Tues. May 11, 2021 – away from keyboard.

By on May 11th, 2021 in personal, WuFlu

Probably warm, certainly humid, possibly wet.  So says the FEMA summary.  Never got any rain yesterday so who knows how it will play out today.

I spent most of yesterday just sitting in pain.  Did something bad to my neck.  Finally got to the chiropractor and he did some things I’ve never had to have done before, so this is a new issue.   Went home and laid down.

Got up for dinner and went back to bed.

Today I’m supposed to meet with the new auction company, but as of last night they hadn’t confirmed the meeting.  I’ll try to confirm before heading over there this morning.   If I don’t hurt I’ll do some cleanup over there.  If I do hurt, I’ll probably get an adjustment and go home.

In any case, short shrift today.

Talk amongst yourselves…  and keep stacking.

n

93 Comments and discussion on "Tues. May 11, 2021 – away from keyboard."

  1. Nick Flandrey says:

    Up and feeling better.  Still pain and tweaks, but improved by some work with the rolled up towel overnight.   Dr visit today should help too.

    78F and 87%RH and the sun isn’t even up.  yuck.  Radar shows a whole lot of stormy looking yuck south of us too, which may miss me, or might not.

    n

    edit!!! looks like it’s mostly moving ENE and will likely miss us.

  2. brad says:

    Compressed Air Grid ‘Battery’ To Challenge Tesla Powerpack

    Compressed-air storage, 10GWh thereof. There’s zero detail on either of those two points, not even in the Popular Mechanics article. There’s also no info on how the underground caverns are constructed.

    I found an IEEE article with a bit more detail. It looks like this is fundamentally hydroelectric storage. The air in the caverns is “low pressure”, and ultimately displaced by surface water. The air may be driving the turbines, but it’s the water displacing the air. So this is a way of doing hydroelectric where land is flat. But you do have to create a lake, and find or build a sealed cavern with roughly the capacity of the lake.

    If you can get permission to build a lake like that, why not put it in the mountains and do classic pumped storage? Seems like it would be a lot simpler and cheaper, since you can keep all of the equipment above ground.

    Also, math: 10GWh represents about 20 minutes of California’s electricity usage. That’s not nothing, but you would need a lot of these plants…

    vi or emacs?

    Back in my grad-school days, I learned and used emacs. It took me a few months to really use it the way it should be used. The problem is: when I stopped using it regularly, it became pretty useless. Emacs is a power editor, and doesn’t have a “non-power” mode.

    vi, on the other hand, can be used as just a simple editor. You need to remember a couple of letters, like “w” for write and “q” for quit. It can do a lot more, but you aren’t crippled if you only remember the simple stuff.

    Meanwhile, most simple texts (like this comment) get written in an even simpler editor. Mousepad, in this case, which is a Linux version of Notepad.

    Coding gets done in an IDE (i.e., special purpose coding environment). But I find that I program less and less. Example programs for my teaching hardly count.

  3. Greg Norton says:

    Solar? Nukes?

    It’s a travesty we are not building 100 fission reactors, plus some breeders to recycle fuel while we start a crash program to get fusion going.

    Fukushima quelled the enthusiasm for nuclear worldwide, regardless of who did what wrong.

    We had another Pacific front roll through Austin over the last few days, and I caught that hint of … something … I’ve been smelling in the rain from storms originating across the ocean since March 2011.

    My wife thought I was nuts until she had a conversation with a patient in Vantucky who contracted through whoever owns Westinghouse these days, supervising cleanup on the reactor mess.

    “Your husband isn’t nuts.”

  4. Marcelo says:

    Another article that puts into perspective the achievements of SpaceX:

    A SpaceX booster now trails only 4 space shuttles in flight experience:

    https://arstechnica.com/science/2021/05/spacex-hits-major-reuse-milestone-with-rockets-10th-flight/

    Think of the savings in time And money that can now be spent on other (not) worthy causes…

    [Should be followed by that devil emoji…]

  5. Marcelo says:

    And this one goes without comments because they are unnecessary:

    Private-equity firm revives zombie fossil-fuel power plant to mine bitcoin

    https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2021/05/private-equity-firm-revives-zombie-fossil-fuel-power-plant-to-mine-bitcoin/

    and now it is My turn to go to sleep.

    [Yeay for the return of The Edit!]

  6. Nick Flandrey says:

    Well I do have a meeting this am with the auction guy. That’s at 10, so I have time to get ready.

    Moving slowly, but moving.

    n

  7. Nick Flandrey says:

    If anyone wants to share some ground truth from any area affected by the gas pipeline shutdown, that would be great….

    It’s not the first time this pipeline got shut down is it? There was a fire or some other disruption a couple of years ago, iirc.

    Preps baby, hope everyone has them.
    n

  8. Nick Flandrey says:

    Any of the complex energy storage schemes are just stop gaps and feel goods. You can’t save your way to prosperity. The real need it for additional capacity to come on line.

    And absent some massive change in cost, or a disruptive technological change, there is a reason why we’re not using those methods already. Unless something big changes, those reasons are still valid and argue against it.

    n

  9. SteveF says:

    If anyone wants to share some ground truth from any area affected by the gas pipeline shutdown, that would be great….

    Tomorrow afternoon I’ll be driving 35 miles and will pass about five gas stations. I’ll note prices.

    Since the senile pedo was installed in the White House gas prices for 87 octane (usually 10% or 15% ethanol) have risen almost $0.60 per gallon. (As of last Wednesday.) Some of that was because of the Texas freeze: the usual happened, in which prices jumped overnight, then rose steadily, then came back down a third or a half of the amount of the rise.

  10. Ed says:

    It’s a travesty we are not building 100 fission reactors, plus some breeders to recycle fuel while we start a crash program to get fusion going.

    20 years ago I’d have been in agreement- but with the decline in educational and, let’s face it, moral standards of the population that will provide maintenance and operations…dunno.

  11. Nick Flandrey says:

    So the guy who keeps the tiger as a pet in Houston looks like a wannabe Scarface, who is out on bond for a murder FOUR YEARS ago…

    According to news reports, Cuevas was arrested on July 28 2017 in connection with the murder of Oseikhuemen Omobhude, 20, who was shot in the parking lot of the popular Sushi Hana restaurant on July 14 that year.

    Omobhude was approached by two men on motorcycles and shot several times in his car. He was able to drive a few hundred yards to seek help at a nearby Buffalo Wings Restaurant, but later died at Memorial Hermann Katy Hospital.

    Cuevas was arrested after sheriff’s received an anonymous tip and held on a $750,000 bond in the Fort Bend County Jail before being released.

    He was charged with first-degree murder in 2020 and is currently out on a $125,000 bond, ABC7.com reported. He is due in court in July.

    –the address is about 9 miles from my house, and is inside a walled neighborhood that hasn’t been scanned by google streetview. It’s a pretty nice neighborhood.

    n

    2
  12. ech says:

    “The Supreme Court ruled that if there is anything synthetic, not from nature, inside of our genome, then whoever owns the patent on those synthetic parts now owns part or all of you as a human. That means Bill and Melinda Gates et al., The Department of Defense, et al. can literally own a human being. If this synthetic code is taken up into your genome, by law, you could be owned overnight.”

    This is SOOOOO much BS. The Supreme Court has not ruled that if you get gene therapy (which the COVID vaccines aren’t), that the company that has the patent on the drug now owns you. That’s absurd. Take anything else this doctor says with a silo-sized grain of salt. Same goes for the source of the interview if they take her seriously.

  13. ech says:

    Jennifer Pournelle wrote a book I liked in the “Mote” universe, wonder if she might finish the stuff Jerry was working on.

    I got the impression that Jerry and Jennifer were sort-of on the outs. He rarely mentioned her compared to “the boys”. Some of that may have been because Jennifer is gay.

    I looked at the pictures of Chaos Manor. A a minimum the baths and kitchen look like gut and replace jobs. Pink and turquoise tile is not something most people want to live with.

    3
    1
  14. ech says:

    If you can get permission to build a lake like that, why not put it in the mountains and do classic pumped storage? Seems like it would be a lot simpler and cheaper, since you can keep all of the equipment above ground.

    It’s hard to get permission. There is one such plant in California   

    The NIMBYism in building reservoirs is a problem. There is research being done on using mines as one of the storage areas for the water.

    The compressed air systems think they can get to 75-80% efficiency by storing the heat of the compressed gas. There is work in Europe ongoing.

    All of these can help smooth out the effect of demand peaks, but we better start building more generators to replace all the IC cars that will be electric.

     

  15. TV says:

    Compressed-air storage, 10GWh thereof. There’s zero detail on either of those two points, not even in the Popular Mechanics article. There’s also no info on how the underground caverns are constructed.

    I found an IEEE article with a bit more detail. It looks like this is fundamentally hydroelectric storage. The air in the caverns is “low pressure”, and ultimately displaced by surface water. The air may be driving the turbines, but it’s the water displacing the air. So this is a way of doing hydroelectric where land is flat. But you do have to create a lake, and find or build a sealed cavern with roughly the capacity of the lake.

    If you can get permission to build a lake like that, why not put it in the mountains and do classic pumped storage? Seems like it would be a lot simpler and cheaper, since you can keep all of the equipment above ground.

    You have to keep in mind the solution is from a company in Toronto, a city which sits on the shore of Lake Ontario. We have 2 nuclear facilities on the shore of Lake Ontario (Pickering and Darlington) so the solution proposed is somewhat specific to location and availability of power to pump air in overnight. I think a proposal I saw earlier (couple of years ago?) may have used large air bladders sitting on the lake bottom, not caverns. I am unaware of any caverns at the bottom of Lake Ontario. How well this solution generalizes from a “Toronto” specific location is unclear to me.

  16. Greg Norton says:

    If anyone wants to share some ground truth from any area affected by the gas pipeline shutdown, that would be great….

    It’s not the first time this pipeline got shut down is it? There was a fire or some other disruption a couple of years ago, iirc.

    In 2017 following Harvey, after the explosion at the refinery.

    People are going to freak out because the media is stirring the “gas shortage” meme, similar to what Clear Channel did (and later came to regret) in Central Texas in August/September of that year.

    In San Antonio, Labor Day Weekend 2017 saw 50x normal sales volume for the holiday weekend. *Buc-ee’s* went dry in New Braunfels and Luling due to the panic.

    While we waited in line in San Antonio on Labor Day to fill up for the return trip home, I looked over to see people parking their cars in line at the Costco station which was closed for the holiday, and the big truck to the end of the line had gas cans in the back.

    I wish I had taken a picture, but I didn’t want to antagonize and end up shot. I also wanted to say, “Yes, the rampaging cannibal hordes may spare the lives of your wife and kids in exchange for the last 10 gallons of gas for 50 miles, but you, sir, are going to be lunch.”

    This has been a slow news month so you’re gonna see some crazy things in the papers and on TV unless the company gets the pipeline controls back online soon.

    In a vlog I follow on YouTube, yesterday, a gas station sign the guy filmed north of Orlando had regular for $2.88. This is a slow travel time in Florida, and gas was running 30-40 cents cheaper in March.

  17. ech says:

    Bitcoin mining? Hey, invest in Dog Money!

    (I get an ad for Toro trading at the beginning when it runs. :-0 )

  18. dkreck says:

    California has seven pumped storage locations.

    This is the one I’m familiar with.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helms_Pumped_Storage_Plant

    built to store excess from Diablo Canyon nuc at night.

    not all that efficient.

  19. Alan says:

    Any of the complex energy storage schemes are just stop gaps and feel goods. You can’t save your way to prosperity. The real need it for additional capacity to come on line.

    And absent some massive change in cost, or a disruptive technological change, there is a reason why we’re not using those methods already. Unless something big changes, those reasons are still valid and argue against it.

    Maybe the reason is that Elon hasn’t “thought” of it yet…

  20. SteveF says:

    Take anything else this doctor says with a silo-sized grain of salt. Same goes for the source of the interview if they take her seriously.

    That nonsense really bugs me. The official narrative needs to be challenged because so much of it is obvious lies, but most of the loudest and most persistent challengers are spouting “scientific facts” which are such complete nonsense that they can’t even be called lies — “not even wrong”. Or else their claims about laws, death counts, and other verifiable facts turn out to be mistaken, outdated, or nonexistent. Not always, but often enough that the naysayers are just as discreditable as the cheerleaders.

  21. TV says:

    If anyone wants to share some ground truth from any area affected by the gas pipeline shutdown, that would be great….

    It’s not the first time this pipeline got shut down is it? There was a fire or some other disruption a couple of years ago, iirc.

    Preps baby, hope everyone has them.
    n

    Regarding pipeline shutdowns, Governor Witmer of Michigan asked that Line 5 (from Alberta to Ontario, but passing through Michigan) be shutdown as of May 12 due to concerns with the environmental impact should the line break where the pipeline crosses under the Straits of Mackinac back into Ontario. The pipeline provides about 50% of the oil used for gasoline production in both Ontario and Quebec (via Line 9).

    I appreciate the concern for a 50+ year-old pipeline and the possible impact to water quality downstream in the Great Lakes, but this is a bit too much. The company involved has offered to build a tunnel under the river to secure the pipeline, but Ms Witmer does not wish to wait, and 180 days (I think) notice is hardly enough time anyway. The company will refuse to shutdown without a court order. National governments are getting pulled into this. The issue is likely to go federal and land in President Biden’s lap since there is a cross-boundary pipeline treaty between Canada and the US (from 1977) on energy security that should prevent shutdowns like this. (Ironically, I am sure the treaty was all about energy security for the US). Looks like Ms Witmer wants to show she has done everything she can to prevent an environmental catastrophe and wants to punt the hot potato of responsibility if anything should happen to the pipeline to the courts/federal government.

    https://www.theglobeandmail.com/politics/article-ordered-shutdown-of-enbridges-line-5-in-michigan-prompts-unions-into/

    1
  22. Clayton W. says:

    Stimulus you can believe in:

    Federal funding for 1 fission reactor, 1+GW, per congressional district, the Representative gets to decide where.  Heck, include the non-voting representatives (DC, PR, etc.).  One, or two, Fast reactor/recycling center per state that the Senators assign.

    Use the French model:  The reactors are of one or two different designs and are identical right to the clock on the wall and the color of the paint.  Operators from one facility are automagically qualified for all identical plants.

    Use the Navy to train the first set of operators.  Whether we keep Navy Nuclear Power standards moving  forward is up to the government, but that is the quickest way to get well trained operators.

    Use the full fuel cycle and recycling to minimize the waste.  The rest, glassify, probably, or maybe burn it in a fusion reactor.  We are close to break-even on those.

    Connect them all to the grid.  Tada, much more stable grid for base loads.  We may still have problems but it will be much better.

    2
    10
  23. Greg Norton says:

    In a vlog I follow on YouTube, yesterday, a gas station sign the guy filmed north of Orlando had regular for $2.88. This is a slow travel time in Florida, and gas was running 30-40 cents cheaper in March.

    Later in the video, a gas station in Lee, FL, well off the beaten path but inside the pipeline’s service area, had gas prices posted for $2.94.

  24. Chad says:

    I tend to shrug off gas prices. It’s extremely inelastic. It’s one of those things everyone grumbles about but it doesn’t affect anyone’s habits which tells me the grumbling is just grumbling. When people, en masse, start parking their cars then I’ll take note of gas prices. However, whether gas is $1.99/gallon or $3.50/gallon doesn’t change driving habits much at all. People will still spend their free time doing a bunch of unnecessary driving in 12 mpg beasts using the most inefficient itinerary. If gas was $8/gallon I’d still be 20 cars deep at a red light on a Friday evening as everyone heads out to entertain themselves. People will whine about needing to commute to work or to medical appointments because that’s good press for high gas prices, but in reality most of their driving is unnecessary bullshit.

  25. Ed says:

    Gas is already $4/gal at the little market near me, in the California high desert.

    And Memorial Day is a month away still.

  26. Rick H says:

    If you want to look at gas prices in the US, try “GasBuddy”   https://www.gasbuddy.com . You can search by zip/state/city/whatever.

    I sometimes use it on the road (they have an app also) to find a cheaper gas station. There’s a ‘map’ mode that shows you prices in your current area.

    Pricing is crowd-sourced, and usually accurate.

  27. lynn says:

    OK, I’ve had enough of your whining about the missing comment editor.

    It’s back. For now.

    Now, all of you behave.

    Sorry dude. If my wife cannot get me to behave then you are whistling up the creek. I have already had my first lecture of the day for making noise while washing the dishes. I can’t hear anything so I smash them together.

    5
  28. lynn says:

    Another take on gasoline avability:

    https://insider.hagerty.com/trends/what-does-the-uks-ban-on-gas-powered-vehicles-mean-for-classics/

    A bunch of morons. And his freaky haircut also.

    Always keep your gas tanks at least half full nowadays. Crazy things are going on. You never know when a bunch of BLM activists are going to block the road ahead of you for hours on end.

    1
  29. ech says:

    You can also get crowd-sourced gas prices on Google maps along a route you have set up.

     

  30. lynn says:

    I tend to shrug off gas prices. It’s extremely inelastic. It’s one of those things everyone grumbles about but it doesn’t affect anyone’s habits which tells me the grumbling is just grumbling. When people, en masse, start parking their cars then I’ll take note of gas prices. However, whether gas is $1.99/gallon or $3.50/gallon doesn’t change driving habits much at all. People will still spend their free time doing a bunch of unnecessary driving in 12 mpg beasts using the most inefficient itinerary. If gas was $8/gallon I’d still be 20 cars deep at a red light on a Friday evening as everyone heads out to entertain themselves. People will whine about needing to commute to work or to medical appointments because that’s good press for high gas prices, but in reality most of their driving is unnecessary bullshit.

    I read an article several years ago that when gas and diesel prices hit $6/gallon in the USA, most people will shut down their usage of gasoline and diesel. And, punish The Powers That Be.

  31. lynn says:

    Gas is already $4/gal at the little market near me, in the California high desert.

    And Memorial Day is a month away still.

    California does not count. You guys use boutique gasoline. I paid over $5/gallon back in 2008 in California.

  32. lynn says:

    “Why Antifa loves the Palestinains”
    https://gunfreezone.net/why-antifa-loves-the-palestinains/

    “Besides being united in Jew-hatred, it’s where they get their best tactics.”

    “The Palestinians have been doing this for years.”

    “Antifa is doing it here.”

    “Why? Because it works.”

  33. Greg Norton says:

    I read an article several years ago that when gas and diesel prices hit $6/gallon in the USA, most people will shut down their usage of gasoline and diesel. And, punish The Powers That Be. 

    I saw $5/gal. in Vantucky during our time there. That was the price point where retail in the Portland Metro started to be affected and whatever was driving prices through the roof seemed to reverse course.

    With gas at $2-3 per gallon, retail on the WA State side of the river was punished with nearly 10% sales taxes vs. 0% just across the bridge on the Oregon side of the river. Once gas went above $5/gallon, however, the big box stores at the airport or Jantzen Beach weren’t so cheap in comparison, and the “nice” retail was 20 minutes down the freeway.

    According to friends, retail on the WA State side continues its downward trajectory … for now. As I’ve stated before, Vantucky is the future of America everywhere.

  34. Greg Norton says:

    California does not count. You guys use boutique gasoline. I paid over $5/gallon back in 2008 in California.

    This is the time of year on the West Coast when the “winter” blend of gas has to be replaced with the “summer” blend, and the distributors, both wholesale and retail, use the refinery down time as an excuse to goose prices.

    The pipeline shutdown doesn’t affect the West Coast at all since output from Texas refineries can’t be substituted for the “summer” blend gas except in an extreme emergency.

  35. TV says:

    I tend to shrug off gas prices. It’s extremely inelastic. It’s one of those things everyone grumbles about but it doesn’t affect anyone’s habits which tells me the grumbling is just grumbling. When people, en masse, start parking their cars then I’ll take note of gas prices. However, whether gas is $1.99/gallon or $3.50/gallon doesn’t change driving habits much at all. People will still spend their free time doing a bunch of unnecessary driving in 12 mpg beasts using the most inefficient itinerary. If gas was $8/gallon I’d still be 20 cars deep at a red light on a Friday evening as everyone heads out to entertain themselves. People will whine about needing to commute to work or to medical appointments because that’s good press for high gas prices, but in reality most of their driving is unnecessary bullshit.

    Anecdotal evidence up here is that when gas was approaching $1.50/ltr ($5.67 CDN/ US gallon) the folks who had bought large SUVs (no doubt because all their friends had large SUVs) were limiting driving because they could not afford $90+ fill-ups weekly (or more often). Whether they were smart enough to ditch the behemoths for something more affordable I can’t say.

  36. Greg Norton says:

    Whatever happened with the hacking of the pipeline company seemed to coincide with a big change of direction at my new place of employment. Maybe the management sees some expanded opportunities?!?

  37. lynn says:

    Compressed Air Grid ‘Battery’ To Challenge Tesla Powerpack

    Compressed-air storage, 10GWh thereof. There’s zero detail on either of those two points, not even in the Popular Mechanics article. There’s also no info on how the underground caverns are constructed.
    https://spectrum.ieee.org/energywise/energy/renewables/hydrostor-building-underground-caverns-for-affordable-compressed-air-energy-storage

    I found an IEEE article with a bit more detail. It looks like this is fundamentally hydroelectric storage. The air in the caverns is “low pressure”, and ultimately displaced by surface water. The air may be driving the turbines, but it’s the water displacing the air. So this is a way of doing hydroelectric where land is flat. But you do have to create a lake, and find or build a sealed cavern with roughly the capacity of the lake.

    If you can get permission to build a lake like that, why not put it in the mountains and do classic pumped storage? Seems like it would be a lot simpler and cheaper, since you can keep all of the equipment above ground.

    Also, math: 10GWh represents about 20 minutes of California’s electricity usage. That’s not nothing, but you would need a lot of these plants…

    10 GWh over 10 hours is 1 GW of electric power. That is 1/60th of California’s peak demand of around 60 GW. That is not an insignificant contribution to the power needs of California. In fact, it is almost one nuke.

    And yes, they need a lot of power plants to meet their demand. Diverse sources is a good thing, a very good thing.

    We tried to run the entire electric grid in Texas in February on one source, natural gas. If it had worked, that would have set all kinds of records. It did not work because we were not prepared.

  38. Ed says:

    CDC limits review of vaccinated but infected-

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/medical/cdc-limits-review-of-vaccinated-but-infected-draws-concern/ar-BB1gx1au?ocid=uxbndlbing

    To quote the great philosopher John Banner: “I see nothing, nothing, nothing…”

    2
  39. lynn says:

    vi or emacs?

    Back in my grad-school days, I learned and used emacs. It took me a few months to really use it the way it should be used. The problem is: when I stopped using it regularly, it became pretty useless. Emacs is a power editor, and doesn’t have a “non-power” mode.

    vi, on the other hand, can be used as just a simple editor. You need to remember a couple of letters, like “w” for write and “q” for quit. It can do a lot more, but you aren’t crippled if you only remember the simple stuff.

    Meanwhile, most simple texts (like this comment) get written in an even simpler editor. Mousepad, in this case, which is a Linux version of Notepad.

    Coding gets done in an IDE (i.e., special purpose coding environment). But I find that I program less and less. Example programs for my teaching hardly count.

    Back before I outsourced our corporate email to Gmail, we got Joe Jobbed several times. The final time I had to go up to my dedicated email and web server and manually delete the bad emails from our email storage which was in one file per user. IIRC, the problem email storage file was over 300 MB. My email and web server is a FreeBSd box, I just loaded that 300 MB file into vi and starting deleting lines of bad emails. Worked like a champ. That was around 2000 or so.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joe_job

  40. lynn says:

    My wife thought I was nuts until she had a conversation with a patient in Vantucky who contracted through whoever owns Westinghouse these days, supervising cleanup on the reactor mess.

    Circle Bar W, as we called Westinghouse back in my TXU days, got bought by Hitachi Heavy Industries many years ago. Including the nasty, nasty, nasty Pittsburg forge, that we engineers considered punishment if we had go babysit one of our steam turbines or generators. We had about 70 of the beasties from 22 MW to 750 MW. Looks like Toshiba bought Circle Bar W one day and then ran it through bankruptcy.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Westinghouse_Electric_Company

  41. drwilliams says:

    @Lynn

    Last I knew there were well over 20 sub-types of regular gas in the EPA books, none substitutable for another without permissions and weeks of delay.

    Do you know what the current number is?

  42. lynn says:

    Stimulus you can believe in:

    Federal funding for 1 fission reactor, 1+GW, per congressional district, the Representative gets to decide where. Heck, include the non-voting representatives (DC, PR, etc.). One, or two, Fast reactor/recycling center per state that the Senators assign.

    Use the French model: The reactors are of one or two different designs and are identical right to the clock on the wall and the color of the paint. Operators from one facility are automagically qualified for all identical plants.

    The French use 1960 GE BWR (boiling water reactor) designs IIRC. The new French designed nuclear reactor is not going well. “France’s Revolutionary Nuclear Reactor Is a Leaky, Expensive Mess”
    https://www.popularmechanics.com/science/energy/a33499619/france-nuclear-reactor-epr-expensive-mess/

  43. lynn says:

    @Lynn

    Last I knew there were well over 20 sub-types of regular gas in the EPA books, none substitutable for another without permissions and weeks of delay.

    Do you know what the current number is?

    Nope. We don’t go that far downstream. I am surprised that number is not a hundred or so as I thought that California has five types of gasoline alone.

  44. Greg Norton says:

    Circle Bar W, as we called Westinghouse back in my TXU days, got bought by Hitachi Heavy Industries many years ago. Including the nasty, nasty, nasty Pittsburg forge, that we engineers considered punishment if we had go babysit one of our steam turbines or generators. We had about 70 of the beasties from 22 MW to 750 MW. Looks like Toshiba bought Circle Bar W one day and then ran it through bankruptcy.

    The new owners retained some of the premium talent from the old days, including my wife’s patient, a nuclear hand from the go-go days in the US before Three Mile Island. Most of those guys are well retired now, but a few involved with the industry late in the era as new-ish grads — like “Bob Cringely” Mark Stevens — are just now pushing 70.

    (Depending on whether you believe that section of his bio, Stevens worked for DOE under Carter doing soething important when Three Mile Island popped.)

    For anyone with a travel job involving frequent trips to East Asia, the eastern part of Vantucky extending into Camas is always worth serious consideration for a home, with the right combination of tax situation, airport, and attractive places to live … until WA State screws it up — not an impossibility.

    My wife’s patient tried living in Bend, OR, like a lot of people with those types of jobs and high expectations for home lifestyle, but going anywhere quickly involved a commuter flight which got old fast.

    Unfortunately, for him and the rest of the patient base, it was a lousy place to try and make money in medicine. A lot of tech areas are like that.

  45. Geoff Powell says:

    @nick (Sunday):

    —- GEOFF,I’ve used my SUPER SECRET SUPER POWERS to mark the ones I think it got or SHOULD have caught. —– NICK

    Indeed so, although one of your picks (the first “it’s”) isn’t. That is a contraction of “it is”. Trouble is, they’re arguably not errors in British English, although even the OED is shifting towards the American usage of “z” rather than “s”. I’m old school – for me, it’s mostly the “s”.

    G.

     

  46. MrAtoz says:

    MrsAtoz and I went to our local Jim’s restaurant this morning for the first time in a year. The food is as good as I remember. The dining experience is lacking, though. Jim’s is an old style diner with TexMex food. A mask is required to enter, which you wear while winding through tables of unmasked diners (plenty of sneezing and such since its heavy pollen), and sit down after 15 seconds. Why even wear a mask. The booths now have plastic walls behind the seats. No menus, just scan the QR code for an online line menu. Lack of charm there. Asked for a paper menu which was immediately trashed after we ordered. No condiments or coffee fixing’ allowed on the table. You get little packets of salt and pepper. I like Tabasco on my chicken fried steak. You get a condiment cup with enough hot sauce for five people. I splattered it on with a knife so I wouldn’t have to deal with a lake of hot sauce on my CFS. The small diner ambiance is gone. Jim’s would get my business a couple times a week BC. Now, I’ll go with the family, but that’s it until this is over. The Marxists must love the destruction of the classic American lifestyle.

  47. Greg Norton says:

    Unfortunately, for him and the rest of the patient base, it was a lousy place to try and make money in medicine. A lot of tech areas are like that.

    That should have read “*Vantucky* was a lousy place to try and make money in medicine”.

    Dunno about Bend, OR, but they manage to support the last Blockbuster Video in existence. 🙂

  48. Alan says:

    Any takers?

    InsideEVs : Ford F-150 Lightning Officially Named, Will Debut On May 19.
    https://insideevs.com/news/506473/ford-f150-lightning-officially-named/

  49. paul says:

    I looked at the pictures of Chaos Manor. A a minimum the baths and kitchen look like gut and replace jobs. Pink and turquoise tile is not something most people want to live with.

    I looked and the kitchen looked fine to me. The baths? Need to see in person. But some weirdo over here (me! me!) thinks pink and turquoise tile look fine. Along with the pale yellow.
    Beats the heck out of Avocado Green and Harvest Gold and Depressing Brown.

  50. TV says:

    I looked and the kitchen looked fine to me. The baths? Need to see in person. But some weirdo over here (me! me!) thinks pink and turquoise tile look fine. Along with the pale yellow.
    Beats the heck out of Avocado Green and Harvest Gold and Depressing Brown.

    If I recall the color for period combination correctly, pink and turquoise are very late 1950s. Certainly my parents house had far too much turquoise in it and it was built at that time. That implies no major bathroom renovations in near 70 years. Now they were built well back then – the toilet mechanism at my parents house lasted 60+ years since it was brass. Of course, I had to pitch the toilet once it broke as there were no replacement parts that fit. The green/gold/brown combo was late 1960s or early 1970s I think.

  51. JimB says:

    A bunch of morons. And his freaky haircut also.

    Sure, but it IS a DIFFERENT take. I pass these things along for their entertainment value. Not all craziness involves 57 genders. 😛

  52. JimB says:

    Hey Rick, thanks for the editor fix. Loving it.

    1
  53. paul says:

    The green/gold/brown combo was late 1960s or early 1970s I think.

    Early to mid ’70’s by my memory. Plus shag carpet.

  54. MrAtoz says:

    Fauxci got roasted by Paul in front of Congress today, about the China Bat Cootie lab again. Fauxci is a classic goobermint carbuncle you can’t get rid of. The highest paid federal employee for years and years. I now know why he won’t keep his piehole shut and appears on TV show after TV show. He can’t be fired for some reason. Somebody should throw a banana peel under his foot. The guy should just shut his yap and fade away. Why does he hang on? Give someone else a chance at the teat.

    2
  55. Nightraker says:

    I looked and the kitchen looked fine to me.

    I looked too and it’s true there was nothing actually objectionable about the kitchen. OTOH, current fashion in HGTV makeovers is shades of gray and white throughout. The front door *may* get a primary color. Woodgrain, other than flooring is out, particularly cabinets.

    My deceased uncle’s 1960 Fremont, CA house went to a flipper just a few years back. The footprint was unchanged but rooms were repurposed and finishes drastically updated. In fairness, those finishes hadn’t been touched for near half a century. Asking price was almost 2x our selling price. Got close to it too.

  56. Greg Norton says:

    I looked and the kitchen looked fine to me. The baths? Need to see in person. But some weirdo over here (me! me!) thinks pink and turquoise tile look fine. Along with the pale yellow.

    Pink and turquoise would be late 80s/early 90s, when our house in Florida was built with similar color tiles in the kitchen, on the back splash areas and countertops. We were always happy with the look, but the kitchen was gutted by the new owners, including removal of the real oak (no laminate) flooring.

    I wonder if they found the extra flooring stashed in the attic, enough to do 1/2 of the entire floor.

    (No joke – I know people who have never been in that part of their house. Generally, Florida attics are pretty cramped.)

    26 years of HGTV have reprogrammed American tastes on an accelerated schedule. I doubt Chaos Manor will endure with just minor renovation after someone pays $2 million. That lot fronting two streets could offer a rental income possibility.

  57. paul says:

    I finally did the taxes.  Don’t owe any.  In fact, what was withheld is being refunded, mostly.

    It’s the whole round up or down to the nearest dollar.

    I’m getting ripped off for 28¢.  Times how many taxpayers?

    Yeah.  I’m silly.

     

    2
  58. paul says:

    Pink and turquoise would be late 80s/early 90s,

    That time frame was Dusty Rose and I forget the name of the blue, sort of a medium-dark grayish blue.

    Better than Harvest Gold anyway.

    Added: “Wedgwood Blue”.

  59. TV says:

    If I recall the color for period combination correctly, pink and turquoise are very late 1950s. Certainly my parents house had far too much turquoise in it and it was built at that time. That implies no major bathroom renovations in near 70 years. Now they were built well back then – the toilet mechanism at my parents house lasted 60+ years since it was brass. Of course, I had to pitch the toilet once it broke as there were no replacement parts that fit. The green/gold/brown combo was late 1960s or early 1970s I think.

    I have to correct this. I took more than a cursory look (my bad) and it does look more recent than 1960 so I will agree with others posting here that the bathrooms are likely late-80- early 90s. It is not an offensive enough shade of pink or turquoise to be 1960.

    1
  60. lynn says:

    Any takers?

    InsideEVs : Ford F-150 Lightning Officially Named, Will Debut On May 19.
    https://insideevs.com/news/506473/ford-f150-lightning-officially-named/

    Gonna fry your butt !

    The last F-150 Lightning was a supercharged 5.4L V8.

    I notice that they did not mention pricing and range.

  61. Greg Norton says:

    The last F-150 Lightning was a supercharged 5.4L V8.

    I notice that they did not mention pricing and range.

    Or the Canadian assembly plant where most of the EV trucks are going to get built.

    Ford is hustling to beat Toyota’s announcement about the long-rumored hybrid Tundra.

    Plus, the PR is currently bad with the RAV4 supplanting the F150 as the best selling vehicle in the US … with an asterisk — due to the chip shortage.

  62. lynn says:

    Fauxci got roasted by Paul in front of Congress today, about the China Bat Cootie lab again. Fauxci is a classic goobermint carbuncle you can’t get rid of. The highest paid federal employee for years and years. I now know why he won’t keep his piehole shut and appears on TV show after TV show. He can’t be fired for some reason. Somebody should throw a banana peel under his foot. The guy should just shut his yap and fade away. Why does he hang on? Give someone else a chance at the teat.

    Just wait until you see who Fauci the Fraud’s replacement is. A mentally ill supposed doctor, also a fraud, who wants to give puberty blockers to every kid in the USA as standard treatment.
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/health/2021/01/19/rachel-levine-transgender-biden-hhs-pick/

  63. Nick Flandrey says:

    Home from my errands.

    Auction guy says we are a ‘go’ whenever I get the piles piled.

    Back cracker got some stuff to move, so I feel better for a while.

    Spent some time at my storage unit going thru items for the other auction. Hitler’s silver cigar ashtray? WTF? I’ve gotta look that one up.

    Weather is hot and ‘close’.

    n

  64. Nick Flandrey says:

    Even the Lutherans??

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9564319/U-S-Lutheran-Church-elects-transgender-bishop.html

    Rev Megan Rohrer was elected bishop of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America’s Sierra Pacific synod on Saturday, becoming the first transgender person to serve as bishop in the denomination or in any of the major Christian faiths in the US.

    Rohrer, pastor of Grace Lutheran Church in San Francisco and community chaplain coordinator for the San Francisco Police Department, was the first transgender person to be ordained in the ELCA in 2006 and the first to serve as a pastor when called to Grace Lutheran in 2014.

    Well known for advocating for LGBTQ rights in street activism, preaching and writing, Rohrer, 41, who uses the pronouns they and them, is also recognized for their work with the homeless.

    ‘It’s an honor to be called to serve the Sierra Pacific Synod,’ Rohrer, who will be installed as bishop on July 1, said to Religion News Service in a written statement.

    — IDGAF what your preferred pronouns are. Never have, never will. You can answer it or not, but you don’t get to force me to do anything.

    n

  65. Ed says:

    I kind of liked the CM colors, to be honest, reminiscent of my parents place.

    If it was built in 1933 then the structure layout and even wood dimensions will be non-nominal. My parents place was a  1923 build, and often I had to either rip modern ‘nominal’ 2×6’s down, or built up 2×4’s to match the true 2×4’s used when remodeling.   And 90yo fir is HARD, btw.

    WRT the HGTV fad colors, I was looking at LVT flooring again yesterday, and that horrible gray tinge to everything is still omnipresent. Ugh.

    I’d prefer cherry or dark oak, but this place is small and rather dark, so something like a light oak or pecanish tone is probably what will finally get put down.

  66. lynn says:

    Plano, Texas has charged the guy who complained that BLM was blocking a road with assault. “Texas AG blasts ‘mob rule,’ police chief after angry driver is only person charged when Black Lives Matter militants ‘illegally shut down traffic’ News”. One of the illegal street protestors (who was not charged with blocking a road) claimed that the man slapped a cell phone out of her hands that she was filming him with.
    https://www.theblaze.com/news/texas-ag-mob-rule-blm-militants#toggle-gdpr

  67. Nick Flandrey says:

    Try to find a bright color on a car… carmakers know that when the economy is ‘feeling poorly’ people want conservative colors. White, black, dark red for sportscars, tan, champagne, silver, dark blue, and that’s about it right now.

    n

  68. Nick Flandrey says:

    German nazi ashtray. just like this one, https://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/gebruder-hepp-pforzheim-silver-ashtray

    only tarnished, at the goodwill outlet.

    never know what you’ll find.

    n

  69. lynn says:

    “OK, this one is funny”
    https://gunfreezone.net/ok-this-one-is-funny/

    Meme with a gas gauge and a Biden – Harris campaign logo.

  70. Nick Flandrey says:

    I’d like to point out that all these schemes to store “excess production at night” have one fatal flaw– if everyone has an EV, there won’t BE any excess, as they’ll all be charging at night.

    n

  71. MrAtoz says:

    Plano, Texas has charged the guy who complained that BLM was blocking a road with assault.

    Unfrickin’ believable.

  72. MrAtoz says:

    Laughable. The *gun* was a taser. BLM told what they were doing is illegal. No arrests. Except for the WHITEY! guy. Things are gonna blow.

    2
  73. ech says:

    I looked too and it’s true there was nothing actually objectionable about the kitchen.

    There is only the one picture and it doesn’t show the range area. That’s one of the things that pinged for me. In fact, there are dang few pictures for a 5 BR house. From that picture, it either has a really small kitchen or there is a lot of wasted space – space an island could go in.

    No bedroom pictures, also.

     

  74. ech says:

    I saw that the rights to Janissaries was bought by a new film production company. We’ll see what happens. It’s got potential as a series, but sale to a new production company with no track record is chancier than normal (i.e. the Honor Harrington movie never got done because the producers decided to do a videogame first (!) and the project died before the game came out). The family has/had a statement on the Chaos Manor site that the film/TV rights to Jerry’s works were available. TBH, Jerry’s agent should be flogging that in Hollywood.

     

  75. lynn says:

    I’d like to point out that all these schemes to store “excess production at night” have one fatal flaw– if everyone has an EV, there won’t BE any excess, as they’ll all be charging at night.

    n

    We can generate more power at nighttime in Texas right now since we have 20 GW of wind turbines. The wind usually blows at nighttime. And below 95 F. The solar is 5 GW. Both are doubling in the next two years. That will finish off the remaining 4 ? 6 ? GW of coal unit in Texas.

    There is almost a GW of batteries in Texas now. That is doubling fairly soon also. Maybe tripling.

    I am not sure about California except that it has a LOT of solar. Some of that solar is natural gas assisted also.

  76. MrAtoz says:

    Next year: The Subaru Solterra. Subaru’s first all-electric SUV. I hope they can get enough batteries made.

  77. TV says:

    I’d like to point out that all these schemes to store “excess production at night” have one fatal flaw– if everyone has an EV, there won’t BE any excess, as they’ll all be charging at night.

    A point, but in the end all these electrification schemes require more generating capacity to be built. You can’t run all of it at 100% all the time. If you have wind energy you don’t know what to do with overnight, in spite of the electric cars (many of which will hardly get driven 50km a day, and so need only a little or no recharging), well, the “gas bags” are an idea for storage (as is pumped reservoir storage, or big hulking batteries, or whatever…). I would still rather build more nuclear reactors, but no one is listening to me.

    3
  78. Chad says:

    Headline on CNN right now is, “State of emergency after pipeline hack leads to potential shortages.”

    The “pipeline hack” didn’t lead to potential shortages. The media’s coverage of it did and they should be held accountable for that horseshit.

  79. Greg Norton says:

    Headline on CNN right now is, “State of emergency after pipeline hack leads to potential shortages.”

    The “pipeline hack” didn’t lead to potential shortages. The media’s coverage of it did and they should be held accountable for that horseshit.

    No. They won’t be held accountable, but, as was the case in Central Texas four years ago, they will eventually have to fill their own gas tanks. That’s when the “shortage” will hit home.

    Slow news month heading into what is shaping up to be a slow news Summer absent a hurricane hitting the mainland US.

  80. CowboySlim says:

    Even the Lutherans??

    Yeah, wait till the Moooslims want to have transgender clergy.

  81. JimB says:

    I had the teevee nooz on earlier, and saw about three stories about the pipeline. All mentioned hackers as if they were brilliant operators. One mentioned Russia as a potential source. NOT ONE put ANY blame on the company. I can see where it might be harsh to blame the company until the facts are known, but it is certainly possible. As has been said many times here, almost all after effects analyses of these problems find some really stoopid cause, such as an unpatched system, or something that should have been isolated, but was connected to the outside world. At least these possibilities should have been mentioned.

    Also, if only the office network has been compromised, why not isolate and restart the line? How long can it take to check the line controllers? Something smells. If this is legit, then some serious redesign needs to be done when the panic is over. Wanna bet it will? I thought so. OFD would certainly have something clever to say about this.

  82. JimB says:

    Regarding Jerry and Roberta’s house, looks pretty nice to me, but I don’t follow trends. They died there, and must have liked it. Good for them. Now, the estate or new owners will have their wishes. Fine. It is just a house.

    My wife sometimes watches those house renovation shows for ideas. I sometimes walk by, but don’t stay long. My fav is the guy who points out what he describes as schlock, and how he will rip it and make it sooo much better. What is never shown is the next iteration in five or so years where some similar guy is saying the exact same thing, and installing the latest fad.

    A house is a home. Make yours whatever you like. Change it weekly for what I care. Just don’t criticize others’ styles. If a house is clean and well maintained, the styles should reflect the owners’ likes, nothing more. Just once, I would like to see a potential  buyer look at a house on the market and say, “Perfect! I’ll take it. Don’t change a thing!” Of course, that would make for a very short show with few, if any, sponsors.

  83. Greg Norton says:

    Also, if only the office network has been compromised, why not isolate and restart the line? How long can it take to check the line controllers? Something smells. If this is legit, then some serious redesign needs to be done when the panic is over. Wanna bet it will? I thought so. OFD would certainly have something clever to say about this. 

    Because, often, in these situations, someone will install a back door like a VPN tunnel or TeamViewer on the critical system to be able to get real work done from the office network in an emergency. I speak from experience.

  84. Greg Norton says:

    Regarding Jerry and Roberta’s house, looks pretty nice to me, but I don’t follow trends. They died there, and must have liked it. Good for them. Now, the estate or new owners will have their wishes. Fine. It is just a house.

    A lot of history happened in that house. Real history. It will be a shame to see it razed for an HGTV dream.

    Ironically, the basic cable “lifestyle” channels what Dr. Pournelle would call “cultural weapons of mass destruction”.

  85. Nick Flandrey says:

    Just looked at that pictures.

    They probably aren’t bothering to show the other rooms because they know it’s a gut remodel at best, a scrape off at worst. Or most likely, what they do in cali, keep one wall and scrap the rest and that way it’s a remodel not new construction.

    That bathroom is much older than the early 70s. There have been a couple of minor cosmetic upgrades between the early 60s and now but not many.

    Even here, in the better neighborhoods, and especially the up and comers, the “keep just enough to be a remodel” happens, although a complete scrape off is much more common.

    n

  86. lynn says:

    Just looked at that pictures.

    They probably aren’t bothering to show the other rooms because they know it’s a gut remodel at best, a scrape off at worst. Or most likely, what they do in cali, keep one wall and scrap the rest and that way it’s a remodel not new construction.

    That bathroom is much older than the early 70s. There have been a couple of minor cosmetic upgrades between the early 60s and now but not many.

    Even here, in the better neighborhoods, and especially the up and comers, the “keep just enough to be a remodel” happens, although a complete scrape off is much more common.

    n

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/12051-Laurel-Terrace-Dr-Studio-City-CA-91604/20027957_zpid/

    The flamingos ??? on the shower door are interesting.

    I love the man-cave. That is so JEP.

    The house reminds me of the wife’s 1959 rent house in Abilene.

  87. JimB says:

    OK, it is not a historic building, and on a tiny lot, but to raze it would be a waste. I say this, having not seen it up close. Would hope some of the nice looking bookcases could be saved. I agree there is a lot of history there. Maybe not enough to make it a landmark.

    Every place I lived in as owner or family of owner (parents) still stands. Kinda fun to watch them on Google Maps.

  88. Nick Flandrey says:

    I agree, it would be fun to have a plaque on the spot. Jerry was a big enough figure a marker would be appropriate.

    I’ve taken my meds and I’m off to bed.

    Leave a light on…
    n

  89. lynn says:

    We went and got the 2008 Highlander V6 for the business today. It did come with new tires and they detailed it. And changed the oil. They did come down on the price $200 and it did have two sets of keys (big savings there !). It was a tradein for a new vehicle from the second owner who bought it in 2014. The A/C is cold and it drives very well for a 13 year old vehicle with 158,000 miles. I got our commercial auto insurance Monday and the business is now covered again against wrecks for either the business owned vehicle or a named employee vehicle running an errand for the business.

    I did find out that one employee is using a SR-22 for their insurance as they let their insurance drop (forgot to renew) and got a ticket for no insurance. So they are not named in the business policy for now until next year. This has cost them quite a bit of money (liability went up 3X for five years) and taught a lesson that I do not think was fair to them. They do not run errands for the business though.

  90. Mark W says:

    A SpaceX booster now trails only 4 space shuttles in flight experience:

    Shuttle was impressive but a different solution that needed expendable SRBs to make it to orbit. Falcon 9 expends the upper stage. In terms of reusability, Falcon9’s turnaround time is 7 weeks not several months.

    Starship is all-in-one. SN15 is back on a launch stand already.

     

    2
  91. lynn says:

    I agree, it would be fun to have a plaque on the spot. Jerry was a big enough figure a marker would be appropriate.

    The pictures of the Chaos Manor man-cave over the years would be appropriate. It was aptly named.

  92. lynn says:

    “Time to send in Teller and Ulam”
    https://gunfreezone.net/time-to-send-in-teller-and-ulam/

    “Hamas is launching huge numbers of rockets to try and overwhelm Israel’s Iron Dome.

    “All of these rockets are targeted at civilians.”

    The video is amazing.

    And scary.

  93. brad says:

    Chaos Manor – not a lot of interior pics, really. I would have liked to see the “monk’s cell”, for example. But the house is empty, and just the shell of what once was. The passing of an era.

    It’s funny, how you can identify styles so easily. My house in Austin, when I had the bathroom redone: The painters peeled of layer after layer of wallpaper. Basically one per decade, and each one was absolutely iconic. They gave up after peeling off 3-4 layers, and just plastered over the 1950s stuff.

    I finally did the taxes.

    I see the IRS has cashed my check for $5. I’m sure that was worth somebody’s time. It certainly wasn’t worth mine.

    puberty blockers to every kid in the USA

    I can hardly wait until the current drooling over transsexuality fades. While gender dysphoria does exist, it is quite rare. But with all the furor, how many kids with other issues are convinced that they have the diagnosis-of-the-day? How many lives does that screw up?

    I had a student a couple of years ago, and I genuinely had no idea whether this person was a guy or a girl. Possibly trans, no idea. They did their work like every other student. I graded their work, like every other student.

    …becoming the first transgender person to…

    Hint to the whole LGBT movement: no one cares about your personal sexual proclivities, unless it’s someone you are dating. Is this person qualified? Not qualified? That’s all that matters.

    Pushing personal information in everyone’s faces does cause resentment, and can lead to the very discrimination they claim to want to eliminate.

    1

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