-No-Evil/dp/0441359175/

    “Sixth Column” is about an Asian invasion of the USA. I love it but some people think that it is horribly racist.
    http://www.amazon.com/Sixth-Column-Robert-Heinlein/dp/1451638728/

    “Tunnel in the Sky” is a story of survival of a group of young adults thrown onto a unsettled planet through a stargate. Also controversial since the protagonist is black and some of the kids kill each other.
    http://www.amazon.com/Tunnel-Sky-Robert-Heinlein/dp/0345260651/

  48. MrAtoz says:

    There is a semi-complete Heinlein collection on K-ass.

  49. OFD says:

    I just want le creme de le creme, haha, of Mr. H.; no second- or third-rate drivel. And his to-do list of chit to learn for Today’s Uber-Mensch is over the top; you would have to have been on it since birth and with the skillz of MacGyver, Sir Edward Francis Burton, and Superman, and be as smart as Linus Torvald and Enrico Fermi.

  50. lynn says:

    On that “Citizen of the Galaxy” reference above, please use this one instead if you are interested. The previous reference was a comic book. Unfortunately the book is out of print again unless you want to do the Kindle thing.
    http://www.amazon.com/Citizen-Galaxy-Robert-Heinlein/dp/1416505520/

  51. ech says:

    Bowing to superior knowledge on these matters, how does Heinlein stack up against Bradbury? Or Le Guin?

    Bradbury wrote science fantasy for the most part – the Martian Chronicles is in that tradition. LeGuin wrote feminist sf and fantasy, but not hit you over the head feminist. Heinlein wrote initially from a 30s socialist POV, but turned libertarian when he divorced his second wife.

    His best books:
    – he wrote a series of YA books (his “juveniles”) in the 40s and 50s. The best of these are “Citizen of the Galaxy” and “Have Spacesuit, Will Travel”.
    – he wrote some good stuff in his early period alongside the juveniles. I am partial to “Double Star”, a political thriller set in a solar system with multiple intelligent races.
    – by the end of the 50s, he had his FU money and could write what he wanted. The two best novels from that period are “Starship Troopers” (military sf, strongly influenced by Heinlein’s hatred of communism) and “The Moon is a Harsh Mistress” (a sf and libertarian telling of a revolution of the moon as a penal colony)
    – his later period novels are OK, but many don’t stand alone – having appearances by characters from his earlier works and the like.
    – he wrote some good fantasy and science fantasy. The novel “Glory Road” is a great take on the hero’s journey trope. Two shorter works that appear together are “Waldo” and “Magic, Inc.”, seemingly set in the same universe are fun reads.
    – he also wrote a bunch of short fiction and some novels that were in the same setting (“The Future History”) that are good reads.

    As mentioned above, “Sixth Column” is almost racist and deals in stereotypes, but the original idea for the story came from John Campbell, the magazine editor, who was very racist, even by standards of the day. A lot of the late period stories explored alternative family structures and sexual pairings.

  52. Lynn says:

    “Farnhams Freehold” went right past “Sixth Column” in my opinion on racist dealings. And yes, “Double Star” is excellent and so is “Between Planets” and “The Star Beast” on political issues. The alien raising eight generations of John Thomases is flat out funny.

  53. ech says:

    “Farnham’s Freehold” was intended as a role-reversal satire, but missed the mark IMHO.

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