Tuesday, 20 September 2016

09:32 – USPS is running today. Lori just stopped to pick up a couple of kits and told me that the Sparta area is getting limited gasoline deliveries. I suspected as much. When I took Colin out this morning to pick up the paper, there was a tanker truck sitting in the 4 Brothers/Liberty station across the road. The odd thing was that it’s normally a Beroth Oil tanker, because Beroth owns the chain of stores. This time, it was a generic tanker. The other odd thing was that when I looked again an hour or so later, the station still had the gas pumps blocked off. I wonder if the city/county has limited this station to filling emergency vehicles until the supply situation is resolved.

Lori also told me that things are getting crazy out there. When a guy at the Wilco station finally got to the pump, he filled up his tank and gas cans and then sat blocking the pump while he called his friends on his cell phone and told them that he’d keep the pump blocked until they could get there to fill up. Other people in line didn’t take that well, of course, and fist fights broke out. It’s just lucky that no one started shooting.

The problem, of course, is panic buying. Most people wait until their gas gauge is down to a quarter or less before they fill their tanks. In recent days, everyone has been filling their tanks regardless of how much they had left, not to mention filling every gas can available. Not to mention trying to hold a place in line until their friends can get there. Even if the pipeline and distribution system is operating at normal capacity, there’s no way it can keep up with that kind of demand.

My takeaway on all this is that once the emergency passes and gas cans are available again, we need to buy at least two or three cans, fill them, treat them with fuel stabilizer, and periodically cycle them through our vehicles. Not so much to have fuel for the vehicles as to have fuel for our generator if there’s a long-term power failure. I’ve calculated that we can run our well pump long enough to keep us supplied with water at a minimal level on five gallons or so of gasoline a month.

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131 thoughts on “Tuesday, 20 September 2016”

  1. ‘Bout time!

    Better late than never, but this is a basic and relatively cheap prep. EVERYONE needs to have some gas stored for their vehicle and/or their gennie. It’s a basic enabler and there is no substitute. If you need gas, you need gas.

    I’ve been told, and watched my dad do it some 35+ years ago, that colman fuel will work in a gasoline engine. When dad added it to the car, it might have mixed with some remaining gas, I don’t remember. I’m pretty sure it was a car that ran on unleaded… We did make it to the station for a fillup. If anyone has some direct and recent experience with this, please chime in. Colman fuel stores very well, although it is pricey. If it works, those of you that have issues storing gas might have an alternative.

    nick

  2. “I’ve calculated that we can run our well pump long enough to keep us supplied with water at a minimal level on five gallons or so of gasoline a month.”

    So that would work out to however many five-gallon containers for however many months; three cans, three months. That is where I’d like us to be up here; you probably mentioned it earlier, but what generator do you have and what’s its wattage?

    I’m still thinking dual-fuel is the way to go; gas and propane.

    “…and then sat blocking the pump while he called his friends on his cell phone and told them that he’d keep the pump blocked until they could get there to fill up.”

    I would have called the local huckleberries immediately and had them move this asshole out of the way. Failing that, call up one of MY friends with a bulldozer and do it that way. We’ll see more of this kind of thing; peeps have learned from the rulers that there IS no rule of law and you can do whatever you can get away with.

  3. The other odd thing was that when I looked again an hour or so later, the station still had the gas pumps blocked off. I wonder if the city/county has limited this station to filling emergency vehicles until the supply situation is resolved.

    The station manager may have been sitting on the delivery until the prevailing retail price at least matched what he paid wholesale for a one time delivery in a crisis situation. I used to see it all the time in Florida during storm emergencies until the state passed “anti-gouging” laws.

  4. I’ve been told, and watched my dad do it some 35+ years ago, that colman fuel will work in a gasoline engine. When dad added it to the car, it might have mixed with some remaining gas, I don’t remember.

    I just checked Wikipedia, and all the information I reported is flagged as needs citation. So it may not be accurate. The article said a gasoline engine will run on Coleman fuel. However, the article reports that Coleman fuel is only 50 to 55 octane and that the combustion temperature will be much higher. In other words it will work, but will dramatically shorten the life of the engine. Where dramatically could mean connecting rod end poking through the side of the engine block.

  5. From the Senile Old Bastard Department:

    http://www.politico.com/story/2016/09/exclusive-george-hw-bush-to-vote-for-hillary-228395

    Big surprise; the patriarch of one crime family voting for the matriarch of another. They’ve been in cahoots for DECADES, too. No one knows, no one cares.

    As one of the linked articles at the Woodpile Report states, and as I have said before, we’re becoming more and more like the old Soviet Union and now it’s their turn to laugh at US.

  6. Those laws are already in effect in North Carolina, and have been since the governor declared a state of emergency. Laws like that are obviously stupid and counterproductive. If someone wants to try to sell gas at $5.89/gallon (which someone was doing yesterday according to news reports), it’s their business. Anyone who doesn’t like it can go elsewhere. It’s called free enterprise.

    If Barbara had ended up stranded, I’d willingly have paid $5.89 (or $58.90) per gallon and whatever they were charging for gas cans just so I could go get her. These anti-gouging laws simply distort the marketplace, preventing people who really, really need something from paying whatever it takes to get it.

  7. If it works, those of you that have issues storing gas might have an alternative.

    I don’t have issues with storing gasoline, I have issues with storing gasoline in my house (or attached garage) outside a flameproof safety cabinet.

  8. If Barbara had ended up stranded, I’d willingly have paid $5.89 (or $58.90) per gallon and whatever they were charging for gas cans just so I could go get her. These anti-gouging laws simply distort the marketplace, preventing people who really, really need something from paying whatever it takes to get it.

    If gas were $5.00 a gallon in the affected area, we’d have every spare gasoline tanker driving from the unaffected area to the affected area and back as quickly as possible. We might even get CSX and Norfolk Southern trying to figure out where they have idle gasoline tank cars sitting, and what they can do to move gasoline into the affected area. Also, we’d have people postponing optional travel until the prices drop to normal.

  9. Some years ago, I bought a 5 gallon gas container monthly, marked the month on it and filled it up. After a year, I dumped that month’s gas container in my car and refilled my car and container.

    That was an easy way to have 60 gallons of gasoline available with the oldest gas being one year old.

  10. Other people in line didn’t take that well, of course, and fist fights broke out. It’s just lucky that no one started shooting.

    No, it’s not luck. If the situation isn’t resolved soon, then the guns come out.

  11. If Barbara had ended up stranded, I’d willingly have paid $5.89 (or $58.90) per gallon and whatever they were charging for gas cans just so I could go get her. These anti-gouging laws simply distort the marketplace, preventing people who really, really need something from paying whatever it takes to get it.

    Back when the normal price of gas was under $2/gal, I once paid $4/gal in the wake of a hurricane so I could fill my tank to get to work. The key word is “once”.

  12. Speaking of blocking the pumps…
    At self-service pumps, even in “normal” times, I think you ought to pretty much treat it like a pit stop: get it done and get out of the way!

  13. “I think you ought to pretty much treat it like a pit stop: get it done and get out of the way!”

    Exactly what I do, as quickly as possible. Others, not so much; some just leave their shitbox parked there and go into the station to pay, buy some stuff, maybe a lottery ticket, etc. Or they just sit there for a few minutes longer and fiddle with stuff, phone, ciggies, pocketbook, whatever. Often I believe it’s deliberate. If so, they’re increasingly playing with fire as the overall situation deteriorates and tempers get shorter.

  14. Interesting observation. The local electric co-op just sent four raffle tickets for four prize drawings that will be held at their next annual meeting. One of the four prizes is a rain barrel. First, the local electric co-op thinks it needs to bribe people to attend the annual meeting. Second, and this is sheer speculation, but I’m taking this as circumstantial evidence that rain barrels are legal in the area served by the electric co-op.

  15. “…circumstantial evidence that rain barrels are legal in the area served by the electric co-op.”

    I may have missed something along the way or perhaps I’m simply obtuse but what is it exactly in all these places around the country that is used to justify making rain barrels illegal?

  16. “Some years ago, I bought a 5 gallon gas container monthly, marked the month on it and filled it up. After a year, I dumped that month’s gas container in my car and refilled my car and container.”

    That’s a good idea, and I might do it except that the only place we have to store gas cans is in the house or the attached garage. I’m not comfortable with either, and there are also probably fire insurance issues. I suppose we could put them out on the concrete pad under the deck, but I’m not really happy with that idea, either.

    After they finally show up to concrete our drive, I think our next major project will be to build a filled/reinforced concrete block outbuilding for storage and an emergency storm shelter.

  17. “I may have missed something along the way or perhaps I’m simply obtuse but what is it exactly in all these places around the country that is used to justify making rain barrels illegal?”

    Silly question. The state owns the rain that falls on your property. They also own the sunlight, so don’t assume solar panels will be legal, and they also own the air, so stop breathing unless you’ve paid for a permit.

  18. I’ve mentioned it before, but until recently I stored my gas in 5 gal cans in a rubbermaid outdoor cabinet. It was on the shady side of the garage, in the narrow space between the tall fence and the garage, partly under the eaves. It never gets any sunlight.

    https://www.amazon.com/Rubbermaid-Outdoor-Horizontal-Sandstone-FG374701OLVSS/dp/B000L0CPPM

    I put a board between each layer of cans and just stacked them. This is WAY less than optimal. The bottom cans would squash, and the stack wasn’t very stable.

    Recently I won a flammables storage cabinet at a surplus auction, and reconditioned that. It replaced my Rubbermaid cabinets in the same location. It’s not designed for outdoor use, so it will rust. I feel safer now.

    https://www.amazon.com/JUSTRITE-MANUFACTURING-894500-Sure-Grip-Flammable/dp/B00AI0LXEE/ref=sr_1_14?s=industrial&ie=UTF8&qid=1474387508&sr=1-14&keywords=flammable+cabinet

    It isn’t cheap to buy one new, and they are usually about half price used.

    Storing larger tanks of gasoline can be problematic too, as it is often not allowed, or needs really onerous environmental considerations.

    In Texas, it’s illegal to fill or transport gasoline in a portable container larger than 6 gallons.

    These issues are just a few of the reasons it makes sense to standardize on diesel for you vehicles and your gennie. But that has costs too.

    nick

  19. Some laws and/or common law might require that downstream water users have a right to the water (and in a clean condition, note).

  20. “Silly question.”

    And silly me. Of course. IIRC, I saw something a very long time ago somewhere that said a property owner had dominion over the land underneath and the air above. I guess that’s no longer the case, if it ever was.

    Yeah, gas and propane storage; we have a list of projects here, major and minor, and among the major ones, the outside storage shed is on it, probably after getting the rest of the windows and shutters done, getting an electrician and a plumber in here, and yeah, about Number Four on said list. I’m very slowly working my way through the dozen minor projects, and it’s taking three times as long thanks to back issues and rapidly advancing senility and general decrepitude.

    Actually I might move the shed up to Number Three, ahead of the plumber, but we really gotta get some electrical evaluation and work done ASAP, preferably before the end of the year.

  21. Well, that was interesting. An hour or so ago, I spotted another tanker truck in the 4 Brothers/Liberty convenience store across the road. Just now, I looked out the front door and saw that they still had the orange streamers blocking off the pumps. So I called them. The phone rang 12 or 15 times and then picked up with a fax tone. It looks like they’re not selling gas for now.

  22. I have stored small quantities of flammables in small jugs in a metal trash can, with some attempt at shade on top. Need to follow up with inspection and inventory… Thanks for the reminders.

  23. As far as I know, all states east of the Mississippi have riparian water law.

  24. I recently bought a Champion 9000/7000 dual fuel generator. (It’s still sitting at my Storage Business in Oklahoma – got to go pick it up). The documentation says it will run 8 hours on a full tank (5 gal) of gas and up to 5.5 hours on a 20 lb. propane tank. I also have the Natural Gas adapter as we have natural gas at our home. Of course the output power is reduced to 8100/6300 on propane and a little less on natural gas. My plan is to hook it up to our to-house gas line and tie it to our circuits that run the kitchen (microwave, fridge, and LED lights) living room (LED lights, DVD, and TV), garage (two chest freezers). Even on NG it should have plenty of power for these. Heat and hot water are NG so for power outage we should be OK.
    Just learned that my father-in-law had a 20 kw whole-house unit (connected to his 250 gal propane tank) for his double-wide a few years back when they had a outage. He passed away last year. I asked mother-in-law if they had ever run the unit. Never. Did they ever test it? Never. I called the guy who installed it and he said they require regular test runs and yearly maintenance. Without any of that for several years he thought that it might be dangerous to try and use it without an inspection and possible overhaul. You just can’t let these things sit or they rot.

  25. Dave wrote:

    “No, it’s not luck. If the situation isn’t resolved soon, then the guns come out.”

    In the petrol crisis of 1973/74 ladies would offer to “go out back” with the station owner in order to get some petrol.

  26. Well, that was interesting. An hour or so ago, I spotted another tanker truck in the 4 Brothers/Liberty convenience store across the road. Just now, I looked out the front door and saw that they still had the orange streamers blocking off the pumps. So I called them. The phone rang 12 or 15 times and then picked up with a fax tone. It looks like they’re not selling gas for now.

    Those trucks have pumps on them also. They carry about 7,800 to 8,000 gallons. The station owner might be selling his tanks contents.

    I don’t remember how many of those tanker trucks that I have unloaded with Fuel Oil #6 in them. Maybe a 100.

  27. More stuff on the ongoing Sovietization of this continent, yeah, O Kanada, too:

    http://chicagoboyz.net/archives/53894.html

    Origins before the humanities and social “science” departments in our colleges and universities date back to the so-called Frankfurt School and in short, French and German “theorists” and pedants. Before that, of course, to the Bolsheviks, Freud, Marx, and Rousseau, evil bastards all.

  28. Actually, I don’t see a demand problem so much as an organization problem. Consider: the average gas tank must be about half-full. The average vehicle needs filled up every 10 days or so. So if everyone panics and wants to top up their tank, they will soak up about 5 days worth of fuel deliveries. Sure, that will empty the service stations, but it’s not crazily excessive.

    The problem is more the idiotic behavior of people. There’s no reason to sit in line, idling your engine for an hour, in order to top up a tank that’s 3/4 full. There’s no reason to block a line, thinking that all the people waiting will let your friends cut in front. Stupid people, doing stupid things, that’s what really puts sand in the gears.

    I’ve been amusing myself, reading some alt-right sites, like Vox Day’s blog. As I’ve mentioned, I find a lot to agree with, but lots of extremists flock to it, in hopes of finding a home. It’s amusing, for example, to watch white supremacists thinking they’ve found a spiritual home, and then start lashing out at everyone who doesn’t agree with them. Some of bible-thumping religious fundies as well, again, the really radical types. Which is really a shame, because these minorities give the Progressives ammunition.

  29. I may have missed something along the way or perhaps I’m simply obtuse but what is it exactly in all these places around the country that is used to justify making rain barrels illegal?

    Water rights are touchy issues, especially in the West. In some places, the debates go back over 100 years, but when we moved to WA State in 2010, the state had just ended a five year experiment in requiring a permit for homeowners to collect the rain water falling on their own property.

    Believe it or not, WA and OR can experience droughts if snowfall in the Cascades is not adequate.

  30. WRT gas cans and car filler spouts:

    Perhaps carrying a metal rod (like from a clothes hangar) that is straightened could be used to ‘open’ the restriction flappy thing in the car filler tube. A hook on one end to hold it. If the hook part was a couple of inches long, it could be held against the outside whilst using any container to pour gas into the tank.

    Could also be useful for removing gas from a tank with a hose, allowing you to insert the hose into the tank to get to the gas in there.

  31. I have found that a funnel made out of a Heet bottle works pretty well with some filler necks. (Heet is methanol in yellow, isopropanol in red.)
    Cut the bottom out of the bottle, leaving it as “long” as possible…

  32. Some gas filler necks supposedly have some sort of device that prevents getting a hose down into the tank. I think this is on down in the neck; it’s not the little flapper.
    That Heet funnel does poke past the little flapper just below the gas cap, quite nicely. I’m not sure if it works with the capless tanks.

  33. Anyone who doesn’t like it can go elsewhere. It’s called free enterprise.

    So you would be OK with life saving medicine that was $5.00 a dose suddenly becoming $5,000 a dose because of a shortage and free enterprise? Would you be happy if that was medicine you needed to stay alive and you only had $1500 in your pocket?

    Necessities need to be moderated and not subject to the whims of supply and demand. That Shelby Mustang may now be worth $150,000 because of supply and demand but it is not something that people need to function.

    Consider your mail carrier. Do they get reimbursed for the cost of fuel or is it part of the cost of their contract for using a private vehicle, say so much a mile? What if your mail delivery and pickup were halted because your carrier could no longer afford $5.98 a gallon?

    You complain when the cost of your supplies for your kits goes up with each order. Supply and demand in action. What if a component of one of your kits suddenly jumped 1000% and there was no other alternative?

    Around here there are no lines for fuel, most of the stations have fuel. Cost went up about $0.20 because the distributor decided to jump the rates even when using the cheaper gasoline. It will take a month for the price to fall because, according the distributor, that more expensive fuel needs time to flow through the system. Here’s a clue, they are paying no more today than they did a week ago. They are just using an event to jump their profits. Same as the price of orange juice when there is a freeze in Florida.

    Water rights are touchy issues, especially in the West

    Yep. My uncle fought several such battles with his water rights and the irrigation. Finally was able to get enough rights to irrigate most of the fields. When the place was sold the realtor neglected to include the water rights. When the rights expired someone else bought the rights. New owner was no longer able to irrigate the land. Now what used to be green fertile fields are nothing but brown weeds.

    Heat and hot water are NG so for power outage we should be OK

    Don’t be so sure. Some natural gas systems use electrical pumps to push the gas through the system. Lose power and lose the pumps. You may not have heat or hot water.

  34. I’ve posted before that I have a Gastapper. Everything you need to syphon gas out of modern vehicles. They all have that stop valve for rollovers. They make powered ones, also. I’ve successfully used it on all of our vehicles. If you don’t want to purchase one, just study it and buy the stuff yourself.

  35. What if your mail delivery and pickup were halted because your carrier could no longer afford $5.98 a gallon?

    Washington State is getting ready to experiment with this if they pass their new state global warming carbon tax on the ballot in November. It is suppose to be revenue neutral, I say pull the other one. You do know how you tell a politician is lying, their lips are moving.

  36. “MYSTERY: What was going on with Hillary’s eyes during Philly speech?”
    http://www.theamericanmirror.com/mystery-going-hillarys-eyes-philly-speech/

    “Hillary’s eyes appeared not in-sync with one another, as the left eye looked to be cock-eyed and displaced, especially as she looked towards the left.”.

    Looks like they have her drugged up but good. Or else the new lizard inside the human skin is not doing well.

    I liked this comment, “The eyes on the chameleon at the zoo does the same thing just before it molts.”.

  37. From the Alhoa Snackbar Department:

    “Like Britain, we assume everyone will eventually become Western and enjoy the same liberties we do if we can just get through this rough patch. The time for this level of naïveté has passed. We are no longer importing “huddled masses yearning to breathe free.” We are importing people who want to choke us to death. As Sadiq Khan himself proudly stated, “Social integration does not work.” To hell with them for coming here with that attitude—but to hell with us, too, for allowing them.”

    http://takimag.com/article/how_did_it_happen_gavin_mcinnes/print#axzz4KjtrUwoq

  38. I’ve been told, and watched my dad do it some 35+ years ago, that colman fuel will work in a gasoline engine. When dad added it to the car, it might have mixed with some remaining gas, I don’t remember. I’m pretty sure it was a car that ran on unleaded… We did make it to the station for a fillup. If anyone has some direct and recent experience with this, please chime in. Colman fuel stores very well, although it is pricey. If it works, those of you that have issues storing gas might have an alternative.

    Isn’t Coleman liquid fuel just white gasoline ? We used run white gas in our boat motor, Coleman lanterns, and our Coleman stove when we were camping. It should have a fairly high octane since it is mostly naptha. Nope, it is 50 to 55 octane. That will rip any modern (post 1980) gas engine to shreds.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coleman_fuel

  39. “So you would be OK with life saving medicine that was $5.00 a dose suddenly becoming $5,000 a dose because of a shortage and free enterprise? Would you be happy if that was medicine you needed to stay alive and you only had $1500 in your pocket?

    Necessities need to be moderated and not subject to the whims of supply and demand.”

    Nothing needs to be regulated, ever. If you don’t want to pay the price, do without.

  40. Heat and hot water are NG so for power outage we should be OK

    Don’t be so sure. Some natural gas systems use electrical pumps to push the gas through the system. Lose power and lose the pumps. You may not have heat or hot water.

    Compressors, not pumps, are used to push natural gas. The reason why that is important is that the power requirement for a compressor is about 10X that of a pump pumping similar lb/hr. Natural gas is compressible so it heats up by 150 to 200 F during the compression cycle from 200 psia to 1,000 psia. All that temperature rise is work by the compressor. A pump compressing water from 200 psia to 1,000 psia will only see a temperature rise of 2 to 4 F.

    And yes, most new natural gas compressors built in the 1980s and beyond near large cities are electric motor driven. 50,000 hp, huge monsters.

    And anyway, the first page of the FEMA book says turn off the natural gas for a region with a natural disaster to prevent fires from getting fuel.

  41. We just had a PC power supply burn itself up at the office. Smoke everywhere. And the PC was still running. It is now on the front porch and we are venting the office. Fun, fun, fun.

  42. Nothing needs to be regulated, ever. If you don’t want to pay the price, do without.

    I started watching “Repo Men” last night. The movie is about the new world of 2025 with $650,000 organs to replace your diseased internal organs. Don’t get behind on your payments !
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Repo_Men

  43. Washington State is getting ready to experiment with this if they pass their new state global warming carbon tax on the ballot in November.

    I don’t miss that place. The crazy ballot initiatives are always really about getting the voter turnout in Seattle to prevent Perkins Coie from having to “find ballots in car trunks” to decide close state-wide elections.

    The WA State legislature has been in contempt of court for a couple of years over education funding. $100k/day IIRC. Ultimately, I think the situation will end with court-imposed income tax, and that will pretty much be the end of their economy.

    Of course, it could be worse. CO residents could face $25 billion in new taxes if the Cankles voters turn out in droves and support (I’m not kidding about the name) Amendment 69.

    (Can they get any more “in your face” than that name?)

  44. We just had a PC power supply burn itself up at the office. Smoke everywhere. And the PC was still running. It is now on the front porch and we are venting the office. Fun, fun, fun.

    You didn’t get weird crashes/reboots first? That’s scary.

    I leave a home server on 24/7, and it does not hibernate.

  45. I bit on a guy on usenet claiming that he is not going to vote for Trump because he says that Trump is not going to keep Putin from annexing the Baltics. He and I have been posting back and forth about the USA’s responsibility to keep NATO going and to defend the Baltics. I keep on saying that the USA is broke and he keeps on talking about responsibility. There is no way that we could muster 50+ ships and 150,000 troops for the Baltics, no way!

  46. Looks like they have her drugged up but good. Or else the new lizard inside the human skin is not doing well.

    What’s even freakier is her promising “millions” of new jobs. In the Green area no less. You know, the are that has failed miserably under Obola. Free, or cheap college, debt forgiveness for college, refinancing college loans. Cankles gonna be shitting gold bricks to finance all this stuff. Loud cheering from all the Social Studies students, of course. El Stupido.

  47. Lynn wrote:

    “A pump compressing water from 200 psia to 1,000 psia will only see a temperature rise of 2 to 4 F.”

    Isn’t water almost uncompressable?

  48. Looking at the Face book while eating my lunch today, and I see a meme “Who says we can’t have free healthcare and college for all? All of Europe does.” And it was signed “Let’s be Ameri-cans instead of Ameri-can’ts.”

    Can they really be that stupid? Europe has HUGE taxes on income. And very low standard of living compared to here, and everything is TINY. Plus they are all going broke even faster than we are, and WE pay for their defense. Cut that shit out and we’ll see how long the money lasts…

    n

  49. Compressors, not pumps, are used to push natural gas

    Duh, what was I thinking?

    and very low standard of living compared to here, and everything is TINY

    I think the standard of living is OK, at least the families and places that I have visited. Everything is small, cramped is a good word. Fuel is expensive because of taxes. Pay is taxed at 50% or more. Pay to park everywhere, pay to use a shopping cart, bags in grocery stores cost money. Europe would tax air if they could figure out how to measure consumption.

    People say the services such as medical are free in Europe. Nope. You are just paying on a continuous installment plan.

  50. Forgot about the VAT tax. Taxed on your income at 60+% and then another 25% on everything you buy.

    n

  51. he keeps on talking about responsibility

    Funny how it’s always the US, or men, or white men, who are held responsible.
    Funny how no one else is responsible for their own well-being, self-defense, or continued existence.

  52. I think in-n-out burger is the best fast food burger in the country. The staff is young, clean, friendly, and well paid. The kitchen is open to complete view of the customers. Everything is fresh and delicious. It’s one of the things I really miss about southern cali, after the weather of course.
    nick

  53. I had a monitor catch on fire a few years ago. Thick acrid smoke billowing out. It was the middle of the night and the smoke from my home office woke me from bed. Grabbed it and chucked it out the front door…

    n

  54. I think in-n-out burger is the best fast food burger in the country.

    Woof! Are trying to start something, sir. Your standards must be lower than a snake’s belly in a wagon rut. I’d take Fat Burger, Carl’s Jr. and Sonic over In-N-Out.

    Let the burger flame wars begin!

  55. We just had a PC power supply burn itself up at the office.

    When I was working on the Navy contract in Oak Ridge we used Burroughs B-20 computers, basically PC’s that could be easily networked and had modules that could be added. Those machines regularly smoked a power supply. We had about 10 machines and every couple of months a supply would go. The smell, was like, ahem, well, ahem, female erogenous zone.

    While at my last job the APC UPS let go of the magic smoke. Filled the room with smoke and odor and immediately shut down everything. Not worth repairing so just replaced. Tore it down to find the offending component. Never did find out what it was as the component no longer existed, just a burnt spot on the circuit board. Lady that was in the office early in the morning said it failed with a substantial bang.

  56. Gasoline update: I filled up at the Sam’s Club in town this afternoon. No lines, no panic, no price spikes. I paid $2.12 / gallon for 87 octane, and $2.68 / gallon for milk inside the store.

  57. Well, I never had Fat Burger, but Carl’s Jr. and Sonic are frozen prepackaged shite that some minimum wage schlub throws together in a sheet of waxed paper.

    While In-n-out is made to order, cooked to order, from fresh ingredients that are never frozen. Each order of fries is julienned from the potato right before your eyes. Each leaf of lettuce split from the head AT THE MOMENT YOU NEED IT! Each slice of onion fresh that day.

    Assembled, wrapped and served in a cardboard tray, after the employee actually LOOKS at your vehicle and says “Will you be eating this in your truck?” No ‘suggestive sell’ no upsizing, no BS.

    Ambrosia on a bun.

    I’ll admit, fresh french fries took a bit of getting used to after eating frozen sugared fries my whole life. But, now, OH MY.

    nick

  58. Sonic tots are to die for. Those alone sinks INO to the 7the Level of Hell. Who gives a shite if the burger is frozen. After all the stuff on it, you can’t tell the difference.

    Plus, you eat all that canned and dry crap from LTS and rave about it, Mr. Fresh Burger!

  59. My 2-cents for the burger war is Five Guys: http://www.fiveguys.com/

    Sounds to me that it might be a lot like In-N-Out.

    The thing about Five Guys is that no matter what size of fries you order they then practically fill the bag with more fries. Their grilled onions and mushrooms on the burger is the best. Their “small” burger is enough to satisfy normal men and is far bigger than anything you can get at Carl’s Jr., Sonic, Jack, BK, or Mickey D’s.

  60. Sonic -blehhh (and too high priced). Carls – blehhh. Five guys pretty good as is Habit Burger. Grilled onions on the INO. And by god if you’re from southern California nothing beats a chili-cheese from Tommy’s at 2am. Cheezeburgr cheezeburgr cheezeburgr.

  61. Mr OFD lives in rural Vermont. He no doubt is scraping up roadkill racoon even as we speak. It’s pre-ground, for your burger-making convenience.

    As for me, I’m trying to work furburgers into the conversation in a way that won’t sound smutty. Trying, and failing.

  62. “”Mr OFD lives in rural Vermont. He no doubt is scraping up roadkill racoon even as we speak. It’s pre-ground, for your burger-making convenience.””

    He’s really missing out. Armadillo is the best roadkill!

  63. I’d hazard a wild guess that most of the roadkill up here is skunks, possums and raccoons. Every once in a while a deer, usually a young one. Good luck finding a moose roadkill; more likely you’ll see the vehicle that it totaled.

    I am with Mr. Ray on the burger wars; Fuddruckers. Haven’t had one in many years; closest ones are down in MA, I guess. Next trip down. We have a Five Guys down in Burlap not too far from the vet meetings I go to so I’ll have to check it out pretty soon.

    On the home IT front today: put a new 500GB SSD in one of the desktops and installed CentOS 7.2 via a perfectly good DVD. All went well for the install but then it just would not boot up all the way after that, no matter what I did with the BIOS settings, etc. Gave up. Went with CentOS 6.8 via a USB stick, and that booted up OK the FIRST TIME and I installed NethServer and added software packages and did updates and then rebooted–stalled on the CentOS splash screen and stopped. Time to quit on that chit for tonight before I throw the machine out the window. Wondering now if there’s a problem with the brand-new SSD.

  64. And more fun facts from the Alhoa Snackbar Department:

    http://gatesofvienna.net/2016/09/the-imperative-to-validate-obamas-axiom/#more-40917

    After reading how this axiom works, some of us with long memories may recall how after 9/11, National Administrator Bush II was holding hands with one of the musloid princes on his ranch in Texas. And how right after 9/11, they evacuated a whole clan of royal Saudi musloid scum out of the country just as fast as they could.

    Meanwhile another $38 billion of our tax money to our wunnerful Israel buddies who spy on us and whose Likud Party runs our foreign policy, with more weapons sales to more musloid shit-hole countries.

    Something is wrong with this picture.

  65. Back to topic of gasoline…
    Gotta admit I’m re-thinking my habit of running dry so I get the maximum amount at the significantly lower price provided by a loyalty card.
    On the other hand, if I am stocked up on beans ‘n’ rice at home, maybe the motor vehicle(s) can just sit here.
    And, if traffic actually thins out enough, I might just get out on a bicycle again…

  66. Not seeing any shootings nooz yet…

    …but Killary’s eyeballs ain’t cooperating much anymore, at least not with each other, and she cancelled/postponed yet another appearance earlier today, apparently. What a wreck; the debate, assuming she shows up, might just finish her off.

    Rice and beans here at home, too, also thinking on the bicycle angle again; it’s fairly flat and level around here for many miles in both directions; dozens of square miles of flat fertile farmland along the Champlain watershed. Some rolling hills and ridges, too. Walking at a brisk pace, I can make it to the “city” in about 45 minutes; a bike would take maybe ten or fifteen. An hour to the next towns north or south of here.

  67. I have some pretty strong opinions on bicycle gear…
    unlike about fishing!

    Like fishing, if there’s “industrialized mayhem” then bicycling is gonna be basically impossible.

  68. “Already arguing about it.”

    Ah, the TEEVEE. I only have ours on for NFL games; can’t kick the damn habit yet, one of my few remaining vices.

    Yeah, I can imagine the chatter; The Axiom stipulates that we rule out musloid terrorism immediately, and better yet, don’t mention it at all.

  69. “Like fishing, if there’s “industrialized mayhem” then bicycling is gonna be basically impossible.”

    Fishing, bicycling, pretty much anything at all is gonna be extremely difficult or impossible, other than basic survival mode.

    I’d be looking for a 19″ mountain bike that I can use to roam around the AO and spy on local infrastructure, mainly. While keeping eyes and ears open for hostiles. I would, of course, like always, be packing heat, but perched on a bike you’re kind of a sitting duck.

  70. “”I’d be looking for a 19″ mountain bike that I can use to roam around the AO and spy on local infrastructure, mainly. While keeping eyes and ears open for hostiles. I would, of course, like always, be packing heat, but perched on a bike you’re kind of a sitting duck.””

    Yeah, that’s what I mean by “industrialized mayhem” …
    Whatever attackers shooting you or worse as you stand fishing or cruise by.
    If things get calm(?) enough, these silent solo things might be possible.

    Not sure what you mean by 19-inch bike. I guess that would be your correct size for the mountain bike _frame_ but mountain bike frame sizes have always been flaky for this old (originally) roadie. Keep in mind that what really counts is the distance to the pedals, nearly straight leg at the bottom of the stroke… and hope for the best regarding step-over height!! Raise the seat (saddle) gradually until you get used to stretching out your leg with one pedal at its lowest point…
    If you meant wheel size, it’s gotta be 26″ wheel. The newer 29″ wheels do have some advantage in serious trail work (or off trail). Euro road (& cyclocross) 700c wheels are still more common than 29″ wheels, but for being able to find tires and tubes, it’s best by far to stick with 26-inch.
    I’d like to have about three (or 6 !) approximately identical bikes, just cheap mountain bikes, for spare parts. Cheaper than trying to find appropriate parts! I currently have three rather good bikes, some parts bikes, and so on, but not everything is interchangeable. And, approximately none of the tires or inner tubes are much good…

  71. “” … but perched on a bike you’re kind of a sitting duck. “”

    It does bear mentioning that walking or riding in any non-armored vehicle ain’t much better, though walking does offer the option of diving into a ditch more quickly than would moving along at a pretty good clip on a bike.

  72. Yup, 19″ frame for my height but I’d test it out first by straddling and also reaching the pedals. 26″ wheel sounds right. I’ll be researching tires and tools, and also taking a ten-week bike mechanicals class (repairing, tuning, modding, etc.) with a bike store down in Burlap, probably in the spring.

    Funny you should mention ditches; most of the rural farm roads up here have pretty good ditches alongside to dive into; the roads tend to be raised somewhat above the surrounding fields.

    Yeah, we’re sitting ducks in most vehicles, too, but can accelerate a lot faster and farther and hopefully outta danger than with a bike or horse. Unless one is boxed in, and then one must dismount and attempt to fight from various positions around said vehicle, which would suck, but there it is.

    On the home IT front again; being a stubborn and mean old bastid; I yanked the SSD and gave up on it; also tossed a 32GB stick that wouldn’t mount anymore on Linux, despite formatting it six ways from Sunday. No time for chit like this. I re-installed the 2TB HDD and CentOS 6.8 and Nethserver and updates and nary a problem so far, though I may have to tighten up the drive inside the enclosure, kinda noisy. Next up is VMware Workstation 12. And Gnucash. And copying over a chit-load of firearms vids and .pdf’s. Tomorrow.

  73. Before SHTF being on a bike gives you a good excuse to be out and about. So does walking a dog. Even very late at night, walking a dog while smoking is a common sight. Just me walking my happy ass around with a camelbak at night and I’m gonna be talking with the constable’s deputies.

    Watching the video, still supposedly live streaming, LOTS of people out on the street in Charlotte.

    n

  74. Late at night here, local imbecile derps are strolling around, heads down, Condition Pink, with Pokemon Go on their smartypants phones.

    I’ll put lights on the bike but won’t make a habit of roaming around at night.

    Speaking of talking with deputies, I had a brief but friendly chat with a local town/city cop who flagged me down with his blues on the shore road north of here yesterday, due to Mr. Heavy-Foot doing 56 in a 40. He just told me to slow it down and we went our merry ways. I gotta watch that chit; I have a tendency to do it on the interstate, too, and they bag local asswipes daily doing 100+, though I never get that high. Gotta keep up with the traffic flow, though, amirite?

  75. “”Yup, 19″ frame for my height but I’d test it out first by straddling and also reaching the pedals. 26″ wheel sounds right. I’ll be researching tires and tools, and also taking a ten-week bike mechanicals class (repairing, tuning, modding, etc.) with a bike store down in Burlap, probably in the spring.””

    My classic road bike is a 23″ (58 cm) frame. Just about right for saddle and handlebar height. I’m 5’8″ …
    Like I say, mountain bike frame sizes are odd, and vary depending. You just want full leg extension (at a reasonable saddle height) and a comfortable angle to the handlebars (at a reasonable saddle height).

    I have ridden for many years with toe clips and straps (including off road and off trail and worse) but I won’t address those issues here. Modern deals involve those clipless pedals and appropriate shoes; I bet I’d like that.

    Most people who are inexperienced end up with something very very inefficient. I’m just sayin’ …

    Nearly any good local bike shop is probably your best bet, but of course they will up-sell you when a cheaper bike ( properly fitted! ) would work just fine. Tacky, but consider getting a fitting and sales pitch at an up-scale shoppe and politely take lots of notes and then go to Walmart and get something that’s about the same. Seriously. Of course, tune up that Walmart bike, a lot, like making sure the fork isn’t on backwards and so on… Helmet, pants leg straps, gloves (partly for numb hands, partly to save your face if you fall)… Figure it out, some, with a very cheap bike, and try not to die, and learn.

    Tools and such are a whole ‘nother game. Lower end bikes these days are probably just simply metric… I doubt you’ll have to deal with British standard threading versus French bottom brackets (iirc those were reverse threaded) versus all the weird Italian stuff.

  76. “”I’ll put lights on the bike but won’t make a habit of roaming around at night.””

    Bicycles, like motorcycles and many cars, are invisible at times, no matter what lights they have on.
    Strobe blinkies help, day or night, some, maybe… besides lights to see your path and a big steady red taillight.

  77. OK, if you go to Fuddruckers then you have to get the sweet potato fries. And the ultra fresh sides applied by yourself are awesome.

    But Five Guys is awesome also. And I’ve never had too many fries until I went there.

  78. “”Speaking of talking with deputies, I had a brief but friendly chat with a local town/city cop who flagged me down with his blues on the shore road north of here yesterday, due to Mr. Heavy-Foot doing 56 in a 40. He just told me to slow it down and we went our merry ways. I gotta watch that chit; I have a tendency to do it on the interstate, too, and they bag local asswipes daily doing 100+, though I never get that high. Gotta keep up with the traffic flow, though, amirite?””

    Hmm… Not sure I want to discuss this, but I find that haulin’ ass I pass dips who later catch up and tailgate (one foot per 10 mph, at best) when I catch up with two 18-wheelers at 55 mph… and they are pissed that I don’t tailgate on the 18 (like I can push him out of the way, like an alligator he tosses on my hood won’t be plenty unpleasant)…
    I mean this on the super-slab.
    In town tend to annoy SUV soccer moms on the phone by being just a bit over the limit, lately. Same super-close tailgating, of course.

  79. I feel kinda underprivileged. I’ve had UPSes and power supplies fail but never any smoke, bangs or fireworks. Must be the voltage over there.

  80. “”He’s really missing out. Armadillo is the best roadkill!

    With a free side of leprosy !””

    Not likely unless you share the cigar!

    For today’s trivia prize, name the movie and the actors…
    Extra points for the original author’s name.

  81. I buried a large armadillo here recently.

    Oops, this narrows down my location, making it somewhere south of Chicago…

    It did have on woolen underwear and a down parka, since there’s no warming here.

  82. Gotta try Fuddruckers, wherever it might be…

    Five Guys burgers are outstanding, I know.

    Ah, the advantage of living in the Land of Sugar, the yuppiest of the yuppies ! I have both a Fuddruckers and a Five Guys within ten miles. In fact, with an average household income of $130K, we’ve got every restaurant chain still in business.

    We even have a bronze statue of two girls taking a selfie in front of the new city hall !
    http://laughingsquid.com/a-controversial-statue-of-two-girls-taking-a-selfie-is-erected-in-sugarland-texas/

  83. “” Ah, the TEEVEE. “”

    Unfortunately, and as bad as the networks and such are, they have the reporters and contacts and such out there, all over the planet, and there is no way that Drudge, much less the smaller players in that news summary arena, are gonna have a clue until CNN and such find out about it. Yeah, the summary sites will, uh, summarize and opinionate, but I’d rather listen to the first level lies and decide for myself.

  84. He’s really missing out. Armadillo is the best roadkill!

    With a free side of leprosy !

    Aw, Lynn beat me to it. Curse that time zone advantage!

    Besides, raccoons are best. They have hands. You can chew on them and half convince yourself that you’re eating a baby.

    (OK, who just threw up a little in the back of his, her, or zir throat? Be honest, hands up — your own hands.)

  85. I had a monitor catch on fire a few years ago. Thick acrid smoke billowing out. It was the middle of the night and the smoke from my home office woke me from bed. Grabbed it and chucked it out the front door…

    I had a power supply fail a few years ago. I happened to be sitting at my desk at the time, so I pulled the plug right away.

  86. Nick writes: “Can they really be that stupid? Europe has HUGE taxes on income. And very low standard of living compared to here, and everything is TINY. Plus they are all going broke even faster than we are, and WE pay for their defense.”

    You’re not wrong, but there are different ways of viewing this stuff.

    Yes, huge income taxes in many places. When I worked in Germany, my take-home pay was less then 50% of my salary. This is a deliberate decision of the populace, which then expects lots of services from its government. The surprising thing (from an American perspective) is: The government generally delivers those services.

    Other countries, like Switzerland, have lower taxes and fewer government services. Here, I pay about a 25% tax rate, which is probably lower than I would pay in the US. So your mileage varies by country.

    Low standard of living: again, it depends on the country.

    Everything is tiny? Again, a matter of perspective. Yes, houses are smaller. The flip side: we don’t understand McMansions. I’ve told the story about my cousin’s house – a pretty normal house in the US – where he gave us a tour, only to discover that his dog has been using one of the rooms as a toilet. Their house was so big that they had rooms they never used – and that seems crazy to me, as a European.

    Paying for the defense: During the Cold War it really was pretty essential to have a forward military presence in Europe. That should have stopped 20 years ago, when the USSR collapsed. That it didn’t probably has at least as much to do with US politics as with European. A big military puts lots of money in lots of pockets. Since it didn’t, we get lovely shows, like the mutual dick-wagging going on now in Syria. Russia is there, because the US is there. The US is there, because Russia is there. Best if both had just stayed home…

  87. ” until CNN and such find out about it. ” and if they then choose not to cover it?

    CNN has a long history of being an active participant in the ‘news’.

    Christiana Amanpur – on camera- said she considered it her mission to bring down Bush.

    Ted Turner- no one will use the word ‘terrorism or terrorist.’

    Wolf Blitzer- “yeah we knew Saddam was committing atrocities, but if we’d reported on them we’d have lost our access…”

    (CBS- Dan Rather!)
    (ABC- played audio of that contractor begging for his life, before being killed)

    So not at all trustworthy.

    And which major covered Kermit Gosnell’s trial? Or the trial in Florida where the white couple was brutalized and murdered by a group of blacks at the beach? (just to name a couple of disgusting examples.

    Oh and ‘gun violence’ instead of ‘gang violence’.

    nick

  88. @brad, the nordic countries have always been different….

    n

    and of course there is a spectrum on both sides. NYC is expensive, crowded, and accommodations are tiny. Miami Beach Florida has a 35% effective sales tax. Chicago is close to that.

    The main difference is, at base, one is a culture of scarcity, the other a culture of abundance. Those have their roots in the frontier vs thousands of years of continuous occupation, and then in WWI and WWII and being bombed flat, but they continue to this day.

  89. And one more difference – the official response to terror attack or active shooter.

    In the US:

    Run – hide – Fight

    In the UK

    Run – hide – Tell

    Last year British police started their own campaign telling people to ‘run, hide, tell’ if they are caught up in a terrorist gun attack.

    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3798690/They-trying-kill-know-survive-terrorist-attack-anti-terror-cop-reveals-tactics-adopt-escape-hiding-desk-really-bad-idea.html

    (and the obsessive focus on “gun” attacks….)

    n

  90. “”And which major covered Kermit Gosnell’s trial? “”

    NYT, Fox, CNN, NBC, Wash. Post, Atlantic, CBS, USA Today, ABC — from a quick search…

  91. @spook, really? Covered or mentioned? Local affiliate or national desk? And when?

    Know anyone who can tell you who he was and what the trial was about? Know anyone who has seen the pictures of the interior of his abattoir? (Did YOU have to google him?)

    Contrast that with any of the Big-ass-ians. Contrast that with the extensive and obsessive coverage of Sandy Hook or any of the other shootings, most of which killed less than 10 people.

    They might have mentioned it, and some did, ESPECIALLY after the outrage was raised in the alt-media, but they did so reluctantly and minimally.

    nick

  92. I would, of course, like always, be packing heat, but perched on a bike you’re kind of a sitting duck.

    You’re also kind of a sitting duck in a car. If you’re stopped at a stop light with a car in front of you and a car behind you, then you aren’t kind of a sitting duck.

  93. @dave,

    good practice in general and vital from a security pov is leaving enough room in front of your vehicle to escape. Normal rules of the road say you should be able to see all of the rear tires of the car in front of you. That used to give you enough room to turn the wheel and drive out. Verify that it does for your vehicle and get in the habit.

    It also helps to protect you from being the meat in the sandwich if you get rear ended while waiting in traffic.

    nick

    (also never turn your wheels while waiting for the left turn. Stay aimed straight ahead. If you are hit from behind with wheels turned, you will be pushed into oncoming traffic. With wheels straight, you might be pushed into the intersection, or even into the opposite guy waiting to turn left, but any subsequent impact will be MUCH less than a head on with moving traffic.)

  94. RE: Standard of living in Europe
    We had experience living in the UK (Nottingham & London East End) for several years and in the south of France (rural area outside Cahors) for summers. The VAT tax is applied at every level of the production & distribution process so drives costs up for everything. In the UK “free” healthcare via the NHS is paid for by an income tax. and the level of care is rapidly dropping from bad to terrible. When I went to a NHS dentist he noted I was an American and advised me to go to the US for treatment as he said American care would be much better than what he was allowed to provide. Our NHS assigned physician didn’t speak English having come from Bangladesh. Getting an appointment was actively discouraged and two times we showed up for appointments his translator was not there so we got no care. He treated my wife for a pre-diabetic condition. Two years later when we moved to Hong Kong (EXCELLENT CARE) her new doctor said that she would have died if kept on her NHS treatments much longer. The NHS incompetence pushed her quickly from pre-diabetic to insulin dependent.
    In the UK, the vast majority of people eat out for most meals or have a just-in-time approach to in-home food storage. Fridges are small, ours fit under the counter. We bought just enough food for the next day, maybe two, as the high street shops were just minutes walk away. Milk was delivered three times a week to our door. Any disruption in food delivery in the UK will be felt immediately by the majority. Our 2 bedroom, 900 sq ft, row house, rented for 750 sterling a month. This was at the far end of the Central line, cheapest area that I could still commute from. Homes in the UK and France do not have air conditioning, don’t need it much. Just a couple of fans needed a few days a year in the UK. In France it’s warmer but they have lived without Air Con for so long, people don’t build it in. Our cottage in France was built from native stone a few hundred years ago and the kitchen and living area were below grade to get in-ground cooling. It had no connections to electricity so we used a cranky diesel generator named “Faufner” we ran in the evenings for lighting. Cooking was propane and heating was wood we chopped ourself. The local village was a couple of kilometers walk for green grocers, butcher, and baker.

  95. “”@spook, really? Covered or mentioned? Local affiliate or national desk? And when?

    Know anyone who can tell you who he was and what the trial was about? Know anyone who has seen the pictures of the interior of his abattoir? (Did YOU have to google him?)””

    Well, yeah, I searched google news, archives…
    Got all I needed to know about a trial three years ago. Monster convicted of horrible late term abortions / murders. No apparent need to know more.

  96. “With a free side of leprosy !
    And don’t forget it tastes like chicken 🙂

    @OFD WRT your SSD problem: sometimes we all miss the obvious because we know it all. Awhile ago I installed a Samsung SSD in one of my laptops and I just knew it would be a piece of cake, I’ve put in a bazillion hard drives. Well that SSD took me down again and again until I swallowed my pride and went to the Samsung website and used their “tool” for the drive. Since then I have installed Crucial and PNY SSDs, all on the first try because I went to the drive’s site and dug up their tools.

    Try not to overthink, but do think 🙂

  97. On driving techniques, that is what is taught by driving schools and manual in NV. Standard. I remember being taught never turn the wheel until you are making the turn, put the horizon of the hood on the back wheels in front of you to leave enough room. This was in ’71 in WI.

    The point I think about on monster Gosnell, is mention him to Libturdian Planned Parenthood folks and their heads will explode.

  98. “”Aussie man patents new Hamdog””

    I saw somewhere a plastic mold to make ground meat into a hotdog shape…

  99. Remember when a friend bought a hot dog shaped cheese burger at a truck stop. Made so they could be cooked on a rolling grill. Big mistake.

  100. “…that SSD took me down again and again until I swallowed my pride and went to the Samsung website and used their “tool” for the drive.”

    Which is basically what I did when I put the SSD in this machine when it was Windows 8.1, only I had the CD/DVD with the migration sw on it, anyway. The other desktop in which I just installed CentOS, won’t run the Windows .exe files off the CD/DVD or the Samsung site. I’m about to try another desktop with the same SSD just for laughs and install CentOS again on that one; it could well be that the first desktop I tried it on is past its sell-by date; the 2TB HDD was pretty noisy. And if the SSD fails again, if that is in fact the case, I have a new 2TB HDD to try it on.

    In re: Gosnell; tip of the iceberg. Killing babies in the West has long since been a profitable industry. And with the Chicoms. So we have that in common with them, along with being a massive debtor to them and the Japanese.

  101. So, the Chinese and Japanese are stupid enough to keep lending us money. You’d think they would have noticed at least ten years ago what a bad idea that was. Of course, everyone lends us money because the dollar is the least worst choice of a reserve currency. That’s really saying something about other countries’ currencies.

  102. Well, my main point with Gosnell was the minimal and extremely reluctant coverage of a truly horrific series of crimes. Much less horrific crimes, and crimes that affect far fewer people get MASSIVE coverage in the MSM. Similarly the rape, torture, and murder of the white couple by a gang of blacks in Florida. That case was an absolute nightmare, about as horrible as any crime a man in a relationship with a woman could conceive of, and it got almost no coverage.

    The MSM will not report on events that don’t further their own agenda or conflict with their world view. In the Gosnell case, that we must have free and easy access to abortion, no matter what horrors are the eventual result, and in the FL case, that blacks do commit horrific crimes of sex and violence against whites.

    To bring it all back around, no matter how many “journalists” the MSM employs or how many resources they have to bring to bear, if they don’t, can’t, or won’t, they might as well be 2 old guys on a porch swing shooting the breeze.

    The alt-media is growing in power, influence, reach, and resources. There is the crowdfunded guy who embeds with warfighters in conflict zones, the PJMedia guys, and a variety of others who do create original reporting and analysis.

    The old classification for sites was- some were thinkers, some were linkers. Now we’ve got some who actually get out and pound the pavement. That will only grow if we can avoid .gov bans and controls.

    And that is a good thing.

    nick

  103. @rbt, and as long as everyone keeps pretending it’s all OK, it stays all ok.

    As soon as the cracks start, it’s a race to get out, and the exits are very small compared to the number of folks who need to get out. So everyone who’s in has a strong vested interest in preserving the fiction.

    And we haven’t gone to negative interest rates yet…..

    n

  104. The alt-media is growing in power, influence, reach, and resources.

    Perhaps that is why Odooshnozzle is giving control of the Internet to a consortium of Turd World fukstiks. Google will probably target anyone who searches for “terrorxxx” “Radical Islam”, etc., with Cankles supplied drone missiles.

  105. “A pump compressing water from 200 psia to 1,000 psia will only see a temperature rise of 2 to 4 F.”

    Isn’t water almost uncompressable?

    Yes. That is why the temperature rise is so low. The more compressible a substance is, the more the temperature rise, and the more energy required to compress it.

  106. “So, the Chinese and Japanese are stupid enough to keep lending us money.”

    It’s all a big game of musical chairs (money). Everybody is OK as long as the music is playing.

    Woe be the day the music dies:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uAsV5-Hv-7U
    BTW, I heard one of his first live performances of this in a college basketball court in Milwaukee WI. Tickets were cheap and he played for hours and then mingled with the crowd. I’ve got a signed ticket somewhere in my pile of stuff.

  107. Almost no one ever gets the lyrics right:

    Drove my Chevy to The Levy
    (a bar in Rye, NY, and who ever heard of a dry levee versus a bar that ran dry?)

    Them good old boys were drinking whiskey in Rye
    (who the hell drinks whiskey *and* rye? Rye *is* whiskey, or at least whisky.)

  108. Yeah, I heard him at a lightly-attended college concert as well. I also was in a bar in State College, PA in 1972 listening to Billy Joel before anyone ever heard of him. But the best one was when the college invited Vincent Price to give a talk. My girlfriend and I were the only ones who showed up, and he sat talking with us for hours. He was an extremely smart and interesting man.

  109. We used to listen to horror classics read by Vincent Price in 9th grade. What a mesmerizing voice. One of the greats.

  110. Lynn wrote:

    “Yes. That is why the temperature rise is so low. The more compressible a substance is, the more the temperature rise, and the more energy required to compress it.”

    Yes, but compression from 200 to 1000?

  111. “Yes. That is why the temperature rise is so low. The more compressible a substance is, the more the temperature rise, and the more energy required to compress it.”

    Yes, but compression from 200 to 1000?

    I have seen and stood on pumps compressing water up to 6,000 psia. All steam boilers have a boiler feed pump that must compress the water in order to get it into the steam drum at the top of the boiler. That steam drum is anywhere from 800 psia to 2500 psia pressure. And usually people like to run that water through a few heat exchangers before throwing cold water into a steam drum. Plus it increases the boiler efficiency.

  112. I started watching “Repo Men” last night.

    I enjoyed “Repo Man”. Emilio Estevez as an apprentice repo man, a car with Something in the trunk, and some punks that “go out and do crimes”.

    As for the Burger Wars, I’ve eaten at In-n-Out. Thought it was slow and OK, but the burgers at Whataburger are better. The best burgers are from a local chain that started out as food trucks – but in an old short school bus, Bernie’s Burger Bus. They make all their own condiments, grid their own burger mix, have great fries (that are cooked properly – fried twice), use local cheese, artisan buns, etc.

    They have a burger that is two beef patties with double cheese, all the fixins, but have two bacon grilled cheese sandwiches as the bun. Called the “Detention”.

  113. “They have a burger that is two beef patties with double cheese, all the fixins, but have two bacon grilled cheese sandwiches as the bun. Called the “Detention”.

    Holy crap. Why not just fire a .44 Mag into yer haht? But I approve! Might make one soon, wot’s the next holiday? Oh yeah…Leif Erikson Day…

    “I enjoyed “Repo Man”. Emilio Estevez as an apprentice repo man, a car with Something in the trunk, and some punks that “go out and do crimes”.”

    Ditto. Another flick I watch almost every year, since it came out. Weird but fun. “The life of a repo man is INTENSE.” A Mike Nesmith caper from 1984. The crappy almost sci-fi landscape is a big part of the fun, set in some shit-hole area of Kalifornia or NM, for all I know. Emilio also did a pretty interesting Billy the Kid in “Young Guns.”

  114. Repo Man, so many good lines, so many good actors. So many cult visuals snuck in.

    “Shut up Archie, you’re nothing but a white suburban punk.”

    “find one in every car”

    “Don’t worry, you’re gonna be ok…….. guess not.”

    “Put it on a plate dear, it’ll taste better.”

    Definitely recommended if you like dark comedy and quirky humor.

    Filmed in some of the finest neighborhoods in downtown LA and east LA/ sarc

    Some others of the same vintage, “Buckaroo Banzai and his Adventures Across the Eighth Dimension” – too many stars to count, fun movie with tons of stuff in the background. “Real Genius”- Val Kilmer.

    nick

  115. “If gas were $5 a gallon in Europe, it would be a 50% off sale……”

    We can wish…!

    Fuel might be expensive, but we have at least two jurisdictions where there are roads without speed limits, to make burning it worthwhile.

  116. yep, I didn’t bother to check current prices, just the last time I was in Norway, gas was $13/gal USD. I figured it was better than that in places that were less isolated, and that was some years ago.

    One thing I was never able to find out definitively was WHY it costs so much. In California, every pump has the percentage of price caused by various taxes printed on a sticker. In TX they don’t. I’m assuming most of the cost in Europe is tax, since there is no technical reason gas should be 4-6 times more expensive to refine in Europe vs the US.

    nick

    (and in canadia, gas was ~4x US prices as each liter cost as much as a gallon in the US.)

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