Mon. Dec. 3, 2018 – busy week ahead

Cool and wet today. Still haven’t changed the batteries in my weather station…

I did get some of the Christmas lights up yesterday, some of the yard work done, and the tiniest bit of cleanup done.

I still maintain we are in a period of worldwide rearrangement. I don’t think the EU will survive the stresses on it. The influx of invaders has sealed its fate. South and central american socialist paradises that were paid for by oil have started crumbling. China has expanded until it can’t keep up. The skin of the bubble no longer has anything behind it. Russia…well, who is next in line after Putin, and what do they want? All the countries that were either trying to align with NATO or the EU must be rethinking that… The UK has already voted their desire…

This is the kind of massive change the historically leaves 100 Million dead or dying from sickness, starvation, and war.

Gloomy? Oh heck yes. Look how they treated Churchil. But he was right.

n

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51 Responses to Mon. Dec. 3, 2018 – busy week ahead

  1. brad says:

    Our ancient dog went on a walk yesterday. Today, he can’t stand. The nerve damage to his back legs (the usual thing that afflicts lots of older dogs) has apparently crossed some threshold.

    Vet appointment in a couple of hours, to see if there’s anything to be done. Likely, he won’t be coming back home. After 16 years, they are such a part of the family.

    Damn, why’s the screen all blurry…

  2. Nick Flandrey says:

    Brad, I hope for a better outcome, but if it’s time, it’s time. You’ll know it, and so will he.

    I believe we made an ancient pact with the wolves. Some would join us in our homes, become dogs, and defend us from the rest in exchange for food, comfort, and loyalty. They joined our pack, and forsook their own. It is at times a heavy burden to carry another’s life in your hands. But it is a joy too.

    n

  3. Nick Flandrey says:

    Another bit on food longevity.

    I use and store Krusteez Pancake mix. It’s tasty and convenient. Somewhere in the year after its Best By date, it is no longer delicious. I think the leavening agent expires, as the waffles were heavy and dense. There was a bit of an ‘old’ taste as well.

    Unopened until use, stored in original packaging inside a bucket, in my hot and cold garage, used at one year past best by, and it was edible but not tasty and failed to ‘fluff up’. Since it has a TWO year Best By, that means ‘edible for at least 3 years, even under poor storage conditions.’

    That’s pretty good, I think, for something that is 60c/pound.

    n

  4. ITguy1998 says:

    Back from a weekend trip to the in-laws. Drove 6 hours Friday afternoon/evening up to northern KY and 6 hours Sunday morning/afternoon back to northern AL. Rainy and dark for the trip up – completely miserable. Sunny and warm for the trip home. One of my wife’s sister’s has a big Christmas party every year, so we went up for that. Tough to arrange schedules, especially when the wife has trouble getting time off, and a boy in high school.

    I still have the loaner car (2018 Cadillac CT6 – every freaking option), so we took that. I’ve commented several times about not liking a lot of the tech in cars. Luckily this one doesn’t have an ipad on the dash. This was my first experience with adaptive cruise control. What a bloody brilliant invention. It has quirks, but once you learn them, it really makes a long haul trip much easier.

    I also tried out the auto steering (or whatever it’s called.) Kinda scary sitting in a car going 80 mph that is accelerating/decelerating and steering by itself. I essentially did the auto steering enough for a test, and for the wife to get a picture, but that was it. It did quite a bit of drifting in the lane, and I just didn’t feel comfortable with it. I did learn to trust the adaptive cruise control, and it never failed to brake appropriately.

    When it’s time to replace a car, I won’t search out adaptive cruise control, but I won’t avoid it either.

    Oh, and the car has seat massagers in the front seats. I’d wear those suckers out in a year….

  5. ITguy1998 says:

    Wrt resume’s… I got my first real job and my current one by applying online and not knowing a soul there. There have been 5 jobs in between that were generated from contacts.

  6. Harold Combs says:

    I am shocked that the EU has lasted this long. Its social and financial errors should have doomed it long ago. When we lived in the UK (1995 – 2001) we saw that the regular people felt that “Brussels” was imposing insane regulations on a formerly sovereign Brittan and extracting heavy payments. The working class has no say in EU policy and this creates a “rule by elite” mentality both for the EU and from the people. The EU ministers pay no price for the unpopularity of their policies and are thus insulated from the will of the people. The people feel, rightly, that they have no control over EU policy. This disconnect has always led to revolution in the past.

  7. CowboySlim says:

    Boeing stock ↑ $18. Have more incompetents at Lions Air crashed more planes?

  8. Greg Norton says:

    South and central american socialist paradises that were paid for by oil have started crumbling.

    Venezuela expected the US invasion to happen a dozen years ago. Chavez probably thought that “smells like sulphur” comment would result in a carrier deployment at a minimum and was surprised when his “air force” didn’t report E-2 radar signatures off the coast the following weekend.

    Sadly, at this point, a US invasion might be the only way to fix Venezuela.

  9. Nick Flandrey says:

    Sadly, at this point, a US invasion might be the only way to fix Venezuela. ”

    NOT OUR JOB TO FIX VENEZUALA!!!!!1!!!!!!!!!11!!!!!!!

    SOOOOO Not our job…….

    n

  10. Greg Norton says:

    “Sadly, at this point, a US invasion might be the only way to fix Venezuela. ”

    NOT OUR JOB TO FIX VENEZUALA!!!!!1!!!!!!!!!11!!!!!!!

    Oh, I’d hate to see it, but the expats with the capital and skills to rebuild the place are firmly ensconced in Miami Beach condos with zero motivation to return absent a significant regime change.

    GTE knew what would happen in Venezuela when I worked for them 20 years ago. After the Chavez revolution, we received new travel restrictions/recommendations, including one to not fly in/out of Caracas with expensive watches after one of our execs lost a Tag Heuer to a security guard at the luggage screening.

    I sometimes wonder if Chavez really expected to gain power.

  11. JimL says:

    39º and cloudy on the north coast. Not like yesterday, when I got 6 beautiful miles in with short & long-sleeved T-shirt. It’s supposed to rain, so I think I’ll get wet.

    Our concerns are rightly within our borders. It is only when externalities threaten our peace and welfare should we become involved in other countries’ troubles.

  12. nick flandrey says:

    And we got enough on our plates. Watch this twitter video of antifa thugs, open carrying, and denying passage down a sidewalk while the cops stand there….

    https://twitter.com/MrAndyNgo/status/1069041229122269184/video/1

    you want the first active video on the page.

    n

    think it’s NOT going to be a shooting war??

  13. MrAtoz says:

    I read Ken Berry died. I loved “F Troop”. One of the classics. Sgt Bilko in the old west.

  14. SteveF says:

    It’s supposed to rain, so I think I’ll get wet.

    Tip: your clothes won’t get wet if you walk around naked.

  15. Jenny says:

    @brad
    Damn. The years with our dogs go by too fast. I’m truly sorry if it’s time for you to let your dog go. It’s a special kind of pain.
    Bing is 14. His clock was ticking loud in my ears last night.
    http://twogeeksandadog.com/?p=2763

  16. ~jim says:

    @Nick
    I don’t know about horses, but in my salad days we once fed half a blotter of Purple Haze to our cat. God, it still gives me the giggles. It spent the next six hours running full speed into walls.

    IIRC, that was also the cat with a serious nipple fetish. If you didn’t wear a shirt she’d climb in your lap and suckle away…

    Something I was going to mention @Jenny, but it’s slipped my mind. Maybe that Purple Haze wasn’t such a good idea, or is it just CRAFT syndrome?

  17. Greg Norton says:

    And we got enough on our plates. Watch this twitter video of antifa thugs, open carrying, and denying passage down a sidewalk while the cops stand there….

    think it’s NOT going to be a shooting war??

    As I’ve noted before here, the Progs living along the I-5 corridor in WA State are heavily armed thanks to a long hunting tradition in the area. Most of the corridor south of Tacoma is at least two generations removed from having meaningful employment, and most subsist either on benefit checks or local/state/Federal employment.

    The lean older guy in the orange vest attempting to block the view in the video screams “Boeing retiree” to me.

    WA State west of the Cascades is *not* a place to go and prep expecting to be left alone when the sh*t hits the fan. If the resident population doesn’t get you, the hordes streaming down into the area from Vancouver, BC will.

  18. brad says:

    @nick, @jenny: Thanks for your thoughts. The whole family went to the vet – it was time, and the vet handled things very nicely. The hard – but good – thing is how suddenly our canine friend went downhill.

    Playing Frisbee in the snow, his two favorite things in life, that’s how I’ll remember him.

  19. Jenny says:

    Dammit. Brad I’m sorry.
    It’s good the family was there. It hurts. It sucks.
    Time helps. I still bawl once in awhile over Abby. We put her down at 14 in 2005 – liver failure and we didn’t know until they opened her up – stoic. . I think bawling is completely appropriate.

  20. nick flandrey says:

    It’s always hard to lose a faithful companion.

    Frisbee in the snow sounds nice.

    n

  21. ech says:

    . The nerve damage to his back legs (the usual thing that afflicts lots of older dogs) has apparently crossed some threshold.

    Sounds like degenerative myelopathy. Our 14 yo Corgi, Pixie, has it. Starts at the base of the spine and advances up the spinal cord. No treatment for it. Pixie also has a kidney problem that is slowly killing her.

  22. ech says:

    I think the leavening agent expires, as the waffles were heavy and dense.

    Self-rising flour and products with it do in fact wear out over time. The acid and base react.

  23. Rick H says:

    @Jenny – got any stories to share about the earthquake and it’s effect on you (and your prepping)?

    @Brad – sorry to hear about your pet.

    @Nick – replace the battery in your weather station! (44F and clear with a few clouds here opposite Mutiny Bay, WA)

  24. Jenny says:

    @ech
    I don’t know the nature of Pixie’s kidney disease. Our Bing has kidney issue and vet wanted to put him on K/D, which is composed of fairly terrible ingredients and not great nutritionally. The key for Bing was low phosphorous.

    We feed 0.6 phosphorous foods. Not all foods label that component.
    Wellness Complete Health
    Adult
    Deboned Chicken & Oatmeal Recipe
    —————
    Natural Balamce
    Limited Ingredient Diet
    Grain Free
    Potato & Duck Formula
    ——————
    Canine Caviar
    Special Needs
    Holistic Entree
    LID

    These kibble cost $1.50 – $3.00 / lb in Alaska depending on the volume. It would be less expensive to buy low phosphorous meats (ground chicken, chicken gizzards, heart, 80/30 beef, leg of lamb) and make his food but time is a constraint and convenience a factor.

    We also feed Bing:
    Nitrogen traps:
    -dark leafy greens
    -raw garlic
    -probiotics (yogurt)

    Potassium supplements:
    -green beans
    -bananas

    Phosphorous binders
    Calcium’s sources – Tums

    Kindness support
    -fresh parsley
    -fresh dandelion (he self medicated in the summer)

    We restrict his phosphorous via his kibble, we restrict his sodium via his treats. We do a senior blood panel twice a year. His blood work has not worsened since we made these changes. He eats 400 calories a day, most of it kibble. The amount of supplements varies a bit by who is feeding him but is a crushed handful of spinach, hefty tablespoon of yogurt, half cloves of crushed garlic mixed in the yogurt a couple times a week (he eats it but glares), handful of green beans or half banana. You get the idea.

    He also gets 1 Costco TripleFlex (750 glucosamine / 400 mg chondroitin / 325 mg MSM) and 1 Costco Alaska Salmon Oil capsule (1000 mg Omega 3). We cap it off with 30 mg of Galliprant for pain and inflammation. Galliprant is $1-$2 a pill. He’s worth it.

    Don’t know if any of that is useful or applicable. It has helped our old boy and that’s enough I suppose.

  25. Bob Sprowl says:

    I had to put down one of our dogs, age 14, 18 months ago and the other, age 14 also, just passed away over night in June. I miss them every day.

    With my wife a nursing home the house is empty.

    I plan to get another soon.

    Bob

  26. lynn says:

    A Girl and Her Fed: Anti Vaxxers
    http://agirlandherfed.com/1.1639.html

    Yup, supervillains.

  27. SteveF says:

    Stupidvillains.

  28. lynn says:

    Funky Winkerbean: The Safe Sex talk ?
    http://comicskingdom.com/funky-winkerbean/2018-12-03

    Oh my.

  29. nick flandrey says:

    I’m no anti-vaxxer, but the shear number of vaccines and WHEN they want to give them is nuts. Unless you’ve got young kids, you really don’t know.

    I had to say NO a dozen times while were were in the recovery after the birth of both daughters. They wanted to give my newborn Hepatitis vax. ONE DAY OLD. No F’ing way. Every time they came in they tried.

    Then the school vax, they wanted to do more than 10 in one visit! NO. You can spread them out, and you can separate them. My kids are up to date on school required vax, but no hep. No guardacil yet either. Most of the diseases are horrible, but now they want to throw in a bunch of extras too, and do it all at the same time. On toddlers.

    n

  30. lynn says:

    Our ancient dog went on a walk yesterday. Today, he can’t stand. The nerve damage to his back legs (the usual thing that afflicts lots of older dogs) has apparently crossed some threshold.

    Vet appointment in a couple of hours, to see if there’s anything to be done. Likely, he won’t be coming back home. After 16 years, they are such a part of the family.

    Really sorry to hear that. Lady will be 16 on Wednesday and is having a bad day. She won’t stop jumping off stuff and hurt a back leg over the weekend. Now she has hurt a front leg. She is really having trouble walking on the tile today. She just ate an entire bowl of ground beef, ground turkey, and brown rice so her appetite is still up.

  31. lynn says:

    I believe we made an ancient pact with the wolves. Some would join us in our homes, become dogs, and defend us from the rest in exchange for food, comfort, and loyalty. They joined our pack, and forsook their own. It is at times a heavy burden to carry another’s life in your hands. But it is a joy too.

    I agree. They are great companions, good protectors, and tremendous responsibilities.

  32. lynn says:

    Then the school vax, they wanted to do more than 10 in one visit! NO. You can spread them out, and you can separate them. My kids are up to date on school required vax, but no hep. No guardacil yet either. Most of the diseases are horrible, but now they want to throw in a bunch of extras too, and do it all at the same time. On toddlers.

    Definitely too much for toddlers. I do not remember how many vaccinations my kids got but they are 35 and 31 now. And I am old and forgetful.

    My son received 35 ??? vaccinations before each government paid trip to Iraq. All in one afternoon, then they (US Marines) went for a five mile jog. Many of the vaccinations were experimental including a flu vaccine with all known varieties of flu. Everyone got sick for a week then next day. But then he did not get sick or have allergies for five or six years. On the second trip he got a smallpox vaccination which is unknown nowadays.

  33. nick flandrey says:

    My buddy was Airborne Ranger, and got all kinds of shots and pills before hitting central american jungles…. some you couldn’t keep down for more than a few minutes.

    Who knows what the long term effects are, when you don’t even know what you got?

    n

  34. Ray Thompson says:

    I seem to remember about a dozen shots when I was in basic training for Uncle Sam. All of single file, injection guns slamming into each arm, every few days. For a couple of recruits that moved their arms a nasty slash was the result, generally requiring stitches.

    When I got order to be on a plane in five hours for overseas I had to go to the clinic and got five more injections of who knows what. After arriving overseas in two days I had a couple of boosters. This along with the regular injections such as flu and whatever Uncle Sam decided I should have.

    I have had my Prevnar-13 injection, recently got my flu shot (stronger version for those over 65), and am on the list for shingles injection, waiting list and a series of three injections.

    I remember when the polio vaccine was available. A series of three shots over a period of time. They hurt. But everyone was lined up to get the vaccine as polio was not uncommon. Then the sugar cube doses arrived and the boosters were on those cubes. Also have the scar from the TB inoculation, spread the stuff on the skin and jab with a hundred tiny needles.

  35. Greg Norton says:

    Definitely too much for toddlers. I do not remember how many vaccinations my kids got but they are 35 and 31 now. And I am old and forgetful.

    I can’t have any vaccine cultured in egg whites. Unfortunately, this includes flu shots and the measles vaccine.

    It hasn’t been a problem for most of my life, but, in the mid-80s, the Florida university system had a rash of measles cases, and they mandated that everyone either present proof of immunity or take the shot. I eventually got someone in the bureaucracy to understand my situation and, after examining the records, exempt me, but it was a looong process.

  36. lynn says:

    “Police Catch Tesla Autopilot Driving Home Sleeping Drunk”
    https://www.pcmag.com/news/365240/police-catch-tesla-autopilot-driving-home-sleeping-drunk

    “It took the police officers in two vehicles seven minutes to outsmart Tesla’s Autopilot system and finally stop the Model S as the drunk driver continued to sleep behind the wheel. Does this count as a DUI, reckless driving, or both?”

    I don’t know what to think about this. The guy was obviously not driving the car.

  37. nick flandrey says:

    that won’t matter to the cops. They’ll arrest you for it if you are asleep in the back seat, but the keys are in the ignition. Ditto if you are asleep with the car in Park. Can’t drive a car in Park, but that doesn’t matter.

    In Illinois, a six pack of beer with a can missing is considered “open liquor” even if none of the remaining five cans are open.

    It’s a racket. We’ve put up with a dramatic decrease in personal liberty at the hands of MADD, and for what? In some years the death toll has INCREASED, although fatalities are down in general. That’s much more likely to be because of improvements in vehicle safety features, and roadway design, than it is because of unconstitutional roadblocks and sobriety checkpoints.

    n

    added– apparently 29 of 3287 deaths in vehicle crashes daily are attributed to alcohol.

  38. nick flandrey says:

    Speaking of cops, TONS of encrypted radio traffic today. Lots of traffic on the special ops and homeland talk groups too. Wife thinks it must be related to Bush…

    n

  39. Greg Norton says:

    I don’t know what to think about this. The guy was obviously not driving the car.

    I’m impressed that Valley cops issued the citations. OTOH, the 101 is a wreck even under ideal weather and time conditions, and, for now, the driver is still responsible for the safe operation of the vehicle.

    Autonomous vehicles are still a long way off, but I believe automated vehicles controlled by a central authority could be possible in the next 15-20 years. Maybe 10. The major issues are (a) having a critical mass of vehicles with “drive by wire” tech and (b) public acceptance.

    We’re probably close on (b), but I don’t think people truly understand the difference between autonomous and automated.

    Of course, in Austin, they won’t care as long as the bacchanalia keeps rolling on 6th. Pass the “day sipping whiskey” (whatever that means).

  40. nick flandrey says:

    I just let win10 on my NVR pc update, it said welcome to the April update…

    And my phone updated too.

    I’m probably F’d.

    n

  41. Rick H says:

    @nick – I upgraded my LG3 phone OS (Android) yesterday. No problems. Took a couple of minutes to complete, but the phone works just fine afterwards.

    And Windows updates happen all the time. Again, no problems.

    On an old desktop upstairs, the latest Windows update seems to have resulted in faster reboots – the time between power on and desktop-is-ready-to-use is faster than it used to be. No actual data, just seems faster.

    No problems with any updates here. Have no idea why you guys keep complaining about updates. Never had a problem with them.

  42. nick flandrey says:

    Every android update and my phone gets slower. I have noticeable lags between taps and presses and stuff happening.

    With win10- I don’t have much experience but I hear and see reports of stuff breaking with updates. I’m only running the iSpy NVR, and it runs poorly on win10. It ran much better on my 8.2 even though the specs are better on the new box. I am hoping it runs better now, but I saw the same things wrong after the update. That leaves me hoping for an update from iSpy….

    n

  43. nick flandrey says:

    It’s monday right? Both our level one trauma centers are on diversion… meaning they’re full up. They just told a crew with a gunshot patient that there wasn’t ANY hospital showing open….

    n

    added- pace of dispatch has slowed way down, must have been a weird surge…

  44. lynn says:

    “The Global Carbon Tax Revolt”
    https://www.wsj.com/articles/the-global-carbon-tax-revolt-1543880507

    “The French are the latest to refuse to sacrifice growth for green piety.”

    “France’s violent Yellow Vest protests are now about many domestic concerns, but it’s no accident that the trigger was a fuel-tax hike. Nothing reveals the disconnect between ordinary voters and an aloof political class more than carbon taxation.”

    Hat tip to:
    https://drudgereport.com/

    If you go there from the Drudge Report then you can see the entire article. I especially like the quote from Macron telling the rural peoples to carpool or wait for alternate transportation.

  45. lynn says:

    It’s monday right? Both our level one trauma centers are on diversion… meaning they’re full up. They just told a crew with a gunshot patient that there wasn’t ANY hospital showing open….

    It could also be a staffing issue. ER doctors are expensive and the Houston area trauma centers are overwhelmed with non-paying people. This is the main reason why I want Medicare for All. Yes, I know that I am naive in thinking that Medicare for All is going to solve the ER payment problem but a guy can hope, right ?

  46. nick flandrey says:

    Patrol just pulled over a bad guy. Outstanding warrants. Lots of driving while suspended. Sex assault on a child. Hopefully they lock him up this time.

    n

    wrt trauma centers, I wonder how many nights a week this happens. The dispatch channel isn’t one I normally catch.

    close the border and cause the current illegals to self deport and we won’t have the issue at the ERs, or it will be reduced by a factor of 10.

    (arrest any of them with an open warrant, check at the ER, at school, anywhere you can. 80% tax on remittances, 60% if you can prove US citizenship. FULL eVerify. Jail and huge fines for any employer caught cheating. Cut all assistance to illegal alien adults to zero. Cut assistance to US citizen children of illegals to half, and only goods and services in kind, no cash. Immediate deportation to anyone caught selling their assistance, and their entire family too [this will be abused to get the US to pay for the trip home- and that’s ok.] No asylum to anyone caught crossing illegally. Second time caught, prison camp in the desert until self deported [you can leave on the bus to the border any time.] Third time caught, forehead tattoo, camp for 6 months of forced labor building the wall, then self deport.)

  47. lynn says:

    close the border and cause the current illegals to self deport and we won’t have the issue at the ERs, or it will be reduced by a factor of 10.

    It is our own citizens causing many of the payment problems too. The problem is endemic. The FSA (free stuff army) is taking over the USA. They refuse to pay for just about anything that they can get away with.

    The real problem with the ERs is the “Emergency Medical Treatment and Active Labor Act”. The 1986 federal act requires that all ERs treat people regardless of ability to pay. This act has destroyed ERs because some people who can pay will refuse to pay.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emergency_Medical_Treatment_and_Active_Labor_Act

  48. brad says:

    @Lynn: Give Lady an extra round of petting.

    We’re a sad household today – but we enjoyed almost sixteen years of Polo’s company. At moments like this, I always appreciate the poem Death is Nothing At All, which reminds us that “whatever we were to each other, that we still are”. We still have those sixteen years, and always will.

    On to other random topics…

    – – – – –

    I just checked the current vaccination guidelines here:

    – Day of birth: Hep-B, but only if the mother tests positive as a carrier.
    – Two months: one shot with 5 components: DTP, Polio and something I don’t recognize from the latin name.
    – 1 year: MMR

    All of these have repititions, for example, the DTP is repeated at 4, 6 and 12 months. There are some optional-but-recommended vaccinations as well, for example, pneumonia along with the DTP.

    It’s not so much that this is a lot of shots, as that they come a lot earlier in life than I recall.

    – – – – –

    Open container laws. When driving, I understand. And the guy in the Tesla was definitely (supposed to be) driving. But in general? Sitting in a parked car, or riding the train, or walking down the street? Iirc, it’s generally illegal to have an open container of alcohol “in public” in the US. Which just reeks of puritanism.

    When I take the train in the evening, it’s quite common to see some people drinking an after-work beer on the way home. When taking the dogs for a walk, I’ve been known to take a beer or (my wife thinks this looks weird) a glass of wine along. Why not? Public intoxication, disturbing other people – those are problems, sure, but they aren’t stopped by open container laws.

    The one time I saw someone absolutely, totally smashed on a train. He came pre-equipped, no container in sight. Two beefy passengers carried him off the train at the next major stop, and called security to come deal with him.

    – – – – –

    Finally, EMTALA, yes, a huge problem. OTOH, if you are a genuine emergency, an ER should treat you first, and worry about paperwork second. I am reminded of the time I drove a friend to the emergency room with a broken shoulder – in Boston? Dallas? – not sure anymore. Anyway, there was a long queue to sign in, and in front of us was a guy with a scalp wound. He was bleeding profusely into a blood soaked bathtowel – it was (pardon the pun) bleedingly obvious that he needed stitches, and sooner rather than later. Put stitches in the guy, then sort out his paperwork.

    As I understand it, the main problem comes more from fear of litigation associated with the EMTALA-mandated screening process. Hospitals, especially in inner cities, have a lot of drug seekers, as well as people who try to use them for any minor complaint. All of whom should be “screened” as they fly out the door. Amend EMTALA to provide legal immunity in those cases, and the situation would improve a lot.

  49. Ray Thompson says:

    It is our own citizens causing many of the payment problems too.

    Indeed. One lady I know just recently had a child. The child had heart problems and required extensive treatment and care including a 150 mile transport to another specialist hospital. They paid nothing for any of this. They are a welfare family as that is the way their parents lived and this young family has chosen the same career path.

    They were even on FB with a funding page to get money to pay for their travel and lodging expenses in Nashville while the child was at Vanderbilt. Raised almost a thousand dollars. But the child was only there for a couple of days as the problems were not as serious as originally diagnosed and the child returned home. I doubt they returned any of that money that was donated.

    Now they are home, back on food stamps, free (to them) care for the child, expensive nutrition delivered through a feeding tube, and buying expensive food at the grocery store on the state issued debit card.

    I would not be surprised if the total of the medical bills exceed $100K, all paid for by taxpayers, or the hospital was stiffed.

    Open container laws. When driving, I understand.

    If you are in a vehicle with the keys in the ignition, front seat, back seat, in the trunk, you will be charged with DUI. Even on private property. The keys in the ignition are the tipping point. If you are on a public street, in a vehicle, you will be charged with DUI. Does not matter if the keys are no where to be found. The assumption is that you drove to the location and thus DUI. Getting in a car to sleep it off no longer works.

    Many bars will call a cab or UBER at not cost to the patron to get them home. Avoids a lawsuit. When I traveled for the bank in Texas the people I traveled with liked to drink, a lot. When we went into an establishment I would tell the server I was the designated driver and would not be consuming alcohol (I don’t drink anyway). All my food and non-alcoholic drinks were on the house. Stems from a case where a person in Texas was drunk, crashed, killed a couple of people, the bar was sued for millions, and lost everything. Cheap insurance to give some free food and relieves the bar of liability.

  50. Greg Norton says:

    It could also be a staffing issue. ER doctors are expensive and the Houston area trauma centers are overwhelmed with non-paying people. This is the main reason why I want Medicare for All. Yes, I know that I am naive in thinking that Medicare for All is going to solve the ER payment problem but a guy can hope, right ?

    Until the doctors shrug in the sense of an Ayn Rand book because nothing gets done about the student loans and Medicare without supplements pays almost zip.

    Navient is currently tracking over 200 people with student loans totaling over $1 million. Granted, the people probably lived higher than most students in pricey metros, but my wife’s loans were $200,000 20 years ago to drive a Corolla and live in … Broward! $1 million is not hard to imagine. The poster child for the stories that emerged last year in the “news” media was a UCLA grad dentist.

    Houston will go the route of Vantucky — my wife’s former employers never adequately replaced her so they substitute a mix of nurse practitioners, empowered pharmacists, physician assistants, and, the latest antic, student doctors to fill the primary care gap in the semi-rural WA town where she worked.

    Of course the recruiters call. All the time. If I get the calls, I liken the Northwest experience to forced financial sodomy and that particular recruiter doesn’t call back, but it never stops. I think they figure if my wife was naive about the area once, she’d fall for the pitch again.

    I half joke that I’ve turned into a really b*tchy doctor’s wife absent the Mercedes and plastic surgery. If the doctors don’t shrug, the spouses eventually will, and *that* will be the end of Medicare For All.

  51. lynn says:

    @Lynn: Give Lady an extra round of petting.

    Done. She is walking better today. We may have to make her a steak tomorrow on her birthday.

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