Thursday, 12 October 2017

09:13 – It was 60.9F (16C) when I took Colin out at 0615, partly cloudy.

They’re still working on the house next door, but it looks as though things are winding down. The last few days, the flooring guy’s truck has been parked up there. It’s the same company and the same installer who did our downstairs and master bath flooring recently. He’s installing hardwood and ceramic tile throughout.

When Ricky and Kim bought the place at auction, they told us they were going to do a lot of work on it, but we didn’t expect as much as they’re doing. They basically gutted the interior, added a deck, replaced the windows, replaced the HVAC, and ripped out the floors and walls down to the joists. My guess is that they’ll end up spending as much on renovations as they spent on the house itself. When it’s finally ready for Grace to move in, I think she’ll be very pleased with it.


I spent two or three hours yesterday trying to get my Epson Perfection V350 Photo scanner working on my Linux Mint desktop. No joy. I’ve been using scanners on Linux boxes for 15 years now, with various scanners and various distros. Sometimes, it Just Works. Sometimes, it eventually works, but is a hassle to get set up. Sometimes, it works fine until a software update that borks it. Sometimes, I just can’t get it to work. This time, I actually started to wonder if my scanner was dead.

So I connected my notebook, which also runs Linux Mint, to the scanner. At first, I thought I wouldn’t be able to get it working, either. I did get it working with Image Scan! for Linux and xsane, although I haven’t tried to get the Epson scanner software working yet.

54 thoughts on “Thursday, 12 October 2017”

  1. I have actually found that for scanning documents the all-in-one printers do quite well. Not sure how the drivers will work with Linux but I have not had issues with Windows. I have one Canon MX922 printer that is hooked to the network. All three of my computers can print to the printer or scan from the printer. Seems to work well.

    HSN, where I bought the printer, lists the printer for $149.00. I bought it when they had a special for $59.00 with free shipping. Just recently I needed new ink for the printer. Buying the ink package, which includes all four inks, from Costco cost me $60.00. The original printer came with cartridges that were full ink cartridges. It seems to me that I should just buy a new printer when they are on sale, keep the ink, and throw away the printer.

    I do have an Epson scanner that will scan photographs and transparencies. Hooked that up a few years ago and scanned in all my transparencies and negatives. Then I threw away all the stuff I had scanned. I was never going to use them again as I now had digital copies. The scanner has now sat on the shelf for about two years unused.

    When scanning the transparencies it was interesting to see the results of transparency film aging, some of which was 40 years old. Kodachrome looked as good as they day it was developed. To my eye there was no difference. Kodacolor negatives all scanned well although it was difficult to tell if there was a color shift. Next was Ektachrome. That film had turned slightly toward the blue end of the color spectrum. Fujichrome was about the same as Ektachrome. Agfachrome was entirely useless as the only color left was red. Then there was Seattle FilmWorks. That stuff was entirely clear, as in nothing left on the slide. Fortunately Agfachrome and Seattle FilmWorks were only experiments and I don’t think I lost anything worthwhile.

    In my unscientific results and personal opinion Kodak made the best film ever produced for consumer use. The colors, the stability, the consistency, were top notch. It is a shame that Kodak missed the digital revolution and now the photo division is basically non-existent.

  2. currently 69F with 82%RH. No rain forcast, but who knows?

    From my FEMA update, things continue to improve in PR and the USVI, but PR still has a long row to hoe.

    This is what it has on the Cali wildfires:

    California Wildfires
    Current Situation
    18 large fires burning (FMAGs issued for 10) across 150k acres of state
    and private land.
    Impacts:
    • 24 confirmed fatalities (CalOES law enforcement)
    Approximately 106k people under Mandatory Evacuations
    • 36,513 (+3,100) homes threatened; 94 (+44) damaged / 1,313 (+168)
    destroyed
    • Within existing fire perimeters: Population 26,270, 2 mobile home
    parks, 12 schools, 10 emergency medical services, 10 fire stations, 5
    NSS shelters, 13 nursing homes, 3 cell towers
    • 50k customers without power and 36k without gas (FEMA Reg IX)
    State/Local Response:
    • Governor declared a state of emergency in Napa, Sonoma, Butte,
    Lake, Solano, Mendocino, Nevada, Orange, and Yuba counties
    • CA EOC at Partial Activation
    • 59 Red Cross and independent shelters open with 5,117 (+2.8k)
    occupants (ESF-6 as of 3:30 a.m. EDT)

    n

  3. A month or two ago, someone mentioned a web site that had a list of more secure and privacy sensitive programs and services. I’m thinking Dave Hardy mentioned it and it was Crypto something. Foolishly, I didn’t bookmark it.

  4. The vegas shooting continues to stink as the FBI and local LEOs continue to change the story, all the while introducing MORE questions, rather than answering them.

    Had a conversation where someone more cynical than me thought that one scenario I haven’t seen much if any coverage. NO ONE has come up with a good motive yet. How’s this one fit?

    The shooting was an assassination. One precision shot, the rest to cover the killing. It would explain why he stopped shooting, there was enough.

    I have no doubt that there are people and organizations fully capable of killing 57 people to get one. But how many?

    n

  5. The shooting was an assassination

    A motive right out of a movie or TV show but is it plausable in real life?
    About as plausable as a distraction for a casino robbery.

    Based on evidence found in the room, it seemed likely the shooter planed to escape the police say. But for someone to plan the shooting so methodicaly and in such detail and yet completely bungle the escape seems absurd. Still way too many loose ends and questions for me to even speculate.

  6. “Kodachrome looked as good as they day it was developed. To my eye there was no difference. ”

    Yep. Kodachrome used a non-substantive process, which meant there were no color couplers in the three emulsion layers. That meant that each layer had to be re-exposed with monochromatic light and then color-developed separately with a different color developer that produced the dye for that layer. That allowed Kodak to use much more stable dyes that also provided much lower graininess, at the expense of a very long, complex development process. The substantive films (Kodacolor, Agfacolor, etc. etc.) had color couplers already in the emulsion. Stability of the final dyes took a backseat.

    This was what I was working on when I was at RIT in the mid-70’s pursuing my masters. It all started when I was 14 years old and wrote a letter to Kodak telling them that I was processing Kodachrome at home and had some questions. I got a reply from a Kodak scientist, who encouraged my interest but said it wasn’t possible to process Kodachrome at home. I replied to him that it in fact was possible because I was doing it, explained in detail how I was doing it, and enclosed a strip of Kodachrome that I’d processed as a negative.

    He replied, answering some of my original questions, and sent me a box with some of the chemicals that I’d told him I was having to synthesize. He also said that if I decided to major in chemistry in undergrad, to talk to him about doing grad in photographic chemistry and that he was pretty sure Kodak would pay my way through at RIT, which at the time was basically a Kodak subsidiary.

  7. That’s odd, about the scanner. In recent history, I’ve had far less trouble getting scanners to work with Linux than with Windows. For me, it’s been “plug it in and it works”, whereas with Windows I have to install some driver, which may or may not actually be available on the manufacturer’s download page. Anyhow, good luck…

    On the military front: I assume y’all have seen (or will see) the article on Peter Grant’s blog. If West Point is in such a sad state, the rot has gone farther than I imagined…

  8. I have actually found that for scanning documents the all-in-one printers do quite well.

    I’ll second the all-in-one recommendation. We have an HP AIO on our network that is configured to place scans into Samba shares on the Fedora Linux home server. It works very well, even for photographs.

    Caveat: The big downside of newish HP AIO units is that nothing will work if an ink cartridge needs to be replaced. At least, that’s the way it is with ours.

    My Linux-only laptop (ye olde Latitude E6400) has Fedora and Mint in a dual boot configuration sharing swap and /home partitions with different primary user account names for each OS configured using the same GID/UID. I don’t completely trust Mint’s grub2 management, having been burned a couple of times, and I’ve found that hardware support has lagged as of late in Mint.

  9. downside of newish HP AIO units is that nothing will work if an ink cartridge needs to be replaced

    I think most of the printers are that way as my Canon has the same annoying behavior. Nothing works if one of the ink cartridges is out. Want to print black and the yellow cartridge is out, nope, not going to happen. Want to scan, nope, not until you replace the yellow cartridge.

    About three years ago I got a great deal on a Brother color laser printer. I paid $138 for a full color, duplexing, networked laser printer that was on sale on Black Friday at Staples.

    Had a problem with that printer about a year ago, covering on the fuser roller developed a tear. Printer was out of warranty but I contacted Brother anyway. Turns out this a known problem and Brother covered the repair. I told them to just send me the part and I would replace it as it was only a couple of screws. Nope. They sent out a Pitney Bowes repair person to replace the part that had been FedEx-ed to my home address with explicit instructions to not open the box. Repair guy said it was a known problem as he has done many of the same repair. Also told me to not back down if Brother says it is no longer a covered warranty repair.

    I also found out that the color cartridge assemblies are actually two piece. One part contains the rollers, the other part contains the actual toner cartridge. Each part has a serial number. Brother asked me for the serial number from the black roller assembly and the toner unit. I guess that is to verify I was using Brother toner. Not a problem as I was on the original toner cartridges.

    Original cartridges are getting low. Purchased new toner cartridges, cost me $320.00, about twice what I paid for the original printer. With what I print now those cartridges should last until I am worm food.

  10. The yellow cartridge in particular is used to print microdot serial or GUID numbers on every output page. Lots of info online. Kind of like the way a typewriter has a unique ‘fingerprint’, so does each printer, although one was the result of physical processes and one was intentionally produced to provide a facsimile for the process. certain 3 letter agencies don’t want you to print money or ransom notes anonymously….

    n

  11. @Nick: Yep, there was some case not too long ago, where the microdots were a decisive factor. If the governments had to push this through today, there are enough of us aware of privacy and security issues to raise a fuss. Back in the day, not so much – and now it’s old news.

  12. Interesting view from space of the California fires:

    https://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/IOTD/view.php?id=91103

    “The shooting was an assassination”. Hmmm. I think there was an old John Crosby or Thomas Perry novel featuring a mass shooting, to cover the true target (who was shot more times than anyone else). But Perry, at any rate, always held to the assumption that one normally doesn’t “work” in Vegas, because that’s where the outfit honcho’s retire to…

  13. The yellow cartridge in particular is used to print microdot serial or GUID numbers on every output page

    So what happens on a black only printer?

    I have heard about this before but closely examining printed output from my printer using a bright blue light does not reveal any yellow dots of any kind. There are no dots of any kind on the output page, black, yellow, green, blue or any color. Thus I think it is a false story about printer identification. It may be the result of custom firmware on an enterprise printer or copier but not true on consumer equipment.

    Yellow gets used up most on color printers because yellow is used in more colors than any of the other primary colors.

  14. He had at least 2 dry runs, or maybe the target wasn’t in the basket….

    “Shibumi” by Trevanian has MI-6 killing a whole plane load of people to cover up the assassination of one and that was back in 1979…

    The mid-70’s film “Two Minute Warning” has a sniper firing into a crowded football stadium for no revealed reason. When aired on TV they added scenes that made the shooting into a distraction for an art theft. [thanks wikipedia]

    There have been others as well, notably Matthew Bracken in his Enemies series.

    Comparing this real life (but seriously hole-y story) to fiction seems appropriate.

    n

  15. regarding the dots, I’ve found them myself, and my hp printer won’t work without yellow, even in ‘black only’ mode. It will work without the other colors.

    recently printer manfs have been selling new printers with very small tank ink carts installed to cut down on ‘I’ll just buy a new printer rather than ink’ purchases. I’m sure their margins are much higher on ink than hardware.

    n

  16. another revealing trick, try to scan money into an editor like photoshop. You will most likely get an anti-counterfitting popup. This means that the software is LOOKING AT every image and making decisions. What other things is it looking for and what other actions does it take? (and why when you set up the networking does it need to know the gateway and DNS servers?)

    n

  17. @nick: That’s a new one on me! Is the popup just a warning, or does the software actually degrade the scan? I’ll have to try this with Swiss money, but I’m going to bet it’s a US-only feature.

    Edit: I just answered my own question: apparently the newest versions refuse to work with images of currency. How stupid can you get?

    Really, it’s pretty silly anyway. Even modern scanners/printers won’t reproduce the fine details, and anyway, it’s the paper that’s hardest to fake. Hand someone a perfect-looking bill, and they will immediately feel that the paper is wrong.

  18. regarding the dots, I’ve found them myself, and my hp printer won’t work without yellow, even in ‘black only’ mode. It will work without the other colors.

    We picked up a LaserJet 4000N at a school surplus sale. That is our black and white network printer. 10BaseT — a little slow, but it always works. $20 plus ~ $120 every 10,000 pages (estimated) for the cartridge.

    Sadly, the school system got tired of dealing with the aggressive Indian and Pakistani resellers that work the sales in the Austin area so they now contract with someone for the tech surplus.

  19. @brad, it’s esp ridiculous as there are enumerated legitimate uses for images of US currency. There is a legal restriction that it be reproduced at 50% or 150% of actual size, but that’s it.

    LOTS of coupons and adverts used to feature modified versions of US currency. Of course, some of those companies got visits from the Secret Service (a division of the Treasury Dept) when their coupons started showing up in change machines. Turns out that most bill changers and dollar bill validators used to only look at the corners of a bill. If you just changed the face in the middle, and printed at 100%, bill readers would accept them… and some machines were loose enough that even photocopies would work (despite the intentional ‘stretch’ and ‘shrink’ built into photocopiers to prevent just that.)

    n

  20. @ greg, I’ve got a big stack of older laser printers I got for a couple of bucks. If I want to print a manual or something similar, I use an old one. Mine came from schools and local agencies. Good luck tracking anything embedded in those…..

    n

  21. another fun fact, do some googling about hard drives in copiers and workgroup printers….

    n

    “”Like a computer, the internal hard drive on a digital printer stores a copy of everything you print or photocopy, and this security risk is often overlooked by major companies,” says Jeffrey Bender, President of JJ Bender. “

  22. Sure ‘nuf: I just scanned a Swiss 20 franc bill, tried to open it in Photoshop, and voila: “This application does not support the editing of banknote images”

    Judging from the link, they offer this “protection” for 26 different currencies. What’s particularly stupid, of course, is that any of a zillion other applications will happily work with the images. Having nothing else handy, I opened it in Paint, no problem.

    The hard-drives in printers: this only applies to printers intended for use in companies. They need the disk so that they can store up documents for printing, when several people want to print at the same time. They also do a lot of other things, like storing standard documents that you can print on demand, directly from the printer.

    Given a disk, of course the documents leave a trail – just like any file leaves traces on any disk. Your average home printer doesn’t have a disk, so this doesn’t apply.

  23. Yes, but your personal and private information is routinely printed to workgroup printers. At the Dr office, at the DMV, at court, etc. Those printers end up in the hands of people like “the aggressive Indian and Pakistani resellers that work the sales in the Austin area. ”

    Not a huge concern for me, but it could be.

    Mainly it’s on my mind because I’ve just reformated a 1TB WD drive I got for $1 at an estate sale. Windows wouldn’t open it, and the WD “Book” it was packaged in wasn’t booting either. Installing the HFS+ drivers didn’t help, even though there was a partition there (in fact several). Since I’m not a data thief or recovery expert, I just gave up my curiosity and reformatted so I can use it.

    I’ve previously recounted the young lady’s HD that I got at a yard sale, full of her personal pictures, and how I returned it to her. She had no idea how it ended up in a yard sale…..

    n

  24. Mainly it’s on my mind because I’ve just reformated a 1TB WD drive I got for $1 at an estate sale. Windows wouldn’t open it, and the WD “Book” it was packaged in wasn’t booting either. Installing the HFS+ drivers didn’t help, even though there was a partition there (in fact several). Since I’m not a data thief or recovery expert, I just gave up my curiosity and reformatted so I can use it.

    Next time, just for grins, take a look at the disc using Brian Carrier’s SleuthKit. It is available on the Caine computer forensics distribution.

    Just be sure to connect the hard drive to the computer via a USB-SATA/PATA cable kit … and only after Caine is booted.

  25. Yes, but your personal and private information is routinely printed to workgroup printers. At the Dr office, at the DMV, at court, etc. Those printers end up in the hands of people like “the aggressive Indian and Pakistani resellers that work the sales in the Austin area. ”

    Fortunately, I don’t think most of those guys stop to think about the merchandise they are buying and selling. Kinda like the old SNL sketch, “Its got Sony guts.”

  26. I’ve previously recounted the young lady’s HD that I got at a yard sale, full of her personal pictures, and how I returned it to her.

    As I have previously posted the story about my friend buying a used computer at a computer show (remember those) about 15-20 years ago.

    We got the computer home, booted it up, WIN 3.1. Started exploring the system. Found out the system was owned by a lawyer who did tax returns for some of his clients. On that system I found the tax files for about 50 clients. I installed the version of Turbo Tax that supported those files and easily opened the files. Within those files I had account numbers, account institutions, DOB, SSN, and names. Everything I needed to steal from these people.

    I suggested my friend contact the lawyer and offer to clean the disk for say $2,000.00. Another option I proposed was to contact the people and inform them that their lawyer had compromised their personal financial information and they should consider filing a lawsuit against the lawyer.

    My friend declined my advice and instead contacted the lawyer and informed him of what we found. The lawyer was shocked and said he had gotten a new computer and the place where he bought the computer had taken the old computer and promised to wipe out the information. My friend agreed to format the disk and destroy the information.

    At a minimum I felt that bar in the lawyer’s home state should have been contacted and informed of the lawyer’s careless disregard for his client’s information. That the lawyer was also using Turbo Tax was somewhat surprising.

    regarding the dots, I’ve found them myself

    I have never seen the dots in the half dozen or so color printers that I have used, ink, laser and wax. I have heard the story but was never able to confirm with my own visual inspection. Maybe I have lived a sheltered life.

    The hard-drives in printers: this only applies to printers intended for use in companies.

    More specifically it applies to machines that copy, fax, print, collate, staple etc. Workgroup printers with high volume. The printer has to have some way to spool the jobs. Regular networked printers just show as busy and a user printing may have to wait or the printing will time out.

    Supposedly when the job is complete the printer is supposed to erase the file. But as with all file systems erasing is just a directory entry and the data still exists on the drive until overwritten. In a high use printer only the last few copy, fax or print jobs would be available.

    Where I used to work we had a Konica-Minolta printer with the above capabilities. Something happened to the printer and required a service call. Motherboard had gone bad, service contract so no charge. But the service tech could not get the new motherboard to work with the copy engine. There is a serial number or something associated with each unit and unless the systems know about each other they will fail to work. The tech was on the phone for several hours for about three days and finally gave up. The printer vendor just brought out an entirely new printer. DRM at it’s finest. I did not know that stealing printer parts, or duplicating, were that big of a problem.

  27. hard drives in copiers and workgroup printers….

    Our company uses big RICOH workgroup printer/copier/scanners.
    These have a feature that can be set to run a DOD level bit wipe of the deleted files & unused (slack) on the drive at regular intervals. Given that these devices are used in our IT, Financial, Legal, R&D departments we keep a close eye on them. They are segregated on a separate VLAN with strict security and monitoring.

    I seem to recall that in Desert Storm #1, the Iraqi air defense was degraded by a virus delivered by installing a smart printer on their defense network that had a virus embedded in the code.

  28. ERP migration project is wrapping up. The big kick is from the folks that didn’t bother to check their reports after the 2nd-to-last pass, which entailed a newer database version. They were the first to scream when they couldn’t print their reports, but were quickly mouse-like when we asked why they didn’t point out their problems 2 weeks prior. (One claimed that he did check. He quieted down when we logged him into the previous version and lo! it didn’t work there, either.)

    I work with some saints. We had some fairly serious problems, and we worked through them methodically until they were solved. Dave & I still have about a month of details to attend to, but we’re up and running with a fairly significant upgrade.

    Hooray, IT!

  29. @JimL: That kind of project is really satisfying, when is wraps up successfully. Congrats!

  30. That driveway sensor? Interesting…
    As expected, I had to increase the sensitivity a bit on the transmitter to detect the side by side when it passes on the far side of the driveway from the sensor. The receiver is hanging on the wall behind the grandfather clock. Out of sight and one less thing to dust. Plus I had a picture hook there needing to be used. Yesterday I opened the house because the weather was so nice. Including the window next to the clock. The windows are from Home Depot. Double pane, double hung, tilt in for cleaning, low-e, argon, everything but mini-blinds in the glass.

    Driveway sensor stopped working. I walked up the drive to check it for something like an armadillo digging up and chewing on the wire. No problems. I power cycled the receiver. That did nothing. I closed the window. That fixed it.

    The signal can pass through one layer of window but not two. ? For a system rated for 2600 feet of range? I think I need to move the receiver if my reception is that touchy.

    I just looked at the signal on my phone. I have 2 bars most of the time. Metal roof. Standing in front of a window I have 2 bars. Open the window? I have 3 bars.

    A newer version of the side by side: https://www.tractorsupply.com/tsc/product/american-landmaster-trail-wagon-tw450e-series-4×2-utility-vehicle-429cc-efi-engine

  31. The window might have a metalic film as part of the low E or other coating.

    might not even be visible.

    n

  32. I do not see any coating. From outside the windows are almost black. With the old windows you could see straight thru the house while 50 feet from the house.

  33. “Congress warned North Korean EMP attack would kill ‘90% of all Americans'”
    http://www.washingtonexaminer.com/congress-warned-north-korean-emp-attack-would-kill-90-of-all-americans/article/2637349

    “Congress was warned Thursday that North Korea is capable of attacking the U.S. today with a nuclear EMP bomb that could indefinitely shut down the electric power grid and kill 90 percent of “all Americans” within a year.”

    “Just six months ago, most experts thought North Korea’s nuclear arsenal was primitive, some academics claiming it had as few as 6 A-Bombs. Now the intelligence community reportedly estimates North Korea has 60 nuclear weapons.”

    Hat tip to:
    http://drudgereport.com/

  34. Is this the same “intelligence community” that is working overtime to undermine tRump and the same one that’s had so many wunnerful successes over the decades?

  35. Is this the same “intelligence community” that is working overtime to undermine tRump and the same one that’s had so many wunnerful successes over the decades?

    I was wondering this myself. How reliable are these bozos ?

  36. “… Now the intelligence community reportedly estimates North Korea has 60 nuclear weapons.”

    Bring back SAC!

  37. “I was wondering this myself. How reliable are these bozos ?”

    Great minds think alike….

    “Bring back SAC!”

    There were SAC bases all over the place up here in Nova Anglia at one time, including Plattsburgh, just across the lake and south a bit; Loring up in northeastern Maine; Westover in Maffachufetts, etc. Westover has been reactivated, last I knew. Let’s see…

    ….ah, never mind. It’s an Air Reserve base now, with multiple commands.

    Half my AF time was the hot mess in SEA and the other half was protecting NORAD resources, including nuke warheads. From the ages of 17-21.

  38. The wild-ass psycho reactions by snowflakes and cupcakes and SJWs and progs are only the extreme versions of the way regular ol’ libtards react when confronted with their bullshit. If they can’t defeat us with a rational argument or even listen to us, they start shouting and becoming very angry and as the kids say nowadays, losing their shit.

    I get it here to a point, when any of these arguments start, which are rare now (because I think it’s a waste of my time) and when being perfectly rational and calm, they get increasingly vehement and strident. Like I say, a waste of time.

  39. “Found: Real Reason “Bump Stock Bill” Is Being Pushed Through Unread”
    https://conservativetribune.com/bump-stock-bill-pushed-congress/

    “There are more problems, as well. The wording of the bill is so vague that it could apply to a wide variety of common gun accessories and gunsmithing services. Most troubling, it could conceivably be used as a “backdoor” confiscation scheme against millions of legal firearm owners.”

    “The bill’s terminology targets “any part or combination of parts that is designed and functions to increase the rate of fire of a semi-automatic rifle.” Think about that for a moment.”

    I see any magazine bigger than 1 round being banned by this bill. And retro-actively which is against the Constitution.

    I cannot believe any Redumplican would vote for this bill. Oh wait, I can if I apply OFD’s rule, “The stupid half of the war party”.

  40. I don’t condone the guy’s sign but I do support his right to stand there with it.

    The sign looks like it came out of the WBC print shop, but the “God Hates Fags” people usually have a few casually dressed lawyers milling around in addition to police protection.

    I’ll give the WBC credit — they are skillful manipulators of the media and legal system.

  41. And that screeching was horrible for a “man”.

    If not a psychiatrist, he/she/it certainly needs to see an endocrinologist.

  42. The Stupid Half of the Party will go along like poleaxed oxen with whatever the Evil Half wants to do. Tweedle-dee and Tweedle-dum, as they continue to rip us off from womb to tomb.

    And good luck sending whomever out to confiscate our chit. This ain’t Moscow circa 1935 where peeps just run down the stairs with their armloads of stuff and drop to their knees, later being carted off to the Gulag. Or the cellars of the Lubyanka.

    Watch this for how it worked back then:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Chekist

    Murkans are still largely of British Protestant, i.e., Anglo-Saxon stock and culture, like it or not, and we have a very long history of violence and rebellion. We’ll eat a certain amount of chit and then all Hell will break loose.

    Look up Hannah Duston, too. But don’t piss her off.

  43. WBC = Westboro Baptist Church ?

    And yes.

    Yeah. They’ve been fairly quiet since Pa Phelps died, however.

  44. If you are having trouble setting up your scanner to work with linux, have you tried VueScan? I’ve used it with Mint to run my old HP scanner that windows no longer supports. It seems to be pretty good software and there are versions for windows and linus.

  45. I gave up on Mint for just the reasons that RBT mentioned in his post earlier. Every update was another adventure, mostly borking things that used to work OK. When I had it, I had to download and run a bunch of drivers for our new Brother all-in-one to get it to work.

    And here’s a fun summary of how we’re now clued in, many of us, as to our “betters:”

    https://townhall.com/columnists/kurtschlichter/2017/10/12/behold-our-betters-n2393375?amp=true

  46. “Principle Numero Uno: If there aren’t any Mexicans to pick the lettuce, that doesn’t mean the owner of the crop lets the lettuce rot in the field.”

    If there aren’t any Mexicans to pick the lettuce … farmers and universities will develop machinery and growing techniques to automate harvesting.

    Lettuce isn’t the problem as much as citrus and delicate produce like tomatoes. Amazon’s facility outside Tampa sits on what used to be the most productive tomato fields in the world, and the main ingredient in Florida Key Lime Pie is not produced commercially in FL or even the US anymore because the trees are nasty and labor intensive to cultivate and harvest.

    I think I’ve shared this before — look at a bottle of Key Lime juice at the grocery store, “The Taste Of Old Key West” … Hencho en Mexico.

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