Thur. Sept. 30, 2021 – hard at work or hardly working, how could you tell?

By on September 30th, 2021 in decline and fall, ebay, WuFlu

Maybe some rain early, then sun and heat. Like yesterday. By the end of the day it was pretty nice. I’m hoping for more of that today.

I did my pickups, did some ebay listings. Even sold a book late at night. Moved some stuff out of the house to the patio. Naturally, I get a question about when THAT is moving. Oy vey, a simple “hey, I noticed that stuff is moving out. That’s great” wouldn’t be out of line would it? Moving goalposts, I got ’em.

Today should be more of the same. Start with cleanups and listing, get the shipping ready, move some stuff. I have to get to my secondary and move some stuff there, so I will get out of the house in the afternoon.

It’s really amazing how much inertia I’ve built up in my life over the last few years. I need to get it moving in a better direction, but it is a LARGE amount of inertia.

Many people also have a lot of inertia in their lives. That and normalcy bias often keep them from prepping. It’s normal to think things will be pretty much the same, they usually are. It’s also normal that bad things happen all the time, all over the place. We tend to see the first and discount the second.

It’s normal to have systems, habits, and a routine- that’s what humans do. And while those routines [mostly/probably/hopefully] work well when the situation is normal, they can be very counter productive when the situation changes away from normal. We will often cling to habits past the point where they become counter productive. I’ve mentioned it before when I get into the habit of buying or looking out for a particular thing, until I realize suddenly that I have many more of them than I need.

Don’t let your inertia or normalcy bias keep you from prepping for whatever is coming. We are living in the middle of a worldwide pandemic. ANYTHING can and does happen. Any preps are better than no preps. You still have time.

Stack all the things!

nick

67 Comments and discussion on "Thur. Sept. 30, 2021 – hard at work or hardly working, how could you tell?"

  1. Nick Flandrey says:

    72F ande 99%RH at 6am. Damp is an understatement.

    n

  2. drwilliams says:

    from last night:

    Speaker of the House Donald J. Trump.

    Daily bills. Operation Warp Impeach.

    Speaker Trump:
    “It’s traditional. Just pass the bills. You can read them later to find out what’s in there.”

  3. Greg Norton says:

    La Brea” series on Hulu: s1e1 “pilot”
    https://www.imdb.com/title/tt11640018/

    “A massive sinkhole mysteriously opens up in Los Angeles, separating part of a family in an unexplainable primeval world, alongside a disparate group of strangers.”

    Apparently inspired by “Lost”.

    or “Land of the Lost”.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bxFt4Fwl200

    “Land of the Lost” was more sophisticated than a typical kids show if you paid attention. Larry Niven wrote two scripts for the first season.

     

  4. Nick Flandrey says:

    Loved Land of the Lost when I was a kid. Found the complete DVD set and gave it to my sibling for Christmas. Was told I “won Christmas” with the gift.

    n

  5. nick flandrey says:

    Computer was very slow this am.   So I look at the disk activity.  It’s pegged at 100% use.

    Hmm.

    Windows is doing prefetch… of what I have no idea.  I’ve got updates as off and deferred as possible.

    Media Player is indexing my entire CD collection.  Again.

    FFox is doing somthing with /storage/defaults// // cache/every website I’ve ever been to seems like…

    FFox is updating the ‘bad websites’ checker for phishing, cryptomining etc

    My pdf program is d/l’ing ads for the start page splash screen.

    Windows is d/l’ing a bunch of .bmp and .jpg to a folder in the /assembly/ dir tree among other dubious things.

    FFox is using 93% of available memory with only 2 windows and 6 tabs in each, so I’m pageswapping like mad.

    F me.

    I closed FFox and it took almost 5 minutes for all the FFox processes and disk activity to end.

    Now MS is d/l’ing graphic files into something ///Dina/ // / deviceIcons/ xxxxxx.jpg  and doing prefetch for something AND dropbox is updating despite not currently running on this pc.

    prefetch just d/l’d a freaking pdf

    n

  6. Ray Thompson says:

    Loved Land of the Lost when I was a kid.

    Was that the show with the Sleestack (or however it is spelled)? I enjoyed that show some but did not get to watch it much.

    I also liked the show “Dinosaurs” (not the mama). Some of those shows were more sophisticated than what the targeted age group was led to believe.

    I grew up in the Bugs Bunny, Yogi Bear, Coyote and Road Runner cartoons on Saturday morning. I was also a fan of “Whirlybirds” show. For some reason I remember the episode where they used the tail rotor to drive a generator to power an iron lung to save a girl that had polio. That really scared me as polio was still fairly widespread. That episode made me realize how serious was polio.

    There was “Engineer Bill” with “Red Light, Green Light” where you drank your milk on green light and stopped on red light. There was also “Clutch Cargo”. May have been local shows for the Los Angeles area. Captain Kangaroo, Mr. Green Jeans, Bunny Rabbit, Mr. Moose, Tom Terrific and his mighty dog Manfred were also favorites.

    Really enjoyed Mr. Wizard. I actually got to speak with Don Herbert many moons ago. I told him how his show piqued my interest in science and technology and thanked him for making science interesting. Nothing he probably had not heard thousands of times. Interesting conversation that lasted about 10 minutes. Nice guy.

  7. Greg Norton says:

    Speaker Trump:
    “It’s traditional. Just pass the bills. You can read them later to find out what’s in there.” 

    Nothing would get done, including a floor vote on a new VP if that was necessary.

    It is a nuclear option, however. A new Speaker needs a majority of the chamber, not just Republican votes, and some of those who voted “yes” on impeachment will keep their seats.

    Jaime Herrera-Beutler in WA State is a sympathy vote in that district for instance. We lived there for four years and know the situation well. I think she is still getting mileage out of the child’s illness.

  8. Ray Thompson says:

    Press is reporting that a woman that survived Spanish Flu, WWII, died after contracting COVID. The lady was 105. Maybe she died because, oh I don’t know, she was freaking OLD. Nothing to do with COVID.

    But it makes headlines.

    6
    1
  9. Greg Norton says:

    I also liked the show “Dinosaurs” (not the mama). Some of those shows were more sophisticated than what the targeted age group was led to believe.

    “Dinosaurs” was an instant classic but has a downer of a series ending that probably isn’t even appropriate for elementary age kids.

    Dark doesn’t even begin to describe the half hour.

    Disney ran enough shows for syndication, but much like “The Wonder Years”, the finale made the show a tough sell. IIRC, it is on Disney+.

  10. MrAtoz says:

    Ha, ha!

    Senate parliamentarian rules out Democrats’ immigration plan B

    The Dumbocrats are persistent in trying to get a new voting block. I can’t wait for Shot Girl’s ™ screams of how one person can stop Congress. I hope this heaping pile of shite falls right on top of Stretch and Chucky.

    3
  11. Greg Norton says:

    “Dinosaurs” was an instant classic but has a downer of a series ending that probably isn’t even appropriate for elementary age kids.

    And I forgot that “Dinosaurs” was a showcase for Kevin Clash — “Not the mama” — the heralded “second ccoming of Jim Henson … but black” until the molestation charges started floating around.

     

  12. Greg Norton says:

    The Dumbocrats are persistent in trying to get a new voting block. I can’t wait for Shot Girl’s ™ screams of how one person can stop Congress. I hope this heaping pile of shite falls right on top of Stretch and Chucky. 

    As Senate President, the Vice President can simply overrule the Parliamentarian. The Dems are letting that woman take the heat for a lot of decisions this session with an eye on the midterms.

    2
  13. nick flandrey says:

    Land of the Lost had the Sleestax…

    We had Clutch Cargo in the Chicago area too.  Weird animation with real mouths.  Since he had a house boy named Hajji I think it probably won’t be back on tv any time soon.

    Sunday morning sucked for TV.  we only had a Jewish cartoon show, something about a treehouse, and the guy would draw cartoons live with sharpie and pad.  We still watched it since it was on…

    Magilla Gorilla, the Banana Splits, Gulliver’s Travels (It’ll never work!!)  I bet they were horrible but we loved them.

    n

  14. Greg Norton says:

    We had Clutch Cargo in the Chicago area too. Weird animation with real mouths. Since he had a house boy named Hajji I think it probably won’t be back on tv any time soon.

    “Clutch Cargo” had a revival of interest in the 90s because of Conan O’Brien. IIRC there were even video releases via Lorne Michaels Broadway Video.

    Unfortunately, when the big 3 network late night slots were rumored to be up for grabs last Summer, O’Brien was among the potential hosts who disavowed their 90s material in an attempt to appease the PC gods.

     

  15. nick flandrey says:

    Buck stops here: Dollar Tree admits that supply chain crunch, increased shipping costs and inflation mean it will now sell goods for more than $1

    The retail chain had reported last month that rising shipping costs would take a bite of $1.50 to $1.60 out of its per-share profits this year
    Annual inflation in the U.S. reached 4.2% in July, the highest in three decades
    Fed Chair Jerome Powell said this week that price increases have worsened amid snarled supply chains and rising labor costs
    The company said the change would allow it to provide a wider product assortment for customers
    The news sent Dollar Tree’s stock up 13% at the opening bell Wednesday

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-10041767/Dollar-Tree-breaks-1-barrier-costs-bite.html

    –more evidence of inflation.
    n

  16. Nightraker says:

    Jonny Quest had Hajji.  🙂  I think it was “Spinner” for Clutch Cargo.  Signs of a mis-spent Sat. morning of youth in front of the electronic babysitter.

  17. nick flandrey says:

    Ah, you’re right!  found clutch on youtube, it’s just as weird watching the lips move as the first time I noticed it….

    and every once in a while they use a live action shot!

    n

  18. Nightraker says:

    –more evidence of inflation.

    Dollar stores used to be called “five and dime”.  Woolworths, Kressge before K-Mart.  Evidence of inflation’s frog boiling, long running life.   Made a special trip to the “Family Dollar” up the street to top off cleaning supplies near dusk.  No longer carry Comet and were out of Ajax powder.  Help wanted signs, screenshot flyer of last robbery, one lady clerk.  Store was middlin’ dirty and the stock was more than a bit helter skelter with more than a few gaps.

    I await establishment of the “Fin and Sawbuck” chain.

  19. nick flandrey says:

    I’m thinking that the totals people quote about number of guns in the USA under estimate how many are thrown in rivers.

    I’ve been watching one guy magnet fishing, and he’s found a dozen.  He is ‘fishing’ in Gary IN outside of Chicago which alternates with DC as murder capitol of the US.  He even gets a guy on tape THROWING a gun in the river in broad daylight.

    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCd9EumaVNLYPZSaOGjRfEpA

    He’s just one guy, and magnet fishing is pretty freaking random, and yet he’s found a bunch …

    n

  20. Brad says:

    I’m thinking that the totals people quote about number of guns in the USA under estimate how many are thrown in rivers.

    I always understood that as a joke. Why would you throw a gun into a river? I’m missing something…

    1
  21. Mark W says:

    Close your eyes and think of England

    It was sarcastic advice given to wives who no longer “enjoyed” their husbands. Probably more accurately described as rape.

    Bank of America

    Scum. I could tell a story that illustrates just how petty and evil they are but it would give away too much. Opsec.

    1
  22. Nightraker says:

    I’ve been watching one guy magnet fishing, and he’s found a dozen.

    Other interesting gub factoids:  ~400 million background checks since ’99 with 1% reject rate.  Kentucky? or Tennessee? checks all their CCW permit holders monthly in an excess of bureaucratic masturbation zeal.  OTOH, buying more than 1 gub per check is not uncommon.  Current monthly checks are down a bit YOY, but still ~20% elevated from the Trump years.

    Also interesting:  Illinois has been the leading state for background checks with ~7 million this year and I saw a headline that Illinois FOID, state gub/ammo purchase permit cards, are almost caught up with applications after being WAY behind.

    Ammo shortages and high prices are a just a given.

    Every blade of grass, indeed.

  23. Nightraker says:

    He’s just one guy, and magnet fishing is pretty freaking random, and yet he’s found a bunch …

    Other interesting gub factoids:  ~400 million background checks since ’99 with 1% reject rate.  Kentucky? or Tennessee? checks all their CCW permit holders monthly in an excess of bureaucratic masturbation zeal.  OTOH, buying more than 1 gub per check is not uncommon.  Current monthly checks are down a bit YOY, but still ~20% elevated from the Trump years.

    Also interesting:  Illinois has been the leading state for background checks with ~7 million this year and I saw a headline that Illinois FOID, state gub/ammo purchase permit cards, are almost caught up with applications after being WAY behind.

    Ammo shortages and high prices are a just a given.

    Every blade of grass, indeed.

  24. Ray Thompson says:

    @Nightraker: I heard you the first time. 🙂

    3
    2
    7
    1
  25. nick flandrey says:

    @brad, murder weapon.

    And this one guy and his group have found 15 so far.

    n

    dammit.  wordpress keeps logging me out.  I think I’m logged in and forget to check that the name box is filled and lose a comment.  It was a clever comment too.  you’d have all gotten a chuckle.  Really.  Super funny.  Now I don’t feel like it so you’ll just have to believe me.

    2
    3
    1
    1
  26. Greg Norton says:

    Dollar stores used to be called “five and dime”. Woolworths, Kressge before K-Mart. Evidence of inflation’s frog boiling, long running life. Made a special trip to the “Family Dollar” up the street to top off cleaning supplies near dusk. No longer carry Comet and were out of Ajax powder. Help wanted signs, screenshot flyer of last robbery, one lady clerk. Store was middlin’ dirty and the stock was more than a bit helter skelter with more than a few gaps.

    FW Woolworth is still around, but they morphed into Foot Locker in the early 80s.

    The “dollar” stores have been popular targets of resellers in the last year, particularly for cleaning products and, early on in the pandemic, hand sanitizer before surface transmission was debunked. Price increases in some categories above the $1 barrier were probably inevitable to keep product on the shelf, particularly in areas where the stores are subsidized by local governments with tax breaks.

    Family Dollar stores were dumpy before Covid. What’s surprising is that Dollar Tree owns the chain and manages their own stores well in most cases. At least any Dollar Tree I’ve been into was clean and well organized.

  27. Nightraker says:

    Family Dollar stores were dumpy before the pandemic.

    That’s true.  It wasn’t too much before the Age of the Flu that Dollar Tree bought ’em.  They don’t do the shrinkflation packaging to keep the price at a dollar, but the house brand is ~50% cheaper than the national brand.  Cases of Scott TP were $11, Listerine was big bottle $7, while house was $3.55, etc.

  28. Nick Flandrey says:

    Our “King Dollar” regional chain was $1.09 in 2008, and is $1.59 now. No multiples of that price, everything in the store is $1.59.

    Lots of smaller packages on name brands, lots of knockoff product that LOOKS almost identical to the namebrand (copies their ‘trade dress’).

    It’s a good place for party supplies and craft items.

    They have a lot of food by smaller US producers and a lot of it is copies of traditional favorites like windmill cookies. Lot of smaller family bakeries in the Midwest seem to be suppliers.

    n

  29. Nick Flandrey says:

    The nearest store to the lake house we most recently rented was a Dollar General. They are the only store in a lot of smaller towns.
    n

  30. MrAtoz says:

    There is a big new comet headed our way. And this is why I wouldn’t mind a piece chipping off and hitting DC:

    Follow the SCIENCE?! Democrats latest stunt proves they don’t REALLY believe the COVID hype they’ve pushed one damn bit

    COVID vax/tests for thee, but not for my illegal voting block.

  31. drwilliams says:

    Used to be “the margin is too small…”

    now it’s

    ”the server error ate my comment”

  32. Greg Norton says:

    The nearest store to the lake house we most recently rented was a Dollar General. They are the only store in a lot of smaller towns.

    A Dollar General in a rural area without a Walmart around is usually subsidized with local tax breaks.

    We saw a couple in small towns in Alabama and Louisiana driving to/from Florida for the 4th last year.

    My wife asked about stopping in one in Louisiana to see if they had Formula 409, but I told her I didn’t want to get shot over a bottle of spray cleaner.

  33. lynn says:

    Used to be “the margin is too small…”

    now it’s

    ”the server error ate my comment”

    I just lost my three paragraph harangue about the Hot Skillz ! kiddies ruining Firefox. I did not copy it first of course. The bit bucket overrunneth this morning.

    Basically, you need 16 GB of ram to use Firefox. You will need 32 GB soon as they convert more and more clean C++ code to Rust, a really crappy language.

    And you need to run uBlock Origin to block the advertisers from downloading their crap over and over again.

    2
  34. lynn says:

    La Brea” series on Hulu: s1e1 “pilot”
    https://www.imdb.com/title/tt11640018/

    “A massive sinkhole mysteriously opens up in Los Angeles, separating part of a family in an unexplainable primeval world, alongside a disparate group of strangers.”

    Apparently inspired by “Lost”.

    or “Land of the Lost”.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bxFt4Fwl200

    “Land of the Lost” was more sophisticated than a typical kids show if you paid attention. Larry Niven wrote two scripts for the first season.

    Yup. I never watched “Lost” but always “Land of the Lost” whenever I could. Even the “Land of the Lost” was good despite Will Ferrel’s attempt to ruin it.

  35. Greg Norton says:

    Basically, you need 16 GB of ram to use Firefox. You will need 32 GB soon as they convert more and more clean C++ code to Rust, a really crappy language.

    The Firefox requirements are already past 16 GB. I’m working on automating performance testing of our product, and I have to use headless Chrome under Selenium to get screenshots of the relevant web interface page from the 16 GB RHEL 8 VM where the test control software will run.

    Firefox gives me a blank PNG.

    Rust is a Hot Skillz now that the Linux Benevolent Dictator has indicated that he will accept it into the kernel.

    Even jobs that don’t involve Hot Skillz want to talk about Hot Skillz in the interview. The place I talked to a few weeks ago was hiring low-level C developers, but the three hour panel discussion touched on a lot of things other than C, including my knowledge of Python 3 vs. Python 2, virtual C++ methods, and inner vs. outer SQL joins.

    Those three stand out because I gave honest answers that obviously didn’t impress since the manager sent the “thanks but no thanks” response fast.

    2
  36. Pecancorner says:

    The nearest store to the lake house we most recently rented was a Dollar General. They are the only store in a lot of smaller towns.

    I love Dollar General. They are my go-to for any kind of OTC medicine or medical/health product. I went there Tuesday, deliberately to get their brand of DayQuil and “large” bandaids.  Like Dollar Tree, it is kind of amazing what they have in stock, and is worth walking through just to find out.

    When Paul was in the hospital for a week in Hamilton, 45 miles from home (stroke, ER visit so no notice), I went to DG and bought clean clothes, toothpaste, deodorant, shampoo, something to read and food. Was very grateful they were there.

    Plus, who doesn’t like a store whose big charity is Literacy, and they mean it.

  37. Brad says:

    @Greg: that must be really annoying. Granted, I haven’t worked as a programmer for years. I could talk in generalities about basically anything, but specifics like Python 2 vs. Python 3, who cares, unless it’s your actual job.

    Anyway, after you’ve used enough languages, you realize that the language doesn’t matter much. The libraries matter, and the paradigm (OO, functional, whatever).

    I’ve never used Python, and I’m told I’ll be teaching it next year. Fine, no problem. The syntax is trivial, if weird, since indentation matters. Slightly harder is searching out the current use cases, and finding approachable, real-world examples. But in the end, it’s just another crappy, weakly typed language.

    2
  38. drwilliams says:

    “But in the end, it’s just another crappy, weakly typed language…”

    that will revolutionize

    programming/the world

    topdown/bottom up/inside out

    this month/this year.

    3
  39. Geoff Powell says:

    @drwilliams:

    this month/this year

    next year, sometime, never…

    G.

    sorry, could not resist.
     

    2
  40. Greg Norton says:

    @Greg: that must be really annoying. Granted, I haven’t worked as a programmer for years. I could talk in generalities about basically anything, but specifics like Python 2 vs. Python 3, who cares, unless it’s your actual job.

    Ironically, the jobs they were hiring to fill did not involve Python.

    I know Python fairly well and can write scripts that work in both Python 2 and Python 3 as long as I remember “print” is a keyword in Python 2 and a function in Python 3. In retrospect, they were probably looking for me to talk about Python 3 using Unicode as its default character set, but that isn’t something I encountered much writing code on the last two jobs or in school.

    Core Python isn’t hard to learn, but, increasingly, if you list it on a resume, the expectation will be that you know the Hot Skillz aspects of the language such as the tools designed to allow newbies to put together sophisticated programs from canned libraries available via “pip install” and deploy to “The Cloud”.

    Of particular interest as of late is anything to do with Ansible.

    Python is also of use in CS Academia because it is remarkably similar to the pseudocode in the CLRS “Introduction to Algorithms” text, and many of the code examples in the book can run with few if any modifications in a Python interpreter.

    It is a good idea that CS undergrads be conversant in the language.

  41. lynn says:

    I’m thinking that the totals people quote about number of guns in the USA under estimate how many are thrown in rivers.

    I always understood that as a joke. Why would you throw a gun into a river? I’m missing something…

    1. gub used in a robbery
    2. gub used to shoot somebody
    3. owner is scared of getting red tagged
    4. owner is scared of getting their gubs seized by an overactive federal bureaucracy
    5. owner is fishing with gubs for protection and accidentally drops their gubs in the river
    6. owner is fishing with gubs for protection and says that they accidentally drops their gubs in the river but actually buried their gubs in a nearby forest in an eight inch PVC pipe with both ends closed

  42. Greg Norton says:

    It is a good idea that CS undergrads be conversant in the language.

    MIT stopped making all undergrads take their legendary 6.001 course based on SICP within the last decade and replaced it with a Python-based class, MIT 6.00.

    The lecture series is on YouTube. Keep in mind that this was 2008 and the prof is being a bit of a jerk because the Annointed One has yet to disappoint the masses.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k6U-i4gXkLM

    1
    2
    1
  43. lynn says:

    “A Marine’s Record-Breaking Bad Day”
    https://patriotpost.us/alexander/83017

    “Some days in the air are worse than others — especially after a midair collision at 37,000 feet.”

    Eek ! I wonder how he got his 6’4″ body into a fighter jet ? My uncle is 6’2″ and had trouble getting into his A-4. He was afraid to eject since the cockpit was 18 inches wide and he was 24 inches wide, he figured that he would lose at least one shoulder in the process.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Douglas_A-4_Skyhawk

  44. drwilliams says:

    @Geoff

    next yea, sometime, never, maybe…

  45. drwilliams says:

    @Geoff

    next yea, sometime, never, maybe…

    I recall that Ada was going to be a Hot Skil

  46. Greg Norton says:

    Eek ! I wonder how he got his 6’4″ body into a fighter jet ? My uncle is 6’2″ and had trouble getting into his A-4. He was afraid to eject since the cockpit was 18 inches wide and he was 24 inches wide, he figured that he would lose at least one shoulder in the process.

    If you are ever in Seattle, the Museum of Flight has an SR71 cockpit you can try out for size.

    As the man says in “Dr. Strangelove”, “it is a big plane” … but the SR71 has a comparatively tiny cockpit.

    If the October Surprise story is true, then Bush 41 got that deal done the hard way.

    So many cool things to see at the museum. Plan on a day.

  47. Greg Norton says:

    I recall that Ada was going to be a Hot Skil 

    Ada scarred many CS undergrads of my generation. A lot of poorly written C code in the 90s was the result of so many young programs adopting Ada under DoD funding and turning out newbies who had zero concept of deallocation of memory, something not supported by the standard version of the language.

    1
  48. lynn says:

    “Manchin says his spending limit is $1.5 trillion”
    https://thehill.com/homenews/senate/574715-manchin-says-his-spending-limit-is-15-trillion

    “Sen. Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.) announced Thursday that his top-line spending number for the budget reconciliation package is $1.5 trillion, far below the $3.5 trillion spending goal set by the budget resolution that he and every other Senate Democrat voted for last month.
    “My top-line has been $1.5 [trillion],” he said, explaining that he doesn’t want “to change our whole society to an entitlement mentality.””

    Manchin is saying that dog don’t hunt. I wonder if he is for real or hanging out there for a bigger payoff. I’ll bet that his constituents in W. VA. have been burning his phone lines up.

    ADD: “Manchin pointed out that many items at the Dollar General stores in his home state now cost more than they used to because of the falling value of the dollar.”

    Hey, he noticed !

  49. lynn says:

    I recall that Ada was going to be a Hot Skil

    Ada scarred many CS undergrads of my generation. A lot of poorly written C code in the 90s was the result of so many young programs adopting Ada under DoD funding and turning out newbies who had zero concept of deallocation of memory, something not supported by the standard version of the language.

    Did you mean scarred or scared ? Ada is another piece of crap. I had a friend working on a DOD fighter simulation project back in the 1990s. They wrote the project in C first, then converted it to Ada for the deliverable. The Ada development tools were horrible and the compiler ran about 1/100th the speed of the C compiler in a standard Unix box.

    2
  50. lynn says:

    “‘Fiscal Insanity’ Is the Democrat Way”
    https://patriotpost.us/articles/83105-fiscal-insanity-is-the-democrat-way-2021-09-30

    “All the same, the standoff between Democrat factions is rather amusing.”

    “Congressional Democrats are trying to do several things with your money in the next few hours and days — keep the government from shutting down, raise the debt ceiling, pass a $1 trillion “infrastructure” bill, and muscle through a massive socialist grab bag under the reconciliation process. You know, the $5 trillion plan that Democrats had been deceitfully saying costs $3.5 trillion until Joe Biden came up with the novel idea of insisting it actually costs “zero dollars.””

    You know, at some point we may have to clean the swamp up. It will not be easy.

  51. lynn says:

    “Smith & Wesson Moving From Springfield To Tennessee, Citing Proposed Massachusetts Gun Laws”
    https://boston.cbslocal.com/2021/09/30/smith-and-wesson-massachusetts-tennessee/

    “BOSTON (CBS) – Smith & Wesson, one of the oldest gun manufacturers in the country, announced Thursday it is moving operations from Springfield to Tennessee due to proposed gun laws in Massachusetts.
    The company plans to move to Maryville, Tenn. In 2023 after being based in Springfield since it was founded in 1852.”

    “Smith said the company vetted several cities before deciding to move its headquarters, which includes 750 jobs, to Maryville.”

    Wow, most states would jump through hoops to entice that many jobs to come to their state.

    I love my Smith & Wesson gubs. Oh wait, I lost them all in the river.

  52. Greg Norton says:

    Did you mean scarred or scared ? Ada is another piece of crap. I had a friend working on a DOD fighter simulation project back in the 1990s. They wrote the project in C first, then converted it to Ada for the deliverable. The Ada development tools were horrible and the compiler ran about 1/100th the speed of the C compiler in a standard Unix box. 

    Scarred. Two ‘r’s.

    Yeah, Ada was hobbled by expensive commercial compilers until the mid 90s. There was not equivalent of Turbo C, but, more importantly, there was no equivalent of GCC until 1995, when Bob Dewar’s group at NYU created GNAT under an Air Force contract.

    And, IIRC, GNAT used to compile to C then assembly.

    Back in the 80s, there was always a Modula Kool Aid drinker in every CS department, and I always figured Ada was the result of enough of those guys getting the ear of someone at the Pentagon.

    Modula-2 was a Hot Skillz circa 1986, but the future never happened for those guys.

  53. lpdbw says:

    McDonnell-Douglas, on behalf of their DOD customers, went whole-hog into Ada in the 1990’s.

    They developed a library of Ada functions called the Common Ada Missile Packages.  CAMP.  I was never a user of it, just a contractor running their VAX 9000 VMS cluster for them.

    As I recall, the computer scientist in me laughed at the history of CAMP, CAMP II, CAMP III,…  It seems that Ada is ill-suited to high performance computation and real-time applications.  As far as I know, they never managed to fly a missile using embedded Ada code.  But they did get to write and rewrite a bunch of generations of routines.

    In fact, in my time as an Ada programmer (on a different DOD program), I’d say Ada was ill-suited to just about every task.  It’s strength MAY have been as an educational pseudo-code language, but in my mind, Pascal was a lot better for that.

    3
  54. ~jim says:

    @Rick, the theme to Rockford Files is still stuck in my brain. Damn you! 🙂

    I came up with a cure for earworms, but I’m afraid it’s sometimes worse than the disease. You have to replace it with another one and hope they both go away. In my case it’s (oh God I shouldn’t!) it’s an unmentionable Broadway tune involving the von Trapp family…

     

    5
  55. Marcelo says:

    FFox is using 93% of available memory with only 2 windows and 6 tabs in each, so I’m pageswapping like mad.

    If I recall correctly, the reason you have not ditched FF is because of Passwords – that are called Logins in there. If you are still interested in ditching it and replacing it by a modern and flexible browser, Vivaldi supports the importing of bookmarks and passwords from FF.

    To export FF Passwords/Logins:

    https://forum.vivaldi.net/topic/50699/import-firefox-bookmarks-passwords-to-vivaldi

    To Import stuff in Vivaldi:

    https://help.vivaldi.com/desktop/tools/import-and-export-browser-data/

    BTW, I only have 8GB of memory and have waaay more programs open and simultaneously working than you and apart from the occasional hard disk thrashing I have no problems running all that. Win10 is good.

  56. lynn says:

    It is release day ! It is release day !

    I released version 16.11 of our software today. Now starts the mad rush to the download area for the 186 MB install executable.

    3
    10
  57. drwilliams says:

    @~jim

    I’ll see your “hills are alive…”

    and raise you  “the sun will come up…”

    2
  58. SteveF says:

    The #1 ultimate earworm killer is the Hampster Dance Song.

    2
  59. lynn says:

    “Scarlett Johansson and Disney settle ‘Black Widow’ lawsuit”
    https://www.cnbc.com/2021/09/30/scarlett-johansson-and-disney-settle-black-widow-lawsuit.html

    “Marvel star Scarlett Johansson and the Walt Disney Company have settled the breach of contract lawsuit the “Black Widow” actor brought against the studio in July.
    Terms of the deal were not disclosed.”

    Show me the money !

  60. lynn says:

    “Global oil demand seen reaching pre-pandemic levels by early 2022”
    https://www.hydrocarbonprocessing.com/news/2021/09/global-oil-demand-seen-reaching-pre-pandemic-levels-by-early-2022

    “Global oil demand is expected to reach pre-pandemic levels by early next year as the economy recovers, although spare refining capacity could weigh on the outlook, producers and traders said at an industry conference.
    The outlook is in line with a bullish forecast from the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), but ahead of estimates from the International Energy Agency (IEA).
    Global demand is seen rising to 100 million barrels per day (bpd) by end-2021 or in the first quarter of 2022, Hess Corp President Greg Hill said.
    The world consumed 99.7 million bpd of oil in 2019, according to the IEA, before the COVID-19 pandemic hammered economic activities and fuel demand.”

    I wonder if that decrepit old man is sitting in a corner of the oval office, breathing shallowly to keep from producing CO2 ?

    Also, apparently some people are feeding processed oil (diesel, jp4, jp8, etc) to their gas turbines to make electricity due to the natural gas shortages worldwide. Not good, that drives their maintenance requirements up due to unequal flame fronts (hot spots).

  61. lynn says:

    “Are SSDs Really More Reliable Than Hard Drives?”
    https://www.backblaze.com/blog/are-ssds-really-more-reliable-than-hard-drives/

    “By the way, we’ll be publishing a post in a couple of weeks on how well drive failure rates fit the bathtub curve; SPOILER ALERT: old drives fail a lot.”

    I have bought about 20 SSDs for business and home, from 180 GB to 2 TB. I do not have a log but about 3 or 4 of them have failed. The worst was a 500 GB Intel that was randomly failing. I opened it up and there was black moisture inside, I wondered if it was melting somehow.

  62. Greg Norton says:

    I’ll see your “hills are alive…”

    and raise you “the sun will come up…”

    “I like to move it move it”. Call.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ApuFuuCJc3s

    2
    2
    1
  63. lynn says:

    “The Radiant Dome (Perry Rhodan #2)” by K. H. Scheer and Walter Ernsting, translated by Wendayne Ackerman
    https://www.amazon.com/Radiant-Dome-Perry-Rhodan/dp/B0007ES920/?tag=ttgnet-20

    Book number two of a series of one hundred and twenty-six space opera books in English. The original German books, actually pamphlets, number in the thousands. The English books mostly have two translated German stories per book. The German books were written from 1961 to present time, having sold two billion copies and even recently been rebooted. I read the well printed and well bound book published by Ace in 1969 that I had to be very careful with due to age. I bought an almost complete box of Perry Rhodans a decade or two ago on ebay that I am finally getting to since I lost my original Perry Rhodans in The Great Flood of 1989.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perry_Rhodan

    In this alternate universe, USSF Major Perry Rhodan and his three fellow astronauts blasted off in a three stage rocket to the Moon in 1971. The first stage of the rocket was chemical, the second and third stages were nuclear. After crashing on the Moon due to a strange radio interference, they discover a massive crashed alien spaceship with an aged male scientist (Khrest), a female commander (Thora), and a crew of 500.

    Perry Rhodan, his crew, and Khrest have returned to Earth from the Moon. But instead of landing in the USA, they landed in the Gobi desert. And they erected a impenetrable force shield of several square miles around the Stardust space ship. The entire world is perplexed and angry. Reginald Bell goes to Australia to find a famous Leukemia doctor to heal Khrest.

    This book has the beginning of Perry Rhodan’s Mutant Corps, two years before the X-Men comic books were released. Neat !

    Also, one has to remember that this book was written in German in 1961 and translated to English in 1969. Many items that came about in the 1970s and beyond such as cell phones are not reflected in the book. However, commercial aircraft commonly traveling at Mach 3 are not available to the public as talked about in the book. Niels Bohr’s saying “Prediction is very difficult, especially about the future” comes to mind.

    My rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    Amazon rating: 4.1 out of 5 stars (5 reviews).

  64. lpdbw says:

    @Stevef, got a link to the original version with the cheesy video of dancing rodents?

    God, that was a long time ago.

    Edit: Never mind. I found one with a little ddg search.
    I won’t burden everyone else with it.

    2
  65. lynn says:

    “Galactic Alarm (Perry Rhodan #3)” by Kurt Mahr and W. W. Shols, translated by Wendayne Ackerman
    https://www.amazon.com/Galactic-Alarm-Perry-Rhodan-3/dp/B0007ES6G4/?tag=ttgnet-20

    Book number three of a series of one hundred and twenty-six space opera books in English. The original German books, actually pamphlets, number in the thousands. The English books mostly have two translated German stories per book. The German books were written from 1961 to present time, having sold two billion copies and even recently been rebooted. I read the well printed and well bound book published by Ace in 1969 that I had to be very careful with due to age. I bought an almost complete box of Perry Rhodans a decade or two ago on ebay that I am finally getting to since I lost my original Perry Rhodans in The Great Flood of 1989.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perry_Rhodan

    In this alternate universe, USSF Major Perry Rhodan and his three fellow astronauts blasted off in a three stage rocket to the Moon in 1971. The first stage of the rocket was chemical, the second and third stages were nuclear. After crashing on the Moon due to a strange radio interference, they discover a massive crashed alien spaceship with an aged male scientist (Khrest), a female commander (Thora), and a crew of 500.

    The USA managed to create a 100 megaton nuclear fusion bomb and blew up the crashed Arkonide space ship on the moon. But, a heavily protected transmitter is sending a FTL distress signal out to the Galaxy. And other alien races are hearing it and show up for the share of the spoils.

    One has to remember that this book was written in German in 1961 and translated to English in 1969. Many items that came about in the 1970s and beyond such as cell phones are not reflected in the book. However, commercial aircraft commonly traveling at Mach 3 are not available to the public as talked about in the book. Niels Bohr’s saying “Prediction is very difficult, especially about the future” comes to mind.

    My rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    Amazon rating: 4.8 out of 5 stars (8 reviews)

  66. Nick Flandrey says:

    I watched these guys when they were riding their motorcycles around china and talking very generally about China. They’ve since fled to the US with family in tow and are (supposedly) safe from the CCP so they are a LOT more free with criticism.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lKbLB_T-IjY

    ADVChina

    Why Evergrande collapsed, how sh!tty is chinese real estate, and why.

    There comments all match my experiences (much shorter and more limited than theirs) of china in the area around Shanghai.

    n

    3
    1
  67. Nick Flandrey says:

    John Ringo looks more like a prophet every day.

    https://www.thegatewaypundit.com/2021/09/muslim-rapes-tortures-lesbian-sister-girlfriends-cuts-permanent-smile-girlfriends-face/

    Cold and failed crops followed by starvation are next on the agenda if his book “Centurion” continues to come true.

    n

Comments are closed.