Mon. May 10, 2021 – another week, plenty of stuff to do…

By on May 10th, 2021 in culture, personal, WuFlu

Warm and humid, with a chance of thunderstorms.  Joy.  Yesterday got pretty hot and humid by late afternoon and stayed hot.  It was 80F at midnight with 80%RH.

Spent the day playing games with my wife and kids.   Cooked dinner.  Lamb was delicious, potatoes got raves from the whole family, and even the chocolate dipped (store bought) strawberry dessert was just right.

Catan is an interesting game.  I think that there is a whole bunch of stuff to discover about the seemingly simple gameplay if everyone knows what they’re doing.   It’s a smaller game than Ticket to Ride, and I didn’t enjoy the first game as much (I compare them because the game mechanics are very similar, except for the trading part.)  I really like Ticket to Ride so the bar is set pretty high.  I know that Catan is a phenomenon, but I don’t understand why yet.  I’ll give it a couple more plays to see if it really appeals to us.  Board games and card games can be important preps, depending on your disaster, and they are great for other more traditional reasons too.  My family played a ton of games when we were kids, and even through college, whenever we were home together.  We still play games when we get together.

This week I have auction stuff to get together, truck repairs to get organized, all the normal household stuff to do, and surely some work getting ready for the rip and replace at my client’s house.  Add a sore back and a stiff neck, and I’m gonna have some fun.

In the category of ‘do as I say, not as I do’, address little things when they are still little.   Clean up all those niggling little details.  Stop procrastinating if the job is at all important.  Get all the ducks in a row.  You’ll feel better, and you’ll be in a better place for whatever comes.

Now I better go address some of those little things that are stacking up, so that I can get back to stacking up the stuff I think we’ll need.

 

nick

103 Comments and discussion on "Mon. May 10, 2021 – another week, plenty of stuff to do…"

  1. Nick Flandrey says:

    76F and 90%RH at 630am.   I think warm and humid is the order of the day.

    n

  2. Greg Norton says:

    “America Hating Communist and Notorious Georgia Sore Loser Stacey Abrams: Absolutely My Ambition To Run for President”

    Where are all of these communists coming from ? More importantly, how do we get rid of them ?

    Stacey Abrams doesn’t strike me as much of a Communist as she does just another African American woman from my generation with the theme song from “A Different World” stuck in her head for 30+ years.

    Short term, GA Republicans need to get serious about defeating her at the ballot box in a decisive way next year.

    Long term, the female Dem swing voters in the suburbs of DC and the tech hubs who decide these things anymore need to accept that they don’t truly have common ground with people like Abrams. Voting Dem won’t restore the SALT deduction, but they want to believe.

    Sunday nights usually include the late local CBS news for weather at our house. I saw this piece air last night featuring a poster child for the swing voter demographic I reference. Interesting since the bit about the favorite tortilla brand being MIA was edited out of the video which aired on my local station, and the Austin edit downplayed the hyphenated last name.

    http://fullmeasure.news/news/cover-story/empty-shelves-05-07-2021

  3. Nick Flandrey says:

    “Alot of companies went very lean….   ….   it saves billions on storage.”

    —hmm, saves billions on TAXES.   Their goals are not your goals.

    n

  4. Greg Norton says:

    —hmm, saves billions on TAXES. Their goals are not your goals.

    The real income in the household featured in the clip is probably the husband and most likely US Government-related.

     

  5. Nick Flandrey says:

    Oh yeah, definitely stay at home mom, maybe some sort of boutique side hustle, wedding planner, decorator…    too busy at home to brush her hair before the interview.

    Oddly attractive though, maybe it’s just a generational thing.

    I was fixing the expert’s quote though from later.   Tax changes and organized labor led to all the offshoring, inventory and work in progress taxes led to lean.  All the big manufactures have acres of empty space so “storage” is not the issue.   Even the company I worked for, in the fit of kanban, kaizen, lean, flavor of the week, never pretended it was because we didn’t have space for the stuff.

    n

  6. TV says:

    What we do works for us. I (and most Canadians) are happy to go unarmed. Don’t fear for us come the zombie apocalypse: Hockey sticks and curling brooms are not licensed or restricted.

    Well, if the zombie apocalypse happens in the winter then you guys will be ok. The zombies go around naked according to John Ringo’s documentary so they will freeze fairly quickly.
    https://www.amazon.com/Under-Graveyard-Black-Tide-Rising/dp/147673660X/?tag=ttgnet-20

    Well, I suppose naked zombies is a better outcome than other possibilities. Naked, lazy zombies would be best. I have read all of Ringo’s books in the series. It is very well thought-out. After reading his books, I stopped watching “The Walking Dead”. You can die from a bite but everyone goes around in shirt-sleeves and shorts? In spite of the likelihood of abrasions or cuts during a scrum, no one ever gets sick from blood splatter from an incurable infection? My “suspend disbelief” alarm went off which left me pointing out stupid behavior rather than enjoying the show.

  7. PaultheManc says:

    Interesting to see the empty shelves in the USA.  After a few months early 2020, from a consumer perspective things came back to nearly normal pretty quickly in the UK, and I don’t notice empty shelves or specific shortages any more. Maybe some reduction in stock lines – but nothing that impacts me.  The News items talks about the global effects – how come the difference UK to USA?

    @Brad – what is it like in Switzerland?

  8. TV says:

    “Alot of companies went very lean…. …. it saves billions on storage.”

    —hmm, saves billions on TAXES. Their goals are not your goals.

    It may also save on taxes, but inventory is money sitting on a shelf, and the more stuff on the shelf, the more money a company needs to borrow (usually) to pay for it. (Of course, there is also the costs of physical space for storage, and property taxes.) If you can trust the supply chain, just-in-time is great as you can reduce, but not eliminate, inventory. If you cut it too much, and a ship blocks the Suez Canal, or a hurricane prevents ships coming to port, or a strike keeps the containers from moving, or your supplier’s factory next door burns down, you have problems. You will still have problems with some situations even with a reasonable amount of inventory, but with JIT the problem happens faster.

  9. Greg Norton says:

    Oh yeah, definitely stay at home mom, maybe some sort of boutique side hustle, wedding planner, decorator… too busy at home to brush her hair before the interview.

    Nothing makes air without careful consideration, especially at the network level. “Harried soccer mom” is more relatable. The cars weren’t seen in the version which made air in Austin; I haven’t watched the national feed version beyond the quote about tortilla brands.

    The Republican convention deciding the party’s nominee for the VA Governor’s race happened this weekend. The votes are still being counted.

    The VA Governor’s race is always an important indicator for the midterms.

  10. JimB says:

    We had some brief grocery store shortages early in the pandemic, but none lately. We have only three major stores in our little town, and they always seem well stocked. My wife is a coupon shopper, so we are used to variety. Also, the usual seasonal rotations. We do keep a pretty deep stock at home, but that has been true for forty years, and is a consequence of stocking up on trips.

    We are well aware of supply chain fragility, but that is a long term trend driven in  part because of the many trends already pointed out here. Our biggest long term issue has been transportation disruptions by weather, with only two major routes to our remote location. Maybe these issues have hardened us against the recent disruptions.

  11. Nick Flandrey says:

    gah, wordpress just ate my long comment about the fallacy of JIT.   My point, with examples, is that lean and JIT just moves the requirement to have inventory on hand up the supply chain.  Walmart REQUIRES suppliers to maintain warehouses full of product so they can fulfill JIT.

    how in hades can I get a ‘page not found’ error for ‘https://www.ttgnet.com/journal/wp-comments-post.php’  when I click on post comment?   Never happened to me before this last week.

    n

  12. Greg Norton says:

    We are well aware of supply chain fragility, but that is a long term trend driven in part because of the many trends already pointed out here. Our biggest long term issue has been transportation disruptions by weather, with only two major routes to our remote location. Maybe these issues have hardened us against the recent disruptions. 

    I have no doubt that the footage in the “Full Measure” piece is old or from a recent Sunday morning trip to the store after a winter storm rolled through. Note that they didn’t identify the store’s location — it looked like a Randall’s (Safeway) here in Austin.

  13. Nick Flandrey says:

    I was wondering about the date and location of those empty shelves too.

    I see lots of empty spaces when I go to HEB.  Soda aisle, ramen noodles, paper products- notably TP, sometime other areas.  I don’t see whole aisles of empty though.

    n

  14. ech says:

    Also, according to CDC data, 45% of comorbidities were from the flu and pneumonia. That says it all.

    From the page under discussion yesterday.

    This shows an ignorance or willful attempt to distort. What is the a common way for COVID to kill – the lungs get inflamed and clogged with fluid. What is pneumonia? An infection of the lungs.

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  15. Chad says:

    Empty shelves have, at least from my perspective, seemed like a mostly dense urban problem. You know, those photos of long lines of customers wrapped around the block waiting to enter a store with empty shelves… Since this whole thing began a little over a year ago I’ve never had to wait in line to enter a store and other than toilet paper, paper towels, and disinfecting sprays/wipes in Spring and Summer 2020 I’ve notice noticed anything out-of-stock either. (Other than the typical problem where they issued a great coupon for something I like and so everyone bought it that weekend and so now they’re out of stock of my favorite brand of _______ for a few days.)

    The MSM tends to portray the news as if EVERYONE lives in the heart of NYC or Chicago or the like (or, we’re all Californians). That just reinforces how out of touch with the rest of the US the MSM is.

  16. ech says:

    Here is the actual piece by Nicholas Wade. Funny how Hot Air buries the link by making it look like a link to The Lancet. I may have posted it here when it went up last week.

    https://nicholaswade.medium.com/origin-of-covid-following-the-clues-6f03564c038

    It was picked up by The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, which gives it some additional credibility.

    I would put the odds at 90%+ that SARS-CoV-2 escaped from one of the Chinese labs in Wuhan, probably the Wuhan Institute of Virology, where the US was indirectly funding “gain of function” research on bat viruses.

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  17. JimB says:

    Various “news” stories are… interesting. I am not a news junkie, so don’t see much. I have always preferred to read niche pubs like newsletters in the old days, and now various web sites. My 99YO aunt has never seen the Internet, and gave up on going to the library a few years ago as she has macular degeneration that makes reading less fun. Aside, please don’t suggest a tablet or other device, because I have been trying that for years. Her political and various views are very similar to my wife’s and mine, but for the past few years she has been getting all her input from television. I have seen her drift because of this. I try to tell her there is a new model out there, and it is slanted on purpose. She certainly comprehends that, but has no counter to it.

    I view this as a small version of what is happening to our country. Many people are accepting. They just want some nooz and an entertainment angle, so the teevee stations are happy to oblige. The puppet masters have learned more than a hundred years ago that a lie repeated often enough becomes accepted. When folks like us try to tell them they are poisoning their minds, most won’t accept that. To conclude that they are not rational thinkers will not solve the problem.

    If that seems like I am being defeatist, so be it. I don’t see a good way forward. Bad examples abound.

    1
  18. JimB says:

    The MSM tends to portray the news as if EVERYONE lives in the heart of NYC or Chicago or the like (or, we’re all Californians). That just reinforces how out of touch with the rest of the US the MSM is.

    Of course. Been living with that my whole life. Never lived in a city bigger than ~100k. Now live near one of ~13k. Every other place we visit out of town is bigger. There are two towns nearby that are smaller. But… wait for it… I am a Californian. CA is a small version of the whole continental US, with a vast collection of small towns and a few big cities. Only the big cities have the daily news influence, and it is of course an image of themselves. Different. By design. Sort of.

    I was going to end there, but the town I was born in, with a pop of only ~90k, had its own newspaper building with presses and a gaggle of reporters. That used to be the norm, but is now rare. Now we have the Internet, and it is a great resource if people use it to their advantage. Most don’t, but that is another issue. TV was never local. It was dominated by stations in medium to big cities. That is a slanted view. I love it when some big city “reporter” goes out into the hinterlands and does a snapshot of life. Some of them are amazed.

    There is a lesson in here somewhere, but I am not awake enough to make it clear. Need… more… coffee…

  19. CowboySlim says:

    There are two towns nearby that are smaller.

    Yuuup, Randsburg & Trona, been to both.

  20. Alan says:

    gah, wordpress just ate my long comment about the fallacy of JIT. My point, with examples, is that lean and JIT just moves the requirement to have inventory on hand up the supply chain. Walmart REQUIRES suppliers to maintain warehouses full of product so they can fulfill JIT.

    how in hades can I get a ‘page not found’ error for ‘https://www.ttgnet.com/journal/wp-comments-post.php’ when I click on post comment? Never happened to me before this last week.

    Possibly related to @Rick’s latest RTE changes? If it ain’t broke…

  21. Rick H says:

    Noticed on Jerry’s FB page (run by his sons), that Chaos Manor is up for sale:

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/12051-Laurel-Terrace-Dr-Studio-City-CA-91604/20027957_zpid/

    Cleaned up rather nicely – no more ‘chaos’ that I can see. Listing price is $2,150,000.00 ; below the ‘Zestimate’ (Zillow’s estimated value). Pictures on the listing page.

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  22. drwilliams says:

    Chinese PLA 2015 Dossier on Biowarfare Included Coronaviruses

    https://legalinsurrection.com/2021/05/report-chinese-peoples-liberation-army-2015-dossier-on-bio-warfare-plans-including-coronaviruses/

    Wade did a good job summarizing. After a year of looking for a natural pathway and finding no evidence, the only evidence that has been found points to lab origin.

    At that point I’d call it 99%.

    This latest is just confirmation that the ChiCom’s recognized the potential.

    Remember the 1980’s controversy over neutron bombs?  Where are the antiwar demonstrators marching to demand the dismantling of the not-so-well disguised Wuhan bioweapons lab? Where is the congressional inquiry into Fauci being a dupe or worse?

    2
  23. JimB says:

    Yuuup, Randsburg & Trona, been to both.

    I was thinking of Inyokern and Trona,  but there were almost a dozen small towns a few miles north of Inyokern. No kidding.

    I have always been interested in maps, and used to collect some. There were never any good maps of our local area back in the paper days. All had errors and omissions. Many of the local town were commissioned by real estate companies or the Chamber of Commerce.

    I bought something called Automap for DOS back in the 1990s. I think it was on a bargain table somewhere, and was old at the time. It showed several towns between Inyokern and Pearsonville. The only one I remember was Brown, and I have been to that site. Nothing left. Inyokern was a rail stop, and there were several nearby ramshackle encampments that probably supported the railroad. Some might have been left over from the stagecoach days.

    Randsburg is a separate community 20 miles to the south; it had its own “suburbs.” Johannesburg, Red Mountain, and Atolia come to mind. These are still inhabited, and have been tourist spots over the years.

    Trona is 20 miles east, on the edge of Searles Lake. It is one of the oldest towns in the area. The lake has been solution mined for sodium carbonate for well over a hundred years, and more wealth has been extracted from that lake than all the gold mined in California, or so the story goes. It was originally set up as a potential site for borax extraction to shorten the distance from the borax mines in Death Valley, but currently mined deposits at Boron were discovered about the same time, and this is much closer to the rail head at Mojave. Trona has the capacity to produce ~60 rail cars of sodium carbonate each 8 hour shift, but runs well below that due to market limits. There are two much bigger operations in the US, and they also compete.

    A bit of local history.

  24. Greg Norton says:

    Noticed on Jerry’s FB page (run by his sons), that Chaos Manor is up for sale:

    Cleaned up rather nicely – no more ‘chaos’ that I can see. Listing price is $2,150,000.00 ; below the ‘Zestimate’ (Zillow’s estimated value). Pictures on the listing page.

    End of an era. Sadly I don’t see how the house doesn’t end up “redeveloped”.

  25. lynn says:

    “I might start a GoFundMe for this”
    https://gunfreezone.net/i-might-start-a-gofundme-for-this/

    “If you’re inside a car and a mob of people is literally trying to murder you, you put the gas pedal down and save your own life.”

    “I did some searching and there are a number of used armored CIT (cash in transit) vehicles available. Some built on pretty heavy chassis like International truck frames or Ford F-550 frames.”

    “The problem is those are generally B4/NIJ IIIA rated against handgun rounds, not AR-15s. The rifle resistant B6 vehicles are sedans or Suburbans for VIP protection.”

    “Then I found it.”

    “A used Blackwater Grizzly APC.”

    “A 50 BMG resistant roadblock smashing goon-wagon with a top turret.”

    “All I need is $129,000 dollars.”

  26. ~jim says:

    I noticed Jerry’s house was a probate sale. Did Roberta also die? Knowing Jerry, I’ll bet that house has been well maintained & additions like the pool well engineered. Seems cheap to me, but what do I know?

  27. SteveF says:

    All I need is $129,000 dollars.

    The seller might drop the price if you tell them the vehicle’s new intended purpose.

  28. nick flandrey says:

    There was a nice armored suburban in one of the auctions last year, I think I posted a link.  Seemed like it went for a reasonable price too iirc.

    n

  29. Rick H says:

    @~jim

    Dr. Pournlle’s wife Roberta passed in August 2020, so it is a sale by Jerry’s executors (children).

    Some info, including eulogy, is in the first few entries on this page https://www.jerrypournelle.com/sciencefiction/?s=roberta .

    The children (Alex, etc) have put up some content on the new “Science Fiction” area of Jerry’s site: https://www.jerrypournelle.com/sciencefiction/ . And there is a FB page that has some current content https://www.facebook.com/JerryPournelleChaosManor/ .

     

  30. CowboySlim says:

    We always stop in Peasonville for gas on the way up to and returning from Kennedy Meadows.  Once while coming back from Death Valley past Trona, we saw the burned out rocket framework for the sequel to Planet of The Apes movie.

    We always used ACSC county maps for SoCal counties.  They were great for 4WD trips and we always got back.

  31. Greg Norton says:

    I noticed Jerry’s house was a probate sale. Did Roberta also die? Knowing Jerry, I’ll bet that house has been well maintained & additions like the pool well engineered. Seems cheap to me, but what do I know? 

    Dr. Pournelle documented the repairs and improvements extensively in his columns and online journal.

    Roberta passed last year.

     

  32. JimB says:

    Anyone here know anything about the Colonial Pipeline ransomware attack? I would bet it is eventually traced to an  unpatched computer.

  33. nick flandrey says:

    Probably an old win95 or 98 machine controlling some logging hardware in a closet or fieldhouse somewhere.  Lots of old PCs still connected to old hardware that is costly or impossible to replace, especially machine control interfaces.

    n

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  34. nick flandrey says:

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9561561/Macron-sent-chilling-warning-soldiers-earlier-letter-calling-military-action.html

    ‘Civil war is brewing’: Serving French soldiers send Macron another chilling warning following earlier letter from retired generals calling for military action against ‘Islamists’

    Open letter by a group of serving French soldiers published late on Sunday
    Soldiers warn Macron that the ‘survival’ of France is at stake after he made ‘concessions’ to Islamism
    It echoes the tone of a similar letter printed last month which warned of civil war

    In contrast to the previous letter, it is also open to be signed by the public, with Valeurs Actuelles saying more than 93,000 had done so by Monday morning.

    ‘We are not talking about extending your mandates or conquering others. We are talking about the survival of our country, the survival of your country,’ said the letter, which was addressed to Macron and his cabinet.

    The authors described themselves as active-duty soldiers from the younger generation of the military, a so-called ‘generation of fire’ that had seen active service.

    ‘They have offered up their lives to destroy the Islamism that you have made concessions to on our soil.’

    –more evidence that this is one of those times when everything changes.

    n

  35. lynn says:

    “Chipotle raises average hourly wage, looks to hire 20,000 workers”
    https://finance.yahoo.com/news/chipotle-raises-average-hourly-wage-123501678.html

    “Mon, May 10, 2021, 7:35 AM

    “May 10 (Reuters) – Burrito chain Chipotle Mexican Grill said on Monday it plans to hire 20,000 more employees and will raise the average hourly wage to $15 by the end of June, as fast-food chains in the United States scramble to reopen dine-in services with the easing of pandemic curbs.”

    “Several U.S. chains, including Taco Bell and McDonald’s, are adding benefits or running hiring events to lure applicants as people, flushed with stimulus checks, are wary of returning to work.”

    Yup, CMG is competing with UBI, Universal Basic Income, from the feddies.

  36. nick flandrey says:

    Maybe all the publicity about Gates is a prelude to someone naming him as more than a friend of Epstein’s…

    EXCLUSIVE: ‘He wasn’t just this little computer nerd.’ Bill Gates biographer tells how the young Microsoft founder would visit nude nightclubs and hire strippers to come to his Seattle home and swim naked with his friends

    Biographer James Wallace wrote two books on Bill Gates in the 1990s, shortly after he became the world’s youngest billionaire
    In an interview with DailyMail.com, Wallace, 74, revealed the Microsoft founder was actually a hard-partying bachelor and was not just a ‘little computer nerd’
    ‘A lot of those Microsoft kids back then, they were young guys in pizza-stained t-shirts for two or three days working on software code,’ Wallace said
    ‘Then they would have some pretty wild parties, where they would go out and get strippers in Seattle and bring them over to Bill’s home’
    Wallace said Gates would hire dancers to come to his Laurelhurst home where he would ‘swim naked with his friends in his indoor pool’
    Gates’s longtime friend and former Microsoft executive Vern Raburn corroborated the book’s claims in an interview with DailyMail.com
    Raburn said Gates ‘liked to party’ and wasn’t faithful to wife Melinda when they first began dating, but was ‘proud’ of staying faithful after their nuptials

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9550869/Bill-Gates-biographer-lifts-lid-Microsoft-founders-wild-bachelor-days.html

    n

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  37. lynn says:

    “America Hating Communist and Notorious Georgia Sore Loser Stacey Abrams: Absolutely My Ambition To Run for President”

    Where are all of these communists coming from ? More importantly, how do we get rid of them ?

    Stacey Abrams doesn’t strike me as much of a Communist as she does just another African American woman from my generation with the theme song from “A Different World” stuck in her head for 30+ years.

    Marxist, Communist, not much difference in those two.

    She is a big time proponent of Critical Race Theory. Marxism.

    We will be fighting a war in the streets someday if we do not put down these people hard now.

  38. lynn says:

    What we do works for us. I (and most Canadians) are happy to go unarmed. Don’t fear for us come the zombie apocalypse: Hockey sticks and curling brooms are not licensed or restricted.

    Well, if the zombie apocalypse happens in the winter then you guys will be ok. The zombies go around naked according to John Ringo’s documentary so they will freeze fairly quickly.
    https://www.amazon.com/Under-Graveyard-Black-Tide-Rising/dp/147673660X/?tag=ttgnet-20

    Well, I suppose naked zombies is a better outcome than other possibilities. Naked, lazy zombies would be best. I have read all of Ringo’s books in the series. It is very well thought-out. After reading his books, I stopped watching “The Walking Dead”. You can die from a bite but everyone goes around in shirt-sleeves and shorts? In spite of the likelihood of abrasions or cuts during a scrum, no one ever gets sick from blood splatter from an incurable infection? My “suspend disbelief” alarm went off which left me pointing out stupid behavior rather than enjoying the show.

    I still watch TWD and FTWD but most of the starting actors are gone now so I can see the winding down soon of the tv shows. One of the remaining principal actors on FTWD has gotten chunky. You ain’t gonna be chunky in the zombie apocalypse.

    What is the number one rule of the zombie apocalypse ? Cardio.
    https://zombie.fandom.com/wiki/Zombieland_Survival_Rules

  39. lynn says:

    gah, wordpress just ate my long comment about the fallacy of JIT. My point, with examples, is that lean and JIT just moves the requirement to have inventory on hand up the supply chain. Walmart REQUIRES suppliers to maintain warehouses full of product so they can fulfill JIT.

    Walmart’s suppliers now maintain 18 wheeler trailers of stuff for them. They just roll when necessary and park the trailer behind the store. I have seen up to five trailers with employees running in and out behind our Sugar Land Walmart. I have not looked behind the Richmond Walmart yet.

  40. lynn says:

    I was wondering about the date and location of those empty shelves too.

    I see lots of empty spaces when I go to HEB. Soda aisle, ramen noodles, paper products- notably TP, sometime other areas. I don’t see whole aisles of empty though.

    n

    I am not seeing a lot of empty spaces in our west Sugar Land HEB. Lots of stuff there. The stockers tell me they are going through up to ten 18 wheeler trailers of stuff restocking the store every night. I do see around 20 stockers in there starting about 8 to 9 pm. And it is one of the small HEBs, just 75,000 ft2.

  41. lynn says:

    Man, I am really missing the re-edit facility. I got conditioned to click on the post button and do a WYSIWYG before editing. Hard habit to break once I got trained.

  42. lynn says:

    Noticed on Jerry’s FB page (run by his sons), that Chaos Manor is up for sale:

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/12051-Laurel-Terrace-Dr-Studio-City-CA-91604/20027957_zpid/

    Cleaned up rather nicely – no more ‘chaos’ that I can see. Listing price is $2,150,000.00 ; below the ‘Zestimate’ (Zillow’s estimated value). Pictures on the listing page.

    And if the “kids” transferred the house into their names, they got a step up and will not have to pay income taxes on the sale of the house. Good for them. I think JEP mentioned that he paid $80K for house back in the 1960s.

  43. Geoff Powell says:

    @Lynn:

    AOL!

    G.

     

  44. ~jim says:

    Some info, including eulogy, is in the first few entries on this page https://www.jerrypournelle.com/sciencefiction/?s=roberta

    Thanks Rick.

    The idea of “closure” ticks me off. There’s no such beast. Someone, or something close to you ceases to exist and you grieve. It hurts! Hurts to high heaven. But, like all injuries, you eventually get over it and get on with it. Memories pop up and you smile, unless you like nost-algia and enjoy picking at scabs, in which case you wail, moan and gnash your teeth until no one can stand your company except a shrink at $200/hr who’s happy to diagnose you with PTSD and treat you weekly with no expectations because so little is known about the disorder.

  45. Alan says:

    Anyone here know anything about the Colonial Pipeline ransomware attack? I would bet it is eventually traced to an unpatched computer.

    What I heard initially is that it was their office (i.e. clerical – email, calendar, wp, etc.) computers that were affected which were separate from any pipeline computers, which were not affected. However as a precaution, they did take the pipeline computers offline which resulted in their pipelines being shutdown. If/when they are comfortable that the pipeline computers won’t be affected by the same ransomware they can bring them online and restart the pipeline flows.

    Of course the MSM glosses over the details and make it sound like it was a direct attack on the pipelines.

  46. lynn says:

    @Lynn:

    AOL!

    G.

    I am sorry but I do not understand ?

  47. lynn says:

    “Chipotle raises average hourly wage, looks to hire 20,000 workers”
    https://finance.yahoo.com/news/chipotle-raises-average-hourly-wage-123501678.html

    “Mon, May 10, 2021, 7:35 AM

    “May 10 (Reuters) – Burrito chain Chipotle Mexican Grill said on Monday it plans to hire 20,000 more employees and will raise the average hourly wage to $15 by the end of June, as fast-food chains in the United States scramble to reopen dine-in services with the easing of pandemic curbs.”

    “Several U.S. chains, including Taco Bell and McDonald’s, are adding benefits or running hiring events to lure applicants as people, flushed with stimulus checks, are wary of returning to work.”

    Yup, CMG is competing with UBI, Universal Basic Income, from the feddies.

    I forgot to mention that my CMG does not have an excess of people running it. I stop by there once a week for lunch, usually about 2pm to 3pm. Usually just one server and one cashier. I just thought they were lean and mean, I did not realize that they were having such trouble getting workers. I am glad that they are raising all the existing employees salaries also, they know my face and always say hi.

  48. TV says:

    Maybe all the publicity about Gates is a prelude to someone naming him as more than a friend of Epstein’s…

    I actually think it is a relief to discover “Gates the nerd” was actually “Gates the normal young man” with too much money. I don’t think an attraction to strippers when you are single and 30 years old is the pathway to pedophilia. (If only I had the money to invite strippers home to my non-existent pool when I was 30!) Of course it does not exclude such awful behavior either. From what (little) I have read, it appears Epstein “collected” rich people and would try to compromise them. That does not let those that allowed themselves to be compromised off the hook. Most folks with money get advise and warnings about how many people are out to get them. Professional sports teams and leagues spend a lot of resources to keep bookies and other rabble away from the players. Not everyone (I am thinking of an NFL quarterback) takes that advise. Of course, Epstein does not present as someone after them for their money. He wanted their influence and cover. In the absence of any evidence, I will give Gates a pass.

  49. lynn says:

    “US Supreme Court: Pfizer, Moderna May OWN Your Genes If You Get Jab”
    https://principia-scientific.com/us-supreme-court-pfizer-moderna-may-own-your-genes-if-you-get-jab/

    “This article is prefaced with a shout-out to the good Dr. Carrie Madej (maa-DAY). She is one of thousands of doctors and scientists worldwide suddenly labeled “conspiracy theorists” and “disinformation” by mainstream and social media. They tell peer-reviewed truth about COVID-19 and experimental shots. Dr. Madej is still on Twitter and Facebook for now. She is also featured in a viral video warning people about experiment mRNA and viral vector shots.”

    “Dr. Madej said in a recent interview with The New American:”

    ““The Supreme Court ruled that if there is anything synthetic, not from nature, inside of our genome, then whoever owns the patent on those synthetic parts now owns part or all of you as a human. That means Bill and Melinda Gates et al., The Department of Defense, et al. can literally own a human being. If this synthetic code is taken up into your genome, by law, you could be owned overnight.””

    I am not sure that I buy this.

    Hat tip to:
    https://thelibertydaily.com/

  50. TV says:

    “US Supreme Court: Pfizer, Moderna May OWN Your Genes If You Get Jab”
    https://principia-scientific.com/us-supreme-court-pfizer-moderna-may-own-your-genes-if-you-get-jab/

    “This article is prefaced with a shout-out to the good Dr. Carrie Madej (maa-DAY). She is one of thousands of doctors and scientists worldwide suddenly labeled “conspiracy theorists” and “disinformation” by mainstream and social media. They tell peer-reviewed truth about COVID-19 and experimental shots. Dr. Madej is still on Twitter and Facebook for now. She is also featured in a viral video warning people about experiment mRNA and viral vector shots.”

    “Dr. Madej said in a recent interview with The New American:”

    ““The Supreme Court ruled that if there is anything synthetic, not from nature, inside of our genome, then whoever owns the patent on those synthetic parts now owns part or all of you as a human. That means Bill and Melinda Gates et al., The Department of Defense, et al. can literally own a human being. If this synthetic code is taken up into your genome, by law, you could be owned overnight.””

    I am not sure that I buy this.

    Hat tip to:
    https://thelibertydaily.com/

    I think you really shouldn’t buy a single word from the good (osteopath, not sure she is a medical at all) doctor. Take a look at:

    https://www.mcgill.ca/oss/article/covid-19-critical-thinking-pseudoscience/enough-make-scientists-cry

  51. SteveF says:

    Hard habit to break once I got trained.

    Smack yourself across the nose with a newspaper when you do it wrong. You’ll learn.

    1
  52. Geoff Powell says:

    @Lynn:

    AOL!

    G.

    I am sorry but I do not understand ?

    I was expecting this uery. An obscurity, unless you were a denizen of UseNet back in the day –

    The JARGON File

    G.

     

  53. Geoff Powell says:

    Drat!

    s/uery/query/

    And, in case you don’t recognise that, it’s Unix sed syntax – replace first string with second string from here on.

    My laptop keyboard misses certain keys, notably q and 3 (not 3 on the numeric pad)

    G.

     

  54. MrAtoz says:

    Gates probably had “Yes Men” around him getting his hos. Probably met with PedoStein based on a recommendation from some flunky who was framed by PedoStein.

    /tinfoil hat

  55. Chad says:

    “May 10 (Reuters) – Burrito chain Chipotle Mexican Grill said on Monday it plans to hire 20,000 more employees and will raise the average hourly wage to $15 by the end of June, as fast-food chains in the United States scramble to reopen dine-in services with the easing of pandemic curbs.”

    “Several U.S. chains, including Taco Bell and McDonald’s, are adding benefits or running hiring events to lure applicants as people, flushed with stimulus checks, are wary of returning to work.”

    There are serious staffing issues in entry level jobs right now. I’ve commented on here about it before. Major chains are slashing their hours of operation and even closing some days of the week because nobody is applying. They’re crazy short on staff with no end in sight. I saw video of guy the other day that runs a flooring company complaining that he had 12 interviews for installers (no experience required – will train) lined up one week and ALL of them no-showed. If it’s shit work nobody wants to do it. Period. You can still hire teens to work at retail clothing stores where they’ll work maybe 12 hours per week and spent 10 of it on their phone, but try and get one to mop floors at McDonald’s or load trucks in a warehouse. Minimum wage around here is $9 hour and people won’t even bother applying for anything paying less than $13/hour. I really don’t understand why this isn’t getting more press. It’s a HUGE problem.

  56. ~jim says:

    My laptop keyboard misses certain keys, notably q and 3 (not 3 on the numeric pad)

    I recently noticed that queueing is most peculiar. I can’t think of any other words containing “ueue”. Ukulele? Nope. I’m not resorting to Google, thankyouverymuch.

    Reminds me of another one: Name 3 words containing all 5 vowels in alphabetical order. Lol, I can never remember the third one. It’s Alzheimer’s, I tell ya.

    1
  57. lynn says:

    Once more, I have tried to tell Google Maps where my primary business is. Once again, they have screwed it up. I told them the name of the business and indicated it using their map utility. So instead of putting the name on that location, they have placed the business address on that location. Not the business name. Just another variation on stupid.

    I suspect that us being out in the country has screwed things up since we have a common road with our fellow landowners. Sigh.

  58. Ed says:

     

    There are two towns nearby that are smaller.

    Yuuup, Randsburg & Trona, been to both.

    Trona: Firebugs and meth.  Want to buy a house in California for $15k? Trona’s the place.

  59. JimB says:

    I recently noticed that queueing is most peculiar. I can’t think of any other words containing “ueue”. Ukulele? Nope. I’m not resorting to Google, thankyouverymuch.

    Reminds me. An old friend gave me a gift of a software dictionary that had utilities for anagrams and palindromes. It was fun and fascinating, but took the satisfaction out of discovering them. Now, just Googling anything can get almost anything else. And, just look up all the Wikipedia articles on various word and letter arrangements.

    Also, I wonder if there is a term for strings created by typos on a standard QWERTY keyboard. I have to stop this!

  60. JimB says:

    Want to buy a house in California for $15k? Trona’s the place.

    Sure, but I wouldn’t want to live in it. The lumber might be worth more.:)

  61. Alan says:

    Once more, I have tried to tell Google Maps where my primary business is. Once again, they have screwed it up at the direction of an unnamed TLA gov’t agency.

    FIFY

  62. lynn says:

    “Compressed Air Grid ‘Battery’ To Challenge Tesla Powerpack”
    https://www.zerohedge.com/technology/compressed-air-grid-battery-challenge-tesla-powerpack

    “Solar, wind, batteries, nuclear, tidal power, among others, provide carbon-free electricity. But their generation is usually immediately absorbed into the power grid for use or stored in lithium-ion batteries. Large-scale energy hoarding is expensive, and quite frankly, with base metal prices skyrocketing, maybe unattainable unless the Biden administration allocates billions of dollars to upgrade the grid.”

    “Toronto-based Hydrostor has found a solution to storing power on the grid that doesn’t involve batteries but instead stores energy in the form of compressed air in underground chambers.”

    I have been wondering about this for a long time. The problem is that as the compressed air expands, the water in the air freezes the energy recovery device so heat must be added to the air before you expand it. Looks like these folks have a way to store some of the heat of the compression.

  63. Greg Norton says:

    I think you really shouldn’t buy a single word from the good (osteopath, not sure she is a medical at all) doctor.

    The Navy doctor who saved Trump’s life was an Osteopath.

  64. lynn says:

    Read on the intertubes …

    -Lawyers should never ask a Mississippi grandma a question if they aren’t prepared for the answer.

    In a trial, a Southern small-town prosecuting attorney called his first witness, a grandmotherly, elderly woman to the stand. He approached her and asked, ‘Mrs. Jones, do you know me?’ She responded, ‘Why, yes, I do know you, Mr. Williams. I’ve known you since you were a boy, and frankly, you’ve been a big disappointment to me. You lie, you cheat on your wife, and you manipulate people and talk about them behind their backs. You think you’re a big shot when you haven’t the brains to realize you’ll never amount to anything more than a two-bit paper pusher. Yes, I know you.’

    The lawyer was stunned. Not knowing what else to do, he pointed across the room and asked, ‘Mrs. Jones, do you know the defense attorney?’
    She again replied, ‘Why yes, I do. I’ve known Mr. Bradley since he was a
    youngster, too. He’s lazy, bigoted, and he has a drinking problem. He can’t build a normal relationship with anyone, and his law practice is one of the worst in the entire state. Not to mention he cheated on his wife with three different women. One of them was your wife. Yes, I know him.’

    The defense attorney nearly died.
    The judge asked both counselors to approach the bench and, in a very quiet voice, said,
    ‘If either of you idiots asks her if she knows me, I’ll send you both to the electric chair.’

    11
    1
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  65. lynn says:

    @Lynn:

    AOL!

    G.

    I am sorry but I do not understand ?

    I was expecting this uery. An obscurity, unless you were a denizen of UseNet back in the day –

    The JARGON File

    G.

    Drat!

    s/uery/query/

    And, in case you don’t recognise that, it’s Unix sed syntax – replace first string with second string from here on.

    My laptop keyboard misses certain keys, notably q and 3 (not 3 on the numeric pad)

    G.

    Yes, I have been using Unix computers since 1989. I love vi and use it to edit my websites on the fly. I used vi to write Unix versions of our software for two years on a terminal attached via serial line to a Unix workstation (Apollo DN2500).

    I have only been using Usenet since 1996. And have stupidly been involved in several flame wars. I still use Usenet just about every day on http://www.eternal-september.org/ .

  66. SteveF says:

    A numbered list of the only three words in the English language which have all of the vowels in alphabetical order:

    abstemious
    facetious
    facetiously

    The only word in the English language which has five vowels in a row:

    queueing

    (Nope, didn’t have to look them up. That was some of the very-low-value cluttering my brain.)

    (And note that the flurry of adding words to the dictionary in the past decade or two may have rendered either of the above assertions incorrect.)

  67. SteveF says:

    Still not getting numbered or bulleted lists. Frankly, I blame Gropey Joe for sniffing the HTML tags right out of the comment.

  68. SteveF says:

    Bah.

    s/cluttering/clutter in/

    above.

  69. Greg Norton says:

    Yes, I have been using Unix computers since 1989. I love vi and use it to edit my websites on the fly. I used vi to write Unix versions of our software for two years on a terminal attached via serial line to a Unix workstation (Apollo DN2500).

    I have only been using Usenet since 1996. And have stupidly been involved in several flame wars.

    Vi vs. Emacs or Tabs vs. Spaces flame wars.

  70. paul says:

    I love vi and use it to edit my websites on the fly.

    I use Notepad. It works for me.

    I hacked up a 7.75 pound pork loin today. I vac packed 13 packages of two “chops” with a bit more for stew or something. Cheap eats.

    Tomorrow’s project is to hack up a couple of spiral cut hams and vac pack in meal size or so portions. Ok, two days worth of ham per package. Maybe more… I’m pretty bad about cruising the fridge and getting a slice or chunk of ham for a snack.

    I still need to plant my tomato plants. Lazy bum! I did find a few bags of potting soil in the boat shed a couple of days ago. So much for the “I need dirt” excuse.

  71. paul says:

    Yes, I would like the Edit button back.

    Then again, I can type here, copy and paste into t-bird to catch the misspelled words.

    Or just look like a dummy that can’t spell.  Shrug.

    1
  72. Alan says:

    Noticed on Jerry’s FB page (run by his sons), that Chaos Manor is up for sale:

    Cleaned up rather nicely – no more ‘chaos’ that I can see. Listing price is $2,150,000.00 ; below the ‘Zestimate’ (Zillow’s estimated value). Pictures on the listing page.

    End of an era. Sadly I don’t see how the house doesn’t end up “redeveloped”.

    Yeah, at a minimum a total gut job, possibly a complete tear-down depending on zoning and building permit concerns.

    1
    1
  73. Chad says:

    I love vi and use it to edit my websites on the fly.

    I use Notepad. It works for me.

    I use Notepad++ on PC and TextMate on Mac.

    No offense to anyone here (now that I said that I have free license to say whatever I want… lol), but the vi crowd has always annoyed me a little. They all seem a little too impressed with themselves for using vi. Consequently, I tend to uncontrollably roll my eyes anytime someone says they use vi. 🙂 I think it’s caused me to hate vi for no good reason and avoid it as a result. The nano and emacs crowds aren’t much better.

  74. Alan says:

    Walmart REQUIRES suppliers to maintain warehouses full of product so they can fulfill JIT.

    The Wally folks require a lot from their suppliers, be sure to have your ducks in a row when in Bentonville making your pitch to their buyers. Can be a profitable opportunity if you’re willing and able to jump through their hoops. Of course, they can cut you off just as easily. I’d imagine things are not much better at the Big River or at Tar-jay.

  75. Chad says:

    The Wally folks require a lot from their suppliers, be sure to have your ducks in a row when in Bentonville making your pitch to their buyers. Can be a profitable opportunity if you’re willing and able to jump through their hoops. Of course, they can cut you off just as easily. I’d imagine things are not much better at the Big River or at Tar-jay.

    I had an uncle who used to be fairly high up at Rubbermaid. They hated Walmart. Walmart basically does this: “Hey, we’re the biggest retailer in the world. Want us to carry your stuff? We want products x, y, and z and we’re only going to pay this paltry amount for them. Don’t like it? We also have a meeting with [fill in the blank with your competitor] today.” That is why Walmart and its ilk have a LOT of Sterilite stuff and very little Rubbermaid stuff.

  76. Ed says:

    Noticed on Jerry’s FB page (run by his sons), that Chaos Manor is up for sale:

    Nice pictures. I always wondered what CM actually looked like.

    End of an era.

    A beautiful library. I wonder what happened to the books?

    Jennifer Pournelle wrote a book I liked in the “Mote” universe, wonder if she might finish the stuff Jerry was working on.

  77. Geoff Powell says:

    @Lynn:

    Sorry, I over-generalised non-recognition of “AOL!” to non-recognition of Unixisms like sed.

    Plus a little of “Look how much I know”. An objectionable habit of mine.

    G.

     

    1
  78. Greg Norton says:

    No offense to anyone here (now that I said that I have free license to say whatever I want… lol), but the vi crowd has always annoyed me a little. They all seem a little too impressed with themselves for using vi. Consequently, I tend to uncontrollably roll my eyes anytime someone says they use vi. I think it’s caused me to hate vi for no good reason and avoid it as a result. The nano and emacs crowds aren’t much better.

    At the last job, pre-Covid, part of the interview involved an in-person coding challenge done at the shell prompt with a text-mode editor, either nano or vi. Of course ed was also available for the truly masochistic.

    Since we had to support systems deployed in the field, often via an ssh login, the point was to make sure the developer could function in a bare minimum environment.

  79. Ed says:

    No offense to anyone here (now that I said that I have free license to say whatever I want… lol), but the vi crowd has always annoyed me a little. They all seem a little too impressed with themselves for using vi. Consequently, I tend to uncontrollably roll my eyes anytime someone says they use vi. I think it’s caused me to hate vi for no good reason and avoid it as a result. The nano and emacs crowds aren’t much better.

    I used vi for quite a while since it came with the IBM rs-6000 AIX systems  and became reasonably competent with it, tho never a master.  When the x86 PC platforms became more powerful than the old RS systems it was nice to have an editor that was very similar, vim.

    I still use it occasionally – but the more elaborate functions such as vertical column editing and multiple buffers, Ive forgotten it all…

    I tried Emacs, but for writing engineering Fortran it didn’t offer any convincing advantages (…and I already *had* an OS…)

    Never used Nano, used a free copy of Notepad++ for a while, but it did strange things to file and folder permissions and gave it up.

     

  80. Greg Norton says:

    At the last job, pre-Covid, part of the interview involved an in-person coding challenge done at the shell prompt with a text-mode editor, either nano or vi. Of course ed was also available for the truly masochistic.

    I forgot to add that, post lockdown, the decision was made to conduct the coding challenge in Godbolt, and, IMHO, that watered down the test to just being able to write a C program.

     

  81. lynn says:

    Noticed on Jerry’s FB page (run by his sons), that Chaos Manor is up for sale:

    Nice pictures. I always wondered what CM actually looked like.

    End of an era.

    A beautiful library. I wonder what happened to the books?

    Jennifer Pournelle wrote a book I liked in the “Mote” universe, wonder if she might finish the stuff Jerry was working on.

    One of his son’s just finished the last Marmalukes novel with David Weber.
    https://www.amazon.com/Mamelukes-Jerry-Pournelle/dp/1982125373/?tag=ttgnet-20

  82. Ed says:

    One of his son’s just finished the last Marmalukes novel with David Weber.
    https://www.amazon.com/Mamelukes-Jerry-Pournelle/dp/1982125373/?tag=ttgnet-20

    Dang, that’s right, I have it already on the Kindle, unread.  Thanks for reminding me

  83. Ed says:

    Hmm.  Must have missed the quote button.

    I really miss the re-edit function.  I’d gladly exchange the bullet list for that.

  84. lynn says:

    No offense to anyone here (now that I said that I have free license to say whatever I want… lol), but the vi crowd has always annoyed me a little. They all seem a little too impressed with themselves for using vi. Consequently, I tend to uncontrollably roll my eyes anytime someone says they use vi. I think it’s caused me to hate vi for no good reason and avoid it as a result. The nano and emacs crowds aren’t much better.

    I always used vi because emacs was a resource hog when you had the console user running X-Windows and I was always fighting to get my time slice on the serial terminal.

  85. SteveF says:

    I always used vi because emacs was a resource hog when you had the console user running X-Windows and I was always fighting to get my time slice on the serial terminal.

    Sounds like that’s a habit you developed forty years ago. It’s no longer applicable to today’s world and you need to break that habit. Smack yourself over the nose with a newspaper!

  86. drwilliams says:

    mRNA vaccine manufacturers are not claiming to be editing genes, they are explicitly claiming that they are not. If it turned out that they were they would immediately be subject to the largest tort claim for damages in the history of the world.

    (Note: The second sentence above is only true until we pin the virus on the ChiComs)

    The other factor that comes into play is that animals and plants may be owned, whereas people cannot. (Yes, I know that is effectively violated in dozens of countries and their is clandestine illegal slavery in the U.S.) If you own an animal and change it’s genes through traditional breeding or the use of a modern laboratory technique, you own the result subject to the then-current state of the law. The Harvard aka Oncomouse was patented in the 1980’s.

    If any person or legal entity (eg, a corporation) changed a person’s genes in situ without prior informed consent, they would not own the result.

    For other situations, there are some historical cases that are interesting–see Wiki entries for Henrietta Lacks and Moore vs. Regents of California. Also of note is the Hagahai patent case, in which the U.S. NIH submitted a patent application–which was later withdrawn–for a cell line developed from a donor from an indigenous tribe in New Guinea.

    Things to note:

    The historical accounts are rife with qualifiers like “as was the practice”.

    The Moore case stopped at the California Supreme Court. Lots has changed since then, and no case has gone to the U.S. Supreme Court.

    In addition to legal constraints, medicine has bioethics requirements that must be considered and can change over time.

    Everything is subject to change at the whim of large corporations or the U.S. government.

    Read those medical forms, and do not give “informed consent” to anyone wanting to diddle your genes inside or out, or keep any samples without an expiration date.

    FINALLY

    None of the above is to be considered medical or legal advice.

     

  87. nick flandrey says:

    CDC sent this out…

    How to Talk About COVID-19 Vaccines with Friends and Family

    COVID-19 vaccines are new, and it’s normal for people to have questions about them. The sheer amount of information—and misinformation—about COVID-19 vaccines can be overwhelming to anyone. You can help by listening without judgement and identifying the root of their concerns. Acknowledge their emotions so they know they have been heard. Ask open-ended questions to explore their concerns, ask permission to share information, and help them find their own reason to get vaccinated.

    Listen to their questions with empathy
    Two people on cell phones with empathetic looks on their faces

    COVID-19 vaccines are new, and it’s normal to for people to have questions about them. The sheer amount of information—and misinformation—about COVID-19 vaccines can be overwhelming to anyone. You can help by listening without judgement and identifying the root of their concerns.

    Acknowledge their emotions so they know they have been heard. For example, you can say, “It sounds like you are stressed at work and home, and concerns about the vaccine are another source of stress. That’s really tough.”

    Ask open-ended questions to explore their concerns
    woman in mask asking other woman in mask with question marks above her head

    Open-ended questions are meant to elicit more than a yes-or-no answer. Asking open-ended questions can help you understand what your friend or family member is worried about, where they learned any troubling information, and what they have done to get answers to their questions. For example, you can ask, “How did watching that news report make you feel? What did you do next?”

    Try not to sound judgmental, and ask questions that help you understand their concerns. For example, avoid things like, “That’s a silly concern,” or “Why would you be worried about that?”

    It goes on for the other headings too.

    TRY not to sound judgemental. Well, ok then.

    n

  88. drwilliams says:

    How about

    “Just get with the effing program and take the shot!”

  89. nick flandrey says:

    https://www.thegatewaypundit.com/2021/05/texas-attorney-general-ken-paxton-gets-involved-plano-police-officer-allows-blm-antifa-illegally-block-traffic-brandish-weapon/

    –while part of me says “do your job”, this is the same guy who jumped in and mooted all the peoples’ bills who had jumped at the chance to sign up for cheaper power without understanding the risks during the cold snap. The urge to jump in and wave your wand is powerful and hard to resist. This won’t lead to good things in the long run, however much the Plano cops need a smackdown.

    n

  90. Greg Norton says:

    –while part of me says “do your job”, this is the same guy who jumped in and mooted all the peoples’ bills who had jumped at the chance to sign up for cheaper power without understanding the risks during the cold snap. The urge to jump in and wave your wand is powerful and hard to resist. This won’t lead to good things in the long run, however much the Plano cops need a smackdown.

    Isn’t Paxton still under investigation?

    Another Griddy will be up and running next year if not by the time temps hit 100 this summer.

  91. Nick Flandrey says:

    I’m taking some meds and going to bed.  See you all in the morning.

    n

  92. SteveF says:

    Several times in the past few years, and with increasing frequency, I’ve heard or read advice for talking with unbelievers about the reality and danger of global cooling global warming climate change climate disruption dread carrrbon. And of the dangers of white supremacy. And of the reality and danger of the Chinese Disease (not that we’re allowed to call it that). And of the wisdom of our glorious leaders. And of the safety and efficacy of the coronavirus “vaccines”.

    In every case, making the appearance of listening to their concerns was emphasized and several approaches to persuading even the most reluctant listener were given.

    Not once was the possibility raised that the bothersome libtard — for all of the above are positions firmly held by libtards — could be wrong and that the other person was honest and well-informed and capable of logic. Of course not. One of the defining characteristics of cults is that their tenets are not to be questioned.

  93. SteveF says:

    Bah. Imagine that most of the climate-related horrors are struck out.

    I find myself unimpressed with the site’s visual editor, what it (correctly) shows in visual mode and in text mode, and the much reduced set of allowed tags when the comment is processed and posted. What we see is definitely not what we get.

  94. drwilliams says:

    @Lynn

    re: compressed air storage

    More CA meadowpie in the sky

    ”More like 60%” efficiency? Doubt it will get over 50.

    Lifespan of 50 years? Maybe the hole in the ground, but the pumps will get replaced ever 10-15 years, the piping not much better, and so on.

    Trump would have said “You have to repay the train money first”. Biden will sign what they put in front of him and tax the rest of the country to pay for it.

  95. SteveF says:

    Trump would have said “You have to repay the train money first”. Biden will sign what they put in front of him and tax the rest of the country to pay for it.

    … while Heels-up Harris is pulling the train.

    1
    1
    8
    1
  96. Marcelo says:

    Hmmm, no edit? I’m stuffed. Lots of typos coming your way. 🙁

  97. Rick H says:

    OK, I’ve had enough of your whining about the missing comment editor. 🙂

    It’s back. For now.

    Now, all of you behave.

    6
  98. Marcelo says:

    Must be on board the Mayflower. Did not get here yet. I am patient and accept your promise. Many thanks Rick!

  99. lynn says:

    @Lynn

    re: compressed air storage

    More CA meadowpie in the sky

    ”More like 60%” efficiency? Doubt it will get over 50.

    Lifespan of 50 years? Maybe the hole in the ground, but the pumps will get replaced ever 10-15 years, the piping not much better, and so on.

    Trump would have said “You have to repay the train money first”. Biden will sign what they put in front of him and tax the rest of the country to pay for it.

    50% efficiency will work. We are going to need everything in this country to make up for the destroyed coal industry.

    Of course, put some inline natural gas burners before the turboexpanders and I can get your efficiency up to 60%. Or even 70%. A little bit of heat goes a long way on an expander.

    The bad thing is that air is fairly nasty. Those machines will have to be cleaned fairly often.

    Modern day gas turbines are running a 40 to 1 compression ratio with a 2,600 F firing temperature. That did not happen in just a day. It took decades of refinement and hard work. If these guys have a good idea then hopefully they will get it to working. We’ve got plenty of night time power, we need a lot more day time power.

  100. JimB says:

    We’ve got plenty of night time power, we need a lot more day time power.

    Solar? Nukes?

    It’s a travesty we are not building 100 fission reactors, plus some breeders to recycle fuel while we start a crash program to get fusion going.

    Right, DadCooks? Hey! Are you OK? Worrying.

    1
  101. ayjblog says:

    Nice of late Dr Pournelle, I remember his experiments with satellite internet, his musings looking the window and wifi assist to cell signal.

    Thanks for the pointer

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