Tues. June 22, 2021 – still hot in Florida…

Weather here is pretty much exactly the same forecast for the whole week, and so far, hot and humid is right, chance of rain is wrong. Probably today we’ll get some rain because I’m scheduled to do outdoors stuff.

As long as you aren’t in direct sun, and can get any air movement, it’s not bad. As long as…

Today we’re going for a mangrove swamp tour on kayaks. I will report back.

I have no opinion of the activity in question, yet. I’m really hoping it’s not in the sun.

I have my slow mini laptop here, and a relatively slow internet connection, so I haven’t been reading much news, or visiting my normal “heads up” sites, so feel free to link anything important here.

There is a whole lot of ongoing stuff that I’m just not seeing any reporting on and that makes me nervous. What is reported is bad enough.

Let’s all keep our eyes open and heads on a swivel, metaphorically and actually. Something’s brewing.

And with that cheering thought, I’m off to the swamp to look at the underside of trees, and water!

Keep stacking, ya know ya wanna…..

n

Author: Nick Flandrey

Mid 50s, stay at home dad, with two elementary school age girls. Love my family and my life.

67 thoughts on “Tues. June 22, 2021 – still hot in Florida…”


  1. I’m off to the swamp to look at the underside of trees, and water!

    Don’t spend too much time looking at the underside of water. That’s not healthy. 😛

  2. Breakfast, then off to the swamp.

    All of the land in FL south of Gainesville is a swamp, some places simply drier than others. You’ll have to be more specific.

  3. As I have stated several times, the renewables only work from 32 F to 95 F. Below that range and above that range, the renewables must be backed up with dependable power generation equipment with at least a weeks worth of fuel. There is a quantifiable charge for that capability, Warren Buffet can tell you what it is. Not cheap, not cheap at all.

    The Legislature didn’t bite on that deal, right? ERCOT saw a few show resignations, but Oncor and the generators still pull the strings at that place. Something is amiss which needs further investigation. Again, to borrow from Warren’s quotable lines, Texas was “swimming naked”.

    The Simple Homespun Financial Wisdom (Formerly Ghostwritten by Carol Loomis of Fortune Magazine) (TM) — the “Letter to Shareholders in the BRK annual report — was late this year and seemed hastily rewritten in the energy sector area. There was still the usual level of gloating reading between the lines, but some direct scolding of Texas seemed missing.

    Go back 15 years, and after helping to create the mess in the FL insurance market, Warren charged the State of Florida $250 million dollars for the right to borrow $4 billion at 6.5% interest in the event of a hurricane to cover the insolvent homeowners insurance carriers in the state — which are, in truth, all of them as things currently stand. The insurance commissioner knew how bad the deal was for the state, but the RINO Governor — Charlie Crist 2022! — and Comptroller — Alex Sink, architect of what was possibly an illegal takeover of FL’s largest bank by Bank of America as an exec at the latter — endorsed the plan so the Legislature went along, frightened by the alternative which was to tell the voters the truth. FL is still in denial about homeowners insurance.

    He’s Warren Buffett, The Real Life Daddy Warbucks (TM)!

    In the end, Warren pocketed $250 million for nothing.


  4. But I had connected all the plugs to the surge outlets not the battery protected outlets.

    Dang reading glasses!

  5. “Today is job termination day for Texas registered nurse Jennifer Bridges and many others who refused to get the COVID-19 shot, and the nurse insists she has no regrets for refusing to get the Johnson and Johnson shot in order to keep her job.”

    If somebody funds the quarter million dollars to fight this to SCOTUS, this could become a landmark case.

    Even if the hospital wasn’t playing with fire in the case of the Emergency Use Authorization vaccines, they have a serious long term problem in the case of the Registered Nurses. There is already a shortage of RNs in Texas — how long do you think it will take for those men/women to accept loss of seniority and find a new job?

    Seniority is the real issue. Who wants to work night shift unless you need to put food on the table?

    State of Texas? Clean license wrt patient care? I saw an RN fired for timecard fraud by my wife’s last private practice management — technically a license violation which could lead to potential credential suspension — and she had a new job within 24 hours in Austin, with only two hospital chains and the VA competing for floor skilled labor.

    Houston. Didn’t kill a patient? Heck, the nurses will get raises, especially the ones *who caught/recovered from the WuXu Flu*.

    As for the rest, any lawsuits require both parties to work through the TWC appeal process, and I speak from experience when I say that the system is seriously backed up right now. Sure, it sucks for the employees who have trouble finding jobs, but the appeal process can continue in the background even after the terminated individuals return to work. It is the hospital that will have the HR and Legal billable hours outstanding until TWC gets their act together.

    Methodist should have adopted the VA approach — don’t get the shot, wear a mask and face shield.

    My wife’s Prog associate in Vantucky came out of residency at Methodist Baytown. Something beyond concern for the patients is at work there.

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  6. This popped up in my YouTube feed. Google knows all.

    Dave Ramsey knows the score about the nursing shortage.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dHSJRzRSDlU

    For all the orthodoxy and hysteria-driven thought around here, neither big hospital chain in Austin has decided to roll the dice like they have in Houston.

  7. If you want to support us taking the vaccine mandate case through the appeal process, here’s a link to the gofundme.

    We’re over $200,000 so far.

    I’m checking my email every half hour, waiting for my termination notification.  I will get it today.

    To reiterate:  I am in IT at Houston Methodist, and haven’t been near a coworker, let alone a patient, in over a year, and was told my position would remain remote indefinitely.  And I’m being fired for not taking a medical treatment that still lacks full FDA approval.

     

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  8. If you want to support us taking the vaccine mandate case through the appeal process, here’s a link to the gofundme.

    This is spam. If you want money, at least tell us your name. Bye.

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  9. MrAtoz, lpdbw uses the same username on at least one other site and I know his real name.

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  10. Requiring a remote IT worker to be vaccinated makes little sense. I suspect that is just management with a one-size-fits-all approach.

    Requiring people with patient contact to be vaccinated against every disease they are likely to see? COVID, flu, measles, etc.? Definitely. If they don’t see the importance of that, they’re in the wrong profession.

  11. They may have a case with the “emergency” use portion. If they hit liberal judges, it is a lost cause. I have no idea of the employee regulations there, if I was so against getting dosed with the mecho-gene-splicing pseudo EXPERIMENTAL vaccine, I would just quit. You get fired for cause, you ain’t getting unemployment without a fight anyway.

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  12. @lpdbw:  If vaccinations do not prevent diseases, please explain why nobody gets polio anymore.

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  13. Requiring a remote IT worker to be vaccinated makes little sense. I suspect that is just management with a one-size-fits-all approach.

    Probably want to get rid of an annoyance (or several) without boosting unemployment insurance premiums. More so than any other department, IT is going to have some vaccine resistance along with other personality quirks that correlate to the high IQ. “Policy violations” are easy cases to fight in unemployment appeals — American tech companies are big into “respect” training as of late for that reason.

    In Texas add in the possibility that management is on Wellbutrin (women), Adderall (men and women), and/or T therapy (men and transmen), greatly reducing tolerance for different thinking on any given subject. An order of magnitude higher possibility for the drugs if my wife’s anecdotal observations are valid.

  14. But I had connected all the plugs to the surge outlets not the battery protected outlets.

    Test, test, test!! OK, we do, but life keeps finding ways to get us to embarrass us. Ranks right up there with the backup that doesn’t work. Hopefully, we don’t make the same mistake twice. Probably not, but there will be variations.

    I took over an organization once, and was briefed by stakeholders. One guy was very competent, but also pretty full of himself. One of his collateral duties was to take care of our little LAN. I asked about backups, and how he had it set up. Fully automated! When is the last time it was verified? No need, works just fine! I suggested he run some tests periodically. Asked every few days. Too busy. That was all the invitation I needed. I “lost” a file and asked him to get it off the backup. Right. Let him stew awhile, but not waste too much time, then told him it was a test. We are still friends.

    I make plenty of mistakes.

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  15. Requiring a remote IT worker to be vaccinated makes little sense. I suspect that is just management with a one-size-fits-all approach.

    Requiring people with patient contact to be vaccinated against every disease they are likely to see? COVID, flu, measles, etc.? Definitely. If they don’t see the importance of that, they’re in the wrong profession.

    Let’s say this hospital gets infected with ransomware and they need all their IT staff on-site immediately – not so remote anymore.
    Also, iirc seasonal flu vaccinations are also required by this hospital and the remote IT worker(s) didn’t fight having to get those.

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  16. Let’s say this hospital gets infected with ransomware and they need all their IT staff on-site immediately – not so remote anymore.

    That’s exactly what happened at Judson ISD in SA last week. All hands on deck just to unplug 100’s of net connected devices. Fortunately, Gov. Abbott EO’d “No mask mandates at Texas PS” so masks were voluntary.

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  17. “But I had connected all the plugs to the surge outlets not the battery protected outlets.”

    Test, test, test!! OK, we do, but life keeps finding ways to get us to embarrass us. Ranks right up there with the backup that doesn’t work. Hopefully, we don’t make the same mistake twice. Probably not, but there will be variations.

    At the last job, a few years ago in a weird portent of things to come in Texas, the backup generator at our test site failed during a storm, crashing our system the night before an important customer demo, during the Summer->Winter (no Fall in this part of Texas, really) transition weeks in October when weather gets ugly.

    Did I mention our test site was right across an airport runway from … ERCOT!

    I should have known.

    After that, I developed a script that would send a simulation of power failure signal from the UPS to test our system’s ability to gracefully shut down. Our QA/testing department had never thought of putting one together, and I still don’t believe they have the capability.

  18. I can hardly wait for season two of Wandavision.

    Not likely to happen.

    BTW, the Loki series is off to a good start.

    Oh man, you are crushing my dream with reality !

    The first episode of Loki was awesome. The second was good, very good.

  19. “Ninth Circuit reinstates California’s ‘assault’ weapons ban”
    https://therightscoop.com/ninth-circuit-reinstates-californias-assault-weapons-ban/

    “Earlier this month a federal judge overturned California’s ‘assault’ weapons ban because it violated the second amendment. The Ninth Circuit just reinstated it:
    The three judge panel issued a stay on Judge Roger Benitez’s ruling, which means the current ban on the firearms will stay in place while other proceedings continue.”

    Well, that sucks.

    Hat tip to:
    https://thelibertydaily.com/

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  20. Go back 15 years, and after helping to create the mess in the FL insurance market, Warren charged the State of Florida $250 million dollars for the right to borrow $4 billion at 6.5% interest in the event of a hurricane to cover the insolvent homeowners insurance carriers in the state — which are, in truth, all of them as things currently stand. The insurance commissioner knew how bad the deal was for the state, but the RINO Governor — Charlie Crist 2022! — and Comptroller — Alex Sink, architect of what was possibly an illegal takeover of FL’s largest bank by Bank of America as an exec at the latter — endorsed the plan so the Legislature went along, frightened by the alternative which was to tell the voters the truth. FL is still in denial about homeowners insurance.

    He’s Warren Buffett, The Real Life Daddy Warbucks (TM)!

    In the end, Warren pocketed $250 million for nothing.

    Warren did something, he charged Florida $250 million to have a $4 billion credit line. I will guarantee you that Re had to put money aside for that possibility.

    And yes, Texas is swimming naked. Gonna get worse too.

  21. As I have stated several times, the renewables only work from 32 F to 95 F. Below that range and above that range, the renewables must be backed up with dependable power generation equipment with at least a weeks worth of fuel. There is a quantifiable charge for that capability, Warren Buffet can tell you what it is. Not cheap, not cheap at all.

    The Legislature didn’t bite on that deal, right? ERCOT saw a few show resignations, but Oncor and the generators still pull the strings at that place. Something is amiss which needs further investigation. Again, to borrow from Warren’s quotable lines, Texas was “swimming naked”.

    Oncor is just a meter and distribution line company. They own the electrical distribution lines at 20,000 volts and below in central and north Texas. Oncor owns four+ million electric meters in central and north Texas, from Monahans to Texarkana and from Wichita Falls to Rockdale (the old Alcoa plant). They used to be a part of TXU whom I worked for from 1982 to 1989.

    There are over ten million electric meters in Texas. And hundreds of thousands miles of distribution lines. And many thousands of miles of transmission lines (69KV, 138KV, 345KV, and several DC lines going to Oklahoma).

  22. But I had connected all the plugs to the surge outlets not the battery protected outlets.

    Dang reading glasses!

    Dang old eyes !

  23. “Storms rumbling through Houston as a “cool” front arrives”
    https://spacecityweather.com/storms-rumbling-through-houston-as-a-cool-front-arrives/

    “In meteorological terms, a cool front is in fact moving into the region. However, in practical terms, it’s late June. So don’t expect much cool or dry air. Far inland areas may see some dewpoints in the upper 60s, but overall the only sensible effects from this storm will be elevated rain chances. We saw scattered storms on Monday—some of which were pretty intense on the east side—and a slightly more organized line of storms dropped into Houston overnight. These rains should continue to progress toward the coast this morning.”

    I will believe it when I feel it outside.

  24. And yes, Texas is swimming naked. Gonna get worse too.

    All right, all right, all right!

    Robert Francis as Governor is the more likely scenario, however. He was just here over the weekend, at what looked like a hastily-planned rally for voting rights.

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  25. “Limetree Bay refinery to shut indefinitely after just a few months of operating”
    https://www.reuters.com/business/energy/limetree-bay-refinery-shut-due-severe-financial-constraints-2021-06-21/

    “The 210,000 barrel-per-day refinery had only restarted in February after being idle for nearly a decade, but was forced to shut in May after the facility sprayed nearby neighborhoods with a petroleum mist and residents complained of breathing problems.
    Last month, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ordered the plant shut for at least 60 days after those incidents, which also contaminated the community’s water supply. The EPA also ordered the plant to install and operate 18 sulfur dioxide and hydrogen sulfide monitors on St. Croix in order to restart.”

    This the 2020s, not the 1920s. It is not cool to spray your neighbors with “a petroleum mist”. Especially not in the Virgin Islands.

  26. And yes, Texas is swimming naked. Gonna get worse too.

    All right, all right, all right!

    Robert Francis as Governor is the more likely scenario, however. He was just here over the weekend, at what looked like a hastily-planned rally for voting rights.

    Nah, he is going to run as a dumbrocrat, not a repuglican. Not a chance, yet.

  27. First, I am now a terminated employee of Houston Methodist.  And I have been using lpdbw on the internet for about 20 years.  If you think it’s spam, so be it.  If you click the link, though, you’ll see the name of a courageous RN who is leading this effort.  And my real name is included in the lawsuit, which is available on the internet.  Along with 116 others.

    Second, I don’t want to hijack this fine website with my issues.  I know some here are supportive of my stance against mandatory “vaccination” with an untested medical treatment.  And I know others think that anything called “vaccine” must be good juju and would help hold me down to stick me with it, for fear I might spread my disease.  A disease I don’t have, haven’t had, and am not likely to ever have.

    Third, I’ll take the bait on the polio vaccine question, in spite of #2 above.

    Are you aware that the technology behind vaccines, real vaccines, from the first time they were ever used up through most of the 20th century used weakened or killed, denatured versions of the infecting pathogen, and that was the definition of vaccine up until they changed the definition to include the technology used in the Covid “vaccines”, which is COMPLETELY DIFFERENT in operation?  True vaccines stimulate your immune system to react to the intruder by introducing the pathogen in a weakened form that can’t hurt you (much)(usually).

    The new technology uses mRNA encapsulated in nanolipid particles (or for the J&J vaccine, DNA via viral vector) to invade your cells and turn them into machines that produce pathogens.  Your own cells express the pathogen.  There are claims that the spike proteins won’t shed, and the production is for a limited time only.  There is some evidence these claims are bogus, and this may explain the blood clotting problems and the heart inflammation issues being reported.

    We have no long-term studies of the effects of these nanolipid particles, and where they accumulate in the body (some evidence for ovaries).  Nor of the shedding of the spike proteins, nor long-term damage to the heart.  Oh, and the spike proteins, if free in your blood, can penetrate the blood-brain barrier.

    All vaccines kill people.  You are supposed to run a cost/benefit risk analysis on them.  Stop polio by killing a few kids?  Good trade.  Stop Smallpox by killing a few kids?  Good trade.

    Kill a few kids and young adults to (maybe) prevent them getting covid, when the long term risk from covid itself for that age group is basically nil?  Not a good trade.

    Risk vaccine complications for people who are already immune because they’ve had Covid?  Not a good trade.

    I’ve had my say, and I’ve used up too much of our host’s bandwidth.  I am going to go silent on this for a while, because I do respect this community.  I may pop in later with an update as the lawsuit progresses, but I believe it will be months in the future before anything significant happens.

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  28. Backups. In ~1983, I was part of a team that oversaw building a simulation lab that had two DEC VAX-11/780 computers, at least one PDP-11 series computer, and various hard disks and interconnect electronics. We were in a remote area that had very dirty power, due to long distance transmission lines and nearby switched big motor loads. DEC approved a company that set up a monitoring station, and said ours was one of the worst they had seen.

    We did not want the cost and maintenance of a diesel generator or a fully isolated battery system. We put in an electric motor-generator set that had full isolation from the mains, and a flywheel to provide about a couple of seconds of power if the mains failed. Power failures were also common. The simple MG set had some electronics that detected an outage, and issued an orderly shutdown to all critical loads. We did not really need to operate during an outage. The MG set had an overhaul life of fifty years, and only needed a cooling air filter change every year or so. Last I checked, it was still being used long after the lab was converted to other uses. It was about the size of a large chest freezer, and was pretty efficient. Almost inaudible. Can’t remember how much power it put out, but it was the manufacturer’s smallest unit, and they made several larger sizes.

    Not going to do that at home, but imagine how many gallons of diesel or how many batteries would have been used over the years. Sometimes old technology is appropriate.

  29. “The concealed carrying of an “ordinary knife.””
    https://gunfreezone.net/the-concealed-carrying-of-an-ordinary-knife/

    “I have told here many times I have not been without a Swiss Army knife since I was gifted one in my early teens. As great as they are, they are not “tactical” enough for some folks because the main blade does not lock open and that can be an issue when the doodoo hits the wind turbine. But, there is one exception to the rule and that would be the Victorinox Swiss Army One-Hand Trekker.”
    https://www.amazon.com/Victorinox-Swiss-One-Hand-Trekker-Pocket/dp/B000687B44/?tag=ttgnet-20

    I carry a Swiss Army Tinker. No locking blade. Very difficult to open with one hand. It has not cut me yet but, the day is long.
    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00004YVB4/

  30. Nah, he is going to run as a dumbrocrat, not a repuglican. Not a chance, yet.

    Robert Francis? Democrat, definitely. He factors into the Electoral College calculus in 2024 if he wins.

  31. We did not want the cost and maintenance of a diesel generator or a fully isolated battery system. We put in an electric motor-generator set that had full isolation from the mains, and a flywheel to provide about a couple of seconds of power if the mains failed. Power failures were also common. The simple MG set had some electronics that detected an outage, and issued an orderly shutdown to all critical loads. We did not really need to operate during an outage. The MG set had an overhaul life of fifty years, and only needed a cooling air filter change every year or so. Last I checked, it was still being used long after the lab was converted to other uses. It was about the size of a large chest freezer, and was pretty efficient. Almost inaudible. Can’t remember how much power it put out, but it was the manufacturer’s smallest unit, and they made several larger sizes.

    Not going to do that at home, but imagine how many gallons of diesel or how many batteries would have been used over the years. Sometimes old technology is appropriate.

    We used 480 volt DC motor – 480 volt three phase DC generator sets in our pre-1968 generating units. Each generating unit had one with several hundred deep cycle batteries. They were continuously running for instantaneous power. The deep cycle batteries required weekly fluid level maintenance. The DC motors only required their brushes to be changed yearly and the carbon blown out. The AC generators did not require any maintenance other than an annual cleaning.

    At the first power plant I worked at for three years, Morgan Creek Steam Electric Station, we had the motor generator set on units #2 through #5 (22 MW, 44 MW, 80 MW, 175 MW) and #6 (500 MW). #6 had an inverter system that was very high maintenance, regularly blowing its fuses when we had uh-ohs. One fine day we had the 25+ MVA auxiliary transformer fault and burn down. Of course, it took out the problem child inverter so we just had DC power that was good for about 4 to 5 hours. We ended up running a 480 volt three phase four conductor 4 ought wire from #6 to #5. Live as it was July and #5 was running wide open for 345 KV transmission line voltage support. I had a rope around the electrician hoping that I could pull him off the 480 volt busswork if he arced. He did not and we moved to #6 switchgear, cleaning the soot off everything and replacing some of the vaporized copper mains before we energized. We had to pull every 4160 volt circuit breaker (2,000 to 5,000 lbs for 400 amps to 10,000 amps) and clean each one but none of them burned / melted.

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  32. I am going to go silent on this for a while, because I do respect this community

    Uh, no. Alternate opinions, expression of views, are welcome.

    I am no fan of the vaccine either. However, I need (well strongly desire) to travel to Europe in 2022. I am also a substitute at the local high school. No vaccine, no subbing. Not a big loss, $5K or $6K a year. However I strongly suspect that travel to Europe will require proof of vaccination. To me that is important enough reason to get the vaccine. In retrospect I probably could have created a fake card and no one would be the wiser.

    Long term effects really don’t concern me. I am old enough that long term, well, is just not that long anymore. I am in a high risk group so figured I had little to lose. I spent 10.5 years in the military where vaccinations were mandatory and during the frenzy during basic training I have no idea what I received in what seemed a couple dozen injections over the course of four weeks. I also needed six mandatory inoculations administered about 30 minutes before I got on the plane for the Philippines from Hawaii.

    I may pop in later with an update as the lawsuit progresses

    It would be appreciated rather than a biased and tainted version from the network news.

    I asked about backups, and how he had it set up. Fully automated! When is the last time it was verified? No need, works just fine!

    When I was the IT manager at a large credit union administration decided it was time to change vendors for the IT infrastructure. Since I had little knowledge at the time of how their system worked I relied on the vendor to properly configure the backups. More than once I asked if all the necessary files were backed up. And specifically if it would be possible to go to an alternate site using the backups stored offsite and be operational within a couple of hours. Vendor was adamant everything was fine and even signed a document requested by the auditor stating that fact.

    A couple of months later I was terminated. I had issues with the vendor and the marketing rep was busty little thing that cozied up to the CEO and had me terminated. In retrospect the best thing that could have happened.

    I got this information from a staff member I still remained in contact. A year later one of the disk drives in the computer system failed. New drive was acquired quickly and the system brought backup. Uh-oh. A critical file was not being backed up and was missing. This required that three days of transactions be entered by hand. Teller line, ATM, ON-US checks, ACH, outgoing checks, every transaction that touched the system. Dozens of people working for days, multiple balance checks. Even then there were discrepancies that were just let go if the discrepancy was in the customer’s favor.

    At one point it was even mentioned that I, who had not worked at the place for two years, had planted a software bomb or otherwise sabotaged the system. My integrity is much higher than such low life tactics. The software company was looking for an excuse for another stupid error.

    I was not surprised. This software company had made several bone-headed decisions. I was a fly in their salad and held their feet to the fire more than once. Pissed a lot of people at the software company off. I had documented everything with extensive notes.

    When another credit union in the area decided to convert system the company at my CU was considered. I provided all my notes to this other credit union. That CU chose the other software company. A couple of months later I got a letter from the original software company’s lawyers stating I was going to be sued. I wrote the lawyer back, told him I had extensive notes that I would be present during any legal proceedings and that such documents would become publicly available. Take the risk otherwise go pound sand. I never heard back from the lawyer or his company.

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  33. Uh, no. Alternate opinions, expression of views, are welcome.

    Yes.

    Added: I’m not taking the shot. I don’t take flu shots ……. even though HEB pushed them and The Help can get the flu shot for free.

    Ah, if I can run a register, run the Business Center, be the Cash Controller and handle a lot of cash, enough to have to wash hands before un-zipping, and I don’t get sick, why get a shot?

  34. What has happened to the price of external hard drives ? The WD 8 TB is $190 ! It was $130 or close to that last December.
    https://www.amazon.com/Book-Desktop-External-Drive-WDBBGB0080HBK-NESN/dp/B01LQQHLGC/?tag=ttgnet-20

    The 12 TB is $310 ! It was $214 back in December 2020.
    https://www.amazon.com/Book-Desktop-External-Drive-WDBBGB0080HBK-NESN/dp/B07X3RBTQT/?tag=ttgnet-20

    I was going to purchase another 12 TB external and archive one of the old 8 TB drives on July 1. Now I don’t know. I may just get another 8 TB.

    This inflation thing and shortages thing sucks.

  35. What has happened to the price of external hard drives ? The WD 8 TB is $190 ! It was $130 or close to that last December.

    Every hard drive has a sophisticated controller chip which the manufacturers have to get fabbed somewhere.

    External hard drives have cases which require quality plastic feed stock made from petrochemicals.

    When we lived in Vantucky, I had an HP engineer tell me that they still had to export plastic feed stock to avoid problems in the overseas plants making the printers and laptops.

  36. “The 210,000 barrel-per-day refinery had only restarted in February after being idle for nearly a decade, but was forced to shut in May after the facility sprayed nearby neighborhoods with a petroleum mist and residents complained of breathing problems.

    See, should have still had their masks on. 😉

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  37. First, I am now a terminated employee of Houston Methodist. And I have been using lpdbw on the internet for about 20 years. If you think it’s spam, so be it. If you click the link, though, you’ll see the name of a courageous RN who is leading this effort. And my real name is included in the lawsuit, which is available on the internet. Along with 116 others.

    Sorry you were fired. My point is, look at your first post, the first line is please send money. Why should I look around the internet for “lpdbw”? I’m not reading the lawsuit and if I did, how would I know it’s you? I don’t recall “lpdbw” posting here. I’ve been around a while.


  38. Risk vaccine complications for people who are already immune because they’ve had Covid? Not a good trade.

    So then what? Follow the Dr Scott Atlas approach to get to herd immunity? How many dead in the US? A year plus locked in our basements, really locked down?

    Full disclosure, I had a lot of concerns when the EUA was first granted but after a lot of research, along with my and my wife’s co-morbidity, I decided the benefits outweighed the risks and got the Pfizer shots (only – intended to pass on the others).

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  39. Are you aware that the technology behind vaccines, real vaccines, from the first time they were ever used up through most of the 20th century used weakened or killed, denatured versions of the infecting pathogen, and that was the definition of vaccine up until they changed the definition to include the technology used in the Covid “vaccines”, which is COMPLETELY DIFFERENT in operation? True vaccines stimulate your immune system to react to the intruder by introducing the pathogen in a weakened form that can’t hurt you (much)(usually).

    All that and your post below that has been discussed a lot here. Why do you think I post “mecho-gene-splicing pseudo EXPERIMENTAL vaccine. I hope you’ve sent your resume all over. I think the lawsuit will fail.

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  40. What has happened to the price of external hard drives ? The WD 8 TB is $190 ! It was $130 or close to that last December.

    Every hard drive has a sophisticated controller chip which the manufacturers have to get fabbed somewhere.

    External hard drives have cases which require quality plastic feed stock made from petrochemicals.

    When we lived in Vantucky, I had an HP engineer tell me that they still had to export plastic feed stock to avoid problems in the overseas plants making the printers and laptops.

    Then why have SSD prices dropped in half since the beginning of the year ?

  41. Risk vaccine complications for people who are already immune because they’ve had Covid? Not a good trade.

    So then what? Follow the Dr Scott Atlas approach to get to herd immunity? How many dead in the US? A year plus locked in our basements, really locked down?

    Full disclosure, I had a lot of concerns when the EUA was first granted but after a lot of research, along with my and my wife’s co-morbidity, I decided the benefits outweighed the risks and got the Pfizer shots (only – intended to pass on the others).

    If “intended to pass on the others” means the socalled Delta Covid vaccine, I intend to pass on that also. It took quite a bit of talking to get my wife to do the Pfizer, I am not going to do the delta vaccine for either of us.

    BTW, I had no idea that I knew so many anti-vaxxers. The covid vaccine has drawn them out of the woodwork. And some of them are loud and proud. I have been quiet so far (at the behest of my wife) but bypassing the DPT shots for your kids is very dangerous in my opinion. Although, this is a lot of vaccine shots for kids:
    https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents/downloads/parent-ver-sch-0-6yrs.pdf
    from
    https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/schedules/easy-to-read/child-easyread.html

  42. If “intended to pass on the others” means the socalled Delta Covid vaccine, I intend to pass on that also. It took quite a bit of talking to get my wife to do the Pfizer, I am not going to do the delta vaccine for either of us.

    They are seriously planning a “Delta” vaccine?


  43. If “intended to pass on the others” means the socalled Delta Covid vaccine, I intend to pass on that also. It took quite a bit of talking to get my wife to do the Pfizer, I am not going to do the delta vaccine for either of us.

    They are seriously planning a “Delta” vaccine?

    I heard the current Pfizer and Moderna vaccines were near similar efficacy for the Delta variant.

    https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/covid-19-which-vaccines-are-effective-against-the-delta-variant

    They are also testing giving one dose of Modera to people that have had their two doses of Pfizer.

  44. If “intended to pass on the others” means the socalled Delta Covid vaccine, I intend to pass on that also. It took quite a bit of talking to get my wife to do the Pfizer, I am not going to do the delta vaccine for either of us.

    They are seriously planning a “Delta” vaccine?

    They are planning an annual booster for covid vaccine. I have seen an article somewhere that said that they are planning to use Delta as a selling point for the booster (just another shot of the same thing).

    Vaccine profits forever ! ! !

  45. What has happened to the price of external hard drives ?

    Amazon Prime time. They should have quite a few discounts going that way.

    NB: No Amazon, Facebook, Whats App, etc etc etc used around here.

  46. Then why have SSD prices dropped in half since the beginning of the year ? 

    No analog electronics? Simple fabs for flash memory? No moving parts/motors?

    I’m not an expert on hard drives. I briefly worked on the Quantum line at Jabil in 1993, but the infamous Tanga Lounge on the causeway near Tampa Airport had more to do with us keeping that contract than anything we did to improve controller board yield.

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  47. Doc visit today – all is well (except my weight, but down slightly during the ‘cootie’ year).

    And A1C level (diabetes test) is down from 6.9% to 6.3% (under 7 is good; 6.3% is at the pre-diabetic level). My highest A1C was 7.6 (March 2018) and had been going down (mostly) since then.  Lowest level since first tested back in 2015.  I take Metfornim to help control diabetes/A1C, which is helping with that (good stuff – has other positive effects).

    LDL/HDL (cholesterol) levels are good. Vitamin D good level (good for the immune system).

    Huzzah for me! And the doctor didn’t mention ‘colonoscopy’ 🙂 (Had one at age 60, and hitting 70 this year, so thought there might be one. Wasn’t that big a deal then. But why have one if the doc says you don’t have to?)

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  48. Huzzah for me! And the doctor didn’t mention ‘colonoscopy’

    Congrats !

    I just had a colonoscopy. Don’t worry, you did not miss anything. Same old semi-rigid hose. Same old lets put you down for this. I don’t remember a thing.

    Doc visit today – all is well (except my weight, but down slightly during the ‘cootie’ year).

    And I want to lose some weight but not enough to stop eating. After, it is a simple boundary problem, to cut the weight of the box, stop shoving so much in it.


  49. I hate debugging threads in C++

    I hate C++ and only use threads in sewing.

  50. Well, y’all did ok today while I was gone. Never know what is going to pop up.

    @lpdbw – please do continue to provide updates as the case moves along. WRT MrAtoz’s reaction, it took me a couple seconds to remember that you were the person SteveF had mentioned and encouraged to share here, so I’m not surprised he didn’t recognize you, and had a the same response I had, briefly. — My understanding is that the point being made is the REQUIREMENT and the emergency use nature of the required shot. We have long term experience with pretty much all the existing commonly used vaccines, except ebola (thank gnu) and people can make informed decisions about them, while we know nothing at all about long term effects of any of the several wuflu jabs.

    [ As an aside for the anti-anti-vaxxers- look at the list. It’s not what you remember from your own childhood, or your kids’, and they are usually given in multiples at the same time. Massive jolts to kids systems. FWIW, we got all the age appropriate ones, one shot per visit, and split as many of the multi-vax shots as possible to avoid any interaction, and lessen the hit on the kids bodies at one time. This also would have helped identify the culprit if bad reactions set in.]

    WRT backups, I’m terrible at it and am behind. I have the stuff, just haven’t run the backups in far too long.

    More in tomorrow’s summary,

    n

  51. I hate debugging threads in C++

    I hate C++ and only use threads in sewing.

    I love C++ and dislike threads. Strictly because writing the thread code is difficult. Then debugging the thread is impossible, I have to elevate the thread code to the main line to find out my simple coding error because I am an idiot and had a runaway in the thread.

    Any software of any size is moving to threads. The processor speed has hit the wall and threads are the only way to get more performance. Or in this particular case, I am updating a user’s file in memory and telling them what is going on because it can take a LONG time.

    I am debugging a 1.7 GB Win32 process. It is bumping up against the 2 GB memory limit.

  52. ok, couldn’t let this one go, not even going to read the article. The stupid it burns.

    Another Starlink Issue? Redditor Reports Lightning-Strike Blows Apart Dish

    Ya THINK?

    n

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  53. I am debugging a 1.7 GB Win32 process. It is bumping up against the 2 GB memory limit.

    You are not the only one getting there:
    https://www.thurrott.com/dev/252094/microsoft-releases-visual-studio-2022-preview-1

    Microsoft announced this week that it has released the first preview of Visual Studio 2022, the first 64-bit version of its developer environment.

    They must have been extraordinarily busy dealing with the umpteen DotNet Core Frameworks they are releasing and deprecating faster than ever.

  54. As great as they are, they are not “tactical” enough for some folks because the main blade does not lock open

    Depends on the knife. I only carry knives with locking blades – Victorinox produces several. Not because they are “tactical”, but simply because they are a lot safer. The Victorinox shop even allows you to filter by this.

    it is a simple boundary problem, to cut the weight of the box, stop shoving so much in it.

    That’s it, in a nutshell. In German, they call this, somewhat rudely, “Friss die Hälfte” (“eat half”). In that sense, the “intermittent fasting” idea is pretty good: skip a couple of meals, keep everything else the same, and lose weight.

    Apparently, there are also other health benefits to be had, by making your body realize that nutrition doesn’t happen like clockwork. I’ve tried it a couple of times, and it works pretty well…

    They are planning an annual booster for covid vaccine.

    Not a surprise. I expect that we will see annual corona shots right next to the annual flu shot. The one hope: The mRNA technique seems to produce a better immune response than injecting damaged viruses, meaning that the response still works against (at least some) mutations. Time will tell…

    The mRNA vaccines have amazing promise. I read a couple of days ago about early results for mRNA vaccines (in mice) against malaria. Until now, nothing has really worked, because malaria is a complicated organism with a nasty lifecycle. Malaria kills millions, and chronically infects hundreds of millions – an effective vaccine would be incredible.

    an aside for the anti-anti-vaxxers

    That’s me. I’m a fan of technology. Apologies if I ruffled too many feathers…

    I hate debugging threads in C++

    Debugging threads is a nightmare in any language. Especially if you’re fighting synchronization problems.

  55. I hate debugging threads in C++

    Debugging threads is a nightmare in any language. Especially if you’re fighting synchronization problems.

    My actual problem was a memory runaway. But it was occurring in one of the six threads that our app uses so I could not find it without collapsing that particular thread. Then the debugger started working instead of just crashing my app.

    I have been thinking about actually reading a book on C++ threads from a master. “C++ Concurrency in Action 2nd Edition”
    https://www.amazon.com/C-Concurrency-Action-Anthony-Williams-dp-1617294691/dp/1617294691/?tag=ttgnet-20

    I’ve got about 200 or 300 computer books, I haven’t actually read many of them cover to cover. I just use them mostly for reference as needed.


  56. I am debugging a 1.7 GB Win32 process. It is bumping up against the 2 GB memory limit.

    You are not the only one getting there:
    https://www.thurrott.com/dev/252094/microsoft-releases-visual-studio-2022-preview-1

    Microsoft announced this week that it has released the first preview of Visual Studio 2022, the first 64-bit version of its developer environment.

    They must have been extraordinarily busy dealing with the umpteen DotNet Core Frameworks they are releasing and deprecating faster than ever.

    I would like for us to go Win64. But we cannot do that until we finish the Unicode conversion project as we are still MBCS (multiple byte character set). A lot of our code is old (Windows 1.0) and uses the SendMessage protocol. Very little string data typing. So we have to go through the messages one by one and upgrade them to Unicode. Even our OLE code steps up and down all over the place.

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  57. I had a rope around the electrician hoping that I could pull him off the 480 volt busswork if he arced.

    No thanks. I worked around a TV transmitter that had 50kV at 20A. All enclosed, of course. We had quite a procedure for shut down before access. I was not one allowed inside, and I didn’t want to be. Perfectly safe, but still scary. It was fun to watch the meters and hear the slight increase in noise when the picture went to black. (Black causes max power, as the video signal is inverted.)

    Anything over about 1kVDC is considered instantly lethal, although there are exceptions. AC is more dangerous, but a few have survived contact with surprisingly high voltages, backed with infinite current in human terms. There were two idiots who climbed a transmission tower near one of the Oxnard generating stations. One guy was zapped, but survived. I don’t know the extent of his injuries, but that was incredible. The towers are very recognizable, unusual shape, made of concrete. Saw it on TV many years ago. The guy was unconscious on the big flat crossbeam, and didn’t fall. Took a long time to shut the power off so he could be rescued.

    I have mentioned that the university I graduated from had a power option in electrical engineering. Also had a nice lab, with old but well maintained equipment. I was in electronics, but all of us had at least one course that had a lab with motors and generators. Fun. Pretty impressive what a few extra zeroes can do. IIRC, the size was only 10-20 hp, but there were a few bigger machines. There were also some thyratrons with pretty glowing gas. Real power, not wimpy transistors.

  58. Headed out to visit the science center, and see some more manatees. Keep the door open and the coffee fresh.

    n

  59. Are you aware that the technology behind vaccines, real vaccines, from the first time they were ever used up through most of the 20th century used weakened or killed, denatured versions of the infecting pathogen, and that was the definition of vaccine up until they changed the definition to include the technology used in the Covid “vaccines”, which is COMPLETELY DIFFERENT in operation?

    This is not true. Many other vaccine techniques have been in use for years (toxoid for tetanus, subunit for flu, etc.) This is typical anti-vaxxer BS.


  60. They are planning an annual booster for covid vaccine.

    Which they should be, in case it is needed.

    Right now, the long term studies by Pfizer (and maybe Moderna, I haven’t seen a report by them) show that there is T-cell activation in the vaccinated people at 6 months after a dose, and they are doing followups at later stages. A recently approved test for T-cell response to SARS-CoV-2 is cheaper than previous tests, making such studies easier.

    Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna don’t need annual boosters to keep the $$ rolling in. They have a whole host of other projects in work. A malaria vaccine that has shown 100% protection in mice. An HIV vaccine that was already in phase 2 trials. A flu vaccine that works on all variants. Individualized treatments for cancers. And more.

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