Friday, 31 July 2015

08:48 – I got email yesterday from another woman who wants to remain anonymous. I’ll call her Jen II, so that I can just use the Jen category. Besides which, she reminds me a lot of original Jen. They’re both determined and decisive.

Jen II isn’t LDS, but she’s prepping for her family of five and has jumped into the Mormon “Big Four” long-term food storage with both feet: 1,500 pounds of flour, oats, pasta, instant potatoes, and rice; 300 pounds of beans; 300 pounds of sugar/honey; 72 pounds of milk powder; 50 liters of vegetable oil; 50 pounds of salt; and various other dry staples. They bought most of that in a couple of runs to their nearest LDS Home Storage Center in #10 cans and foil-laminate bags, hauled it home in their pickup, and stacked it in the basement.

She’s now set for a year of feeding five people on iron rations, and could probably stretch that to 18 months with other regular foods she has stocked. Their basement is now stacked with cases of #10 cans, but she knows this is just the basic staples. She needs to (a) add lots of supplemental dried and canned foods–meats, fruits, vegetables, powdered eggs and cheese, sauces, spices, and so on, (b) get it all organized, and (c) figure out exactly what to do with it if/when worse comes to horrible. Her goal is to have what she needs to feed her own immediate family plus some other family and friends for a year or more. Fortunately, her husband is fully on board with all of this, and is happy to leave the decisions to her. Money isn’t much of issue, nor is storage space.

She and her husband are both retired professionals. They live in a small town that sounds ideal. The rest of her family consists of their adult daughter, their son-in-law, and their early-teens grandson.

My first suggestion to her was to pick up a good cookbook oriented toward cooking from long-term storage, such as MD Creekmore’s Shelf Storage Recipes, both of which are collections of recipes contributed by people who routinely cook from long-term storage. Then to go through those, pick out some recipes to try and figure out which ones she likes, and order whatever supplemental foods are needed from Augason Farms via Walmart on-line.

My time this week was occupied almost exclusively on science kits, but I did spend some time in the evenings doing prepping research.

  • I spent a lot of time researching relocation issues. We’re still looking at homes, and have decided to look at some that are farther out into the county. One or two of them are located not far from the oddly-named hamlet of Meat Camp, NC.
  • I read a couple of post-apocalyptic novels, including the first in Angery American’s Home series, .

So, what precisely did you do to prep this week? Tell me about it in the comments.


69 Comments and discussion on "Friday, 31 July 2015"

  1. nick says:

    I spent the week on vacation with family in Michigan. I’d love to say that now I’ve got a backup cache in place and at least a minimal food stock at a second retreat.

    UNFORTUNATELY, that is not the case. Family is frankly scornful about prepping, even though they are intelligent, and see some of the news. For example, one commented that 25% of fruits and veg consumed in the US come from Cali. When I asked what they thought the drought would do to prices and availability, or what would happen if the trucks stopped running, I got “oh Nick (sigh.)” At root, the problem is they don’t take me seriously, so they find it very easy to discount anything I might say or any belief I might have. This despite the massive engagement I have with the issues, and my first hand experiences with a laundry list of disasters.

    They are family and I love them but they have AT MOST 3 days food if they eat every cracker and hot chocolate mix. Their 3 huge dogs will have to eat chipmunk or squirrel.

    Michigan near the lake is beautiful with abundant natural and cultivated food. It would make a great bug out from Chicago or Milwaukee, especially with a boat.

    I did get to practice traveling with hardware. No problems at the airports (United). I avoided Illinois completely. MI has reciprocity with everyone’s resident permits, so that was smooth too. Thorough review of the differences in the carry laws (thanks for the H/T) and I felt good to go.

    I’m finding that carry IWB on right hip is easier to conceal under a golf shirt, or when wearing beach attire or shorts, than the 4 o’clock position. It is a lot less likely to print when bending or squatting.

    For pure preps, I ordered and received a BOB bathtub water storage bladder, some israeli bandages, and “down wash” to clean up the sleeping bags I scored some weeks back.

    In the garden, the squashes are starting to send out runners and finally growing. The grape vines are finally doing the same. I have little buds on the brusselsprouts, but they aren’t forming heads. I have a couple of volunteers that I’m going to transplant into one of the raised beds. They are pumpkin or some other squash, possibly watermelon. I figure if I’m getting volunteers, I could put in some seed. We’ll see.

    Lots of stuff to do, limited funds, limited time.

    Got a few sales to attend this weekend, and need to finalize the storage re-org. Might put on a yard sale myself for some quick cash. I can’t believe summer is almost over. In a couple of weeks, school starts back up. Time FLIES.

    nick

  2. Robert Bruce Thompson says:

    I’ve never understood the BOB. It’s relatively expensive for what you get, and it’s essentially one-time use. What’s wrong with cheap kiddie-pools from Walmart? No, they’re not rated food-safe, but they’re made of food-safe plastic and simply need to be rinsed well before using them for water storage. You can use one in a tub, or simply inflate them and fill them on the garage floor. For that matter, you can scrub out the tub with abrasive cleaner and bleach, duct-tape a piece of heavy plastic over the drain, and simply fill the tub with water.

  3. Dave B. says:

    I’ve never understood the BOB. It’s relatively expensive for what you get, and it’s essentially one-time use. What’s wrong with cheap kiddie-pools from Walmart? No, they’re not rated food-safe, but they’re made of food-safe plastic and simply need to be rinsed well before using them for water storage. You can use one in a tub, or simply inflate them and fill them on the garage floor. For that matter, you can scrub out the tub with abrasive cleaner and bleach, duct-tape a piece of heavy plastic over the drain, and simply fill the tub with water.

    What happens if a preschool age child falls into a bathtub full of water without a bathtub bladder?

  4. Robert Bruce Thompson says:

    They sit up and start yelling.

  5. Robert Bruce Thompson says:

    I think you’ve drunk the nanny-state Kool Aid.

  6. OFD says:

    “… a regular 30-something guy–6 feet tall, 260 pounds, and not in particularly good shape–who walks 250 miles home carrying a 60-pound (!) backpack…”

    A guy that size and condition might make it a couple of miles on flat terrain and then collapse at the end. Guys in far better shape get in condition by fast-walking 30-pound rucks a couple of miles, and then increasing the distance and varying the terrain, until they can do it with 65 pounds. It takes a while and is varied with calisthenics and stretching exercises. I’m doing a bit of that now and it kicks my 62-year-old ass, and I’m not a big fat slug like that character, 6’5″ and 245 now. I might get to reasonably good shape for my age by Xmas.

    For prepping, besides the miserable PT stuff, I got some cases of tuna, corned-beef hash, veggies and fruit, down at the Costco, with my renewed Executive card. Staff there very helpful; but I hope the selection varies from time to time.

    Kept the raised beds going; it’s a jungle out there; we’ve had alternating days of steam heat in the 80s and low 90s, with periods of torrential downpours all summuh so fah. The tomatoes have laughingly sloughed off their cages and spread out over the yard, ditto the pumpkins and squash. Peppers are a slow go, though, and seem to be in suspended animation; I’ll try re-potting them in bigger pots. Wife likes flowers and so they’re all over the place, like a hothouse garden. They’re nice but I’d like to replace them with medicinal and kitchen herbs; we do have one big pot of basil and another of rosemary.

    We’re clearly not gonna have much more than a small kitchen garden here, due to space and sunlight and wind considerations; it’s not gonna feed us through the Apocalypse. For that level of prepping, we here in the village/town, whatever, need to hook up some kind of arrangement in future with the farmers who own dozens of square miles all around us of the most fertile watershed farmland in northern New England and north-country New York. An acre per family should be doable, in return for some kind of barter/financial setup. Some of that land will have to go from feed corn for cattle to mixed “truck” farming to feed people. Hunting and fishing ain’t gonna cut it for the Apocalypse, either, not even here in all these woods, fields and mountains.

    Still working the online Technician ham license course; more ammo enroute; and I’ve been dunging out the cellar to create space for storage and plan to wrap up that operation today, while also assembling shelving, piling up junk in the driveway to be hauled away, mowing the lawn and weed-whacking, and getting ready for another possible “job” interview doing remote RHEL support for an outfit inexplicably located in Brown County, South Dakota.

    While also dealing with the fems’ ongoing family and transportation issues and plans which change hourly, between Kalifornia, here in Vermont, Montreal, and New Brunswick. My plans and VA med appointments evidently are of no consideration when they make all their plans, although said plans involve me and a shit-ton of driving.

    Now back to the cellar, as clouds thicken above and around us and we may get some more rain.

  7. Robert Bruce Thompson says:

    One of the reasons I post these Jen articles is to show people that there really are other people out there who have gotten off their asses and are actually doing something, like around here (notably) Nick, OFD, me, and a few others.

    I get even more mail from people who are just thinking about it, which does absolutely no good whatsoever. Perhaps I should post more of the emails from these wannabes. If things do turn to shit, they’ll be kicking themselves as they slowly starve. What’s so hard about making a Costco or Walmart run or two?

    I don’t believe in psycho-babble stuff, but I sometimes wonder if these people are not taking action because that would force them to admit to themselves that the prospect of a major change is really real.

  8. nick says:

    @rbt,

    I have kiddie pools for outdoor water collection and storage if it comes to that. But they are in no way ‘food safe’. They are made from some sort of vinyl (completely unknown and unregulated), in china, with incredibly strong off-gassing when exposed to air or heat. (The BOB may have the same issues, but at least it is intended for that use.)

    I’ve simply filled the tub before, during Ike and Rita, and it works. It is very sub-optimal though. The tub is not clean, possibly could be made clean, but will quickly become contaminated. It’s a foot from the toilet!

    In the past, I’ve used it only for toilet flushing water. I’d like the OPTION to use it for other purposes, like washing, or after treatment, drinking.

    There is the safety issue too. Prepping with small children is different. Many things that would be fine, and many plans that would be effective, are simply non-starters with little kids. If post-SHTF we revert to 1800’s level or worse, then I’ll be forced to accept higher domestic risk levels, but our most likely disaster here is a hurricane, or extended power outage. If we end up living like Afghan refugees, the kids will have to suck it up, as kids throughout history have done, but one of the reasons I prep is to avoid that.

    For the money, it’s cheap. It cost less than the equivalent number of 5 gallon buckets, and is easier to store. I have it in the back of a cabinet in the bathroom.

    I think of it as part of a spectrum of options.

    nick

    FWIW, I can think of several ways to use it cheaply in my truck to transport water effectively, if I ever found myself in a situation where I had water at my secondary location, but not my home (as happened during Ike.) Or half bury it in the yard, or pick up a broken tub and put it in that outside or in the garage…. (two used tubs and two BOBs and a pickup truck would be a pretty handy way to move water….)

  9. Robert Bruce Thompson says:

    You know, I really, really hope that things just keep on keeping on and that 20 years from now I’ll looking at stacks of long-term food and feeling foolish for buying all of it. But I’m really afraid that’s not going to happen.

  10. nick says:

    “I think you’ve drunk the nanny-state Kool Aid.”

    Man I really hate this on so many levels.

    It is a pet peeve of mine, and I usually let it go, but –

    You are talking about the death of hundreds of people, and the murder of children. I HATE to have that trivialized.

    and it’s factually wrong as the drink wasn’t Koolaid.

    nick

  11. Robert Bruce Thompson says:

    That’s what bleach/HTH and 0.2 micron water filters are for. I wouldn’t hesitate to drink treated sewage if it came to that. In fact, that’s what comes out of our taps. Yours too.

    As to the kiddie pools, the one’s I saw at Lowes were labeled as polyethylene rather than vinyl. People are concerned about putting their little kids into pools made of riskier plastics.

  12. Robert Bruce Thompson says:

    @nick

    Sorry if it bothers you, but it’s a common phrase.

    I remember the initial news reports about Jonestown, and they did in fact say that it was Kool Aid laced with cyanide. I see Wikepedia says it was Flavor Aid, which is a different brand name for Kool-Aid. BFD.

    I never bothered to read any more about it. At the time, I hadn’t gotten over the girl I was living with and hoping to marry taking a vacation in California and joining the Moonies. I never saw her again.

  13. Robert Bruce Thompson says:

    I suppose I shouldn’t mention that I refer to facial tissues as Kleenex regardless of the actual brand.

  14. dkreck says:

    Certainly you could just use a large plastic sheet to line the tub and if big enough just fold over the top and use duck tape to hold it as a cover.

  15. OFD says:

    When I was doing my little substance abuse rehab gig down at the VA in White River Junction six years ago, one of the other vets there was an ex-Air Force loadmaster, and he got the plum assignment of loading up the Jonestown corpses. So he had a version of PTSD without ever seeing any combat. What a lousy gig that must have been.

    Oh my goodness, I see blue skies here again! Maybe I’ll come outta the cellar for a while and do yard stuff!

  16. nick says:

    @RBT, I know, and appreciate the common-ness but that’s what I’m railing against. Too many years in a corporate environment where people said it of anything, down to wearing logo’d shirts on Fridays.

    I especially hate to hear it from immigrants or ESL speakers who learned it only as a catch phrase and have no understanding of the actual events. There is a LOT of that in corp world.

    I remind people that they are joking about the death and murder of hundreds of people. It’s a bit ghoulish.

    We are prepping for bad times. The Jonestown events are a good cautionary tale, and should be remembered by anyone seriously looking at prepping. Anything can be taken too far. An isolated community got caught up in events that were outside their experience and control. Many innocents were killed including a US Congressman. Their response made SENSE to many of them.

    What can we learn from this? How would our isolated and struggling post-SHTF communities avoid something similar? If you are hunkered down for a length of time, how do you avoid or minimize the isolation, fixation, etc?

    Got comms? Got sane folks to talk too? Got outside perspective you trust?

    nick

    ADDED:

    there are MANY examples of isolated people and communities that have problems. Cabin fever is but one example. Some of the Alaska reality shows skirt around the issue, but it is a real consideration. More than one fugitive has given themselves up after successfully evading, just because of the strain of being socially isolated. I suspect that even many of the homebodies here would be a lot less sane if denied the outlet of sharing via the internet or (for example) writing books….

    added again: I include myself in this as I spend a whole lot of time alone, but not lonely. Working from home can be isolating. Even working on the road with others tends to be socially isolating in ways that people who haven’t done it can’t really understand.

  17. Dave B. says:

    You know, I really, really hope that things just keep on keeping on and that 20 years from now I’ll looking at stacks of long-term food and feeling foolish for buying all of it. But I’m really afraid that’s not going to happen.

    I look at it as a form of insurance. I have no intention of dying before my term life insurance policy expires. I still pay the premiums because I could be wrong.

  18. Dave B. says:

    They sit up and start yelling.

    You are almost certainly correct. I am being an overprotective father to worry about such things. At this point, I wouldn’t buy one because I have more important prepping priorities. I suspect that this time next year, I wouldn’t even think about buying a bathtub bladder.

  19. nick says:

    “I don’t believe in psycho-babble stuff, but I sometimes wonder if these people are not taking action because that would force them to admit to themselves that the prospect of a major change is really real.”

    I think this nails it on the head. Call it normalcy bias, stubbornness, head in the sand, whatever. It’s real.

    It kills me to see it in those I love. ESPECIALLY when it is so easy to disprove. Disasters DO happen. They happen all the time, all over the place.

    We have had a major depression. We’ve had stock market crashes in 2000, 2008, and one coming up. Many countries around the world have seen a currency collapse. We have had a dust bowl [ecological collapse] (that wiped out farmers and resulted in major population shifts.) We’ve HAD race riots. We have in fact been attacked by terrorists. We have had prolonged blackouts, the carrington event, Towunga, and asteroids hitting the planet and changing life as we know it planetwide. We have had actual war in major cities of the world. We have had millions killed by political beliefs and YES ORDINARY PEOPLE WILL DO THOSE THINGS.

    People act like any of those scenarios are completely impossible, and yet most of them (asteroid strike excepted) have happened during living memory or recent historical memory. For pete’s sake, less than 80 years ago the most technological and socially advanced nation on the earth was burning thousands of corpses within SIGHT of villages FULL of ordinary folks.

    Taking that first step makes it real. And then it can be overwhelming. The shear number of ways it can all go wrong can lead a person to simply throwing up their hands and saying “what’s the point of living thru that anyway?” But- the earth is still here. People got thru those crisis and society continues. For some, it was the end of the world but for many, it was just a localized hardship. Prepping lets you get thru it and reduces the hardship.

    That is why I’ve chosen to prep specifically for local hazards FIRST, and then leverage that up to more general preparedness.

    I started at Y2k, then morphed that into general earthquake preparedness. That became hurricane prep with my move from SoCal. Hurricane prep became more general, and eventually my planning horizon extended to social and economic collapse.

    I’ve been thru the stages.

    For anyone new, and overwhelmed.

    First prep for 72 hours. This is what FEMA recommends, so it is easily defensible to family and friends, and self.

    Extend that to 2 weeks. This is what experience shows is needed in a bigger regional disaster or disturbance. (Hurricane, tornado, earthquake, winter storm, Rodney King Riots, etc.)

    From there, a month or more (Katrina, Ike, Colorado wildfires for locals.)

    From there, six months. (unemployment, serious illness in the family)

    From there, one year or longer (economic collapse, extended civil unrest, war, multiple regional disasters, etc.)

    You don’t have to do it all at once. If you try, you will likely make mistakes (which is still ok). That said, I’ve got nothing against ‘panic buying’ as it is sometimes disparagingly called. It just can’t be ALL you do. Having a pallet of freeze dried food in the basement doesn’t mean you are ‘prepared.’ It does mean you will be WAY better off than many. So meet your first needs as quickly as you feel comfortable. That gives you some time to take a breath and broaden your approach.

    BUT TAKE THE FIRST STEP! There is a lot of support out there for you.

    nick

  20. nick says:

    @DaveB

    ” I wouldn’t buy one because I have more important prepping priorities”

    Me too! It has been on my amazon wish list for a couple of years, but it was recently both in stock, and on sale, and I needed another item to fill out my shipping, sooooooo……

    Now I’ve got one. For the same money ($20) and bulk you can get a lifestraw. Did that first. I’ve got purifier tablets, hiking filters, bulk bleach, and rainwater storage. Like I said above, all part of a spectrum.

    Having now thought about it, the BOB might be best as a way to transport bulk water if needed. A plastic bag and a broken tub in the back of the truck will certainly get less attention than a rotomolded water tank….

    nick

  21. Robert Bruce Thompson says:

    @nick

    +1

    Except for the congressman being innocent. All politicians are guilty until proven innocent.

  22. Clayton W. says:

    Nick, I think you have the right idea.

    I am not a prepper, yet. I live in a fairly dense area and, currently, have more health issues than I can survive TEOTWAWKI.

    But I have recently gone from 3 days Hurricane readiness to two weeks. And reading this site and a few others you have led me to increase that preparedness. Firearm, Radio, First Aid supplies, Flash lights (I need more, any recommendations?)

    The discussions here have made me think about it more, and act. That is important. Thanks.

  23. nick says:

    Congrats Clayton, that is awesome. Compared to some it may not seem like much, but it is WAY more than most have done. Keep plugging away at it, and you will keep building.

    You are taking responsibility for your life and that should come with a good feeling too.

    I understand that many people feel as you do about medical issues. It is a common refrain on other sites. Here, as there, I encourage you to explore your options and not just give up or assume that nothing can be done. If you require power, there are ways to get that. If drugs, there may be ways to stockpile, herbal alternatives, or ways to reduce the need. If other ongoing interventions are needed, what scale of disruption would make those impossible, and how can you prepare to get thru all the lesser disruptions? MOST of the things I prep for are NOT TEOTWAWKI, or at least not the most extreme versions.

    If not, can you survive long enough to help others? Even if all you can do is leave behind a cache of supplies for others, or a planted garden, you’ve saved a life… and who really knows? The human is a tough apex predator. You may be capable of more than you think.

    nick

    BTW, I’d say you ARE a prepper. You’ve take the first 2 steps so now you are on the journey.

  24. Dave B. says:

    I am not a prepper, yet. I live in a fairly dense area and, currently, have more health issues than I can survive TEOTWAWKI.

    If you have two weeks of supplies, you’re more prepared than a lot of people. If you have health issues, I would suggest the next step is to start getting prescription refills as soon as your insurance allows. If your insurance allows monthly refills every 23 days then do that if you can. That means every month you will build up another week’s supply of your prescriptions.

  25. Lynn McGuire says:

    Their basement is now stacked with cases of #10 cans, but she knows this is just the basic staples.

    I wish I had a basement here on the Gulf Coast next to the biggest hot tub on the planet. Instead, I have a Texas basement which is a 10 ft extension on my detached two car garage. It is about 110 F in there right now.

    My dream house has a 10×20 ft or 20×20 ft kitchen pantry which is in reality a safe room with a restroom, etc. I’ve seen a 20×20 ft safe room in a barndominium about 20 miles south of here that had concrete walls and a concrete roof built with the concrete slab foundation.

  26. Chad says:

    Anyone know of a good reference website that details how much certain types of ammo shot from various calibers of weapons will penetrate different materials?

  27. nick says:

    @Chad,

    The truth about guns . Com did an extensive series of tests and video. A Canadian university did to, RBT linked to their report previously.

    Nick

  28. nick says:

    Sorry so short, an on phone in Dr’s office waiting room.

    Nick

  29. Chad says:

    If you have a basement and live in a hurricane path, then you may want to make sure you have a battery backup for your sump pump. A hurricane knocks out power so your sump pump cannot run and then torrential rains from the same hurricane flood the basement. Not cool. Also, don’t set the battery on the basement floor. Elevate it some. 🙂

  30. Chad says:

    TheTruthAboutGuns.com did an extensive series of tests and video. A Canadian university did to, RBT linked to their report previously.

    Thanks, Nick. I’ll have to wait till I get home from work. My employer blocks any weapon-related websites. They also block any alcohol or tobacco related websites. What do they expect me to do all day? Work?!

  31. Robert Bruce Thompson says:

    @chad

    Basically, given the choice you want concrete, filled-concrete block, stone, or rammed earth walls. A good step down is unfilled concrete block or brick veneer, but either of those will stop repeated hits from .223/5.56mm and at least one hit from a .308/7.62mm. Either *may* stop one hit from a .50 BMG.

    Our current house is brick veneer, and the new one will probably be the same. I plan to have the materials and means readily available to build bastions in front of apertures. We also have several hard wood bookshelves that are large enough to block windows and, if packed tightly with books that are secured from being blown off the shelves, will also reliably stop .223.

  32. nick says:

    @Lynn, I’m adding safe room features to my matter bath/closet. It won’t fully meet the standard, because I have a window, and sliding door, and hvac penetrations as well as not being able to get to all the parts of the wall needed.

    It will have stronger walls and ceiling, more anchors to the slab, and more hurricane strapping for the ceiling and roof. There are good guides courtesy of FEMA, including construction details.

    I’m debating whether to use any Bullet resistant panels. Leaning
    toward not, but why do things halfway?

    One other choice might be a 20 ft shipping container bolted down in the garage. Would work for hurricanes anyway.

    Nick

  33. Robert Bruce Thompson says:

    Incidentally, 6″ of packed sand or clay will stop nearly anything you’re likely to have to worry about, and a foot will certainly stop it.

  34. nick says:

    Or, apparently, a2x4 stud cavity filled with rock chips.

    Nick

  35. OFD says:

    ” My employer blocks any weapon-related websites. They also block any alcohol or tobacco related websites. What do they expect me to do all day? Work?!”

    Bastards!

    How about porn? They block that, too? Online poker? Craigslist? Last dump I was at they were blocking the latter, until the wife of the owner, who also worked there, in the palatial office right next to mine, actually, asked me to unblock it for her. I did that in about five seconds, but her multitude of goofy laptop problems took longer.

    Mr. nick has some good advice today (as most days); primary being, take the prep stuff in stages. Not all of us have retired professional lifestyles, pallets of cash in the garage, nor are we ex-Seals with scads of weapons, martial arts and combat experience. Some of us are still stuck in Megalopolis or on the fringes, like us, with limited financial and time resources and possible medical issues; Mrs. OFD, for example, has a thyroid condition that requires DAILY meds, that if she goes off for a couple of weeks, she’s dead. Her cousin, a judge in north-country Vampire State, will croak if he misses a day or two. Meanwhile she’s hassling with this state’s version of ObummerCARE and other insurance bullshit.

    Do what ya can, when ya can. 72 hours to a couple of weeks, and then a few months.

    We’ve got about a month to six weeks covered here; we need to extend that to cover a hard six months of a cold and snowy winter with no juice. We also need to get together six months of living expenses in cash somehow. Working on it…

  36. Robert Bruce Thompson says:

    Yep. All you can do is what you can do. Better to do a little bit than dream about doing a lot.

    If our funds were unlimited I’d be doing a lot more, and as it is we’re better off financially than the vast majority of preppers. Fortunately, neither of us has ever wanted the big-spending lifestyle.

  37. nick says:

    Best financial advice I ever got, get rid of consumer credit debt.

    Follow that with saving 10% of every dollar made. Transfer the 10% when you make the deposit. When getting started, try to go one week without cashing your paycheck, then deposit it on your new savings account.

    Times have changed since I did this, but I still think it’s good advice, especially for young folks starting out.. It started me on the way to all my long term goals.

    Course now my income is far from regular and is greatly reduced, so I haven’t been living up to the savings, the credit tho, I’ll never get caught in that trap again.

    Nick

  38. Lynn McGuire says:

    “… a regular 30-something guy–6 feet tall, 260 pounds, and not in particularly good shape–who walks 250 miles home carrying a 60-pound (!) backpack…”

    A guy that size and condition might make it a couple of miles on flat terrain and then collapse at the end.

    Hey, I resemble that! 6’1″ and 250 lbs. BTW, in the book it took him two months to get home, right? 250 miles in 60 days means walking an average of four miles per day. Probably dropping a pound of body weight and a 1/2 pound out of the backpack per day. Of course, he did get shot about 40 days into the journey.

    I’ve read all the books in the series, not bad. Goes over the deep end with the DHS re-education camps though. Or maybe, not depending on who actually launched the EMP.

  39. OFD says:

    If a person was in decent shape and needed to do 250 miles with a 65-pound pack, they should be able to get there in about ten days to two weeks, depending on terrain, weather and bad peeps trying to eff them up. Add a rifle, pistol and the ammo, and more like a month.

    By this time next year, barring any injuries, I hope to be able to do 10-15-mile ruck marches over varying terrain with 65 pounds and a pistol and ammo. In three to five hours.

    Not today, though; made a huge dent in the pile of crap in the cellar and just have a couple of large items to push/pull outta there tomorrow; I’ve had it for today, probably lost another five pounds. I should be able to wrap it up tomorrow and also get to the lawn and gardens, and leave the Sabbath as a day of rest and study.

  40. Lynn McGuire says:

    Hey, that is cool! BOB: “waterBOB Emergency Drinking Water Storage (100 Gallons)”
    http://www.amazon.com/waterBOB-Emergency-Drinking-Storage-Gallons/dp/B001AXLUX2/

    My son says that you can always get water out of the water heaters but my reply is what if the water supply was contaminated just before the event?

    BTW, I appreciate URLs in postings. Helps me to see what people are talking about. I had no idea that one could buy a 100 gallon bathtub bladder for $22.95.

  41. Lynn McGuire says:

    Best financial advice I ever got, get rid of consumer credit debt.

    Consumer debt sucks. That is not productive at all.

    I do not worry about debt on real estate though, even though I am carrying high six figures on my home and office. I am just happy to be under seven figures real estate debt, now that was worrisome.

  42. Lynn McGuire says:

    By this time next year, barring any injuries

    Famous. Last. Words. At age 62, injuries are real and almost always present.

  43. Lynn McGuire says:

    “Should you upgrade to Windows 10? It depends.”
    http://blog.chron.com/techblog/2015/07/should-you-upgrade-to-windows-10-it-depends/

    No. Wait for SR2.

    Well, that did not take long for SR1:
    http://www.neowin.net/news/windows-10-service-release-1-expected-to-roll-out-next-month

  44. Lynn McGuire says:

    _The Survivalist (Finest Hour)_ by Dr. Arthur T. Bradley
    http://www.amazon.com/Survivalist-Finest-Hour-Arthur-Bradley/dp/1505887267/

    Book number six of a six book series. There will be more in the series, probably, since the book ends in a cliff hanger. Actually, two cliff hangers. I look forward to the seventh book.

    This is not a zombie series. But, it has zombies. This is an EOTWAWKI series when 98% of the populace dies of the Superpox-99 virus, 1% is permanently infected, and 1% is unaffected. Lots of political intrigue, good people, and bad people.

    My rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    Amazon rating: 4.8 out of 5 stars (162 reviews)

  45. OFD says:

    “At age 62, injuries are real and almost always present.”

    Hey cupcake, run a little dirt on it and get yer ass in gear!

  46. nick says:

    @lynn,

    I was always counting on the water heater storage too.

    And then my assumptions got handed to me during Ike. As you say, the water in the heater is contaminated before you know it. Shutting it off ahead of time is doable but very inconvenient. We were without water for only 3 days, and I had running water at my secondary location, but after that, I swore to dramatically increase my water storage.

    Another risk is that it drained when the hurricane/tornado/etc tore your house open. Then you are short.

    nick

  47. nick says:

    Find it difficult to post urls from the phone, and will usually only post one when there might be trouble googling for a good result.

    Worry about posting URLs on the site…

    added: URLs trigger automatic comment moderation on some of the other places I post, so I’m not in the habit…

    nick

  48. nick says:

    @OFD <—- Ohhhh you aggressed him! Bad! bad!

    nick

    🙂

  49. OFD says:

    Yep, you nailed me there, Mr. nick. Even a microaggression directed at a hypothetical character and ridiculing a fictional weakness or cowardice is itself a microaggression and me explaining it here is yet another as I attempt to exculpate myself from said microaggression. Repeating the word three times like that in the same post is still another. Me saying it that way, kind of sarcastically, is, yes, you guessed it, another!

    As you can, microaggressions tend to accumulate in an infinite series…

  50. Robert Bruce Thompson says:

    Aleph null

  51. OFD says:

    Aleph naught.

    As in naughty.

    Aleph, short for Alf. Which was a funny sitcom years ago that they took off the air, bastards.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PgiLBvPGoT4

  52. Ray Thompson says:

    I do not worry about debt on real estate though

    Nice sized and good looking addition you have going there Mr. Lynn.

  53. OFD says:

    Yes, Mr. Lynn, and I’m sure we wouldn’t want anything bad happening to it…

  54. Lynn McGuire says:

    I’m betting all of my middle and upper middle class neighbors have guns… We are in Texas after all.

  55. OFD says:

    Ditto here in Vermont, compadre.

    And we don’t need no stinkin’ permits.

  56. MrAtoz says:

    By this time next year, barring any injuries, I hope to be able to do 10-15-mile ruck marches over varying terrain with 65 pounds and a pistol and ammo. In three to five hours.

    Would you mind posting when and where you attempt this Mr. OFD. I’d like to pick up some supplies from your carcass.

  57. MrAtoz says:

    RIP Rowdy Roddy Piper

  58. OFD says:

    “Would you mind posting when and where you attempt this Mr. OFD.”

    Yo, it be right around here. Only three roads outta town, mostly flat, but some hilly terrain a few blocks away.

    “RIP Rowdy Roddy Piper”

    Yup, haht attack in his sleep at 61. Back in the day my favorite performer; once saw him do a classic Olympic-style Greco-Roman wrestling match with one B. Brian Blair, and it was a donnybrook; Hot Rod won in the end but it was close.

    Mr. Blair is now a “conservative” Christian politician down in wunnerful Floriduh.

    http://www.brianblair.com/

  59. Lynn McGuire says:

    Nice sized and good looking addition you have going there Mr. Lynn.

    Thanks. I’m betting that you saw the pictures that I posted on FB.

  60. OFD says:

    Still on FaceCrack, eh?

    I gave it up many moons ago.

    Huge security hole and don’t like supporting Zuckerburg’s empire or the back doors he and the Google and M$ empires open up for our lords and masters in government and crime. Oh there I go repeating myself again….

  61. Miles_Teg says:

    Coldest July in 20 years, your Adelaide correspondant is freezing his butt off… 🙁 Please Al, send me some AGW.

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-08-01/adelaide-experiences-coldest-july-in-almost-20-years/6665260

  62. Miles_Teg says:

    What’s the security hole in FB? Yes, I’m on it.

  63. Ray Thompson says:

    I’m betting that you saw the pictures that I posted on FB.

    Las Vegas bookies can’t pull one over on Mr. Lynn.

    Still on FaceCrack, eh?

    Actually allowed me to connect with some family members out on the far left coast. I also post the sports pictures from local high schools on FB where many of the kids and their parents view the images. I have about 1,000 friends on FB, probably 800+ are under the age of 21, 600+ under the age of 18.

    Just to cut OFD comments off at the pass, I have zero contact with any of the people on FB unless they want senior pictures. And then I require that a parent accompany them while the pictures are taken.

  64. brad says:

    @Ray: have you no heart? Cutting of OFD’s prurient ideas before he even gets to have them?

  65. nick says:

    with that many kids, you can be assured that some have inappropriate shares…

    nick

  66. Ray Thompson says:

    have you no heart?

    Apparently not.

    Cutting of OFD’s prurient ideas before he even gets to have them?

    I stand corrected. I should have been more sensitive. Off to the female dominated “Personal Sensitivity Non Aggression Wimpy Wuss Society” meeting for me. Dues optional.

  67. OFD says:

    “Dues optional.”

    Is that anything like taxes?

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