Mon. Sept. 5, 2022 – Labor Day in the US

By on September 5th, 2022 in culture, decline and fall, lakehouse, personal

Hot and humid.  Well, maybe just humid for a while.  It got downright chilly last night.   A front moved by, with horizontal lightning and spatters of rain, in the evening and temps got down to 74F.   That felt pretty chilly with the high humidity.  Today might be hot, or could be moderate.

Septic guy is supposed to be here today to start.  Don’t know what that means, exactly, but maybe the wife and kids are headed home early.   Maybe not…   I’m here for the next few days at least.   Tank arrives Wed.  Could be he installs the drip field and the lines down to it.   That will be a lot of work and isn’t dependent on any other thing being in place.

Yesterday my wife painted all day and I worked on plumbing and electrical.   Found time to do a couple small things too.   DIDN’T get up in the attic to run the gas line.   I guess I’ll do that today.  One of the first things that will happen when the digging starts is turning off the LP gas, and pulling up the existing line to the house.   I’ll be cooking on coleman until I get the new gas in place.

It’s a weird feeling to be getting stuff done.  Good, but somewhat odd.   It seemed like the stuff was all in the future, but now the future is here.  Maybe it’s because if the future can arrive for my construction jobs, the future can arrive for the bad things too.  Dunno, but it does feel weird.

I’m stacking up the work!   Stack something yourself.

nick

50 Comments and discussion on "Mon. Sept. 5, 2022 – Labor Day in the US"

  1. Greg Norton says:

    “The wealthy will buy expensive electric cars that will be charged with pricey, intermittent, weather-dependent wind and solar power. Middle classes will see their jobs and living standards plunge further.”

    We’ve got a bunch of people in government who think that they are dictators.

    The bigger problem is that people voting for the mess don’t believe that they will lose their cars. 

    Most of the population can’t afford the vehicles they are driving now.

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  2. nick flandrey says:

    Wow, 68F with dew on the ground.  Sun is up in patchy  blue skies…

    Septic guy hasn’t arrived yet, but I’m up, coffee started.    I’ll put on some work clothes in a few minutes.  Don’t know what he wants to start with but the drip field, and the pipes to get down to it would be a logical place.  So would establishing finished grade where the tanks go before digging for the tanks.   I could make arguments either way, but my money is on drip field pipes…

    n

  3. drwilliams says:

    Aye, coffee is a good start.

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  4. drwilliams says:

    more details from yesterday:

    At least 10 people are dead and 15 more have been hospitalized after two men went on a stabbing spree across Saskatchewan, Canada on Sunday, cops said as they searched for the killers. 

    Two suspects — identified by Canadian police as Damien Sanderson, 31, and Myles Sanderson, 30 — remain at large and were last seen traveling in the Regina area in a black Nissan Rogue, according to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP).

    https://nypost.com/2022/09/04/10-dead-15-injured-in-canada-stabbing-spree-2-suspects-at-large/

    Canadian government has taken all the guns away. Then this happens. They just have to redouble their efforts. Knife control. And that Nissan Rogue is undoubtedly and ICE. Nothing in the Canadian constitution about the right to knives or ICE’s. zprobably just take out a copy of the standard legislation, cross out “machine guns” and Buble’s your uncle.

    I doubt steak knives will survive. Why do they need steak, anyway?

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  5. nick flandrey says:

    Daily Mail said possibly drug related…

    n

    No septic guy yet.   I think he might have forgotten that today is a holiday.

    Fished for 45 min.   Didn’t catch anything.   Lots of turtles sunning themselves and the minnows are feeding on something … 

    n

  6. Geoff Powell says:

    Well, we have a new Prime Minister – the former Foreign Secretary, Liz Truss. She was elected by majority vote of the members of her political party, the Conservative and Unionists. The electorate at large had no say in the matter, due to the fact that in our system, the leader of the majority party in the House of Commons is the Prime Minister. Replacement of the Party leader is not justification for a General Election.

    Boris Johnson, the outgoing PM, will (in a departure from tradition) travel to the Queen’s Scottish residence at Balmoral, together with his replacement, for the formal handover, where Liz Truss will be “asked to form a Government”, as the official language has it. Doing this at Balmoral is needed, because H.M. is increasingly unable to travel to where her Royal duties require her to be. Well, H.M. is 95, so this is unsurprising. She considers it her duty to continue to do as many of the duties of State as she can, and is likely to continue to do so until her death, after which the task will devolve upon her eldest son, Prince Charles, Prince of Wales.

    The change will likely involve different policies, Liz Truss has already intimated that she will seriously consider energy price freezes, for example. We shall have to see what else she decides to do.

    G.

  7. Greg Norton says:

    The change will likely involve different policies, Liz Truss has already intimated that she will seriously consider energy price freezes, for example. We shall have to see what else she decides to do.

    Good luck with that. OPEC announced production cuts this morning. That combined with the G7 announcement on Friday about setting a price cap on Russian oil will mean an ugly Winter is coming for Europe.

    It didn’t have to be this way.

  8. EdH says:

    re: Anker build quality. 

    The multiplexing 7 USB-A data port + 2 charge-only ports that I bought in December of 2013 has already suffered 2 data port failures. 

    This is one every 4.5 years. 

    At this rate by mid-2044 it will failed completely, unacceptable!

    I shall add a note to my trust documents that the trustees should ask Anker for a replacement then, or, if USB-A is no longer used, an upgrade!

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  9. Alan says:

    >> Still dropping packages at the gate… seems pushing a button to open the gate is too difficult.  

    The Amazon drivers too. Why ask me to update the Delivery Instructions section (which is so well hidden that I have to Google how to find it every time – then again maybe they don’t want to be bothered to read/follow them)? Our house is behind a six foot fence. I guess they figure that saving ten seconds by just tossing the package in the driveway, ripe for the local ‘porch pirates’ is preferable to getting it behind the fence. Hmm, I wonder who ultimately pays for the cost of replacing those stolen packages? 

  10. drwilliams says:

    Special master request granted:

    https://www.businessinsider.com/florida-federal-judge-allows-special-master-review-seized-trump-docs-2022-9

    Virtually every piece about this search is full of false tripe that is simply designed to sully Trump’s reputation.

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  11. Clayton W. says:

    Plus, no one yells.

    It is truly surprising how much this affected my decision to change companies.  I am much happier, even though it is a much smaller firm.

    A 15% pay raise didn’t hurt any, to be honest.

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  12. drwilliams says:

    Takedown of the latest polar bear propaganda

    https://wattsupwiththat.com/2022/09/05/fact-check-polar-bears-breaking-through-thin-ice-is-not-evidence-of-climate-change-its-a-drone-chase/

    If the polar bears were really threatened the global warming zealots wouldn’t have to post carp like this, or deplatform Susan Crockford and Mitch Taylor, two dedicated and honest polar bear researchers.

  13. Alan says:

    >> Special master request granted 

    Seeing how it’s no longer pc to say “master bedroom” will they object to special master? Does ‘he’ need to be male? Is a biologist needed? 

    Best line I heard compared Trump having these documents to a kid with a bunch of overdue library books. 

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  14. Alan says:

    So FJB will have been to Pennsylvania three times in a week, but all are non-political and  necessary, right? Or maybe he just needs a new travel agent that can plan better? 

    And no need to visit Jackson, since Mississippi is a deep-red state…so let them drink bottled. 

  15. Alan says:

    Wife pulled out the to-do list today and suggested several items…”It’s Labor Day, let’s get laboring.” 

    I said “but…” https://youtu.be/no0qB8CVspY

  16. Rick H says:

    Small seaplane crashed near Mutiny Bay last night – I can see Mutiny Bay from my house. Couldn’t see the actual crash site, but lots of rescue boats out there last night and into today looking for victims.

    Plane apparently  went straight in – didn’t attempt an emergency water landing.  Ten people on board, only one body recovered so far. 

    Seaplanes are common around here. Occasionally one goes over my house to land at the marina just a quarter mile from my house.

    Mutiny Bay is a bay in the U.S. state of Washington. Part of Puget Sound, Mutiny Bay is located in Island County near the southern end of Whidbey Island, northwest of Useless Bay and adjoining Admiralty Inlet.

    Always thought that “Mutiny Bay” would be a good title for a fiction book. Or a book publishing company – which is why I own https://www.MutinyBay.net

  17. Brad says:

    Nobody yells

    Honestly, I cannot imagine a workplace where people yell. That’s just bizarre.

    FWIW, that’s one thing (of many) thatI hold against our crazy neighbors: being yelled at, like they were toddlers throwing tantrums. Mature adults don’t act like that. Or shouldn’t.

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  18. lynn says:

    Pearls Before Swine: We Got The Loan !

         https://www.gocomics.com/pearlsbeforeswine/2022/09/05

    Oh my !  That is a lot of inflation.

  19. ITGuy1998 says:

    Went and looked at a couple cars with my son today before he headed back to school. First we drove a 2016 ecoboost mustang. Pretty nice, and it’s definitely on his list for purchase in a few years.

    We then drove a 22 Genesis Gv70 with the v6. Wow. I think I would have bought it today if prices weren’t so crazy. It was used, with around 10k miles. They were asking almost 10k above msrp of a new one. No thanks. I hope the car inventory mess eases later this year, but I’m not holding out hope.

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  20. lynn says:

    We are having enormous problems with a phone sim card company in Germany, https://www.winsim.de/ .  They have really upset their customers and removed all email contact with their company.  So, people are daily complaining to our customer support email, just the plain old support @ company name.com .   And one of their customers just dropped a one star review on Google on my website which really torques me off.  Any advice here ?

  21. Greg Norton says:

    Nobody yells

    Honestly, I cannot imagine a workplace where people yell. That’s just bizarre.

    Austin. Lots of T Therapy and Adderall.

    The *recruiter* yelled at me during the interview process for that job.

  22. Greg Norton says:

    Went and looked at a couple cars with my son today before he headed back to school. First we drove a 2016 ecoboost mustang. Pretty nice, and it’s definitely on his list for purchase in a few years.

    Be really careful with the EcoBoost Mustangs. Hecho en Spain engines are having serious problems. Hecho en Cleveland are better, but it is still a turbo four driving that ten speed transmission. Used will be a cr*pshoot in terms of longevity.

    The next generation Mustang will probably be the last true iteration of that car as defined by Lee Iacocca. After that, it will be the EV abominations of the name.

  23. Greg Norton says:

    Small seaplane crashed near Mutiny Bay last night – I can see Mutiny Bay from my house. Couldn’t see the actual crash site, but lots of rescue boats out there last night and into today looking for victims.

    That made the national CBS or Sinclair feeds last night. I stopped what I was doing to pay attention when I heard the name Mutiny Bay, WA during the local newscast. I didn’t recall you owning a seaplane so I figured you were ok.

  24. Rick H says:

    I’ve been using “Somewhere Opposite Mutiny Bay WA” in my books and web sites. 

    Lots of float planes in the sky daily around here; most marinas have a spot for seaplanes. Lots of traffic to/from the islands in the are to the east of Victoria, Vancouver Island, BC, Canada. No bridges to the islands, so your travel choices are ferries and seaplanes and boats.

    The islands up north are the route to the ‘inside passage’ that all the cruise ships take to Alaska. During the cruise months, I can see the big (and giant) cruise ships sail by that Mutiny Bay area each day at about 530pm. Some of them are really big, holding several thousands of people.

    All the big container/etc ships use that route on their way to/from Seattle/Tacoma ports. Plus the occasional Navy aircraft carrier (the Nimitz is one – haven’t been able to view that one yet) and the subs on their way to the sub bases in Bremerton and into the Hood Canal (Bangor Trident base).

    The subs to the base in Hood Canal have to go through the Hood Canal bridge, a floating bridge that ‘pulls apart’ for marine traffic. Have been able to watch the subs several times while waiting for the bridge. The Hood Canal bridge is ‘open (to traffic) when it is closed, and closed when it is open’. I get text alerts for planned openings (sailboats) to help with travel plans. 

    There are two bridges at either end of the Hood Canal bridge for non-sailboat traffic. Took a whale watching tour earlier this summer into the south end of the Hood Canal. Saw a couple of pods of killer whales, and went by the sub pens at the Bangor Trident base.

    I have a nice view of the Puget Sound and Mutiny Bay from my front room. One of the big reason we chose this house. Can see the Cascade Range on a clear day. (Which we get a lot of around here, despite the reputation of ‘rainy Washington state’.)

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  25. EdH says:

    So, finally pulled the new Midea 7CF freezer away from the wall and checked the P3kaw meter. 
     

    21.38kwhr in 951 elapsed hours, so a bit over 16kwhr for a month. Not bad, it will not affect the bill much. 
     

    It is pulling 115W when on, but I don’t know what the startup is. You could easily run this off a moderate sized solar panel and controller.  

  26. paul says:

    Ok.  I did the Healtcare.gov thing today to drop all that on 9/30.  No option to keep the dental plan I had and was paying for out of pocket.  Oh well.  Done is done.  Annoying.  Never used any of it.

    Then a lot of circular circling on the Medicare site.   Jeebus.  More swirling on the Texas site. 

    “Resource Limits” are, I dunno.  Too much money in the bank?  Go away.  More than one vehicle?  Go away.  Like, the Van’s Blue Book is $400.  The truck, I still owe about 20 grand on it.  It’s all wacky. 

    Looks sort of like I qualify for nothing.  How the wetbacks with almost no English with an EBT card qualify and load their groceries into an Escalade is a mystery.  Heck, I speak more Spanish than they do English. 

    I know.  “Shut up racist Hater”.  I’m just mystified how they get all that stuff. 

    Anyway.  I found a couple of phone numbers to try.   Maybe I don’t get routed to India.

    Found a drug plan that’s like $6.90 a month.  Gotta cough up the first $600 or so for drugs but then it’s like a $1 for generics.  Or I can go with a $45 a month plan and have no deductible.  I have no idea what drugs cost beyond buying aspirin and Tums.  So going “cheap” is the way.

    I’m going to go find a beer and give the dogs their evening cooky. 

  27. Greg Norton says:

    I have a nice view of the Puget Sound and Mutiny Bay from my front room. One of the big reason we chose this house. Can see the Cascade Range on a clear day. (Which we get a lot of around here, despite the reputation of ‘rainy Washington state’.)

    When I worked in the Bank of America building in Downtown Seattle, even if it drizzled all day, when I walked down the hill to Pioneer Square to catch the bus around 4:30-5 PM, I generally caught a look at the Sun as it set, peeking out from beneath the clouds over the Sound.

    Portland, OTOH, was just misery most of the Winter. The Valleys deserve the reputation for gloom.

  28. drwilliams says:

    @Lynn

    We are having enormous problems with a phone sim card company in Germany, https://www.winsim.de/ .  They have really upset their customers and removed all email contact with their company.  So, people are daily complaining to our customer support email, just the plain old support @ company name.com .   And one of their customers just dropped a one review on Google on my website which really torques me off.  Any advice here ?

    I don’t see any reviews of your site on Google. Facebook? Whatever, contact them and complain.

    I’d also suggest putting up a note in your “Latest News”:

    We do not sell sim cards. But some illiterate sim card users in Germany have been calling us about their problems with a German company that does sell sim cards. And now one has posted a negative review.

  29. Rick H says:

    @paul – I’d still recommend that you find a Medicare specialist that knows how to do all of that work you are trying to do yourself. Someone here recommended that several days ago.

    I recall using one for my wife’s disability claim after the suicide death of our son. She was unable to work the 50+ hours/week at the local government job due to stress from that incident. The consultant got her early disability retirement and benefits that she was unable to get.

    So, unless you enjoy the aggravation, getting someone to help with your efforts is a good idea. It’s worth it, IMHO.

  30. Jenny says:

    In last seven days I have processed three goats, one sheep, and six rabbits. I’ve picked eight gallons of crab apples, and turned four gallons into one gallon of cider with a hand cranked press. 
    Did a deep deep clean on the rabbitry. 
    Practiced the guitar every day. 
    Kept up the house and worked full time. 
     

    My hands have labored hard and are tired.

    All worth it. 
    ————

    @Greg (I think) Jaws was the original turned into 3D. It was remarkable how it enhanced the classic film instead of detracting. 
    I have to reread comments because I think there was another question, but I don’t recall. 

  31. Greg Norton says:

    @Greg (I think) Jaws was the original turned into 3D. It was remarkable how it enhanced the classic film instead of detracting. 
    I have to reread comments because I think there was another question, but I don’t recall. 

    I reacted to your election news IIRC, pointing out how every vote counted in GA and commenting that Republicans need to stop waiting for La Revolution. Viva Gorditas!

    Our former RINO Congresscritter in Vantucky (WA State) who voted for Impeachment after Jan. 6 got thrown out in the primary.

  32. Lynn says:

    I don’t see any reviews of your site on Google. Facebook? Whatever, contact them and complain.

    Here are the reviews:

        https://www.google.com/search?q=WinSim+Inc.

  33. Lynn says:

    I’d also suggest putting up a note in your “Latest News”:

    We do not sell sim cards. But some illiterate sim card users in Germany have been calling us about their problems with a German company that does sell sim cards. And now one has posted a negative review.

    I may try this.  It will probably not work as these people are not English speakers.

    Now I am beginning to wonder if they are damaging my business reputation.

  34. Ray Thompson says:

    Looks sort of like I qualify for nothing

    I will echo what RickH stated, find a Medicare specialist and let them do the grunt work. When you reach 65 you qualify for Medicare. Most private (or group) insurance will make you take Medicare as primary insurance. There are no income limits or net worth boundaries to overcome.

    Medicaid is a different story. There you have to have very limited income or resources, as in basically penniless. My aunt had about $3.5K left in her bank account. Assisted living was $3.2K a month. Medicare was the only option. However, she had too much money. I had to get that balance below about $2K (or somewhere there about). I purchased a funeral cremation policy for $1.1K, and some clothes to get the balance below the limit. Those purchases were perfectly legal and were recommended by the state representative that handles Medicaid applications for the county.

    The biggest decision I had to make with Medicare was which company would be the supplemental insurer, that plan that I wanted, and who would do prescription insurance for the wife.

    I chose Mutual of Omaha as they were recommended by the agent I used. Humana was the choice for prescriptions. Both seem to work well and I have not had any issues with either one of the companies.

    I chose the plan with the highest level of coverage. I pay about $450.00 out of pocket and the rest is covered 100%. So far that has been the case. After I pay that amount I have never seen another bill from any provider. The companies that insure for Medicare have strict rules to follow so choosing between company A or B is not a choice that will go wrong.

    The advice from the agent was to avoid Medicare Part C. Medicare Part A is hospitalization, Part B is doctors and other providers, Part D is prescription. Part C is like an HMO, limited doctors and facilities, some stuff not covered. A good agent will explain it all.

    Medicare only pays 80%. Major surgery of event will still leave with a person with huge bills. My wife’s heart attack was about $80K for hospital (4 days), stent installation, operating room, emergency room, emergency room doctor, EMS ride, etc. Original cost was well over $150K but medicare adjusted rates applied. Without supplemental coverage I would have been on the hook for over $16K.

    Wife’s supplemental is $170.00 a month. about $2K a year. Rates are set by coverage level, age, past incidents, who knows, etc., but are generally reasonable. In my opinion, don’t be without supplemental.

    The supplemental and prescription coverage are automatically deducted from the my SS payment along with the Medicare premiums.

  35. Jenny says:

    Found it

    @Alan

    Are you anywhere near access to hunt big game (caribu, moose, etc.)?

    Unit 13 is the nearest / easiest game unit for caribou. Call it 6-8 hours driving from Anchorage. It receives heavy hunting pressure. most years we apply for a permit and make a try. Last success was 2012. We don’t try very hard, though. A moose would be more sure. I don’t want the work of a successful moose hunt. They are very large. I’m not up to that degree of effort and physical labor. 

    In 1995 or thereabouts I joined friends on their November fly in trip to Montague Island. We stayed in a forestry cabin on the Nellie River. Landed on the frozen beach on Patton Bay. It was glorious. And very hard work. We flew out with 16 Sitka Black Tail deer. I still have the antlers and first tanning job I did of a hide from that trip, and the two mink we trapped.

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  36. Lynn says:

    “Guy Who Has to Move NASA Moon Rocket Back to Hangar Very Annoyed”

        https://futurism.com/the-byte/guy-move-nasa-moon-rocket-hangar-very-annoyed

    “I went to my management and said, ‘I’m not bringing it back. It stays here.'”

    Sounds very boring with eight hour periods of incredible driving stress.

  37. Lynn says:

    Pearls Before Swine: We Got The Loan !

         https://www.gocomics.com/pearlsbeforeswine/2022/09/05

    Oh my !  That is a lot of inflation.

    There is prior art !  From a friend on another website:

         https://www.gocomics.com/doonesbury/1973/05/03

  38. Greg Norton says:

    “Guy Who Has to Move NASA Moon Rocket Back to Hangar Very Annoyed”

    Sounds very boring with eight hour periods of incredible driving stress.

    LC 39B is “clean pad” so that means the tower has to go back with the vehicle.

    The intent was that SLS share the pad with whatever Orbital was working on in the fourth high bay in the VAB, but I think that’s been abandoned after several corporate mergers.

    If that is the legacy Ares tower, it will be scrapped after this launch, regardless of whether or not SLS continues. Two more are in varying stages of construction.

  39. Alan says:

    >> I’d also suggest putting up a note in your “Latest News”:

    We do not sell sim cards. But some illiterate sim card users in Germany have been calling us about their problems with a German company that does sell sim cards. And now one has posted a negative review.

    I may try this.  It will probably not work as these people are not English speakers.

    Now I am beginning to wonder if they are damaging my business reputation.

    @lynn, you probably can get your note translated to German for not much money using a service such as Ffiver. Use Google Translate to check the translation.

    And if I google winsim reviews, the first reference that appears to be about your company is halfway down page two…
    https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0038092X98000620

    Do you do any SEO on your site?

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  40. drwilliams says:

    Takeaways from the ruling granting Trump’s request for a special master in Mar-a-Lago probe

    A federal judge threw a wrench Monday in the Justice Department investigation into potential mishandling of documents from former President Donald Trump’s White House by granting his request for a special master to review evidence seized from his Florida home last month.

    US District Judge Aileen Cannon cleared the way for a third-party attorney to review all the seized materials, not just for documents covered by attorney-client privilege — the circumstance in which special masters are usually used — but also for potential executive privilege concerns, a move the Justice Department has said would be “unprecedented.”

    She did not agree, however, with Trump’s arguments that there had been a “callous disregard” for his constitutional rights with the search.

    https://edition.cnn.com/2022/09/05/politics/takeaways-trump-cannon-mar-a-lago-special-master/index.html

    I’m not sure about the legal definition of “callous disregard”. Given the restrictions placed on searches by the Fourth Amendment, it’s difficult to see how confiscating passports, magazines, newspaper clippings, clothing, photographs, medical records, and attorney-client communications falls within the scope of any search warrant. Nor is scattering a selection of items in disarray on the floor and taking a press photo indicate anything but cheap publicity.

    Amendment IV

    The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.

    “particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.”

    Repeating from above: it’s difficult to see how confiscating passports, magazines, newspaper clippings, clothing, photographs, medical records, and attorney-client communications falls within the scope of any search warrant.

    There’s the standard, there’s the partial list of items that they took. Be happy to entertain an explanation.

    Judge Appoints Special Master, Temporarily Bars FBI/DOJ Review Or Use Of Records Seized in Mar-a-Lago Raid

    “The leak of information also came up. This part of the oral argument – for which there is no public audio – was not known to me, but is important. How can the government claim secrecy when it’s leaking to the press:”

    11 When asked about the dissemination to the media of information relative to the contents of the seized records, Government’s counsel stated that he had no knowledge of any leaks stemming from his team but candidly acknowledged the unfortunate existence of leaks to the press.

    “Here is the context in which leaks were considered by the Judge (emphasis added):”

    With respect to the first factor, the Court agrees with the Government that, at least based on the record to date, there has not been a compelling showing of callous disregard for Plaintiff’s constitutional rights. This factor cuts against the exercise of equitable jurisdiction.

    The second factor—whether the movant has an individual interest in and need for the seized property—weighs in favor of entertaining Plaintiff’s requests. According to the Privilege Review Team’s Report, the seized materials include medical documents, correspondence related to taxes, and accounting information [ECF No. 40-2; see also ECF No. 48 p. 18 (conceding that Plaintiff “may have a property interest in his personal effects”)]. The Government also has acknowledged that it seized some “[p]ersonal effects without evidentiary value” and, by its own estimation, upwards of 500 pages of material potentially subject to attorney-client privilege [ECF No. 48 p. 16; ECF No. 40 p. 2]. Thus, based on the volume and nature of the seized material, the Court is satisfied that Plaintiff has an interest in and need for at least a portion of it, even if the underlying subsidiary detail as to each item cannot reasonably be determined at this time based on the information provided by the Government to date.

    The same reasoning contributes to the Court’s determination that the third factor—risk of irreparable injury—likewise supports the exercise of jurisdiction. In addition to being deprived of potentially significant personal documents, which alone creates a real harm, Plaintiff faces an unquantifiable potential harm by way of improper disclosure of sensitive information to the public.11

    note: Williams Jacobson’s words in “” with judges order excerpted in blockquotes above.

    https://legalinsurrection.com/2022/09/judge-appoints-special-master-temporarily-bars-fbi-doj-review-or-use-of-records-seized-in-mar-a-lago-raid/

    The government attorney has “no knowledge” but “candidly acknowledged the unfortunate existence of leaks to the press.”.

    Judge throws Mar-a-Lago probe into chaos

    Andrew C. McCarthy from NRO  Sep 05, 2022 7:00 PM ET

    There are no heroes in this drama. The Justice Department has been playing with fire from the start. Trump dragged his feet in seeking the special master, to the point that DOJ had nearly completed its privilege review by the time he finally filed his court action. Cannon, whom Trump appointed to the district court in 2020, inexplicably allowed nine days to elapse after first signaling her inclination to appoint a special master, during which she wrung her hands about whether to order the appointment and, more significantly, failed to rule on Trump’s application for a court-ordered suspension of the Justice Department’s review process and directive that DOJ cease using documents Trump claimed were privileged in furtherance of its criminal investigation.

    The Justice Department blithely assumed that Trump had no executive privilege even though this is an unsettled question in the law.

    When a salient point of law is unclear, the responsible course for prosecutors is to flag the issue for the court and get a ruling before taking controversial actions. Instead, in seeking the search warrant, DOJ advised Magistrate Judge Bruce Reinhart that the filtering process that would be implemented in connection with documents seized in the search would screen only for attorney-client privileged documents, not executive privileged documents. The latter category is apt to be considerably more expansive. It does not appear that DOJ alerted Reinhart to the possibility that Trump could have a colorable executive-privilege claim, and there’s no indication that Reinhart raised the question on his own.

    The remainder of McCarthy’s piece is behind the paywall.

    I note that his “Trump dragged his feet in seeking the special master, to the point that DOJ had nearly completed its privilege review by the time he finally filed his court action.” is inaccurate. Part of the record includes acknowledgement by the government:

    “Counsel for the Government stated during the hearing that Plaintiff’s request for a special master was rejected on August 9, 2022, the morning after the search.” [from LI link above]

    So his quibble here is that a private citizen without the resources of the U.S. government took some time to file a motion in response to a truly unprecedented action by that government. I suggest you pound sand, Andy. 

    As to the judge moving slowly, compared to what? Garland waiting months when classified documents were strewn on the floor /sarc?

    What really has him torqued is that the delays gave the DoJ time to dig the hole to maximum depth. Leak provably false statements to their lapdogs in the press, fail to immediately identify and return Trumps passports, have their “filter team” fail at least twice and allow privileged documents to pass, and a wide variety of other tomfukery to occur. 

    [As I stated when the special master request was filed, I suspect that the delay was in part intentional for just the purpose of letting the DoJ gather more rope for their hanging. If this is ever confirmed I will invite McCarthy to pound sand again. As a former prosecutor he has doubtless routinely engaged in timing search warrants, arrests, and other actions to do maximum damage to the government’s perceived “enemies”]

    Emphasizing again:

    The dispute with the National Archives is not over a criminal statute.

    U.S. Presidents are the ultimate deciders of security classifications. If President Trump pointed at a truckload of documents and stated “I hereby declare everything contained therein is declassified” then it would be a fait accompli–there is no constitutional basis for any review. 

    Former U.S. Presidents are allowed to retain papers from their administration.

    Mar-a-lago is not “unsecured”. It is under the protection of the U.S. Secret Service, and document storage there was inspected by the government in June and their request to add an additional lock was done promptly.

  41. nick flandrey says:

    Well, busy day after all.    Shortly after my comment this morning the septic guy showed up.   He did indeed intend to work today.   He wanted the get the part of the job with the most question marks done, and he did.  Got it to the point where it will be normal anyway.    

    We spent the day breaking concrete.   He ran the big Case excavator, his son and I ran the sledgehammer and angle grinder.   Together we broke a path across the patio for him to run the trencher for the drip lines.   6 ft wide, about 30 feet long… maybe 40.   Lots of concrete.   On one hand, it was very poorly done.   Voids, poor mix, low strength, wire not embedded properly…  On the other, he went for overkill pouring a grade beam around the patio.   I had to hammer drill that to get it to break.   We had to break a lot of slabs into pieces we could get in the loader bucket, and I cut a LOT of wire reinforcement.

    There is a big pile of concrete where my burn pile normally lives, and after they left, I broke up enough to fill the garden trailer 3 times.   That’s about a cubic yard and a half of mostly fist sized lumps.   The broken concrete went behind my bulkhead (sea wall but on the lake) where a lot of soil had washed out.   In essence, I picked up and tossed every piece into the wagon, then picked up and tossed every piece under my dock, into the area that needed filling.  Between that and the sledgehammering, I’m gonna be sore tomorrow.

    I did get cleaned up in time to float on the lake and watch the sunset, moon rise, and stars come out.   Watched the bats hunting too.

    Had dinner, and now I’m going to have a fire, spin the dial on the radio, have a ginger ale, and relax a bit.

    I feel like I’ve done almost as much as Jenny 🙂

    n

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  42. drwilliams says:

    @Nick

    Between that and the sledgehammering, I’m gonna be sore tomorrow.

    I did get cleaned up in time to float on the lake and watch the sunset, moon rise, and stars come out.   Watched the bats hunting too.

    Had dinner, and now I’m going to have a fire, spin the dial on the radio, have a ginger ale, and relax a bit.

    I feel like I’ve done almost as much as Jenny 

    Don’t forget to use some ginger ale to chase a healthy dose of NSAIDS or whatever your preference.

    I read Jenny’s list. Humbling.

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  43. Lynn says:

    And if I google winsim reviews, the first reference that appears to be about your company is halfway down page two…
    https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0038092X98000620

    Do you do any SEO on your site?

    Nope that is not about my software.  My software is chemical process simulation (the analysis of what is inside the pipes).

    Very little SEO.   I do put “Chemical Process Simulation” all over the place.

  44. Lynn says:

    “The Forty-Year Programmer”

       https://codefol.io/posts/the-forty-year-programmer/

    “Software Development is Young”

    “The computer language Fortran dates back to 1957. There are other languages about the same age (LISP and Algol: 1958, COBOL: 1959) and a few weird contenders for being older (Konrad Zuse’s Plankalkül, 1942-ish.)”

    “Let’s say there have been programmers since roughly 1957. 65 years. I’ve been a full-time paid programmer since 1998 (24 years) and a programmer at all since 1984 (38 years.) I’m pretty experienced. Alan Kay, inventor of the Smalltalk programming language, starting somewhere around 1963 — 59 years. He’s one of the longest-active I’ve found.”

    I started writing Fortran in 1975 at age 15.  I wrote some Basic in 1982 on our new IBM PCs to help with my engineering calculations at the power plant I was working at.  I bought my own PC in 1983 and bought the new Turbo Pascal compiler which was the most amazing thing that  I had even seen, using an interactive development environment.  I bought the Turbo C compiler in 1987 and moved on to that. I took an engineering software job in 1989 writing C on DecWindows. I moved to a Smalltalk and C product in 1992. I moved on to C++ around 2002. I write engineering software in F77 and C++ nowadays.

  45. Nick Flandrey says:

    crazy how fast it grew, and how much of our lives it took over.

    n

  46. Alan says:

    >> Most of the population can’t afford the vehicles they are driving now.

    Which is why they came to up with leasing. The F&I guys loved it with more variables to play with. Of course most everyone didn’t forsee the “one bagger” opportunity for the lessees to buy the vehicle and flip it. 

  47. Alan says:

    >> The wealthy will buy expensive electric cars that will be charged with pricey, intermittent, weather-dependent wind and solar power

    Still waiting to hear where all the people with no off-street parking (think NYC, Boston, Chicago, SF, etc.) are going to do their overnight charging. And for those that say “at the office,” how long to upgrade miles upon miles of parking lots with at least Level 2 charging, say even one-third of the spaces to start. 

    At least this is now available in an extended range model. https://onewheel.com/

  48. JimB says:

    I still claim to have never written any software, but… I took my first and only “computer” course in college in 1964. It was divided between analog and digital. I kind of liked analog, but really was not good at Fortran, the only language in use in the digital portion of the course.

    I started building hardware in ham radio in 1959. Built mostly transmitters, but a couple of receivers. This was from scratch using other people’s designs, and does not count Heathkits. I later designed some of my own circuitry, especially power circuits.

    I was in a co-op program in college. During my work periods, I designed small analog and digital circuits, mostly for test purposes. My main field was transition to production, and most of this was RF circuitry, receivers and transmitters up to 30 MHz. Later, I went into VHF and UHF. All of this was discreet components, and some was even tubes when power or high frequencies were needed. I later got into computer hardware design, mostly logic and control circuitry, but some test methodology. The closest I got to software was analog simulations in the early 1970s. That was fun, but too mathematical for me. Back then, analog was better at interfacing with hardware; digital was too slow, and the interface circuitry was more difficult. How things have changed.

    I always wanted to learn a little programming, but never had the chance. I later did some work with spreadsheets, but never counted that as programming. I still like hardware.

  49. Alan says:

    >> Small seaplane crashed near Mutiny Bay last night – I can see Mutiny Bay from my house.

    Odd coincidence…just watched the Breaking Bad episode with the plane crash… 

  50. brad says:

    We are having enormous problems with a phone sim card company in Germany, https://www.winsim.de/ .  They have really upset their customers and removed all email contact with their company.

    @Lynn: I just saw this. If it would help, here is a note that you can send to anyone complaining to you:

    Bitte bemerken Sie, dass unsere Firma WinSim in den USA gar nichts mit der Firma WinSim in Deutschland zu tun hat. Wenn Sie Probleme mit dem Dienst von WinSim in Deutschland haben, müssen Sie die Firma in Deutschland kontaktieren. Ihre Telefonnummer lautet 06181 7074 094. 

    Translation: “Please note that our company WinSim in the USA has nothing to do with the company WinSim in Germany. If you have problems with the service from WinSim in Germany, you must contact the company in Germany. Their telephone number is…”

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