Sun. Feb. 28, 2021- no rest for the wicked…

Cool and probably raining.  High humidity if not rain.

Yesterday was mostly overcast with occasional sun, but got misty drizzle in the late afternoon.

I did some more cleanup.   Stacked some of the cut pecan tree.   Washed some stuff.   Raked.   I am going to be sore today.  Very glad the pressure washer survived being frozen.  It’s common for the pumps to split if they freeze with water in them.   I guess mine sat long enough before the freeze that it was dried out.

Headed over to the rent house later today to look at the A/C and see if I can diagnose what the problem is, or at least decide if a pro needs to be involved.  I hope I don’t need the same part that everyone else needs.

Supply lines continue to be disrupted in Houston, and there are shortages of plumbing stuff you might not even think of.   People are offering crazy money for outdoor on demand hot water heaters.   And I have one new in the box… but.   It would set our own plan back 3-6 months, and any profit selling it would be eaten up when we needed to replace it with new for our install.   It’s going to continue sitting in storage, because we can’t (in good conscience) get a plumber to do the work now anyway.  We had one scheduled to give us a bid the day everything froze.   Seems like a waste to let it sit though while people don’t have hot water at home, so I might do some more thinking on the subject.

It occurs to me  that it is a bit difficult to tell if the high prices are organic supply vs demand driven or if it is inflation starting to take off.    SOME of it is organic, but I’m getting worried that we’re about to see inflation really take off, and that the rapid increase is masked by genuine real demand driven increases.  Historically the strategies for dealing with rapid inflation are simple.  Borrow money that you will pay back with devalued money and spend it on durable goods that you know you will need later, or that you can sell.  And spend every dime as soon as you get it on the same things.  Savers get destroyed by high inflation.  People who own real stuff have a buffer.  Those on fixed incomes get destroyed.  Make some plans.  Start moving on them.

I’m no financial genius, but gold isn’t crazy high at the moment (compared to some other things), if you can find some, and that makes me wonder what’s going on.  I mention it only in passing, and not as advice.   And I point out that Ferfal talks about the value of broken gold necklaces and bracelets in his book.  With a bracelet or necklace, you can just cut off an inch at a time… and Selco points out the value of wedding rings, you can feign a great deal of reluctance with a ring, and no one wonders if you have more stashed away.  Give some serious thought to a world where your savings are gone.  It happens all the time in other places.   It can happen here.   Our ‘reserve currency’ status won’t save us forever, foreign powers are working as hard as they can to obviate that advantage.  At some point they will succeed.   Think hard about this.

Stacking can help.   Stacking will help.   Keep stacking.

 

nick

 

 

Author: Nick Flandrey

Mid 50s, stay at home dad, with two elementary school age girls. Love my family and my life.

73 thoughts on “Sun. Feb. 28, 2021- no rest for the wicked…”

  1. It occurs to me that it is a bit difficult to tell if the high prices are organic supply vs demand driven or if it is inflation starting to take off.

    It’s only one point to be considered, but you might check out lumber futures. The peaks have been somewhat seasonal historically associated with hurricane rebuilding. This time, that’s not so much the case.

    Like you, I’m not so sure inflation has taken off yet, with yet being a very important word.

  2. With a bracelet or necklace, you can just cut off an inch at a time… and Selco points out the value of wedding rings, you can feign a great deal of reluctance with a ring, and no one wonders if you have more stashed away

    Rick Harrison has a chapter of his book discussing how some customers of his shop use jewelry as portable wealth. Of course, he has plenty to sell you at his shop.

    The paper gold price is manipulated by trading games in GLD, amenable to antics similar to GameStop like any other stock. It works as long as people believe continue pretending that there is a physical asset behind the ETF.

    GLD has been a lousy investment since last Summer.

    Again, my number for the cost of an ounce of gold US in non SHTF situations is physical delivery of an uncirculated Eagle from a reputable dealer in a couple of days. The coin shouldn’t have additional collector appeal like a unique Mint stamp.

    Eagles aren’t strictly portable wealth crossing borders in non-SHTF situations, but they are easy to sell within the US. Walk in to a dealer with an Eagle and you have a graduation gift or bequest from a relative. A Maple Leaf or a Krugerand requires more of a story less likely to be believed, and people will wonder if someone went to that much trouble, how many more you might have.

  3. From yesterday

    –who TF wrote and approved all these regs in the first place?

    Your sacred cow is my cheeseburger.

    When I first went to Texas in the early 80s I was floored by liquor laws and blue laws. I guess most of that was religious based but I’m sure someone was getting rich.


  4. All that renewables crap only works between 32 F and 95 F.

    @lynn; what are the issues with wind and solar above 95F?

    The wind stops blowing in Texas above 95 F. The wind turbines stop being generators and become motors at a certain wind speed. In other words, they use electricity instead of making electricity. Otherwise, they have to take the wind turbine offline.

    Solar has a generic problem, it only makes power until 5 pm. 6pm if the panels are oriented to the west. Everybody is getting home at 6pm, turn on the A/C, turn on the stove and make supper. So you have gas turbines to start at 430pm so they make the power that the solar was making. It is called the duck curve. It is not just the solar farms, it is also the panels on homes, very few people have battery backups (Tesla Powerwalls).
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duck_curve

    Every MW that renewables can make must be backed up by a gas turbine. We need more gas turbines in Texas right now, somewhere between 5,000 MW and 10,000 MW. Plus we have 30,000 MW in new wind turbines and solar coming online in the next three years, all of this must have gas turbine backup.

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  5. Every MW that renewables can make must be backed up by a gas turbine. We need more gas turbines in Texas right now, somewhere between 5,000 MW and 10,000 MW. Plus we have 30,000 MW in new wind turbines and solar coming online in the next three years, all of this must have gas turbine backup.

    Nothing a few nukes wouldn’t solve.

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  6. But, dkreck, if you had a number of nuke plants running then you might not need wind and solar at all, and where’s the virtue signalling in that?

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  7. And of course plenty of nukes won’t get around the need for a way to even out the system in the face of minute-by-minute changes. That needs either storage systems or gas turbines. So sorry, watermelons, but the real world gets in the way of your grand schemes yet again.

  8. When I first went to Texas in the early 80s I was floored by liquor laws and blue laws. I guess most of that was religious based but I’m sure someone was getting rich.

    Car dealerships in Texas also operate under a version of the blue laws.

    WA State still had state run liquor stores when we moved there. Oregon still does. In theory, the state monopoly protect “craft” distillers, but WA and OR have lots of what I call “Church Ladies Without Churches” who think it is there business to decide how you should conduct your life.

    When WA State eliminated the state hard liquor monopoly, Costco put their chosen candidate into the Governor’s Mansion, and their lobbyists wrote the deregulation rules.

    If you think religious-based liquor laws are unusual, you didn’t see Jack Daniels stocked on the endcap of the pet food aisle at Fred Meyer (Kroger) the first few weeks deregulation kicked in around WA State. I can’t decide if that was the end result of a rushed stocking or clever data mining showing people who bought cat litter also tended to drink that whiskey brand.

  9. “–and a lot of tough talk NOW, but where was that when those guys got hired?”

    STATEMENT ON RESIGNATION OF ERCOT LEADERSHIP

    ERCOT is not a state agency but a non-profit entity wholly owned by the utility companies to run the grid and the deregulated energy trading. They could hire whomever they wished. No one cared as long as the place stayed out of the news.

    IMHO, the place was set up to take the fall in this situation, insulating Oncor and Berkshire Hathaway Energy in particular. The kabuki is pretty good, though. The location of ERCOT’s physical building at the airport in Taylor implied serious contingency planning and thought. Cargo cult level.

    To be fair, the staff who actually work probably prevented a bigger problem. OTOH, word is starting to creep out of the hearings that ERCOT management knew on Thursday before the storm that something bad would happen.

    Maybe the politicians will actually come up with something useful out of the hearings.

  10. Don’t be ridiculous, Greg. Everyone knows that lonely, bitter cat ladies drink box wine.


  11. Everyone knows that lonely, bitter cat ladies drink box wine.

    Not the hardcore ones! 🙂

  12. @Greg

    WA and OR have lots of what I call “Church Ladies Without Churches” who think it is there business to decide how you should conduct your life.

    They are ubiquitous and worse than all the viri in history.

  13. Don’t be ridiculous, Greg. Everyone knows that lonely, bitter cat ladies drink box wine.

    Prior to deregulation of the liquor market, the idiot husband of my wife’s associate physician in WA State worked for a big distributor out of Seattle and stocked the fine box wines in gas stations on the WA side of the river in the Portland metro.

  14. WRT rising prices:

    I track food prices and item sizes using a couple of shopping Apps (OutOfMilk and AnyList, both paid versions). In 2020 prices increased, and sizes decreased. This translated to an average 30% increase in food costs. So far, in 2121, the average is ahead of last year. So if that paycheck seems to be going too fast, it is. Be prepared for worse plus higher taxes all around.


  15. But, dkreck, if you had a number of nuke plants running then you might not need wind and solar at all, and where’s the virtue signalling in that?

    Well maybe the other nuke.

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  16. The stupid, it burns … an M1 tank gets 0.6 mpg. A gallon of diesel contains ~ 40 kWh of energy. A solar panel puts out ~ 1 kWh per day. A solar panel is about 17 sq. ft. You MIGHT fit four of them on an M1 tank without impairing the weapons and sensors. Then you’d need four Tesla Powerwall batteries, weight half a ton.With that setup, every ten days you could move your tank 0.6 miles …w.

    https://wattsupwiththat.com/2021/02/14/nato-chief-suggests-battle-tanks-with-solar-panels-as-militaries-go-green/

    via https://borepatch.blogspot.com/

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  17. This translated to an average 30% increase in food costs.

    That’s about what I see from doing the shopping. When mentioning it I’m careful to state that this is simply my experience in the grocery stores near me, but it matches what others report.

    So if that paycheck seems to be going too fast, it is. Be prepared for worse plus higher taxes all around.

    Yep. And gasoline prices are up 40 cents, or almost 20%, just in the past two or three weeks. (I don’t go out often enough to be more precise than that.) And NYS income taxes and the various property taxes are almost certainly going up, probably sharply because of the (self-inflicted) crisis.

    In the face of that, my employer gave a blanket 3% merit pay raise. Setting aside that a blanket raise isn’t exactly a merit pay increase, it’s grossly below the cost of living increase. One person left last month, one quit shortly after the raise announcement, I’m in theory looking, and another has asked if I’ll serve as a reference. Note that it’s not the bozos or slackers who are leaving.

  18. A gallon of diesel contains ~ 40 kWh of energy.

    True, but running a diesel engine doesn’t extract all of that energy. Taking into account the inefficiency of an internal combustion engine and the loss in using a battery, the solar panels might let the tank move 0.6 miles every five days.

    (This may be addressed in the article. I wasn’t able to view it; site wouldn’t come up.)


  19. Headed over to the rent house later today to look at the A/C and see if I can diagnose what the problem is, or at least decide if a pro needs to be involved. I hope I don’t need the same part that everyone else needs.

    @nick; good site for DIY central A/C repair: https://arnoldservice.com/


  20. ERCOT is not a state agency but a non-profit entity wholly owned by the utility companies to run the grid and the deregulated energy trading. They could hire whomever they wished. No one cared as long as the place stayed out of the news.

    @Greg; understand the ‘not a state agency’ status but shouldn’t the Governor had more insight into an independent entity whose proper functioning, or lack thereof, has such a big impact on the residents of his state? Or is there more involved here that what’s apparent at the surface? Which seems to be Abbott blaming ERCOT and no one blaming him.

  21. “That’s about what I see from doing the shopping. When mentioning it I’m careful to state that this is simply my experience in the grocery stores near me, but it matches what others report.”

    –I could have written that word for word.
    –gasoline way up too from $1.89 to $2.2x or higher

    I’ve got three propane bbq bottles to fill, it was $10 ea. last time. We’ll see this time.

    Leisurely start to the day. Last night’s dinner was brats boiled in beer, followed by the grill, with home made potato chips. Since I had the oil out anyway, and I didn’t put onions in it, I left it out to do hillbilly donuts this morning. The kids LOVE the DIY donuts. (the cheapest refrigerator biscuits in the store, a shot glass, and some powered sugar in a sack….) (actually I have chocolate -swiss miss hot cocoa mix, powdered sugar, and cinnamon. ALL need granulated sugar added, for ‘sparkle’ and flavor.) We even left two biscuits whole and injected them with jelly. Note that it’s difficult to get the middle fully cooked on a whole biscuit without burning the outside. Failures are how we learn, right?? And the swiss miss is pretty salty. I don’t have a great chocolate powder figured out yet.

    We are seeing real increases in prices and have for some time. We’re also seeing demand driven price increases with all the disruption that is STILL happening. We’re about to see a MASSIVE increase in money creation – printing press go BRRRRRR….. these are not good trends with positive outlooks, unless you owe a lot of money and need to keep refinancing at ever lower rates.

    And that ain’t us…

    n

  22. Homemade potato chips tricked the kids into eating a whole big potato each 🙂 Kids that insist they ‘don’t like potatoes’…

    n


  23. I could have written that word for word

    But didn’t, because you’re not Gropey Joe, the serial plagiarist.

  24. @Greg; understand the ‘not a state agency’ status but shouldn’t the Governor had more insight into an independent entity whose proper functioning, or lack thereof, has such a big impact on the residents of his state? Or is there more involved here that what’s apparent at the surface? Which seems to be Abbott blaming ERCOT and no one blaming him.

    Texas has “deregulated” power except for several cities which run their own systems. Even Florida, which also resorts to rolling blackouts during severe cold weather doesn’t go as far with being hands off with the utilities.

    The office of the Governor in Texas is a lot weaker than it seems, with most of the executive power resting with the Lt. Governor and the Legislature. And a *lot* of people are smelling blood in the water with regard to Abbott.

    Robert Francis suddenly exploring entering the Governor’s race is a sign that Abbott and the Republicans in general are vulnerable next year.

    ERCOT lacked a lot of transparency, but the Legislature is conducting hearings. I still suspect Oncor and the “working” from home over the last year as the primary reasons the rolling blackouts didn’t work due to equipment failures preventing reactivation in places.

    It is beyond time for people to go back to work away from home.

  25. The CD ripping programs will go online and pull down all the track info, and even cover art. I think I might have had 2 disks in many hundreds that didn’t have online data available. Since I had the jewel cases I just typed that in.

    I have ripped about 200 of my music CDs. Either one or two have not had online info. Both of those CDs were anthologies.

    I’ve got about a 100 more music CDs to rip.


  26. Briggs & Stratton 6151 Pump Saver Anti-Freeze and Lubricant Formula for Pressure Washers, 10.7-Ounce

    I close the fuel valve, let the engine run out of fuel, turn off the ignition, pull the starter rope 3 or 4 times with nothing connected to the pump. Gets all the water out of the pump. Getting the above mentioned lubricant into the pump can be a real hassle.


  27. Getting the above mentioned lubricant into the pump can be a real hassle.

    Screw a short length of hose to the inlet. Get a funnel, if needed, pour a few ounces of antifreeze/lube into the hose, and pull the starter cord a few times.

  28. I have 389 folders for artists on my personal pc, many with multiple albums inside. Freaking windows is hiding or “organizing” them because I put them in the Music folder, which is really some sort of “library” symlink or some nonsense.

    Wife’s computer has a bout the same, and I don’t know what the overlap with the damaged RAID is.

    Well over 200 DVDs so far. About two flip top crates full.

    n

  29. ” Getting the above mentioned lubricant into the pump can be a real hassle.

    Screw a short length of hose to the inlet. Get a funnel, if needed, pour a few ounces of antifreeze/lube into the hose, and pull the starter cord a few time”

    –good to know

    n

  30. wife is out getting materials for today’s GS project, owl boxes. Another example of stuff I’d have liked to know about BEFOREHAND so that I can gather the tools and materials at MY leisure.

    Also shopping for a clothes dryer at the local used outlet.

    n


  31. I close the fuel valve, let the engine run out of fuel, turn off the ignition, pull the starter rope 3 or 4 times with nothing connected to the pump. Gets all the water out of the pump. Getting the above mentioned lubricant into the pump can be a real hassle.

    I turn my pressure washer on its side (mine is electric so no worries about gas) which drains most of the water and then use my leaf blower on full blast held right by the water input and that removes basically the rest. Then attach the hose fitting connected to the can and one spray until I see some of the fluid coming out the output port and it’s done.

  32. I completely forgot about mine before the freeze. We don’t have much winterizing to do here normally so it wasn’t top of mind.

    n

  33. Nick, I was making a suggestion for getting the antifreeze into the sprayer, not saying something that I’ve done. I should have made that clear.


  34. –so completely untested internet advice, I see…

    good for everything, especially medical.

    BTW Friday’s second vaccine shot was a bust. Turns out they had some lame excuse I really didn’y but and everyone had been rescheduled. Too bad they didn’t call and inform us. Next Friday for sure. I’m calling before have to head over there. It’s almost a half hour drive and it’s going to be in the late afternoon.

  35. The fill valve for the dishwasher arrived yesterday. Easy install. The power connector is goofy. It’s like RJ45 but the release tab is part of the socket. I’m sure there is good reason to make it so you need two hands.

    Dishwasher is running. Sounds normal allowing that the kick panel is not installed. No leaks.

    I think I dodged a bullet.

    After the Jeep is out of the shop, the truck goes in for inspection to learn if it actually has a blown head gasket / cracked block.

    Next big project is finding an insulation company to get the darn floor insulated. Might have some extra blown into the attic.

    Along the way I’ll get my pipes wrapped and taped and covered with a layer of chicken wire. Chicken wire? The cats seem to think pipe insulation is GREAT for clawing.

  36. After the Jeep is out of the shop, the truck goes in for inspection to learn if it actually has a blown head gasket / cracked block.

    When you change the oil on the truck, does the drained fluid look “foamy” on top?

    Good luck with the inspection.


  37. When you change the oil on the truck, does the drained fluid look “foamy” on top?

    The oil looks brand new. It should, a few trips to Marble Falls and a trip to Ft. Worth is all that is on the oil. No milkiness at all. Anti freeze looks good, no sign of oil in it.

  38. From yesterday

    –who TF wrote and approved all these regs in the first place?

    Your sacred cow is my cheeseburger.

    When I first went to Texas in the early 80s I was floored by liquor laws and blue laws. I guess most of that was religious based but I’m sure someone was getting rich.

    You could not sell beer and wine in a grocery store in Texas until 1995 or so. Every grocery store had a beer and wine store right next to it.

  39. And of course plenty of nukes won’t get around the need for a way to even out the system in the face of minute-by-minute changes. That needs either storage systems or gas turbines. So sorry, watermelons, but the real world gets in the way of your grand schemes yet again.

    Nukes can follow load just fine, Duke Power did it for years. You just install a big valve on the main steam lines and dump steam straight to the condenser instead of running it through the steam turbine first.

  40. No trip to the rent house today. tenants aren’t interested, so that will shift to tomorrow.

    I still need to go to my secondary however.

    In the mean time, back to work around the house.

    n

  41. To be fair, the staff who actually work probably prevented a bigger problem. OTOH, word is starting to creep out of the hearings that ERCOT management knew on Thursday before the storm that something bad would happen.

    ERCOT knew a decade ago that Texas had rotating blackout problems in severe weather events. Because we had rotating blackouts in winter 2011. And in Labor Day 1989. And in winter 1984. And in …

    As I mentioned earlier, the problem is getting ready to get worse. More renewables equals more blackouts. And we are doubling our renewables in Texas over the next three years, another 30,000 MW of windmills and solar.

  42. You could not sell beer and wine in a grocery store in Texas until 1995 or so. Every grocery store had a beer and wine store right next to it.

    Florida still requires a separate store front for hard liquor but not beer and wine.

    Costco’s lobbyists went too far with the deregulation in WA State, and most major stores with the exception of the warehouse clubs gradually built hard liquor departments with limited access from the main part of the store.

  43. Along the way I’ll get my pipes wrapped and taped and covered with a layer of chicken wire. Chicken wire? The cats seem to think pipe insulation is GREAT for clawing.

    No!! ! ! ! ! ! !!1111!!!!


  44. Nukes can follow load just fine, Duke Power did it for years. You just install a big valve on the main steam lines and dump steam straight to the condenser instead of running it through the steam turbine first.

    I thought there was a reason that nukes couldn’t do that and had to run at roughly steady output with only slow ramps up and down. I read about a different type, I suppose, or am misremembering entirely. Something else to read up on when I have some time.

  45. Nukes can follow load just fine, Duke Power did it for years. You just install a big valve on the main steam lines and dump steam straight to the condenser instead of running it through the steam turbine first.

    I thought there was a reason that nukes couldn’t do that and had to run at roughly steady output with only slow ramps up and down. I read about a different type, I suppose, or am misremembering entirely. Something else to read up on when I have some time.

    The steam generation stays the same, the amount of steam to the steam turbine varies. It is amazing how small a pipe is needed to send a significant amount of steam to the condenser. Of course, the smaller the pipe, the finer the control is.

    Of course, we did not use these steam bypass valves on our power generation units since they were all coal, natural gas or fuel oil, and hydro (very small amount of that). But we did have steam warming lines on all of the steam lines since we had to heat all pipes to 300 F before using them.

    The other way to control load on nuclear units is to partially drop the rods (not good since these are a safety device !) or to slowly poison the primary coolant with boron (electron inhibitor).

  46. The girls decided to do owl boxes this year. They’ve debated the bat boxes previously. After all, one of their field trips told them bats were necessary to saving the planet, and they have been conditioned even at this very young age to do whatever it takes to ‘save the planet’. They are unable to tell you who or what they’re saving it from, or for who.

    Owls are fluffy and bats are still yucky, so the owls won this round.

    n

  47. Well, front yard is dethatched and raked. Rain came and spotted me. Just enough to wet my shirt. Currently 84F and 66%RH but it feels like 100% when raking leaves.

    Loading up and headed out.

    n

  48. @lynn:

    slowly poison the primary coolant with boron (electron inhibitor).

    Shouldn’t that be a neutron inhibitor? To the best of my knowledge, electrons are not involved in uranium fission. Of course, IANANE (I Am Not A Nuclear Engineer)

    G.

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  49. @lynn:

    slowly poison the primary coolant with boron (electron inhibitor).

    Shouldn’t that be a neutron inhibitor? To the best of my knowledge, electrons are not involved in uranium fission. Of course, IANANE (I Am Not A Nuclear Engineer)

    G.

    Neither am I. I should have looked it up. I worked / interviewed at Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station for one day in 1983 as possible reactor shift engineer. I have forgotten all that I learned and more since then.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comanche_Peak_Nuclear_Power_Plant


  50. The other way to control load on nuclear units is to partially drop the rods (not good since these are a safety device !) or to slowly poison the primary coolant with boron (electron inhibitor).

    Or run a cable into a big pond and generate lots of vaporized water. I believe that is what they do when they have that 1 hour turn-off the lights thingie to “save the world”…

  51. Every MW that renewables can make must be backed up by a gas turbine. We need more gas turbines in Texas right now, somewhere between 5,000 MW and 10,000 MW. Plus we have 30,000 MW in new wind turbines and solar coming online in the next three years, all of this must have gas turbine backup.

    Nothing a few nukes wouldn’t solve.

    Before the price of natural gas dropped from $14/mmbtu to $2/mmbtu in 2008 ???, there were plans to add four more nuclear power plants in Texas. STP 3 and 4, Comanche Peak 3 and 4. But the precipitous drop of the natural gas prices caused all four nuclear power plants to be canceled or delayed.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_Texas_Nuclear_Generating_Station
    and
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comanche_Peak_Nuclear_Power_Plant

  52. The wife decided last week we needed a pickup. So she sold our 2007 suburban to our son who actually needs a second vehicle and arranged for MIL to sell us one of her extras. She has 3 pickups 2 tractors and a minivan but only drives the van and that about 50 miles a month. Just got back from MIL place with her 2004 Dodge Dakota crew cab on trial. Short wide bed doesn’t hold much. I’m not convinced we need it. We will see.

  53. Just got back from MIL place with her 2004 Dodge Dakota crew cab on trial. Short wide bed doesn’t hold much. I’m not convinced we need it. We will see.

    The six or eight cylinder?

    I believe Cash for Clunkers 2.0 is coming to take all of the smaller pickups like the Dakota, dating back to the early 2000s. Lousy crash test ratings but really useful beater trucks with a design predating the Germans.

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  54. Sam’s run today. Beef and chicken were available, but pork non-existent. Limits on beef of 3.

    No 2 Liter sodas in any flavor. All Coke products in short supply.

    No gallon size bottles of water.

  55. “Trump: We All Knew Biden Would be Bad”
    https://www.newsmax.com/politics/trump-biden-speech-cpac/2021/02/28/id/1011850/

    “”Already the Biden administration has proven that they are anti-jobs, anti-family, anti-borders, anti-energy, anti-women and anti-science,” said Trump. “In just one short month, we have gone from America first to America last. Think about it, right? America last.””

    Can Biden be anti anything else ?

    Hat tip to:
    https://thelibertydaily.com/

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  56. “Trump: We All Knew Biden Would be Bad”

    I caught part of the speech driving around this afternoon.

    I’ve already received two panicked emails from the Terry McAuliffe campaign in VA.

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  57. Took some stuff back to the secondary location. I’m pretty sure that I won’t need the kerosene space heater at this point. Brought home some bankers boxes. I’m taking books OFF my shelves in the office. Magazines really. Can’t quite bring myself to get rid of them but I can get them out of the office and maybe shelf some of the stacks of books that seem to wash up like drifts of snow….

    n

  58. MIL saga continues. Every time she goes to the doctor and he tells her something bad, the MIL takes another step off the cliff. One visit, where she walked in just fine, Dr. told her she had about a year to live, suddenly MIL could no longer walk.

    When MIL was moved into senior living she was angry she was having to get rid of a lot of stuff (worthless junk). She HAD to keep half a dozen big boxes of receipts, some from 1980. Grocery receipts, worthless. Now MIL is talking about going into assisted living. Now she is a 1 bedroom apartment, kitchen, bedroom, living area, bedroom. We explained to MIL that going into assisted living is basically a hotel room. MIL would have to get rid of much more of her stuff. So she is balking, again.

    Spousal unit is going back to San Antonio the second week of April to deal with these issues. I will, wisely, stay home. Aside from the expense (about $1,500 for both of us), I just don’t want to deal with hassles. MIL is to the point she thinks she cannot do something, therefore she can’t, or won’t. Her home phone was not ringing so she basically gave up and refused to use the phone. It was just a switch on the base unit that she had flipped to silence the phone. Convincing, instructing, coaxing, etc. MIL to move the switch back was a 20 minute ordeal.

    I personally don’t think MIL will reach 2022. I also expect spousal unit to make a journey to SA that will last a couple of months before the end of the year.

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  59. @ray, that is sad, and I’m sure frustrating.

    Since we all end up there, all I can council is patience and grace… and support for your wife.

    n

  60. Greg – The six or eight cylinder?

    It’s the V8 XL sport edition. Plenty of power in a small package. I put some SeaFoam in it as it probably hasn’t been run in months. She put a new battery and tires on it about 10 months ago then parked it in the shed. I put a mobile XM radio in it as the factory unit was AM/FM/CD. The power steering has a slow leak I’ll have to look at. MIL dealt with it by keeping a bottle of steering fluid handy. We will see how goes.

  61. Looks like getting actual books on the shelves isn’t going to happen but I am able to display a bunch of stuff that was either hidden or piled up, from my non-prepping hobby.

    n

  62. The Cheaper than Dirt eflyer says, no limit on this winchester 9mm ammo, stock up….

    It’s $1.10/rnd

    for bulk pack white box fmj ammo.

    yeah, no wonder it’s “in stock” still.

    n

  63. Hah, everyone went to bed early except me.

    I gotta fix that….
    n

  64. “Predicting and planning for the next polar vortex?”
    https://www.iceagenow.info/predicting-and-planning-for-the-next-polar-vortex/

    “‘Texans were clearly not prepared by their federal, state or local governments, or even their local news media outlets, let alone ERCOT, for the magnitude of this polar storm…””

    ““We’ve spent billions on wind turbines and solar panels that were useless when people most needed electricity.””

    This year’s polar vortex may be a practice run for next year. Get more blankets. And toilet flushing water. And a generator.

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