Sun. Sept. 19, 2021 – girls coming home today, I better get crackin’

By on September 19th, 2021 in ebay, personal, WuFlu

Hot and humid although less so than the peak of summer. We did get a sprinkle or two of rain during the day yesterday, but it didn’t really cool things off, instead it just made the day more humid.

I got a couple of things on my list accomplished. I slept in. And I got some organizing and stacking done at my secondary. Spent a few hours there moving stuff around and even throwing a bit of stuff out. Mostly just shifted the piles though to make room for auction stuff. I did get pics for the first three lots in my industrial auction. I need to get another 5 or six pallets set up then I can get that all in motion.

It is taking so long, but forward progress is being made.

I really need to stay home today and get the house ready for ‘the Return’…

Wife’s birthday is this week too, so I need to get that sorted.

Made one ebay sale yesterday, a book that I bought for $5 and sold for $32 and shipping. Baby steps. Rebuilding my ebay sales will apparently take a while but frequent listing and changing my product mix is having some early good results. I’m going to continue with this and see if it helps longer term.

Soon it will be fall garden planting time. I have to think about that too.

So much to do, so little motivation.

Needs must when the devil drives the cart…

Keep stacking.

nick

71 Comments and discussion on "Sun. Sept. 19, 2021 – girls coming home today, I better get crackin’"

  1. Greg Norton says:

    –huh, didn’t Lil’ Marco Rubio say pretty much the same thing with the immigrants “vigorous” ness….?

    It is a constant subtle campaign theme of Little Marco, but that plays well in South Florida.

    Little Marco is a protoge of the Bush family, particularly Jeb!, but he learned from the meltdown of the career of another Bush family Florida Project, Adam “Opie” Putnam, a scion of old citrus grower money who was slotted for the Governor’s Mansion twenty years ago and never made it there.

    “Opie” was an unapologetic point man in Congress for the 2006 Amnesty bill. People never forgot.

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  2. dkreck says:

    http://talklikeapirate.com/wordpress/sample-page/

    Arrr….

    It be back!

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  3. pecancorner says:

    Monoclonal Antibody Infusion Treatments that May be Available [In Texas]

    TX State Senator Bob Hall Email :

    ….one experimental drug that has received FDA Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) is Regeneron, a monoclonal antibody. The approval is only for out-patient treat during the first ten days of symptoms.

    Texas has been quietly making this treatment available for several months through Infusion Centers, but because there has been little to no public promotion of these centers, few Texans are aware of their existence.

    To request infusion of monoclonal antibodies and a medical team at your facility, you may call the 24-hour State Infusion Hotline at 1-800-742-5990 or go to the web site meds.tdem.Texas.gov.

    The purpose of this post is to make as many Texans as possible aware of this FDA approved early treatment and provide the information.  …

    I am honored to have my good friend and Liberty 8 classmate, Senator Lois Kolkhorst, Senate Health and Human Services Chair with me today to help explain the Infusion Center service and how Texans can receive C-19 early treatment at no direct cost to them.

    Not on Facebook?  Find it on the video portion of my website, SenatorBobHall.com as well!

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  4. Nick Flandrey says:

    That’s the treatment Biddn’s people decided we’re using too much of, and so they cut our allotment. Us, FL, and 5 other southern states.

    PTacky says “get the vax and you wont’ need the MCA [neanderthals]” and besides, the vax is 1/10th the cost….

    n

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  5. ech says:

    I did note that one of the pretexts for pulling the preprint on the last one was similarity of phasing with other published work

    The one (from Egypt) I referred to being pulled, a week or more ago, was pulled not because of phrasing, but because the patient data was obviously fake. There were patient records that had identical medical data except for one or two values.

    You claim that there is a giant conspiracy in medicine involving ignoring patient treatments and under the table money for grad students. Fine. I’ll see your conspiracy and raise you that much of the anti-vaccination and pushing for HCQ and Ivermectin is being driven by web sites, podcasters, and streamers that want clicks and ad revenue.

    Look, a lot of stuff was thrown against the wall and didn’t stick early one. Other anti-virals, many still on-patent, were tried and failed. They were dropped. But HCQ and Ivermectin, because they are off-patent, suddenly became the darling of the alternative treatment crowd that screams big pharma conspiracy at every opportunity.

    And that link doesn’t work. I’ve inspected the source for the page and the link isn’t there.

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  6. JimB says:

    PTacky says “get the vax and you wont’ need the MCA [neanderthals]” and besides, the vax is 1/10th the cost….

    Since when do they care about cost? If yhey did, then they would promote that horse dewormer or the antimalaria drug. I won’t mention them by name out of fear. 🙁

    Oh, wait, those can’t possibly work. Just ask 240M Indians. Hat tip to this site. 🙂

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  7. MrAtoz says:

    I still want the tRump/Rogan protocol if I’m hospitalized with COVID. Why not?

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  8. Greg Norton says:

    I’ll see your conspiracy and raise you that much of the anti-vaccination and pushing for HCQ and Ivermectin is being driven by web sites, podcasters, and streamers that want clicks and ad revenue.

    I don’t discount the arbitrage crowd in the current push to make Ivermectin over the counter.

    If someone *really* wants access, the drug is available, but listing the pills on EBay is currently illegal.

    The US is fast becoming Feringinar. Controlling the government means lots of gold pressed latinum for your chosen racket.

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  9. Nick Flandrey says:

    @ech,

    I’m not taking sides here, but I am trying to understand something.

    And that link doesn’t work

    Can you reference the link both by pasting it here, and by the date and time of DrWilliams comment?

    I know it’s more effort than you want to put in for this but something weird is going on.

    EVERY link he posted works for ME. Every one. They all open new tabs and load content. The one for USSANews has some weird “tracking virus misinfo” graphic in place of what was originally there, I think.

    —added— every link back thru Friday opened for me.

    I would like to know if your browser, or provider, or malware or SOMETHING is blocking or redirecting links for you and/or substituting page elements on the fly.

    If so it would explain a lot and be terrifying at another level.

    I’m running FFox 92.0 on win8.2 with uBlockOrigin active. I don’t run any other malware or antiphishing, or web nanny, except some of what FFox provides, and Windows Defender.

    thanks

    n

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  10. Nick Flandrey says:

    Can anyone give me a short explanation of why FRANCE is losing there sh!t over the Aussie submarine deal?

    Don’t countries vie for sales of military hardware to other countries all the time?

    This has a unique vibe to me, I can’t remember anything similar for other platforms.

    n

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  11. Greg Norton says:

    Can anyone give me a short explanation of why FRANCE is losing there sh!t over the Aussie submarine deal?

    Lots of jobs.

    Plus, advanced attack submarines are not like a tank or a plane, where a single country even on the scale of the US can develop and field more than a dozen or two of a class without external customers to armortize the costs, and there aren’t really civilian applications for a lot of the tech.

    (The Red Hat Linux update tool Yum came from a submarine-related program, but that’s a rare example. A lot of the systems software stays classified.)

    The US only produced three Seawolf subs in the 90s before the program ended, and the Virginia class count currently sits at 19.

    In comparison the Sturgeon and Los Angeles classes combined fleet numbered ~ 100 or so before the decommissioning started in the 90s.

    Plus, I’m sure the French desire for revenge for Brexit is a factor.

    I’d joke about ITV’s “Tenacity” set in the UK sub service as being a factor in the decision, but that production was delayed and hasn’t even made air in Britain yet.

    I spent the summer after graduating college going through the interview process with GE for Seawolf’s tactical systems. The terms of the contract kept getting worse all through the process until they were down to an offer for three months of probationary work in Syracuse in January-March the following year. I couldn’t afford the “opportunity”.

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  12. MrAtoz says:

    Dr. Williams links open for me using Safari under iPadOS and macOS.

    Didn’t France have a pending deal for subs? Or maybe they were just cut out for some reason.

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  13. drwilliams says:

    @ech
    This is what I posted:

    There are billions of dollars at stake, and it wouldn’t surprise me in the least if there are a hundred grad students “keen of eye and strong of jaw” who are selflessly (with a large amount of help from under the table money) picking away to poke holes wherever they can.

    I did note that one of the pretexts for pulling the preprint on the last one was similarity of phasing with other published work. Brought back memories of the controversy over Martin Luther King Jr.’s thesis.

    Fact is that it matters not how many studies. There are hundreds of millions of people without significant access to vaccines that do have access to ivermectin and other inexpensive medicines. They are in use. The experiments are being done on the world population. The success or failure will not depend on some artificial “gold standard” 95% CI double blind study with twelve bozos on the paper author list and peer review by their social network.

    If there are successes, then the question will be asked: How is it that potential lifesaving treatments were poo-pooed by the multi-billion dollar medical establishment in the U.S.? As we creep up on one million lives lost in the U.S., the math becomes more and more significant. 10% efficacy might have saved 100,000 lives. At what point do the wives, husbands, sons, and daughters of the dead start gathering tar and feathers, sharpening pitchforks, and decide that it’s time to have a little “come to Cthulu” meeting with the medical establishment?

    ech: “The one (from Egypt) I referred to being pulled, a week or more ago, was pulled not because of phrasing, but because the patient data was obviously fake. There were patient records that had identical medical data except for one or two values.”

    Here, let me help:

    “one of the pretexts”

    “one”

    When I partially learned English, “one” did not preclude “others”.

    And if the preprint gets pulled before contacting the principal author of the study, then yes, they are all “pretexts”.

    ech: “You claim that there is a giant conspiracy in medicine involving ignoring patient treatments and under the table money for grad students. Fine. I’ll see your conspiracy and raise you that much of the anti-vaccination and pushing for HCQ and Ivermectin is being driven by web sites, podcasters, and streamers that want clicks and ad revenue.

    Look, a lot of stuff was thrown against the wall and didn’t stick early one. Other anti-virals, many still on-patent, were tried and failed. They were dropped. But HCQ and Ivermectin, because they are off-patent, suddenly became the darling of the alternative treatment crowd that screams big pharma conspiracy at every opportunity.”

    What I stated above was that “it wouldn’t surprise me in the least” if grad students (and others) were getting paid to do hatchet jobs. The institutions employing those grad students and their professors have been full-on cricket in the face of overwhelming evidence that the replicability crisis in medical research is second only to the social sciences. Grad students don’t go wandering off doing things without the full blessing of their professors, and they are seldom independently wealthy, so to the extent they are involved, someone is paying them (ultimately the taxpayers).

    When social media moves in lockstep to deny any discussion of alternative treatments, when search engines bury results, when YouTube takes down videos on the judgement of snotty-nosed SJW warriors, and the MSM passes no opportunity to misrepresent one of the greatest drug discoveries of the last century, it’s a conspiracy.

    And as I noted in a previous post, the study that was pulled represented 15% of the positive data in one U.S. metastudy. That leaves 85% from that study alone, yet we aren’t hearing about the rest.

    When the CDC and FDA–despite their recent history of totally flocking their response to the pandemic–denies that there is any treatment until “Come to the ER when you’re deathly ill”, when the medical establishment joins in to sanction doctors looking at alternative treatments, and the U.S. government does its level best to restrict supplies, then the medical establishment is part of that conspiracy.

    Indeed, the recent restriction of the distribution of monoclonal antibodies for thinly disguised political purposes is absolute proof that the medical establishment is morally bankrupt. But if you need more, you only have to look at the silence in New York State as Cuomo caused the deaths of 15,000 or so in long-term care facilities and successfully covered it up for months, all while patting himself on the back for the excellent job and having a ghost-written book get a $5 million advance.

    The medical establishment is, per se, a conspiracy. From collusion in setting costs to approval of obscenely expensive new drugs that are not effectively better than generics but only “equal”, it is firmly in the twin grasping hands of big pharma and their enablers the insurance companies.

    ech: “I’ll see your conspiracy and raise you that much of the anti-vaccination and pushing for HCQ and Ivermectin is being driven by web sites, podcasters, and streamers that want clicks and ad revenue.”

    If you call that a raise, you don’t play much poker. The total revenue streams there are probably 0.01-0.1% of big medicine. Yet they have a financial incentive and “Big Med” does not?

    ech: “HCQ and Ivermectin, because they are off-patent, suddenly became the darling of the alternative treatment crowd that screams big pharma conspiracy at every opportunity.”

    Alternative treatments are being used in countries that cannot afford and do not have access to vaccines. Both HCQ and ivermectin are already in widespread use in many poorer countries, and both are manufactured there. There is ample evidence that such use has met with success. Despite both being much less expensive, they still have significant cost in a country where per capita income is a fraction of the U.S. and Europe. That governments in India and elsewhere would incur that expense without some evidence of efficacy is unlikely.

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  14. drwilliams says:

    @MrAtoz

    Thanks for checking the links.

    “Didn’t France have a pending deal for subs? Or maybe they were just cut out for some reason. ”

    My understanding is that the French deal was conventional, whereas the U.S. deal is for nuclear.

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  15. drwilliams says:

    @Nick

    I believe this is the post and the link:

    drwilliams says:
    17 September 2021 at 21:10

    Uttar Pradesh, the largest state in India, 240 million people with a vax rate of 5.4%, has an effective KungFlu rate of zero:

    https://ussanews.com/News1/2021/09/17/uttar-pradesh-india-announces-state-is-covid-19-free-proving-the-effectiveness-of-ivermectin-the-horse-drug-democrats-mocked-and-lied-about/

    Must be the masks.

     

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  16. Brad says:

    COVID-free? Do they also sell bridges?

    Seriously, even if Invermectin works, they aren’t going to have eliminated the virus. That’s not even remotely believable.

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  17. Nick Flandrey says:

    Yeah, that’s the one I thought it was, but it opens fine for me.

    I don’t know why the first two images onthe page are something about blocked misinfo, IDK if that was to illustrate the point of the article, or if something is being blocked, and I’m too sore and busy getting kids back inthe groove of home.

    If ech’s browsing is being censored silently and he didn’t set it up that way, then that should be concerning for everyone.

    n

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  18. Nick Flandrey says:

    I’m bothered by the whole of medicine basically saying “come back when you’re really sick” as the sum total of treatment.

    At least, that is the messaging. Apparently in TX and FL anyway there is the option of outpatient infusion centers for MCA treatment.

    We don’t even get the constant admonition of a normal flu season to get lots of vitamin C and rest. All we get is prevention messages, and since you have to get the prevention right all the time, but the virus only needs one screw up, that doesn’t seem efficacious.

    n

  19. drwilliams says:

    @Brad

    Click on the link, scroll down to the quote from the Hindustan Times, and you find this link:

    https://www.hindustantimes.com/cities/lucknow-news/33-districts-in-uttar-pradesh-are-now-covid-free-state-govt-101631267966925.html

    note:

    lakh – 100,000

    crore = 10 million

    Putting the state name in the search engine found this:

    Last Updated: 19th September, 2021 21:29 IST
    17 Fresh Coronavirus Cases In Uttar Pradesh
    With 17 fresh cases in the state, the total COVID-19 tally in Uttar Pradesh rose to 17,09,669 on Sunday while no new death due to the virus was reported from the state.
    Written By Press Trust Of India

    https://www.republicworld.com/india-news/general-news/17-fresh-coronavirus-cases-in-uttar-pradesh.html

    More stats here:
    https://www.livemint.com/news/india/uttar-pradesh-govt-relaxes-covid-curbs-further-100-people-can-now-gather-in-non-containment-zones-11632053332372.html

    I have no doubt whatsoever that the numbers are suspect.

    But deaths can’t be concealed. If alternative treatments are effective, then the simple model predicting KungFlu deaths based on vaccination rates will be inaccurate.

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  20. drwilliams says:

    @Nick

    The strangeness may be due to some sort of positive ivermectin ad being replaced by a pasty billionaire’s “fact-checker” who knows better.

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  21. JimB says:

    I still want the tRump/Rogan protocol if I’m hospitalized with COVID. Why not?

    Instead, you will probably get the Plugs senility protocol. Good luck with that. You will then be known as Mr A to B.

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  22. MrAtoz says:

    But deaths can’t be concealed. If alternative treatments are effective, then the simple model predicting KungFlu deaths based on vaccination rates will be inaccurate.

    Sort of like the thermal plume from all the crematoriums running in China. “What deaths?” And several months after the Wuhan lockdown, partying en masse. Every country has a spin, but reality can be checked.

    Give me the tRP (tRump/Rogan Protocol). What do I have to lose? That doctor in San Antone who is trumpeting “I did an illegal abortion, come get me” probably wouldn’t prescribe the tRP since he is obviously a ProgLibTurd with no morals. He’d rip a baby out of the womb up until the head is coming out, but fcuk prescribing “horse paste”. It doesn’t fit with the narrative.

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  23. lynn says:

    BC: Catch and Release
    https://www.gocomics.com/bc/2021/09/19

    One can only hope that humans are such.

  24. Nick Flandrey says:

    Hah, schooled by momma nature again.

    NOT cooler. almost 100 in the sun. And pretty danged humid too, since everything is still wet from this morning’s showers.

    All the more reason to nursemaid my screaming back and just clean house.

    n

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  25. Nick Flandrey says:

    You will then be known as Mr A to B.

    –more like meister q to 7.

    n

  26. Nick Flandrey says:

    But deaths can’t be concealed.

    –LOTS of deaths can’t be EASILY concealed, IF people go looking.

    I’m reminded of the cell phone data out of china, and the missing hundreds of thousands of subscribers after wuflu.

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  27. Ray Thompson says:

    Doctor called this morning, no COVID. I have to be around people tomorrow.

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  28. Nick Flandrey says:

    I have to be around people tomorrow.

    — unless you build your ‘Omega Man’ fortress…

    n

  29. MrAtoz says:

    We should place a dozen of these around Del Río, TX:

    The Scientist and the A.I.-Assisted, Remote-Control Killer Robot

    That should clean things up nicely.

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  30. lynn says:

    Can anyone give me a short explanation of why FRANCE is losing there sh!t over the Aussie submarine deal?

    Don’t countries vie for sales of military hardware to other countries all the time?

    This has a unique vibe to me, I can’t remember anything similar for other platforms.

    n

    I think that the French subs are diesel-electrics whereas the USA – Brit subs are nuclear Tridents ?

    Australia, and all of her neighbors, especially Taiwan and Japan, are getting enormous pressure from China. Diesel-electrics have to surface or snorkel every day or two to recharge the batteries and thus are somewhat trackable. Nuclears, especially Tridents, are not very trackable at all.

    Frankly, the world needs to be very paranoid about what China is doing right now. Japan is apparently starting a huge construction program with new bases on the Senkaku islands between Taiwan and Japan. We, the USA, get involved in that in a hurry as Japan is a protectorate of the USA, we have treaty obligations with them. If that goes crazy then we could end up in nasty conflict with a nuclear nation.
    https://www.the-sun.com/news/3682106/japan-preparing-for-war-military-drills-senkaku-islands/

  31. Greg Norton says:

    We should place a dozen of these around Del Río, TX:

    Thousands of … Hatians?!?

    Even if … and I doubt this story … they walked up from Guatemala and points south, someone is funding them. I saw one interviewed after he swam back across to Mexico to pick up provisions for his family — diapers and water?

    Walmart’s data mining stats show its usually diapers and beer, but ok.

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  32. Nick Flandrey says:

    AdaptiveCurmudeon is waxing poetic as he rides thru the woods on his dirt bike.

    The students of Mao began with books and statues. Eventually they killed people who wore prescription glasses… and then starved. A green haired revolutionary can stop the wheels, but not maintain them. When will the grid go down? During a cold snap in Texas? During a heat wave in California?

    I’ve read history. I see empty shelves and angry chants. I know where it leads.

    There is no guarantee to anything. There never was.

    Lest you think my ride was sad, it was not. It was beautiful. Death has it’s own beauty. We are torn apart from the inside by people that cannot build… and here I can see a lost world in repose. That incorrigible hippie Neil Young captured the feeling: “Every junkie is a setting sun”. Societies only last if they can. If they cannot… they won’t. But the trees do come back. Always.

    — that “Build back the world library” seems a lot more desirable and relevant some days than others.

    n

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  33. Nick Flandrey says:

    The invaders are already here, the invasion happened. All that needs to happen is for the weapons to be distributed and the range to go ‘hot’.

    There are enough chinese grad students of military age to stand up an actual army, and if just one in ten is a saboteur we’re completely F’d.

    How many students from China are in the US?
    Around 370,000 Chinese nationals studied in the U.S. during the 2018–2019 school year; they accounted for more than a third of the entire international student population in the U.S., according to the Institute of International Education.

    Their command and control are TEACHING in the schools and working in our labs.

    How many foreign nationals work in the US?
    In 2019, there were 28.4 million foreign-born people in the U.S. labor force, comprising 17.4 percent of the total.

    After immigrants from Mexico and India, the Chinese represented the third largest group in the U.S. foreign-born population of nearly 45 million in 2018.

    Compared to the overall foreign- and native-born populations in the United States, Chinese immigrants are significantly better educated and more likely to be employed in management positions. Almost 30 percent of Chinese who obtain lawful permanent residence in the United States (also known as getting a green card) did so through employment-based routes; the remainder qualified through family ties or as asylees.

    50K chinese H1-B visa petitions for 2019 alone.

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  34. drwilliams says:

    IPCC Model Scenarios Compared To Actual Measured Temperatures
    3 hours ago
    Guest Blogger
    by Bob Irvine.

    The IPCC and others have been making global temperature projections for some time now for various emission scenarios. These projections have invariably failed but the obvious corollary of this, that the modelled climate sensitivity is too high, has never been addressed.

    In an effort to hold the IPCC accountable, I have compared actual measured temperatures with two of their scenarios from the AR4 report in 2007. The B1 and A2 scenarios. See Appendix “A” for the relevant section of the AR4 report.

    The graph title is confusing.
    Just look at the explanations of the charted lines.

    Short explanation:
    The straight lines are predictions (oh, they hate that word) of the models.

    The straight gray line is what the model says should have happened based on actual global CO2 emissions.

    The straight yellow line is what the model says would have happened if we all gave up cars and became vegans in 1990, and only fired the Internet up with our hand-cranked gennies to get the regular reports of the climate scientists from their tropical beach meetings.

    The crooked orange and blue lines are two actual temperature measurements. Blue from Roy Spencer’s group at UAH, orange from the cooked books of Hansen’s GISS.

    Takeaways: Their models are crap and if you were investing with such you’d be bankrupt long ago.

    $30 billion a year for crap.
    but…science.

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  35. Greg Norton says:

    Australia, and all of her neighbors, especially Taiwan and Japan, are getting enormous pressure from China. Diesel-electrics have to surface or snorkel every day or two to recharge the batteries and thus are somewhat trackable. Nuclears, especially Tridents, are not very trackable at all.

    The Australia deal is about attack subs, not ballistic missile subs.

    The US replacement for the Ohio Trident missile class, the Columbia, is still in development. Cost projections are pure insanity — $8 billion+ with only one actually being built

    Diesel electrics can be uber sneaky in shallow water environments close to home. I’m willing to bet the Taiwanese have something special planned for coastal China if the excrement hit the AC.

    Sink a few container ships and all bets are off about shipping insurance out of China.

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  36. drwilliams says:

    @Nick

    Back in the 1980’s there was a regular columnist for design news that railed against the H1B program and how it was used to keep engineering wages down. IIRC, he was a EE and his last name was Feist. Either I’m not recalling correctly or there is no trace on the internet.

    I know at one point I had some of those columns saved in a folder, but can’t find them now.

  37. Nick Flandrey says:

    Looks like sh!t is getting real in Australia…

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CQVp1B1SBXo

    those are some angry people. And next time there will be a WHOLE LOT more cops.

    n

  38. drwilliams says:

    The next time the mob runs over the cops they will not be standing, and some won’t be moving.

  39. lynn says:

    IPCC Model Scenarios Compared To Actual Measured Temperatures
    3 hours ago
    Guest Blogger
    by Bob Irvine.

    https://wattsupwiththat.com/2021/09/19/ipcc-model-scenarios-compared-to-actual-measured-temperatures/

    The models are crap as usual.

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  40. lynn says:

    Australia, and all of her neighbors, especially Taiwan and Japan, are getting enormous pressure from China. Diesel-electrics have to surface or snorkel every day or two to recharge the batteries and thus are somewhat trackable. Nuclears, especially Tridents, are not very trackable at all.

    The Australia deal is about attack subs, not ballistic missile subs.

    The US replacement for the Ohio Trident missile class, the Columbia, is still in development. Cost projections are pure insanity — $8 billion+ with only one actually being built

    Diesel electrics can be uber sneaky in shallow water environments close to home. I’m willing to bet the Taiwanese have something special planned for coastal China if the excrement hit the AC.

    Sink a few container ships and all bets are off about shipping insurance out of China.

    Ah, I did not realize that the nuclear attack subs carried missiles also.
    https://www.cnn.com/2021/09/17/australia/nuclear-submarines-aukus-explainer-intl-hnk-ml/index.html

    I don’t think that we will sell nuclear attack subs to Taiwan. That would be really tweaking the China … whatever.

    I will bet that the Brits had a strong hand in this decision by the Australians and USA.

    There is a pretty good book about the problems with diesel-electrics in hostile waters. “Blind Man’s Bluff: The Untold Story of American Submarine Espionage”. CO2 poisoning is a real thing.
    https://www.amazon.com/Blind-Mans-Bluff-Submarine-Espionage/dp/1610393589?tag=ttgnet-20

    ADD: Somewhere, I saw that the China container transport charge has jumped from $2,000/container to $12,000/container since the beginning of the year. That is a heck of a disadvantage already.

  41. Greg Norton says:

    Back in the 1980’s there was a regular columnist for design news that railed against the H1B program and how it was used to keep engineering wages down. IIRC, he was a EE and his last name was Feist. Either I’m not recalling correctly or there is no trace on the internet.

    I know at one point I had some of those columns saved in a folder, but can’t find them now.

    Are you sure that you don’t mean Norm Matloff out of UC Davis?

    I never received Design News so I’m not sure about whether he worked for them at any point.

    Also, the visas for several programs are abused — H1B, L1, and the one I’ve posted about frequently here OPT, whcih turned non-thesis Masters in CS programs into diploma mills at many US schools.

    The mill at my Masters alma matter was so agregious that they taught remedial C, something most of the students required. Of course, at $20k per head per year mulitplied by ~ 50 students for two years, I’m sure you understand the incentive.

    Even if the “grad students” worked for the department, the tuition waiver was only the International surcharge.

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  42. Greg Norton says:

    There is a pretty good book about the problems with diesel-electrics in hostile waters. “Blind Man’s Bluff: The Untold Story of American Submarine Espionage”. CO2 poisoning is a real thing.

    The science museum in Portland has the last diesel-electric US attack sub, the USS Blueback, a semi-permant loan but still property of the US Navy.

     

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  43. Greg Norton says:

    I don’t think that we will sell nuclear attack subs to Taiwan. That would be really tweaking the China … whatever. 

    The Taiwanese nuclear program ran until the late 80s. If they have any subs capable of launching missiles, I’m guessing that they went to the Germans like the Israelis did.

    Yeah, kinda ironic.

  44. Nick Flandrey says:

    WRT H1-Bs, they are clearly abused by US companies and do in fact keep wages down. So do ideas like “learn to code” to build up the supply of code monkeys. Pointy haired bosses are tired of funny smells from the lunch room and late night video conferences so they want a larger pool of local talent…

    BTW, all foreign employment in Canada has the same restriction as H1-Bs, that there is no Canadian that can do the job. My ‘green card’ for Canada application contained an attestation to that fact. Not sure what legal affidavits must be sworn to on the US side for H1-bs, but if there was teeth in it, there would probably be fewer H1-bs.

    n

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  45. drwilliams says:

    “Are you sure that you don’t mean Norm Matloff out of UC Davis?”

    Not him, but I’m pretty sure I have a copy of his “The Art of R Programming”.

  46. MrAtoz says:

    LOL! Giddyap, plugsy:

    Border agents on horseback round up Haitian migrants after closing Rio Grande crossing where 15,000 have congregated under Texas bridge: First removal flight arrives in Haiti with up to EIGHT scheduled per day to deal with crisis

    Ride ‘em out on a rail, straight to Mexico, who should have stopped them in the first place. I’m sick of Mexico. Set up the trebuchets and start launching crimmigrants back.

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  47. MrAtoz says:

    LOL, while plugs rides his bike (DOCTOR Jill driving, of course):

    While President Biden was at the beach, Gov. Abbott secured the Del Rio border crossing using National Guard and Texas DPS troopers

    I wonder if the Guard got axe handles or ammo.

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  48. Greg Norton says:

    WRT H1-Bs, they are clearly abused by US companies and do in fact keep wages down. So do ideas like “learn to code” to build up the supply of code monkeys. Pointy haired bosses are tired of funny smells from the lunch room and late night video conferences so they want a larger pool of local talent…

    H1B is still the preference because of the indentured servant nature of the visa. Unless the employee finds another company willing to endure the legal process of sponsorship, quitting a job means having to leave the country.

    “Learn to Code” graduates can always go back to delivering pizzas. Wait time last night was 2 1/2 hours from the Dominos where my son works in the kitchen.

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  49. Nightraker says:

    BTW, apparently the French had a $43 billion deal with Australia to build subs, now canceled.

  50. MrAtoz says:

    How can plugs sell those filthy NUKE subs? Why doesn’t the EPA and Sierra Club protest this sale?

    LOL, nukes for me, not for thee!

  51. Marcelo says:

    BTW, apparently the French had a $43 billion deal with Australia to build subs, now canceled.

    Yep. Construction being done in Oz. They were falling well behind schedulle and with cost overruns and those were in billions.

    Ergo, seek alternatives via the Brits. New deal is for for nuclear Powered subs not with nukes. We do not officially have nucular tech and even processing of ores is banned (for now given that even the global warmers are bending to the nuclear option). More silent, longer trips and no need to resurface. Deal is also for construction in Oz.

    No brainer for me and very pleased to have pi$$ed the French as an added bonus. 🙂

     

  52. drwilliams says:

    “Speaker Pelosi is absolutely holding the infrastructure bill hostage… There are not just nine or 10 Democrats who are concerned about how breathtakingly large the $4.7 trillion combined package is. I mean there might be 100 Democrats that have some concerns,” Rep. Dusty Johnson, R-S.D., told Fox News this week. ”

    https://pjmedia.com/news-and-politics/rick-moran/2021/09/19/joe-bidens-presidency-is-hanging-by-a-thread-as-radicals-and-moderates-go-to-war-n1479883

    Just think: A list, a wall, and 100 rounds and we could start drawing back from the Second American Revolution.

    ADDED: Just to be clear, the wall and accessories would be for the 100 or so Dems that are 100% on board with the bill.

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  53. MrAtoz says:

    I guess Butto’s run for Tejas Goobernor in 2022 is official. How much money will come from out of State?

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  54. Greg Norton says:

    I guess Butto’s run for Tejas Goobernor in 2022 is official. How much money will come from out of State? 

    A lot. Newsom’s money people haven’t wasted any time getting that story rolling.

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  55. lynn says:

    I guess Butto’s run for Tejas Goobernor in 2022 is official. How much money will come from out of State?

    All of it.

  56. Nick Flandrey says:

    All of it.

    –hah, that was my response.

    n

  57. Greg Norton says:

    I put in some more practice with the P/N rice pot today using the gas grill’s burner after doing some digging around on the Interwebs for an English manual. I found a document that was semi-useful so I multitasked while grilling chicken.

    H-Mart wants $120-140 for the pots these days, depending on capacity. IIRC, we paid $50 about eight years ago. Korean made, solid aluminum, no Hecho en China.

    I didn’t burn the rice like the last few attempts, but it was a little undercooked.

    Closer.

  58. Nick Flandrey says:

    I made liver and onions for dinner tonight. Mashed potatoes from a pouch, and bottled brown gravy.

    Kids said no, wife liked it. First time I’ve cooked it for myself, and I was happy with the result. I usually eat it 1 or 2 times a year if I find it on the menu in the sort of place that might do a good job of it…

    It wasn’t restaurant quality,but it was tasty.

    n

  59. drwilliams says:

    Peppers and onions on the stovetop, steaks on the grill for me and neighbors.

    I don’t believe it is possible to cook enough peppers and onions, much less too many. Never have any leftovers. Have to hit the mid-week farmer’s market and buy more.

  60. Thomas Lucas says:

    While the French navy operates 10 nuclear subs, what they were selling to Australia was a non-nuclear design based upon one of their nuclear attack subs. Apparently it would have drive using a technology similar to the German export subs, which use fuel cells powered by hydrogen. The German U-31 has stayed submerged without surfacing or snorkeling for for 18 days/1500 miles and has a reputation of being very quiet. Taiwan on the other hand, has a fleet of 4 subs, two of which are old US subs of the WW2 Tench class. They are currently building an indigenous design, that while not using fuel cells has batteries of a more modern design than the lead-acid batteries of the old subs. https://www.nti.org/analysis/articles/france-submarine-capabilities/  and  https://www.navalnews.com/naval-news/2021/07/taiwans-first-indigenous-submarine-to-be-launched-ahead-of-schedule/

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  61. Nick Flandrey says:

    @thomas lucas, thanks, that is interesting.

    The french temper tantrum is very odd to me, but if they thought they had a deal, and we swooped in and stole the deal, I guess they can be upset about it. Odd to do it so publicly.

    the whole thing points out that while we are over here watching all these things unfold, someone else is over there watching those things we don’t even know COULD unfold.

    Never occurred to me that we’d sell nuke powered subs to anyone.

    n

  62. Alan says:

    Plus, advanced attack submarines are not like a tank or a plane, where a single country even on the scale of the US can develop and field more than a dozen or two of a class without external customers to armortize the costs, and there aren’t really civilian applications for a lot of the tech.

    Probably Tony is not reading these comments.

  63. Alan says:

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-10004201/US-nears-plan-widescale-expulsions-Haitian-migrants.html

    Our tax dollars at work folks. Hopefully no bags of pretzels being handed out.

    And where’s Kamel? Didn’t Plugs put her in charge of dump Southern border issues on her?

  64. Alan says:

    Biden will spend the weekend in seclusion at his mansion in Rehoboth Beach

    Looks like we survived the weekend without him. Maybe he liked the quiet so much that he decides that this POTUS gig ain’t all it’s cracked up to be and doesn’t come back.
    A guy can have a little hope, right??

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  65. nick flandrey says:

    Keep hope alive!

    n

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  66. lynn says:

    @thomas lucas, thanks, that is interesting.

    The french temper tantrum is very odd to me, but if they thought they had a deal, and we swooped in and stole the deal, I guess they can be upset about it. Odd to do it so publicly.

    the whole thing points out that while we are over here watching all these things unfold, someone else is over there watching those things we don’t even know COULD unfold.

    Never occurred to me that we’d sell nuke powered subs to anyone.

    n

    Other than Britain ?

  67. Marcelo says:

    Never occurred to me that we’d sell nuke powered subs to anyone.

    I think the British were the first one’s and a very long time ago.

  68. MrK says:

    The whole submarine situation in Oz has been a fiasco for a very long time. The current Collins class is Swedish designed, built in Oz. Work started in the 80’s and commissioned in the late 90’s. Plagued by extensive problems as mentioned by one journalist, “cursed with one of the worst diesel engines ever put into a marine vessel”. By 2008 only 3 of the total of 6 submarines could be manned. Between 2009 and 2012, on average two or fewer were fully operational. (note: never buy and build from plans of something that doesn’t yet exist.)

    One prime minister wanted the Japanese Soryu class as a replacement, but due to inhouse faction fighting, he was kicked out and his successor did everything he could in the opposite manner. So the French option was chosen, which was deemed “vapourware” in 2018 by the same journalist. Also the navy wanted lead acid batteries instead of the lithium ion batteries as used by the Soryu class. This added an extra 200 tonnes, (220 tons), which favoured the French design.

    So again from the same journo in 2018. “The French submarines are scheduled to enter service in the 2030s.  In the interim we will be spending as much keeping the sclerotic Collins class submarines going as it would have been to replace them with the Japanese Soryu class.”

    Also, up to now, no politician would ever dare mention the “N” word. Because “N” is bad m’kay? Diesel electric is much more appeasing to the peasants..

    Fast forward to 2021 and we now have a deal with the USA and UK. We are buying a proven, working design, rather than “vapourware”…  😀    Cue: The Who: “Won’t Get Fooled Again”.   (extending middle finger to France).

    Perhaps vapourware is a bit harsh as according to Wikipedia, one French Barracuda class has been built. (N powered), but no D/E units have been built. (still vapourware IMHO).

    In commission
    From 2020[2] (originally planned for 2017)

    Planned
    6

    Building
    5

    Completed
    1

    Of course now that the “N” word has been spoken by our PM, various heads are exploding…

    But thankfully due to covid and the Victorian Police pepper spraying 65yo women protesters, the N thing is off the front page..

    If you are Australian, read and weep. The New World Order:

    https://mobile.twitter.com/PaulBateman3/status/1439683931549286400/photo/1

    Speaking of submarines… Hope MrDadCooks is ok.

  69. brad says:

    the world needs to be very paranoid about what China is doing

    This. Can the current Chinese government maintain control for the next 30-40 years? The methods they are using (social scores, etc.) are very clever. OTOH, seemingly simple things like forbidding video games to kids under 18 are dangerous and could backfire when the next generation grows up. If the Chinese government remains clever, avoids pissing off their own population, and keeps corruption more-or-less under control – our grandkids will be learning Chinese.

    I’m pretty certain that China isn’t going to start any sort of shooting war. They’re just going to run over the rest of the world economically. Look at their progress in the past 70 years. If they keep that kind of curve going, it’s all over.

    If the West wants to compete, we’ve got to curb-stomp the woke crowd, fix a lot of stuff they’ve broken (like the education system in too many countries), and get back to making progress.

  70. Tony Russo says:

    Back in the 1980’s there was a regular columnist for design news that railed against the H1B program and how it was used to keep engineering wages down. IIRC, he was a EE and his last name was Feist. Either I’m not recalling correctly or there is no trace on the internet.

    I know at one point I had some of those columns saved in a folder, but can’t find them now.

    Yes I know who you are talking about his first name was Irwin. I thought there was an r in the last name as well. I believe he passed away in the early 90s.

  71. Tony Russo says:

    His name was Irwin Feerst.

     

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