Monday, 28 January 2013

07:50 – Barbara just headed off to work. She and Frances are alternating staying overnight with their dad, and it’s Barbara’s turn tonight. She’ll stay there tonight and go directly in to work tomorrow. If their mom is still in the hospital Wednesday night, Barbara will stay over again then. I told her again last night that it wouldn’t bother me if she decided to stay over at her parents’ place every night while her mom’s in the hospital. That’d let her spend some time with her dad while she still can. Colin and I can take care of ourselves while she’s gone.


27 thoughts on “Monday, 28 January 2013”

  1. “Colin and I can take care of ourselves while she’s gone.”

    Sure you can. You sit there eating boxes of doughnuts and washing them down with Coca-Cola while Colin decides what you can watch, or not, on the tee-vee.

  2. Sure you can. You sit there eating boxes of doughnuts and washing them down with Coca-Cola while Colin decides what you can watch, or not, on the tee-vee.

    Doing the South Beach Diet has warped my mind. The thought of doughnuts doesn’t hold the same appeal for me that it once did. I’d still like to have a doughnut, but I live in a small town where there’s at most one place to get good doughnuts. Grocery store doughnuts just don’t cut it any more. I wouldn’t mind having some nice warm Krispy Kreme’s, but the closest place to get them still warm is over a half hour away, and I don’t want to spend my entire lunch hour driving too and from Krispy Kreme. I’m still quite fond of pizza and pasta, neither of which is particularly South Beach Diet friendly.

  3. Hmmm. You can get Krispy-Kreme doughnuts many places in Winston-Salem. I wonder why.

  4. Hmmm. You can get Krispy-Kreme doughnuts many places in Winston-Salem. I wonder why.

    I think I can actually get Krispy Kreme doughnuts at a grocery store here in Smallville. They’re good, but they have cooled off. A freshly made Krispy Kreme is even better than the ones that have had a chance to cool. .

  5. Huh. I figured they made them all in Winston-Salem and just shipped them elsewhere.

  6. There are three Krispy Kreme stores in the Portland area. I don’t think they do as well as a local outfit called Voodoo Doughnut. Think bacon. http://voodoodoughnut.com/

    They’re the antithesis of health food.

    Rick in Portland

  7. Going to a store and buying Krispy Kreme doughnuts is OK. You just need to throw away the doughnuts and eat the paper box.

  8. I think I can actually get Krispy Kreme doughnuts at a grocery store here in Smallville. They’re good, but they have cooled off. A freshly made Krispy Kreme is even better than the ones that have had a chance to cool.

    Well, I just checked, and there is no longer a Krispy Kreme location in Central Indiana. If I want a hot fresh Krispy Kreme, I’m looking at an almost 4 hour round trip.

  9. They’d probably make ones for you if you ordered a dozen, according to their web site.

    I can eat about one gut bomb like this a month.

  10. Krispy Kremes invaded Nebraska years ago and became wildly popular almost immediately. They quickly monopolized the gas station and grocery store resellers. In recent years they’ve closed most of their stores (another chain that expanded too quickly) and there’s been some backlash as customers are demanding donuts from locally owned bakeries. Myself, I always preferred things like Apple Fritters and whatnot, so Krispy Kreme was never my thing.

    Frankly, they’re very light (which is a nice way of saying they’re selling you air) and they just submerge them in glazing which gives them an almost airtight seal that keeps them soft. No offense to those that love them, but I always thought they were cheap crap. Sort of the McDonalds of the donut world.

  11. What Chad said. And I also prefer apple, pear, banana, whatever, fritters, which we make ourselves and give a light dusting of confectioner’s sugar. I have zero idea if the KK’s are sold in Vermont and couldn’t possibly care less, so there!

    20 here and snowing light but steady; roads are slippery due to vehicle tires churning the snow to icy slush and mud and then it freezes. This is, of course, the perfect condition for a lot of motor vehicle operators to SPEED UP! Don’t turn the lights on, never signal, and by all means keep yakking on the cell. So I’m driving back home just now and the speed limit is 40 on this particular road and I’m doing 45 in a heavy, 4x V8 truck. Naturally the bastards crowd my rear bumper and if the road was only wide enough, there wasn’t oncoming traffic, and deep rocky ravines on both sides, they’d pass me.

    I need to mount weapons systems front and rear, at a minimum; reading the recent book on the assassination (supposedly) of bin Laden by the Seals, I was astonished to read that some of them like to carry and use what they call a “pirate gun.” It’s my old break-action M79 grenade launcher, cut down to the max.

    http://www.inetres.com/gp/military/infantry/grenade/M79.html

    http://www.businessinsider.com/these-are-18-things-navy-seals-are-probably-taking-with-them-to-libya-right-now-2012-9?op=1

  12. I’ve had KKs once or twice and couldn’t work out why people rave about them. They were okay but nothing special.

  13. OFD wrote:

    “Naturally the bastards crowd my rear bumper and if the road was only wide enough, there wasn’t oncoming traffic, and deep rocky ravines on both sides, they’d pass me. ”

    Have you ever had someone pass you on the wrong side? I have. I was doing 100-110 km/h on a country road in South Australia, and a car approached on the correct side of the road, it then swerved in front of me and passed me on the wrong side, in the dirt. Whack job.

    I’ve also crested a hill to find two semi trailers coming the other way, one on my side of the road. I had just enough time to get half into the dirt at the side of the road, the two semis bunched together, and I missed the one on my side by less than six inches. I really hate the cowboys on the road.

  14. “Have you ever had someone pass you on the wrong side? ”

    A few times over the years. They’ll actually use what we call here the breakdown lane and pass on the right; haven’t seen it yet here in Vermont but down in Maffachusetts and NJ. Saw a guy do that once on 128 southbound outside Boston, always a very busy route, and he was going 80-90 MPH, easy. Stayed in that lane, too.

    Tailgaters bug me up here, esp. during shaky weather, road and visibility conditions. I generally slow right down and really piss them off. They’re welcome to try ramming my truck. At which point I will happily return the favor.

  15. Miles_Teg said at 28 January 2013 at 20:03
    “Have you ever had someone pass you on the wrong side? ”

    In response
    OFD said at 28 January 2013 at 21:21
    “A few times over the years. They’ll actually use what we call here the breakdown lane and pass on the right; haven’t seen it yet here in Vermont but down in Maffachusetts and NJ. Saw a guy do that once on 128 southbound outside Boston, always a very busy route, and he was going 80-90 MPH, easy. Stayed in that lane, too.

    Uhmm, OFD, I don’t think that’s what Greg meant. There’s a legal distinction between “pass” and “overtake”. What you describe is someone travelling in the same direction as you, pulling to the kerbside verge or breakdown lane and overtaking you on the passenger side from behind.
    What Greg was describing was someone coming in the opposite direction on a 2-lane road, gravel or dirt road shoulders, approaching Greg head-on, then pulling to the driver’s side across the centre-line, all the way across the road into and past head-on in Greg’s lane, keeping on going until he passed Greg head-on on Greg’s passenger side kerbside gravel or dirt verge (no breakdown lane).
    As he said, “Whack job”. Psycho. Nutter. Total raving loonie. No words are adequate.

  16. Thanks Don, that’s exactly the way it happened. I don’t know if the other driver was high, stupid, or exceptionally skilled. S/he was lucky I’m a pretty calm driver and didn’t freak out and take evasive action.

  17. Ping Dave B!

    One of my toons (a hunter) just hit 20 in WoW, and I got a horse for her. Can the horse die in a fall like a human can if the drop is high enough? Do they recover or is the damage permanent, just as gear can be damaged and need occasional repair?

  18. One of my toons (a hunter) just hit 20 in WoW, and I got a horse for her. Can the horse die in a fall like a human can if the drop is high enough? Do they recover or is the damage permanent, just as gear can be damaged and need occasional repair?

    The horse won’t die or need to be repaired. The worst thing that can happen while riding your horse is a fall where you die. After you deal with that, you can remount the horse as normal.

  19. Thanks Dave. One of my alts got a horse – that is trained and paid for it, and when I swapped to an alt that had a mount given to it for free – a dire horse I think, I also had the option of the chestnut that the first alt had bought. I’d assumed it would only be available to the buying toon.

  20. Thanks Dave. One of my alts got a horse – that is trained and paid for it, and when I swapped to an alt that had a mount given to it for free – a dire horse I think, I also had the option of the chestnut that the first alt had bought. I’d assumed it would only be available to the buying toon.

    Mounts and companions are now shared across the account. I think there are still restrictions about use of the mounts, for example having to be level 20 to ride a horse. I don’t think any of my toons but the one with tailoring skill can ride a flying carpet. I’m not sure though. Things are shared a bit more across the entire account than they used to be before the release of Mists of Pandaria.

  21. Dave B: Long’s Donuts on Indy southside. That would not be too far. I am seldom on the southside near Long’s, but when I am, I never miss getting some.

    Best donuts I ever had were at a place called Cottage Donuts in West Newton, Mass. where we belonged to the Y for the kids activities which were fantastic at that time. Unfortunately, Cottage is gone. It was once a chain, but I think every store closed. The one in West Newton was run by a single woman raising 2 daughters, who also worked in the store. When they graduated from college, the mom sold the store, and it was turned into something else. Very sad day for lots of people.

    Dunkin’ Donuts thought they were going to invade Berlin. They started opening stores shortly after we moved to Berlin. That kind of overly sweet stuff would never succeed with the Germans. And it didn’t. After about 5 years of watching hardly anyone frequent the stores, they changed their whole menu. They began serving the ‘Belegtes Brötchen’ (stuffed rolls) that all other bakeries serve in the morning. Donuts were relegated to about a dozen in a remote display rack. I am not making this up. You could hardly get donuts at Dunkin’ Donuts. They were doing well when I left—after they switched to a menu that people would actually eat. Now, if they would only start serving Belegtes Brötchen in their stores here in the States.

  22. Dave B: Long’s Donuts on Indy southside. That would not be too far. I am seldom on the southside near Long’s, but when I am, I never miss getting some.

    Long’s has very good donuts, but it is about 30 minutes from where I live now. It was less than a mile away from the apartment we lived in before we bought the house.

  23. “… if they would only start serving Belegtes Brötchen in their stores here in the States.”

    Not gonna happen. We’ve sent all German-related stuff to eternal Perdition, since circa the Great War era. German ethnicity was once probably close to half the country but World War I put paid to all that.

  24. OFD says on 30 January 2013 at 11:16
    We’ve sent all German-related stuff to eternal Perdition, since circa the Great War era.

    I knew that there had to be some excuse for US beer, but it’s certainly not an adequate justification.

  25. What is worse is that beers from Milwaukee and St. Louis were ostensibly created at the hands of German immigrants. The CFO for Prince spaghetti lived behind us in Natick and his daughter and my son were in the same classes in school. He said the taste tests for Prince products were done by a few guys who were German and did not speak much English. They always got their taste testers from Germany, he said, as nobody else seemed to be able to discern differences. Prince sold out to Creamettes, which fired everybody at Prince and ultimately did away with the name. Creamettes is not worth putting in your mouth. Prince was the best at one time.

    One can hope about the Brötchen. I sure miss German (and true Italian) food. Olive Garden is about as far from real Italian one could get. There was a really great true Italian restaurant on Boylston St. in Back Bay, Boston that replaced the Magic Pan when it met its demise. Wonder if it is still there? I remember eating there once and a guy at the next table was complaining there was too much garlic in his entrée. The waitress did not give him any sympathy, “Sir, this IS an Italian restaurant.”

    I was communicating with a Berlin friend over the weekend, and told her that when I was a kid, there were quite a few German words that were common in these parts. One was “verboten” (forbidden or “not done” as the Germans like to translate it) and another was “verruckt” (crazy). Of course, at that time, it was pronounced here with a “v” sound (“v” is the “f” sound in German) and we kids thought it was from Russian, not German. I never hear either word anymore—except from hyper-literate OFD and SteveF.

  26. ‘There was a really great true Italian restaurant on Boylston St. in Back Bay, Boston that replaced the Magic Pan when it met its demise. Wonder if it is still there? I remember eating there once and a guy at the next table was complaining there was too much garlic in his entrée. The waitress did not give him any sympathy, “Sir, this IS an Italian restaurant.”’

    There’s no such thing as too much garlic (or ginger). I try not to breathe all over people when I’ve had garlic, but I don’t forgo it either. I have a very heavy hand when adding powdered or crushed fresh garlic to food.

    And just try asking for Coke in a good French restaurant. I’ve heard of Americans being kicked out for that.

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