Fri. Sept. 9, 2022 – work progresses, progress works

By on September 9th, 2022 in culture, decline and fall, personal

Cool and humid turning to hot and humid, with a possible bit of rain.   Which forecast pretty well describes yesterday’s actual weather.  It got to just around 100F in the afternoon.   It was certainly hot in the attic.

Shortly after  getting started for the day (with stretches and limbering up) I crawled up into the attic to finally run the new gas line to the kitchen.   Spent some time slithering on my belly like a reptile, and finally got in place, drilled a hole, and failed to get into the wall cavity.   Approaching the problem from outside, by cutting a hole in the soffit and reaching in from the other side confirmed that of all the places I could drill through the top plate of the wall, I’d  hit a freaking stud.  Couldn’t do it on purpose.   I was able to hog out the hole a bit, come through the side of the stud, and make  a path for the pipe.  Except that the fiberglas insulation in the cavity kept the pipe from moving.   I gave up.  Decided to run the pipe down inside a cabinet, and move it when I had the wall open during the [future] kitchen remodel.

Got the pipe run in, but ran short of connectors, valves, and gas appliance hookup kits.   The rest of the install will have to wait until next time.

Helped the septic guy trench for the kitchen drain, then he got everything on the uphill side backfilled and graded.   There is obviously a septic tank in my front yard, but some plants will screen it eventually.   Meanwhile he moved on to the drip line, and we both laid out the pattern.    He’s hoping to finish the install today, with possible cleanup on Sat.

I’ll be home with my non-prepping hobby meeting, and my littlest Girl Scout. My wife and D1 will be doing sailing stuff.    It’s been a long hard working week, and I’ll be glad to be home.

Spent some time chatting with the neighbors about politics and the future.   They are very like minded and have a lot of skills and success harvesting all the local game.  I volunteered to help break down the next big thing they brought home.  I hope they take me up on it, as I’m anxious to learn.

Keep stacking skills and people.   They will make the difference.

nick

69 Comments and discussion on "Fri. Sept. 9, 2022 – work progresses, progress works"

  1. Nightraker says:

    If it is covers and access ports, fake (fiberglass) rocks are an option to hide the tank.  Amazon and Home Depot sites show ’em up to 12″x28″.  Really intended for well pipes, but…

  2. ITGuy1998 says:

    All I can say is, thank deity  I am on a city sewer system. You guys mess with poo way too much for my comfort! 

    Nick, on a serious note, have you thought about adding in the option to hook all the grey water into a pipe that doesn’t drain into the septic tank? Not to actually have it hooked up, but there in case the need arises (such as the place actually becomes a bug out pad)? 

  3. EdH says:

    You guys mess with poo way too much for my comfort! 

    Not really.  After a proper install it’s nearly maintenance free – for example the previous owner at Nick’s got away with a very substandard system and it worked for decades. 

    Don’t use a garbage grinder, be careful of the brand of soaps you use, and pour 8 oz. of RidX down the commode two or three times a year. 

    And no fee‘s to anyone. 

    Unless you live in California, where the state has imposed a septic system fee, as well as nationalizing water wells.

  4. EdH says:

    It is weird getting up at 5:30am and having it still be dark out…

    Surprises me every year.

  5. Nick Flandrey says:

    @ITGuy, yeah, I know where the pipes are now, and they aren’t buried deep.   I could  re-install what was there originally and get the kitchen and washer off the tanks or diverted to another tank.   I can’t get to the showers or bath sinks as they are under the slab and all exit in the same 4″ pipe.

    Today at some point septic guy (really a great guy, hard and smart worker, and deserves a better alias than “septic guy”) will pop the top on the second -previously unknown- tank, pump it, an fill it in.   He’s concentrating on the drip line grid first though.   He’d like to get inspected and approved before the end of the day.   He can clean up a few details after that.   And I’m comfortable that he will as he has the 2 year service agreement that is mandatory for aerobic systems.    He doesn’t want to come back out to solve problems.

    73F and slight overcast today.   Sun looks like it is going to break thru soon.

    Coffee is ready and I’m running late.

    n

  6. Ray Thompson says:

    deserves a better alias than “septic guy”

    Turd Resolution Specialist? Nah, probably worse.

    Effluent Discharge Expert? Yep, probably better.

    And no fee‘s to anyone.

    Indeed. My average water bill is about $100.00 a month. $30.00 is water, $70.00 is sewer. Water that is discharged from the treatment plant must be potable. That is expensive. For a small town with 1,500 users it is really expensive per individual. State provides some help but not much. Town had to spring for a multi-million dollar upgrade a few years back paid with a bond that is still being paid.

    When I fill my pool I must beg the water board to adjust my sewer as what I filled my pool with never went down the sewer system. That bill to fill the pool will be about $600.00, $200.00 for water (which I have no problem paying), $450.00 for sewer (which is theft in my opinion). I am facing that hurdle this spring when I have the pool resurfaced. I don’t refill unless absolutely necessary. I have only done that four times in 34 years.

  7. EdH says:

    Effluent Discharge Engineer.

    I actually have seen sanitation engineer used.

    Mockery of titles aside, I have worked with people in the field, mostly hard-working guys that perform a vital function.

  8. Ray Thompson says:

    mostly hard-working guys that perform a vital function.

    Make a lot more money than a person with a master’s degree in Egyptian History. Certainly much more useful. Probably not nearly as much in debt. Doesn’t whine at the slightest provocation.

    3
  9. EdH says:

    @Ray: Can you fill from a hydrant, and not your house supply? 

    Some pool companies will have a meter put on, and charge you a fee for that supply separately. Same water, different billing…

  10. Ray Thompson says:

    Can you fill from a hydrant, and not your house supply?

    Nope, city will not allow that to happen. Tried that the first year I was here after fixing problems in the pool. Hydrants are strictly fire use only. The premise is that a fire may happen while I am using the hydrant and it would affect water pressure. The fact the city has not used a hydrant to extinguish a fire in at least five years is not relevant.

    I have contacted water delivery companies but their charges exceed what the city charges, including sewer, for delivering 25,000 gallons of water. It would take several truck loads.

    Another option is run a hose at night from the outside faucet on the church next door. I could hook up about 10:00 PM and disconnect about 6:00 AM. Would take about three nights. I don’t think the church would be happy.

    3
  11. drwilliams says:

    @Ray Thompson

    ”I don’t refill unless absolutely necessary. I have only done that four times in 34 years.”

    Do you test your TDS (total dissolved solids)?

  12. Greg Norton says:

    Another option is run a hose at night from the outside faucet on the church next door. I could hook up about 10:00 PM and disconnect about 6:00 AM. Would take about three nights. I don’t think the church would be happy.

    The Bat Guano neighbors in Florida did that to me when we left Florida with the house still unsold. 20,000 gallons tacked on to my water bill with sewer charges. Our Realtwhore was a moron and didn’t check the house enough.

    The joke is going to be on them, however, since the only faucet I had outside without a numbered seal was a mistake plumbing job where the line was connected to the output of the water softener.

    I’m sure they found out after about a year when the new high tech liner they installed started flaking, around they time they had to make a short sale which I think they are still paying off a decade later.

    Test the church’s water if you go that route. The new high tech liners don’t like soft water.

    The most durable liners which are still around are low tech and have asbestos in the mix. The Edison House in Fort Myers has the textbook example, still the original liner Tom spec-ed and had installed in the pool 100+ years ago.

  13. EdH says:

    @Ray: My sympathies, sounds like the fix is in.

    OTOH, small town politics can sometimes be used to ones advantage. 

    Someone I know had a problem with people speeding down the long suburban street in front of his house. He complained to the road department for years without getting anywhere. 

    Finally during one election season he walked into the re-election center for an incumbent city council member, talked to him personally and mentioned oh-by-the-way that his neighborhood had an issue, and donated $50 to the reelection fund. The very next day there was a work crew out putting in a four-way stop, signs, striping, the whole ball of wax.

  14. EdH says:

    Who knew that ‘free spirits’ were so good at queuing?

    https://dailytimewaster.blogspot.com/2022/09/the-anti-open-road-traffic-jam-of.html

  15. Jenny says:

    @nick

    I am in awe at the progress you are making at the new place. My shoulders and hands can imagine breaking up that concrete. Yikes! What a beast of a job. You’ve handled the twists and gotchas well. Your contractors seem to be diligent and hard working. Phew. 

    It has been good, and educational, reading your efforts. 
     

    What a lot of work.

    4
  16. lynn says:

    From SRW at the Fort Bend Journal:

    Overheard at the pharmacist: “Sometimes you gotta let God fix it, because if you fix it, you’re going to jail.”
     

    2
  17. lynn says:

    Helped the septic guy trench for the kitchen drain, then he got everything on the uphill side backfilled and graded.   There is obviously a septic tank in my front yard, but some plants will screen it eventually.   Meanwhile he moved on to the drip line, and we both laid out the pattern.    He’s hoping to finish the install today, with possible cleanup on Sat.

    At my house subdivision, everyone has a septic tank, all 450+ homes.  We just ignore the looks of the two to four 24 inch (0.61 meter) manholes sticking up from our side yards.  You really want to know where they are when you have a problem.  And you know when you have a problem by the piercing alarm or the black water backing up into your home.

    1
  18. lynn says:

    All I can say is, thank deity  I am on a city sewer system. You guys mess with poo way too much for my comfort! 

    Nick, on a serious note, have you thought about adding in the option to hook all the grey water into a pipe that doesn’t drain into the septic tank? Not to actually have it hooked up, but there in case the need arises (such as the place actually becomes a bug out pad)? 

    Sewer treatment facilities and piping are very high maintenance.  In the event of a societal downfall, they will be one of the first systems to fail.  Along with pressurized clean potable water in the other pipeline going to your house.  You would be surprised how quickly it backs up.  Our previous house had a 30+ (10 meter) foot deep 12 foot (4 meter) wide cistern for our neighborhood of 200+ houses behind our backyard.  When the 10+ hp lift pump tripped every 3 or 4 months (usually storm related) it would fill up quickly in 2 or 3 hours and start screaming like a banshee.  But it did not call anyone, they relied on me to call them.

    Nick’s BOL is on a lake.  It would be better to put in a chlorination system and a RO system for that water, it is probably way cleaner.

  19. lynn says:

    Performed a test of the 38 kw liquid cooled Generac at the house this morning.  Started right up and full power in less than 10 seconds.  Mission accomplished.

    4
  20. JimB says:

    And no fee‘s to anyone. Unless you live in California, where the state has imposed a septic system fee, as well as nationalizing water wells.

    I must live in a different California. No septic system fee for me, other than the original installation in 1978. Is this on your property tax bill?

  21. lynn says:

    “Richard Stallman Announces C Reference” 

       https://www.i-programmer.info/news/184-cc/15705-richard-stallman-announces-c-reference.html 

    “Richard Stallman (RMS) is a controversial figure – you either like or dislike him – but you have to assume he knows his C. So an announcement that he has a book on the subject is interesting.” 

    “As you might guess, being the founder of the Free Software Foundation, Stallman’s book is free to download, but at this stage you will have to do some work if you want to read it and it seems to be still in beta. The text contains requests for comments.” 

    I did not know that RS wrote the first gcc compiler.

  22. lynn says:

    “Janet Yellen Says Biden’s ‘Inflation Reduction Act’ Will Rid Us of Oil and Gas (VIDEO)”

        https://www.thegatewaypundit.com/2022/09/janet-yellen-says-bidens-inflation-reduction-act-will-rid-us-oil-gas-video/

    “Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen on Thursday admitted that Joe Biden’s ‘Inflation Reduction Act’ is actually the Green New Deal repackaged.  Yellen said Biden’s Marxist spending bill will “rid ourselves” of oil and gas.  “The Inflation Reduction Act will put us on our way toward a future where we depend on the wind, the sun and other clean sources of energy. We will rid ourselves from our dependence on fossil fuels,” Yellen said.””

    “Meanwhile California’s grid operator is telling utilities to prepare for rotating power outages.”

    Get lots of batteries is all I can say.  Renewables don’t work during hard freezes and really hot summers when the wind does not blow.

    3
  23. drwilliams says:

    @Greg

    The joke is going to be on them, however, since the only faucet I had outside without a numbered seal was a mistake plumbing job where the line was connected to the output of the water softener.

    I’m sure they found out after about a year when the new high tech liner they installed started flaking,

    I suspect that filling the pool outstripped the ability of the water softener to regenerate. At best they got partially softened water. Depending on how much salt was left when you moved, it might not have been very soft at all.

    Newer exposed aggregate finishes are actually much more resistant than plain white plaster (aka Marcite) to low TDS water, because the surface that flakes off  (the calcium hydroxide rich cream layer that is troweled up during the finishing process) is minimal on a hard-troweled surface, and what is present is 90% removed when the aggregate is exposed.

  24. Greg Norton says:

    I did not know that RS wrote the first gcc compiler.

    And Emacs before that.

    GCC was huge to have in the late 90s as the vendor compilers stagnated but application performance demands kept escalating. I once had a retired Sun engineer estimate that we paid a 40% speed penalty by continuing to compile our binaries with their compiler. OTOH, Sun had an STL license.

    Fortunately, SGI’s bankruptcy resolved the licensing problems with STL once HP bought up what was left and made it free as in beer and speech.

    Of course, GCC was key to building Linux, and Linus Torvalds has kept them honest over the years, famously commenting on one release:

    “Ok, so I’m looking at the code generation and your compiler is pure and utter *shit*. For chrissake, that compiler shouldn’t have been allowed to graduate from kindergarten. We’re talking sloth that was ‘dropped on the head as a baby’ level retardation levels here.”

    I still don’t know how he gets along living in Oregon — in Dunwoody, a serious money Portland suburb — unless he never leaves the house.

  25. Greg Norton says:

    I suspect that filling the pool outstripped the ability of the water softener to regenerate. At best they got partially softened water. Depending on how much salt was left when you moved, it might not have been very soft at all.

    Ah, well, I’m guessing that their short sale required them to eat ~$250k at a minimum after I sold at market price at the end of 2010. They put a lot of improvements into the house, including a reported $60k rewiring to support charging what was then a custom conversion Prius to “plug in” hybrid. 

    I’ll live with the $300 water bill.

    According to neighborhood legend, the wife ran the snake torture at Gitmo on the payroll of {big Government contractor which probably doesn’t have “torture” listed on their mission statement]. Dealing with her, there were days I was surprised I didn’t wake up in a bare concrete room, handcuffed to a chair, with a bag containing a corn snake tied over my head.

    2
  26. Ray Thompson says:

    Do you test your TDS (total dissolved solids)?

    Pool company tests once a month when I bring in a water sample. I add what they tell me to add.

  27. drwilliams says:

    @Ray Thompson

    Check with the company resurfacing the pool and see if they have any recommendations for water. I’ve seen pools filled from trucks in areas where the water pressure was low, and I’ve seen good pool water saved and reused by temporarily pumping it into bladders.

    With a properly well-run water utility, pool owners should not have to beg for sewer fees to be waived for filling a pool.

    As a long-time pool owner, you already know most of this:

    Conventional plaster will jump the TDS considerably in the few couple of months as the plaster cures. Exposed aggregate finishes are formulated and troweled differently, and the exposure process takes place with most of the particulates pumped out before the pool is filled.

    Make sure the contract lays out how the start-up will done. It should specify continuous, uninterrupted fill to prevent “bathtub ring” lines forming. A sequestering agent should be added at the beginning, perhaps by simply leaving an open  quart bottle on the drain cover to tip in an mix when the water level floats it off.

    If conventional plaster it needs to be brushed twice a day minimum, three times is better. Brushing removes the “plaster dust” that appears on the surface as the cement cures, and produces a better final product. Full upper-body workout best left to young pool techs. Exposed aggregate can probably get by with one brushing a day, depending. A “combi-brush” with polypropylene and stainless steel bristles is more aggressive but can be used safely on exposed aggregates. 

    The chemical process of balancing the pool takes place over the first 30-days, during which the chemistry is not well-behaved. A good pool tech knows what to expect. Do not swim the pool until you are told it is pH balanced and has the proper level of chlorine and sanitizer. Target pH for exposed aggregate pools is typically a bit lower, particularly if TDS is high.

  28. Greg Norton says:

    Pool company tests once a month when I bring in a water sample. I add what they tell me to add.

    Do you cover the pool in the Winter? How well does that work out in TN?

    When we lived across from Portland, in the Winter, the family who owned the estate at the point where 205 crossed the river northbound, entering WA State, kept their pool heated and uncovered, visibly steaming all through the cold/dreary months … in other words, most of the year.

    My guess is that the point was to make a statement about their money. Someone told me the family founded one of the large banks in Vantucky.

    We were paying attention to living potential as we traversed TN. Chattanooga has a huge VA outpatient clinic, but that place struck us as a really small town, not much changed from when I rolled through there twice in 2010. Memphis is out, and we only saw the Opryland area, a bit of Downtown, and a really sad Target in Nashville.

  29. drwilliams says:

    Potential for a nation-wide railway strike creeps closer

    https://hotair.com/tree-hugging-sister/2022/09/09/potential-for-a-nation-wide-railway-strike-creeps-closer-n495407

    Last weekend to take inventory and make prudent buying decisions.

    1
  30. Denis says:

    …deserves a better alias than “septic guy”…

    Antiseptic guy? 🙂

    Glad to hear of so much progress!

    I have replaced the ad-hoc wifi network of cheap and cheerful Wavlink access points at our BOL with a proper WiFi Mesh system: an Asus RT-AX88U router, plus a pair of Asus ZenWiFi AX (XT8) routers acting as nodes in the mesh.

    Many thanks to Greg Norton and Ray Thompson, who kindly reported back in July on their satisfaction with similar Asus setups. I am suitably impressed with this Asus gear – it is clearly quality stuff – it’s not cheap, but then quality rarely is. It reminds me very much of the first time I got a beautiful piano-black Asus PC case – on RBT’s recommendation – instead of the then ubiquitous cheap and nasty beige boxes.

    The network install took me a couple of hours, working slowly, a good part of which was spent tracking down with a tracer which RJ45 wall socket corresponded to which port number on the patch panel in the basement. That was one of those “round tuit” jobs that got neglected after the renovation works were complete.

    I patched the phone company’s VDSL modem to the WAN port of the Asus router, then ran a line from one of the router’s LAN ports back to the whole-house 24-port switch, so anything patched into the switch will see the router and not the modem. I could then disable wifi on the modem via its GUI, including disabling the phone company’s “public” node.

    Other than spending a while head-scratching about how to launch a PPPoE session on the new router,  the setup was quite manageable. I did need to change the phone company’s password for our internet connection via their website. That took a bit of digging on the telco’s user forums to figure out – they do have a FAQ entry on how to install your own router instead of theirs, but it is so laconic as to not be much use. I also had to use the Asus router’s Quick Internet Setup (QIS) wizard to tell it to run in PPPoE mode and to input the new password for the connection, which took some digging in the Asus FAQs to discover.

    I didn’t use the Asus app for the setup, as my smartypants phone is in having the USB-C charging port replaced, but hooking the new gear directly to a lone laptop and accessing the setup GUIs from that worked fine to upload the latest firmware and then to get the whole mesh network working in a dress rehearsal on the kitchen table. Afterwards, I just carried the constituent units to their proper places around the house – the router in the living room, and one Zen unit on each floor above – and plugged them in to network and power.

    I am impressed with the ASUS equipment, so much so that I ordered an identical kit to go in our principal residence. The GUI of the router is packed with features, but is nevertheless easy to understand and configure. Had I not needed to allocate the telco’s connection a new password, the Asus setup wizard would have been sufficient to get the mesh up, online, and running with very little intervention on my part.

    The flaky connectivity problems have gone away – they did so already when I ditched the Wavlink units – and we have solid wired and wireless connectivity throughout the house, with Google Speed Test reporting 56.5 Mbps download and 4.55 Mbps upload speeds, which is pretty good, considering we are still on a “last mile” of old copper cable and we have the “basic” package from the telco.

  31. drwilliams says:

    When we lived across from Portland, in the Winter, the family who owned the estate at the point where 205 crossed the river northbound, entering WA State, kept their pool heated and uncovered, visibly steaming all through the cold/dreary months … in other words, most of the year.

    If evaporation outstrips precipitation, TDS goes up. When you have too much, the only option is removing some water and replacing it with lower TDS water.

    My guess is that the point was to make a statement about their money. Someone told me the family founded one of the large banks in Vantucky.

    A friend of mine developed and patented a pool cover with living grass. No reason it couldn’t have been a tennis court, if they wanted a statement. 

  32. drwilliams says:

    New UK appointee has the right idea for oil and gas, but it may be too late:

    https://wattsupwiththat.com/2022/09/08/british-climate-divergence-jacob-rees-mogg-appointed-energy-minister-as-charles-is-crowned-king/

  33. drwilliams says:

    Are Pakistan’s Floods Your Fault and You Should Pay?

    https://wattsupwiththat.com/2022/09/07/are-pakistans-floods-your-fault-and-you-should-pay/

    Whoops! Spent that money looking for Bin Laden. Tapped out. Learn to float.

    1
  34. Lynn says:

    When I fill my pool I must beg the water board to adjust my sewer as what I filled my pool with never went down the sewer system. That bill to fill the pool will be about $600.00, $200.00 for water (which I have no problem paying), $450.00 for sewer (which is theft in my opinion). I am facing that hurdle this spring when I have the pool resurfaced. I don’t refill unless absolutely necessary. I have only done that four times in 34 years.

    When you dump the pool water, where are you going to put it ?

  35. Ray Thompson says:

    Do you cover the pool in the Winter? How well does that work out in TN?

    Every year. Seems to work well. Water is clear when the cover is removed in the spring. Diving board is also put up for the winter. Lasts much longer. Typical fiberglass encapsulated wood.

  36. Lynn says:

    Over The Hedge: Lawn Darts

        https://www.gocomics.com/overthehedge/2022/09/09

    Ah, a game only for those in suits of armor.

  37. Ray Thompson says:

    When you dump the pool water, where are you going to put it ?

    Most of the water will have drained due to the leak. What remains will be pumped to the sewer. On year I siphoned out to my property. I was informed by the city that pool water is considered hazardous waste and must be pumped to the sanitary sewer. That was probably 15 years ago, the last time I drained the pool.

  38. Lynn says:

    “California planned to close down its last nuclear plant by 2025. What went wrong?”

        https://www.utilitydive.com/news/california-planned-to-close-down-its-last-nuclear-plant-by-2025-what-went/631264/

    “Efforts to replace the Diablo Canyon nuclear plant faced multiple challenges, including disruptions to global supply chains.”

    Oh, those crazy Californians.  They are suddenly realizing that megawatts do not grow magically on trees.  And, their power usage is growing due to electric cars and such.  Why do these people try to treat everything as a zero sum game ?

  39. Lynn says:

    Potential for a nation-wide railway strike creeps closer

    https://hotair.com/tree-hugging-sister/2022/09/09/potential-for-a-nation-wide-railway-strike-creeps-closer-n495407

    Last weekend to take inventory and make prudent buying decisions.

    There are not enough trucks or truck drivers to move the rail bound containers, according to the report, with an additional 467,000 long-haul trucks per day needed to handle the freight.”

    Everyone I know in the trucking business has retired including my wife’s cousins.  They are not going back to work for anything. The crappy diesel engine emissions that killed the engines before 100,000 miles were the last straw. Paying for a $35,000 full diesel engine rebuild every year killed their profit margin.

    2
  40. EdH says:

    @JimB:  Yes, a line item on the property tax bill from the county, but mandated by the state I believe, started a couple of years ago.

  41. Lynn says:

    “Apple’s iPhone Satellite Connectivity Might Run Into Starlink’s Mobile Push”

        https://www.pcmag.com/news/apples-iphone-satellite-connectivity-might-run-into-starlinks-mobile-push

    “Apple is tapping Globalstar to power its satellite-based Emergency SOS feature. But SpaceX wants to use the same radio spectrum for its own mobile-satellite service.”

    Uh oh, the elephants are dancing.  Don’t get stepped on.

    1
  42. Kenneth C Mitchell says:

    Apple’s iPhone Satellite Connectivity

    I’d read that Apple’s tracking devices were going to utilize Starlink, and that T-Mobile has also announced a Starlink partnership. It may be that they’ll all end up working together. 

  43. Jenny says:

    Milled and pressed 8 gallons of apples this morning. Specific gravity of 1.050, potential alcohol about 7%. 
    made two gallons of cider. 
     

    Next up – hard cider!

  44. Greg Norton says:

    Potential for a nation-wide railway strike creeps closer

    There are not enough trucks or truck drivers to move the rail bound containers, according to the report, with an additional 467,000 long-haul trucks per day needed to handle the freight.”

    What convenient timing. I smell a rat … or, more specifically, a Gecko.

    I just can’t wrap my head around what the play would be for Buffett to allow a strike to happen other than creating a lot of chaos heading into the midterms, but I think that would backfire more on the Dems and Darth Biden.

    Maybe a clue is in the last BRK.B Shareholder Letter, but I don’t remember seeing as much about the railroads as when Obama cancelled the pipeline and then Biden reversed Trump.

    Buffett likes to gloat in his own folksy way.

  45. paul says:

    My health insurance that I’ve never used, ever, beyond one visit to the Dr for a general inspection about when I was 52 and had Blue Cross Blue Shield from my job at HEB, has been on The Marketplace for the last few years.

    I paid quite a bit over $200 a month for a few years for a worthless plan.  Hey, a six grand deductible before it pays anything?  Then stuff changed with the subsidies and I had a plan for “free” but with an eight grand deductible.  But on a different hospital chain.  Shrug.  Never used any of that, either. 

    I don’t have a working chainsaw either.  I always run them out of gas and while the McCulloch has an excuse because it’s almost 30 years old and on its second chain bar, the other two just won’t run.   But you never know if you might loose a leg with chainsaws.

    Yeah, have a bad day with a chainsaw and the deductible is cool. 

    Come to think about it, HEB was deducting about $75 a week for health insurance and /everything/ had a co-pay.

    So.  Need to cancel the Marketplace stuff because Medicare is kicking in.  Ok.  Clickity click and done.  The options were to cancel everything or cancel just dental.

    I’ve been paying for the dental on my on.  No Gov subsidy involved.

    The dental folks sent an e-mail.  I replied that I don’t want to cancel but the Marketplace doesn’t have the option to keep dental.

    And after giving them my account number and such, it’s cool.  I still have my dental.  

    It’s not a big deal as things go.  But I don’t have to re-start the clock on when they will pay for more than teeth cleaning and general inspections.  

  46. paul says:

    So, I’m wondering… if, going by various crap I see on twitter, the Queen was such a horrible white supremacist racist hater and colonizer of colored folks, said colored folks being anyone from say Kenya or Jamaica or South Africa…. 

    If she was SO EVIL that you start talking trash before her body is cold?  Why are you in London or anywhere on the island?  And not in your beloved African country up-lifting your fellow countrymen?  

    Better welfare in London than say, Nigeria? 

    Just wondering. 

  47. EdH says:

    “…made two gallons of cider. “

    So the party is  at your place, this November 18th, Apple Cider Day?

    Hmmm…is the AlCan Highway open that late?

  48. EdH says:

    Apple’s iPhone Satellite Connectivity

    I gave a friend’s son the little Garmin inReach  Mini 2 for his birthday a while back, since he is an active outdoorsman (and drives a vintage Bronco … not knockin, ‘jes saying…). 

    But it’s two way.  

    You can get a one-way device for a lot less than 10 Benjamins.

  49. Geoff Powell says:

    @paul:

    Better welfare in London than say, Nigeria? 

    Very probably. Add to that the fact that we, as a nationality, are tolerant of other opinions. In general – there will always be a small minority who kick up a rumpus, making noise out of all proportion to their numbers. 

    The haters you describe are holders of extreme opinions – rabid republicans (Note: small r) or rabid anti-slavery nuts, for example.

    Our police force (with the possible exception of the Metropolitan Police (London cops)) are also not given to breaking heads at the slightest provocation. Also our plod is routinely unarmed. Our equivalent of your SWAT is much more highly trained, and  none of them have “qualified immunity”, so they can be, and are, put on trial for excessive use of force. There have been a number of cases of qualified firearms officers being tried for manslaughter after a hot “use of firearms” bust

    Of course, I have to enter a caveat – this is all from the viewpoint of an elderly white man. The view may very well be different through the eyes of a person of colour.

    G.

  50. drwilliams says:

    @Ray Thompson

    I was informed by the city that pool water is considered hazardous waste and must be pumped to the sanitary sewer. That was probably 15 years ago, the last time I drained the pool.

    In general, pool water is not hazardous waste. 

    The main concern is chlorine. Stop chlorination for 1-2 weeks before discharge and test. Residual should be less than 0.1. If time restrictions apply, a fountain would be my first choice (1-2 days) or thiosulfate  in a pinch (1-2 hours).

    Limitations on discharge of pool water vary, but are mainly concerned with the chlorine. In some areas there is a limit on changing the temperature if the water flows into a stream. Ground erosion concerns may limit discharge rate, In dry environments there may be water preservation standards that require the water to go to storm sewer so it is captured.

    Water used to backwash pool filters, to expose aggregates during installation or wash pools that are out of service should be handled according to local ordinance. 

    If you have a need to drain a pool and get a song and dance about hazardous waste, ask for the pertinent regulation. I suppose a local government might be daft enough to try such, but they would have no authority to cite, and it would be counter to state regulations and unsupported by APSP (formerly NSPI) or other pool organizations.

    I mean, really, some local government is going to claim that water in swimming pools is hazardous waste? So people going to properly maintained public swimming pools have potential tort claims? Jump the fence when your neighbor is away, take a swim in their pool and then sue them for hazardous waste exposure?

  51. Geoff Powell says:

    I will also add that Her late Majesty presided over the most extensive decolonisation ever. This started under her father, George VI, with Indian Independence in 1947, and the attendant Partition, in an attempt to keep the Hindus and Muslims apart.

    One of the “bad” examples I’ve seen mentioned is the Mau-Mau uprising in Kenya in the 50’s. But what were we to do? Again, this was a very violent minority. Should we have left them alone, and “let God sort them out”? It was a case of “damned if you do, damned if you don’t”. I believe that the greater good was to try to stop the violence.

    Another example is the Troubles in Northern Ireland. Again, a violent minority attempting to impose their will on others.

    All-in-all, she did well, I think. As, I believe, do a majority of British citizens. But not for nothing is it called the silent majority.

    G.

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  52. Geoff Powell says:

    @EdH:

    You can get a one-way device for a lot less than 10 Benjamins.

    But that would mean carrying, and using, 2 devices (shock, horror!). It wouldn’t be a problem for me, because I already carry, and use, multiple devices.

    G.

  53. drwilliams says:

    Potential for a nation-wide railway strike creeps closer

    Meanwhile, Pete Bootyjoos and his partner are very excited about the latest strap-on gear that allows them to simulate breast feeding.

    “I know a lot about strap-ons, and this one is awesome, ” the ex-mayor was overheard to say.

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  54. EdH says:

    @Geoff:   

    But that would mean carrying, and using, 2 devices (shock, horror!).

    True.  In the end, as the smartphone showed, ease and convenience trumps almost everything else.

    Personally I am a belt and suspenders guy, but most people aren’t.

  55. Alan says:

    >> And you know when you have a problem by the piercing alarm or the black water backing up into your home.

    Are whole house sewer shutoff valves feasible/allowable on septic systems? I’ve seen them on houses connected to city sewers.

  56. Rick H says:

    @nick (and all you others that work outside in the heat) – how about a ‘neck cooler’?

    It might not be the most fashionable device, but this bladeless wearable neck fan offers up to nine hours of cooling power from two turbo motors and 60 dedicated air outlets. Your friends may think you look silly, but you’ll get the last laugh this summer when everyone else is drenched in sweat. 

    On Big River, of course. On sale at $35, regular price $49. Get it here.  USB-C charging, battery lasts 3.5-9 hours. Weighs under 15 oz.  Positive reviews.

    There is a knock-off version, but it seems a bit bulkier. And has blades (the above one is ‘bladeless’).

  57. EdH says:

    @Rick: Hah! Will it recharge airpods? Can I control it with a $1,600 iphone?

    I am particular. 

  58. drwilliams says:

    Like to see this one in a caption contest:

    https://ace.mu.nu/archives/sandwichforskippy.jpg

  59. drwilliams says:

    Oh, So Here’s the ‘White Supremacist’ Accused of Vandalizing a Gay Pride Crosswalk With Swastikas

    https://townhall.com/tipsheet/miacathell/2022/09/09/white-supremacist-vandalism-atlanta-rainbow-crosswalk-swastikas-n2612642

    I have it on good authority that his man’s disguise was developed by one of Ralph Northam’s sorority theys.

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  60. drwilliams says:

    Secretary of Energy Jen Granholm:

    “The nation’s grid has got to be ready. We have to basically double the size of the nation’s electric grid with clean energy.”

    https://hotair.com/tree-hugging-sister/2022/09/09/biden-cabinet-officials-derps-of-a-feather-n495444

    189/20 = 9.45

    No plan for increasing the world output of copper by 9.45 times as only one of many bottlenecks to this greenie fantasy.

    How about a plan to double the electrical infrastructure in a medium-sized blue shiitehole? They can leave the big ones for later but how about a proof of concept in, say Denver or Seattle?

  61. Nick Flandrey says:

    Home for the weekend.  Wife and D1 are feeling poorly, so aren’t going to GS Sailing weekend after all .  If it weren’t for non-prepping hobby meeting tomorrow, I could have stayed at the lake and worked.

    I’m probably going back up Monday to get sign off on the septic.   I’ll do some work then.

    Spent the morning working on the gas line to the kitchen.  Went into town to buy some gas pipe and fittings.   Ended up with stuff that will work, but not exactly what I wanted.    The store was an Ace hardware, wasn’t huge, and had a lot of empty spaces and single items on hooks where there should have been multiples.  Generally Ace seems to have more ‘housewares’ type items, and cheapo ones at that, but they do carry hardware specific to the region (like a particular window component that every builder in the area used).  They try to have a bit of everything, but you’d want to order anything you needed more  than a handful of.

    Dripline is installed, and the system is running.  Should get at least 2-3 years without any real maintenance, although there is a particle filter on the drip line that should be checked every month if the system is getting daily use.   The filter is cleanable with a water spray.  The inspector signed off on the dripline install with a video and facetime.    There are still a couple of details to finish, and the inspector wants the “licensed sanitarian”* who did the design to update his drawings to account for site conditions. 

    I’m sore.  Hands are moving, but the left grip is still weak.  Couldn’t hold a coffee mug this morning.  Definitely over did it, at least wrt my hand strength.

    I ran late and ran out of the house leaving it ‘in a state’.   I pretty much have to go back  and finish cleaning up before my wife sees it 🙂

    I was also please to see that gas was back under $3/gallon in town.   Demand must be down, or they are adding lots more corn juice…

    n

  62. drwilliams says:

    The Triumph of Will the Modern Party of Science:

    Biden’s New Deputy Coordinator on Monkeypox… Literally Wrote the Article Instructing Health Professionals To Lie About How Monkeypox Is Really Spread, and By Whom, In Order to Spare Gays “Stigma”

    https://ace.mu.nu/

    Yeah, that’s the butch leather (don’t worry: vegetable-dyed) freak in the SS cap (sans ornamentation) shilling for NastyPig:

    https://www.facebook.com/18560068537/posts/nasty-pig-heroesdr-demetre-daskalakisdemetre-is-an-infectious-disease-doctor-who/10158815369628538/

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  63. drwilliams says:

    @Nick

    I’m sore.  Hands are moving, but the left grip is still weak.

    Is MSM (methylsulfonylmethane) in your daily regimen?

  64. Nick Flandrey says:

    Is MSM (methylsulfonylmethane) in your daily regimen?

    that is one, along with shark cartilige, that I’ve never tried.   I do take chondroitin and glucosamine.

    n

  65. Lynn says:

    “Local BlackLivesMatter Chapters Sue BLM Leaders, Saying They Stole Millions”

        https://ktrh.iheart.com/featured/michael-berry/content/2022-09-09-local-blacklivesmatter-chapters-sue-blm-leaders-saying-they-stole-millions/

    I was wondering when this was going to happen.

  66. Nick Flandrey says:

    Not sudden jhihadi syndrome apparently…

    https://www.thegatewaypundit.com/2022/09/horror-woman-beheaded-sword-front-onlookers-california/ 

    n

    Restraining order.   Back it up with some firepower.

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  67. Greg Norton says:

    Yeah, that’s the butch leather (don’t worry: vegetable-dyed) freak in the SS cap (sans ornamentation) shilling for NastyPig:

    High IQs and kinks go together. I’ve learned that the best you can hope for is that no one you work with directly is into anything that could get them arrested.

  68. Greg Norton says:

    “Local BlackLivesMatter Chapters Sue BLM Leaders, Saying They Stole Millions”

    I was wondering when this was going to happen.

    Local guys didn’t get their cut. Rackets never change. Everyone wants to “wet their beak”.

    Of course, I’m sure that will phrase be construed as racist.

  69. lynn says:

    “Green Champion Switzerland: Jail Time If you Heat Your Home Above 19C / 66F”

        https://wattsupwiththat.com/2022/09/08/green-champion-switzerland-jail-time-if-you-heat-your-home-above-19c-66f/

    Get warm, go to jail !

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