Thursday, 17 August 2017

08:57 – It was 65.3F (18.5C) when I took Colin out at 0650, clear and sunny.

While Barbara was down in Winston yesterday, I spent some time working downstairs in the food storage areas. I found the four #10 cans of Augason Powdered Whole Eggs I’d ordered a couple of months ago, and moved them into the freezer, where they joined seven other cans of eggs. That’s roughly equivalent to 65 dozen fresh eggs. Not that we’ll be eating scrambled eggs or anything, but over the course of a year that gives us a couple eggs a day for making up pancakes or whatever.

The remainder of the freezer space is filled with vitamins and other mostly OTC drugs, which leaves the refrigerator. I’m currently moving a couple hundred 28-ounce cans of Keystone Meats and 12.5-ounce cans of Costco chicken into the refrigerator, which’ll extend their real-world shelf lives by a factor of at least four. I’d like to get us eventually up to one can of meat per day for a year. That won’t all fit in the refrigerator, obviously, but the more we can fit in there, the better. Eventually, I want to start pressure-canning meats, like the sausage Barbara gets at Costco. I may even try pressure-canning bacon.

Any space left in the refrigerator for now will be filled with #10 cans of Augason powdered cheese and butter, 15-ounce jars of Bertolli Alfredo sauce, and perhaps a few bottles of olive oil. When we’re finished, that refrigerator/freezer will be jam-packed with relatively high-value food.

I’ll keep the oldest stuff on the shelves at room temperature, where we’ll use it first. Room temperature downstairs, particularly in the unfinished area, is noticeably cooler than upstairs. In cold weather, it gets positively chilly down there.

I’m moving most oils/fats, syrups, vinegar, etc. to the upper, less accessible shelves in the unfinished area. Currently, there are seven or eight gallons of pancake syrup, a couple gallons of white vinegar, and about five gallons of vegetable/olive oil on the top shelf. They’ll soon be joined by a dozen 3-pound cans of shortening, a 3-gallon jug of peanut oil, several more gallons of vegetable/olive oil, and a gallon or two of wine vinegar.


Speaking of oils/fats/lipids reminds me of something I’ve meant to mention for a while. The LDS Church LTS recommendation is to store one quart/liter of oils per person per month, or about 2 pounds’ worth. Keep in mind that the current LDS iron-ration recommendations are for a minimal diet to sustain life, so you should consider them an absolute minimum.

The LDS recommendations are particularly light on oils/fats. Overall, the recommended amounts provide about 2,200 calories/day. Carbohydrates and proteins both average about 1,700 calories/pound, give or take. Oils average about 4,000 calories per pound. That means that the LDS recommendations provide a diet in which only about 12% of the calories come from fats. That’s much, much lower than a typical American diet, which yields somewhere in the 25% to 35% range of calories from fats. A diet that’s too low in lipids can have undesirable gastrointestinal and other effects, and should be avoided.

So instead of storing only one quart/liter per person-month, my goal is to store about twice that much, and I recommend that others do the same. Call it two quarts/liters or 4 pounds per person-month. That’s roughly six gallons or 48 pounds per person-year, or 27 gallons/216 pounds for the 4.5 of us.

You can store the bulk of your oils/fats supply as the obvious items: vegetable/olive oil and shortening. But other fatty items like butter, ghee, lard, peanut butter, mayonnaise, and so on also count towards the total.

59 thoughts on “Thursday, 17 August 2017”

  1. Thanks, RBT. Could you say something about the “storability” of fats and how to stop them becoming rancid, please? I suppose ghee / clarified butter / “schmalz” is pretty stable, and I’ve used prepared mayonnaise long after its “best before” date with no ill effects. I know butter can be frozen, but does it have to be?

  2. Wow, that seems really high. We don’t stint the butter or peanut oil, but we don’t use anywhere NEAR that amount. Sure you didn’t miss a decimal point somewhere?

    Even assuming our consumption would double if cooking from LTS bulk, I don’t think we’d get there. 2 adults and 2 little kids, and we eat about a pound of butter a week, and maybe a couple tablespoons of oil. If we have waffles more than once it MIGHT get to 6 Tbs / week. A liter of oil currently lasts months. Making bread or tortillas might double oil consumption again, but still….

    “Call it two quarts/liters or 4 pounds per person-month.” or in our case, 3 adult equivalents or 6 liters per month for our family. That’s more than a liter a week! My gut says that’s crazy high.

    I know you guys are eating more from bulk, what’s your actual consumption been?

    Anyone baking bread every day? Got feedback?

    n

  3. Hey Denis, I freeze all our butter. I don’t even change the packaging. (It comes with individual bars wrapped in waxed paper, inside waxed cardboard box.) In our deep freezer it lasts essentially forever. I’m eating butter a couple years old, it looks tastes and cooks exactly the same as new.

    The lard I stored on the shelf all melted out of it’s paper wrap and box. Messy. ‘course it’s really much hotter than “room temperature” in my garage.

    I use peanut oil for liquid oil. It has vitamin E added to “preserve freshness” and it keeps for years. I’ve got some at least 2 years old sitting on the shelf. Once opened, it stores in the kitchen cabinet for a long time without spoiling. I’ve never had any go rancid.

    I just bought some glass jars of ghee, but left them in the car. They seem to have expanded in the heat, pushed out past the sealed lid, and made a mess. I don’t trust it for LTS now, so it’s in the refrigerator.

    In our daily cooking, I use saved bacon fat as a primary fat. Got a metal strainer/storage container sitting on the counter. Nice white fat.

    n

  4. Thanks, nick!

    Mmmm – Bacon fat. What the breakfast of champions is cooked in!

  5. Yes, then the lunch of champions, then the dinner of champions!

    If you let an apple get a bit too soft for tasty eating raw, I like to core, then slice in 1/2″ slices and fry in bacon grease. Makes a great side dish with roasted pork, or with a bit of maple syrup or sugar, a side for pancakes, or even just as dessert. Takes about 15-20 minutes to get nice and brown, and soft all the way thru.

    n

  6. “Could you say something about the “storability” of fats and how to stop them becoming rancid, please?”

    I think I’ve written about this in detail before, but I should probably do so again. Basically, there are several different mechanisms by which rancidity occurs.

    The most common is moisture-catalyzed rancidity (hydrolysis), which is why people have been rendering fats for thousands of years. Heating them drives off all moisture, which greatly increases shelf life. The other common mechanisms are UV-catalyzed rancidity–which you can prevent simply by keep the stored lipids in the dark, or reasonably so–and heat-catalyzed rancidity, which occurs faster as the storage temperature rises.

    But fats also go rancid eventually from self-catalysis, which occurs even in the absence of moisture, light, and heat. This process is much, much slower than the first three mechanisms, but it does eventually cause lipids to go rancid.

    The other issue is saturation level. Polyunsaturated fats, with all those double bonds, are the least stable types. Mono-unsaturated are next down the list. But saturated fats are remarkably stable, and the more highly saturated the more stable they are. That’s why people have been storing rendered lard and suet for millennia. Even at room temperature they keep well. That’s why, in general, animal fats store much better than vegetable fats.

  7. “Sure you didn’t miss a decimal point somewhere?”

    Me, drop a decimal point? Surely you jest.

    The problem is, you’re looking at ADDED fats. If you consumed only the amounts of lipids you mention, your whole family would have starved to death long ago. Even during its War on Fats, the federal government was recommending that 25% to 35% of an adult’s calories should come from fats. You and your family are obviously getting the vast majority of your lipids directly from the foods you eat.

    In a situation where you’re eating from LTS, you’re likely to find that you need to use a LOT more added lipids to keep you all healthy.

    To answer your question about our consumption, Barbara is more like you guys. She uses some but not much Country Crock or similar, and she does often fry or stir-fry meals. I’ve always tried to keep my dietary intake of fats high, with a particular focus on saturated fats. Accordingly, I add butter to many, many meals. I go through probably a pound or more of butter per week, just for me. Barbara eats actual butter only on popcorn, so she may consume 10 pounds of so of it per year.

  8. I think I’ve written about this in detail before, but I should probably do so again.

    In the right rail of this site you could have a block of links to older posts answering frequently asked questions.

  9. “In the right rail of this site you could have a block of links to older posts answering frequently asked questions.”

    But, but…. That would require me to be ORGANIZED.

  10. “The problem is, you’re looking at ADDED fats. ”

    And we had the same issue with added salt….

    Since my storage includes prepared food, ie canned food, and packaged pasta, whatever included fats in our normal diet are present in our stored food diet too. Sure, there will be less meat, and my daughter won’t be begging for the strip of fat off the ribeye, but there will be a certain amount of included fats.

    If I find we’re living off the fat of the land, our most likely meat source is feral hogs, they’ve got fat in spades. Deer, maybe not so much but we don’t have a nuisance deer problem here. I can see adding fat to rice, and simple flat breads usually call for a fat in the making, and most people would add a fat when eating them, if available.

    Still, unless you’re eating nothing but bulk flour and rice and beans, you should be getting fat in your diet.

    Like salt, I agree that it’s so cheap you can’t really make a case against storing it, but it can get difficult for LTS due to aging, and most families are never going to use enough to keep it rotated properly. added- which means some people are going to look at that high number and go “that’s just nuts, no way that number can be right” which then calls all the other numbers into question.

    Perhaps the answer, for a reco list, is to note the reason it is so much higher than a normal cook/grocery buyer is likely to expect.

    n

  11. I am off myself to the vets group and will try to keep the yak away from recent nooz events. (now becoming increasingly obvious it’s been a long-planned false-flag caper by the commies in government and media and they not only don’t mind people being hurt or killed now, they welcome it) Vets issues only from now on.

    A bit of sun here but it’s that bright white overcast thing going on, and possible t-storms coming later.

  12. But, but…. That would require me to be ORGANIZED.

    Ewwww… I withdraw the suggestion.

  13. “Since my storage includes prepared food, ie canned food, and packaged pasta, whatever included fats in our normal diet are present in our stored food diet too. ”

    Good point, and we in fact have a reasonable amount of lipids stored in the form of packaged foods. But again, I was referring specifically to LDS LTS food storage recommendations, which contain very little fat other than those you store explicitly.

    In reality, our personal LTS food items contain a fair amount of fat, although it varies greatly from product to product. A 12.5-ounce can of white meat chicken, for example, may contain only 3 grams or so of total fat, while a 28-ounce can of Keystone Ground beef contains about 49 grams and a 28-ounce can of their pork contains 35 grams.

    (Incidentally, what a deal Amazon has for Prime members. They sell a pack of one 28-ounce can each of Keystone Ground Beef and Pork for only $32.88. Walmart sells the same for $12.56, so Amazon is charging only three times as much for the same product.)

    BTW, the lipids issue is why I always recommend that people who like tuna buy the version packed in oil.

  14. “I think I’ve written about this in detail before, but I should probably do so again. ”

    Many thanks for having done so!

    “BTW, the lipids issue is why I always recommend that people who like tuna buy the version packed in oil.”

    Please, please don’t tell me that tuna is de rigeur for LTS. I can’t stand the canned stuff, whether in oil or in brine, though I do like fresh tuna. If I must have oily canned fish (or canned oily fish), I’d prefer mackerel or sardines…

  15. Incidentally, what a deal Amazon has for Prime members. They sell a pack of one 28-ounce can each of Keystone Ground Beef and Pork for only $32.88. Walmart sells the same for $12.56, so Amazon is charging only three times as much for the same product.

    I’m not a Prime member, and, as a result, lately I’ve found that my shipments from Big River don’t go out for 2-3 days after ordering. I always try to find it elsewhere first.

    If Barnes and Noble finally goes under in the near future, in that particular distribution category you will get a preview of what Amazon would do with the rest of retail given the opportunity. I still think we are experiencing “peak” Amazon, however, even if the government beyond Trump isn’t interested in looking at the anti trust implications of Bezos’ antics.

  16. Do oils store well in plastic containers? I seem to recall someone complaining the plastic containers went to shit after a period of time and so oils should be stored in glass or metal.

  17. “Please, please don’t tell me that tuna is de rigeur for LTS.”

    Not at all. That’s why I said “people who like tuna”. I don’t mind canned tuna at all, but Barbara despises it. I do have maybe a dozen or two of the small (7-ounce?) cans in LTS, mainly because I like it and Barbara has said she’d eat it once in a while. When she’s away and I’m fending for myself, I sometimes make up a batch of Tuna Shock. (http://www.dutchgirl.net/recipes/tunashock.html)

    Conversely, she likes canned salmon, which I despise. I wouldn’t mind it so much if the cans weren’t full of bones and skin. Yuck. So we have a few cans on hand for her.

  18. “Do oils store well in plastic containers? I seem to recall someone complaining the plastic containers went to shit after a period of time and so oils should be stored in glass or metal.”

    I suppose it depends on the type of plastic and its thickness. Of the common plastics, PET/PETE is most impervious to moisture and oxygen penetration, and doesn’t appear to be softened or otherwise affected by edible oils. A lot of bottled oil comes in PET, but HDPE/LDPE are also common, and I’ve seen it bottled in PP. All of those latter are much, much (a factor of 10 or so) less impervious to moisture and oxygen, thickness for thickness.

  19. Thanks, RBT. Apologies for my tongue in cheek about tuna, and I bow to “Dutchgirl’s” superior TIC. The potato chip recipe is grandiose.

    I too despise canned salmon – if only they would can it without the skin and bones, one could at least make mousse or soufflée out of it…

  20. Tuna salad (a little mayo, maybe onion or celery) for a sandwich

    Salmon patties (mix w/ egg & bread crumbs, then fry in a little oil).

    Both are yummy. Wife won’t eat either one, so the kinder won’t touch them either.

    And I grew up thinking I was the picky eater. (I don’t like raw tomatoes.)

  21. Wife insists on solid albacore in water. I’m not so picky and in fact my favorite is Italian canned tuna in olive oil. Don’t eat it that often but mostly as tuna salad with plenty of mayo so that makes up for lack of oil. The other option is a good tuna casserole and that requires lot of different ingredients to be worth eatng. Of course chicken works just as well.

  22. I learned to love Tuna salad on baked potato when I lived in Nottingham.

  23. I just upgraded my FireFox to the 64 bit version on my 16 GB ram Windows 7 x64 office pc. I had to do so manually since it was still defaulting to 32 bit for existing users. The following website will let you download the installer which will switch you to 64 bit if you shutdown FF first.
    https://www.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/new/?scene=2

    FF does not run any faster but now it has four threads to respond to me whereas the 32 bit version only uses one thread. The 32 bit version of FF was locking up on me all the time and crashing due to out of memory if I let it go. FF 64 bit is definitely still a memory hog, it is using 566 MB with only three windows open.

    Funny, it kept my “Autofill Forms” add-on but it deleted my ‘U-block” add-on. I will run without U-Block for a while and see how it goes.

  24. I eat butter only at other people’s tables. I prefer margarine for its easy spreadability.

    Does butter and margarine need to be refrigerated? I do but ISTR someone here saying it can be stored at room temperature.

  25. I love tuna (and kippers and herring) and will eat it fresh or canned. I like salmon but not from a can, for the reasons stated above.

  26. Margarine can be stored at room temperature at least for months. I don’t have personal experience with longer than that. (And no recent experience with margarine.)

    Butter can be kept at room temperature at least for a couple days. It goes rancid, but I don’t know how long it takes.

    “At room temperature” means around 70F. Not nick’s preferred 105F nor whatever his garage gets to.

  27. I have a one Kg tub of margarine in the fridge. Haven’t opened it for two years. I wonder if it’s still good…

  28. Margarine in the fridge will keep until homo sapiens is extinct and bees have evolved into the successor species.

  29. FF does not run any faster but now it has four threads to respond to me whereas the 32 bit version only uses one thread. The 32 bit version of FF was locking up on me all the time and crashing due to out of memory if I let it go. FF 64 bit is definitely still a memory hog, it is using 566 MB with only three windows open.

    Firefox started adding Rust code so the bloat may get worse before it gets better.

    On the plus side, a 64 bit executable can take advantage of additional registers and opcodes available in x86_64. Firefox performance should improve … in theory.

  30. Quality butter can be left at room temperature for more than a week, it actually gets a stale taste before it turns rancid. We use Costco’s Kirkland Organic Butter.

    Since butter is produced regionally the quality can vary quite a bit, depending on weather, cattle feed, and handling (both of the cows and product). So YMMV.

  31. We keep butter in a tub on the kitchen counter. Easy to spread. Tastes better than margarine.

    Tub? Ziplock box. Think square “disposable tupperware” container about 4x4x2 inches. Two cups volume.

    The butter for the last couple of years is from Costco. I get the 4 pound package of salted butter that has four one pound sticks. I cut a stick in half and put each in their own tub. One for the counter, one in the fridge. Basically two normal sticks of butter per tub.

    Keep it covered and it keeps quite a while. I buy salted butter because I like the taste and salt is a preservative.

    added- Here “room temperature” while on A/C is about 77F. In the winter about 72F. During nice weather with the windows open we vary from 65F to 85+F.

  32. On the plus side, a 64 bit executable can take advantage of additional registers and opcodes available in x86_64. Firefox performance should improve … in theory.

    In theory, yes. In practice, no.

    But, the biggest change in FireFox from 32 bit to 64 bit is the changing from one main thread to four main threads. That should really liven things up. I don’t know why that they did not put a separate thread for each new window.

  33. I too buy the costco butter. The sticks are a different size than I grew up with, but the same measure.

    I just leave a stick on the counter in a covered butter dish. The other sticks from the box live in the fridge until needed. Nice and soft, and we use it much faster than it can get stale.

    n

  34. and the religion of piss strikes again

    http://www.thegatewaypundit.com/2017/08/update-multiple-people-dead-many-injured-barcelona-terror-attack-graphic-footage-victims/

    but the biggest terror threat in the US? – according to CNN it’s right wing extremists.

    http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2017-08-17/cnns-chris-cuomo-extreme-right-number-one-domestic-terror-threat-us

    Meanwhile, left wing extremists are calling for T’s assasination….

    http://www.thegatewaypundit.com/2017/08/missouri-top-democrat-calls-patriot-calling-trump-assassination-video/

    back home after a 6hr round trip. picked up good money and a great microscope.

    n

  35. Funny thing on my trip today.

    I saw truck after truck with Amazon branding. Big new semi trailers, 5 or six headed west from Houston, one at least headed into Houston, and one headed north toward San Marcos and Austin.

    Amazon owns/leases trailers. They are going vertical on the delivery side too.

    n

  36. Oh what the hell? I’m passing through the living room and “they” have destroyed the carving at Stone Mountain?

    This is not going to end well.

    Then again, DC is full of privileged whlte male stuff so maybe there is a way to drain the swamp after all.

    What happens when the white guys are gone? Rhodesia?

  37. “What happens when the white guys are gone? Rhodesia?”

    If we let it.

    Easier to break than to build…

    n

  38. Easier to break than to build…

    Especially for stupid subhumans who couldn’t invent or build or create anything if their lives depended on it.

  39. Butter can be kept at room temperature at least for a couple days. It goes rancid, but I don’t know how long it takes.

    I keep a stick of butter smashed in a “butter bell” on the counter. It lasts at least two weeks. DuckDuckGo or Amazon butter bell.

  40. Appopo of nothing in particular, I’ll note that at the reception desk of the university facility where I picked up my stuff, there was a sign attached to the receptionist’s nameplate.

    It was a rainbow, with the words “student Ally”

    I’m guessing that today’s special snowflakes need to be reassured that “Jane random person” isn’t going to attack them and drag them behind a pickup truck for being gay when they need to interact with university personnel.

    The butch dikes and hardcore fags I went to college with would have PUMMELED anyone that fucking weak back in the late 80’s.

    My how far they’ve come, their afraid of everyone, even though I can’t think of a more gay friendly time or place than today’s college campuses.

    nick

    Added, and how fucking patronizing is it to advertise that you are an “ally” to gays, like they’re too fucking weak to make their way in the normal world.

  41. like they’re too fucking weak to make their way in the normal world.

    So far as college students go, evidence seems to suggest…

  42. But, the biggest change in FireFox from 32 bit to 64 bit is the changing from one main thread to four main threads. That should really liven things up. I don’t know why that they did not put a separate thread for each new window.

    Most laptop users have two core CPUs, two hardware threads per core, and cache sizes are limited. Save the threads for the I/O.

    Google has a different philosophy with a software thread per page, but my guess is that the closed source Chrome has some secret sauce for C++ memory management that Mozilla doesn’t have the resources to match.

  43. Oh what the hell? I’m passing through the living room and “they” have destroyed the carving at Stone Mountain?

    That carving isn’t going anywhere unless the Progs cut a deal with the Norks for a nuke.

  44. “I learned to love Tuna salad on baked potato when I lived in Nottingham.”

    Mrs. OFD loves tuner salad with a baked spud on the side. One of her fave repasts. I usually load up the tuner salad with chopped walnuts and dried cranberries. Load the spuds similarly with bacon and sour cream and cheese and chopped onion. Plus chili powder from New Mexico (she picks up bags of it every time she’s out that way).

    “Did I not get the memo about Lincoln being a Confederate?”

    They’re either blindingly stupid or somebody read that he wanted to send the black people back to Afrika ricky-tick. And has plenty of statements on record that he thought they were inferior beings and Whitey should rule.

    “…until homo sapiens is extinct and bees have evolved into the successor species…”

    I thought bees were dying out up here; I figure cockroaches, coyotes, crows and rats will succeed us.

    WRT to buttah; we keep it in a covered butter dish in the cupboard above the sink and we go through a stick every two or three days, no problemo. No margarine here; it tastes fake. Usually unsalted buttah but I’ve also started getting the salted kind, and usually our local Vermont brand from the Cabot creamery empire up here.

    Musloids continue to murder people overseas and here; progs keep pushing and pushing and pushing here, along with BLM and antifa types. But the biggest threat is Whitey, of course. I’m guessing they have no fucking clue just how much a lethal threat Whitey can and will be if they keep pushing. They need to stop being stupid and illiterate and look up some history on Whitey’s accomplishments outside of the usual science, engineering, invention, law, liberty, literature, etc., etc., and study up on the war machines we’ve put together. (nothing really great since the early 90s “cakewalk” assault on Iraq, of course).

    My recommended targets, however, are not so much the rank-and-file scum, unless they’re immediate lethal threats, but their enablers and agitprop specialists and government stooges. Which is why I strongly advocate creating LISTS with all the relevant ID intel on our local nabobs, like judges, DA’s, mayors, town and city managers, etc., etc. These are the people undermining and betraying us and destroying the country.

  45. Looks like a required diversity/sensitivity training session to me. Love the comments.

    She needs a student ally, STAT!

    n

  46. That shit was just getting started when I was working for state gummint up here and I simply refused to go. I ended up giving them nearly zero notice later and walking out of the job. They ran a couple of those at IBM and I got out of that, too; busy inside the data centers putting out fires, doncha know, systems that suddenly went out of whack for some odd reason, very busy, mission-critical, catch ya later, bye.

  47. Check out the class/audience; almost all white female and metrosexual male masochists.

    Geez. Just, geez. The day is rapidly coming where I won’t even be able to travel with MrsAtoz. “Who’s that White fucker in the room? Get him!!!” She travels in 99% Libturdian circles. And most of the people saying that *are* White! At least they are loaded with Obamabucks. Show me da money!

  48. Yeah, it’s mostly white folks caving in to this stuff and then denouncing their fellow white people. Pretty funny if it wasn’t so fucked up.

    And there is a different Murka out there, whoda thunk it, eh?

    “To get out beyond successful neighborhoods in DC, New York City and the elite college campuses – beyond where prevailing socio-political opinions are made – is to see another America.”

    https://www.theguardian.com/society/2017/feb/21/outside-coastal-bubbles-to-say-america-is-already-great-rings-hollow?CMP=share_btn_tw

  49. Watching the gap between the political sides in the US widen is…shocking. In particular, the sheer brainless hypocrisy of the Antifa crowd: it’s horrifying that a baker doesn’t want to service a gay wedding, but it’s just fine for hosting companies to ban websites they dislike and for dating sites to ban anyone they consider a white supremacist. I expect the companies doing stuff like that are going on right-wing lists, and come to regret their actions in a few years.

    Meanwhile the silent majority isn’t so silent anymore, and the alt-right has discovered that striking back at the prog’s and Antifa terrorists works. Interesting times ahead, in the sense of the Chinese saying…

  50. But, the biggest change in FireFox from 32 bit to 64 bit is the changing from one main thread to four main threads. That should really liven things up. I don’t know why that they did not put a separate thread for each new window.

    Most laptop users have two core CPUs, two hardware threads per core, and cache sizes are limited. Save the threads for the I/O.

    Google has a different philosophy with a software thread per page, but my guess is that the closed source Chrome has some secret sauce for C++ memory management that Mozilla doesn’t have the resources to match.

    Huh ? You are the first person that I have ever heard complain about multiple threads in software. Since the speed wall of cpus has been hit, 4 Ghz with air cooling and 5 Ghz with liquid cooling, multiple threads is the only way to get any new speed out of software. In fact, the newest display adapters are now coming with 4,096 cpus and their software is extremely multiple threaded.

    I have read the Chrome allocates a new thread per page page. I have also heard that the Chrome memory requirements are 2X that of FireFox. Still, I hope that FireFox goes to a new thread per page also. That seems to be the best way to stop blocking pages from blocking the entire internet browser.

    BTW, my phone has a quad core ARM cpu. And it is an old Samsung Galaxy S5.

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