Tues. Sept. 25, 2018 – more network and pc work, and cleanup

Currently 73F and not quite saturated. Close though.

Wife has moved along the closet remodel by coming home with a van load of modular closet system. It hangs from the wall and so doesn’t rely on a finished floor. It looks good, but cheap to my eyes. Better than wire shelves.

I’ve got to get the network changeover (note how it wasn’t even on my list, but suddenly kills two days) done so I can get back to the list.

Hah, tech content. Who knew?

n

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33 Responses to Tues. Sept. 25, 2018 – more network and pc work, and cleanup

  1. ITguy1998 says:

    Hopefully your ATT router has a dmz. My router provided with google fiber does, and that is where my Cisco ASA lives.

  2. lynn says:

    “A.F. Branco Cartoon – Russian To Judgment”
    https://comicallyincorrect.com/a-f-branco-cartoon-russian-to-judgment/

    “Democrats are so desperate they are willing to accept any accusation as fact from anywhere and anyone. Political cartoon by A.F. Branco ©2018.”

    Fits well with this also:
    https://comicallyincorrect.com/a-f-branco-cartoon-thats-show-biz/

  3. MrAtoz says:

    Eight Rinos still not committed to Kavanaugh vote. What are they waiting for? Trying to lock-in a reelection? If Grasshole would have held the vote on schedule, none of this would be happening.

  4. MrAtoz says:

    Murkowski:

    “We are now in a place where it’s not about whether or not Judge Kavanaugh is qualified,” Ms. Murkowski, a key swing Republican vote, said in an extended interview in the Capitol Monday night. “It is about whether or not a woman who has been a victim at some point in her life is to be believed.”

    I read that as a “no” on Kavanaugh. Is she going to vote “yes” and not “believe” a woman? What a joke! We need Mr. OFD back to man the guillotine.

  5. lynn says:

    “Software disenchantment”
    http://tonsky.me/blog/disenchantment/

    “I’ve been programming for 15 years now. Recently our industry’s lack of care for efficiency, simplicity, and excellence started really getting to me, to the point of me getting depressed by my own career and the IT in general.”

    “Modern cars work, let’s say for the sake of argument, at 98% of what’s physically possible with the current engine design. Modern buildings use just enough material to fulfill their function and stay safe under the given conditions. All planes converged to the optimal size/form/load and basically look the same.”

    “Only in software, it’s fine if a program runs at 1% or even 0.01% of the possible performance. Everybody just seems to be ok with it. People are often even proud about how much inefficient it is, as in “why should we worry, computers are fast enough”:”

    Wow, that is a get off my yard article if I have ever read one. Unfortunately, he / she is right. And it is getting worse.

  6. nick flandrey says:

    So early this morning, our local constable patrol spotted two guys with backpacks walking down the street… and called for backup.

    The guys put on masks and started walking up my across the street neighbor’s driveway. The deputies ran in and grabbed the guys.

    450am

    Masks and backpacks.

    I’m ordering a couple of new cameras, and taking another look at our physical upgrades….

    n

  7. nick flandrey says:

    More info has arrived. The initial contact with the robbers triggered them to run and hide. Nino and Dondre (19 and 20) were burglarizing vehicles. When the K9 and deputies got them, they recovered stolen items and a stolen pickup truck.

    So they were not planning a home invasion robbery, but were out doing smash and grab thefts from motor vehicles.

    Oh, both were carrying pot too, so they get that added on…

    Still gonna look at our situation, and move some of the planned upgrades up the list. The endless list…

    n

  8. Greg Norton says:

    Wow, that is a get off my yard article if I have ever read one. Unfortunately, he / she is right. And it is getting worse.

    Interpreted languages run the Internet. And new fancy lad compiled languages based on LLVM aren’t any faster than the C++ runtime.

  9. Spook says:

    Fridge / freezer thermometer with alarms…

    Amazon B004QJVU78

    Good idea every day, possibly life-saving for freezer failure
    or power outage.

  10. nick flandrey says:

    I got a bunch of these cheap somewhere, and I use them in my chest freezer, with the “outdoor” sensor deep inside and the thing stuck to the wall above.

    I also have them in my tool bag so I know how hot it is in attics

    They lack the alarm feature though.

    https://www.amazon.com/AcuRite-00888A3-Outdoor-Digital-Thermometer/dp/B000PAQ32O?crid=3ALADPW6RFIZD&keywords=indoor+outdoor+thermometer&qid=1537910108&s=Home+&Kitchen&sprefix=indoo%2Cgarden%2C169&sr=1-13&ref=sr_1_13&tag=ttgnet-20

  11. brad says:

    “Software disenchantment”? Lack of optimization in programming? Yes, gawd yes. But there are reasons…

    First, physical costs. If you had to design a bridge, but were not allowed time for all the static calculations, you would throw material at it to make sure it stood up. But material costs money, so people spend the time optimizing. Unfortunately, code is cheap, so is memory, so is processor power. In most cases, there is no real cost to not optimizing.

    Side note: We have reached the point of pain with web pages. When you download a newspaper article with 10k of text, but get 10MB of advertisements, trackers, and JavaScript libraries sent along with it, well…people do start to notice. But on that ERP system – who cares if the client takes 4GB of memory instead of only a couple of MB?

    Second, incompetent programmers, combined with time pressure. We need this new system, or this new app, or this new web service. We need it by next month, if not by yesterday. So programmers go out and find some framework that does 90% of the work (along with 20 zillion things you *don’t* want or need). That framework, in turn, relies on X other external dependencies, which also include everything but the kitchen sink. All so you can write a web-app real quick.

    When I programmed commercially, I always wrote my own frameworks, that did exactly what I needed and nothing more. But that’s challenging meta-programming, and it takes more time. Most programmers are not capable of meta-programming, and they are forced to work to schedules that won’t allow it anyway.

    So we get software bloat.

  12. lynn says:

    And now a word from OFD’s former much admired neighbor:

    “The huge stakes of Thursday’s confrontations”
    “Pat Buchanan covers Rostenstein meeting with Trump, Kavanaugh showdown”
    https://www.wnd.com/2018/09/the-huge-stakes-of-thursdays-confrontations/#vgIWYxJlBUbj1TQM.99

    “Thursday is shaping up to be the Trump presidency’s “Gunfight at OK Corral.””

    “That day, the fates of Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, and much else, may be decided.”

    Buchanan may be correct.

    Hat tip to:
    https://drudgereport.com/

  13. lynn says:

    Side note: We have reached the point of pain with web pages. When you download a newspaper article with 10k of text, but get 10MB of advertisements, trackers, and JavaScript libraries sent along with it, well…people do start to notice. But on that ERP system – who cares if the client takes 4GB of memory instead of only a couple of MB?

    I have found that ublock and/or ublock origin will remove the vast majority of the downloaded advertisement pain in FireFox. In fact, somehow I am running both of them now to zero obvious problems. Double in fact, without ublock, FireFox is not stable due to event loop problems in the advertisements.

  14. paul says:

    After a dry Summer on top of our forecast for “extra wet Winter” that was not at all wet, the crab apple tree is blooming again. So are the pear trees, what’s left of them.

    The pear trees were here in Winter 1992. They are old. I’ve needed to cut them down for the last four years, but, lazy. The canopies are 3/4 dead. But maybe we’ll get pears again! The tree rats beat me again. We’ve had a good enough season to bother with canning pears three times plus a year where we froze the pears in sugar water. The neighbor makes a wicked pear cobbler.

    Other than along paths a couple of times, I last mowed the yard in February. The cows had it well eaten. The cows left in March. After a couple of weeks of rain, maybe 8 inches total, and a few days of it not being so dang hot, the grass in the back yard is suddenly tall enough to make it hard to see Missy. Missy is a lab over pit and weighed 95 pounds at her last vet visit.

    Lawnmower is gassed and the tires are aired. Maybe tomorrow. It depends on how insane the mosquitoes are.

  15. lynn says:

    First, physical costs. If you had to design a bridge, but were not allowed time for all the static calculations, you would throw material at it to make sure it stood up. But material costs money, so people spend the time optimizing. Unfortunately, code is cheap, so is memory, so is processor power. In most cases, there is no real cost to not optimizing.

    I first start programming in 1975 on 36 bit, 60 bit, and 32 bit machines. The only real common problem on the 36 bit and 60 bit machines was the lack of memory. The 32 bit machines had more memory but had round off issues.

    The new 64 bit machines are simply amazing. Coupled with 16 GB or 32 GB of ram, they are immensely powerful at running many apps together. Even with these, I am noting two issues, the first being that the apps are doubling in size every so year or so. The second issue is that I, the user, want to save everything now. This is how our contact app database has grown to 28,000 names and 2 GB in size.

    Our LAN backup has hit 4 TB now. I am bringing another 8 TB external drive online and into the weekly external drive rotation. It has been running since last Thursday for its first backup. I am wondering if it will be done on Wednesday.

  16. lynn says:

    Lawnmower is gassed and the tires are aired. Maybe tomorrow. It depends on how insane the mosquitoes are.

    The mosquitoes are insane here in Fort Bend County. Our HOA is spraying twice a night and I got bit 4 or 5 times walking my mile last night at 11pm.

  17. paul says:

    I’ve used AdBlock Plus for years. I added the DuckDuckGo Privacy thing that blocks trackers. As I find them, I add to my hosts file and direct to 127.0.0.1 I plan to get rid of the DuckDuckGo add-on in a few weeks.

    I’m not blocking everything. I know there are hosts files out there for the downloading but I don’t go to many sites in Europe and I don’t care to have a 4 MB hosts file.

  18. lynn says:

    “US F-35 fighter jet poised for combat debut”
    https://www.cnn.com/2018/09/25/politics/us-f-35-combat-missions/index.html

    “The US Marine Corps’ stealth F-35B Lightning fighter jet could fly its first combat mission within days, according to several US defense officials, who told CNN that the fifth-generation aircraft are currently aboard the USS Essex amphibious assault ship and should soon be in a position to conduct airstrikes over Afghanistan.”

    Finally ! I do note that the cost is now published at $159 million each. I would have sworn that the cost was over $200 million each previously.

    Hat tip to:
    https://drudgereport.com/

  19. paul says:

    and should soon be in a position to conduct airstrikes over Afghanistan.

    How about let’s not. The Brits didn’t change them. The Russians didn’t change them. And somehow the US will?

    How about this? Instead of bombing Arabs, and pissing them off, enforcing our southern border?

  20. lynn says:

    “Linux developers threaten to pull “kill switch””
    https://lulz.com/linux-devs-threaten-killswitch-coc-controversy-1252/

    The SJWs got Linus Torvalds and now are apparently going after selected Linux kernel developers, one in particular who dates back to 1991.

    “On holy wars, and a plea for peace”
    http://esr.ibiblio.org/?p=8139

    “Most of you know that I have spent more than a quarter century analyzing the folkways of the hacker culture as a historian, ethnographer, and game theorist. That analysis has had large consequences, including a degree of business and mainstream acceptance of the open source way that was difficult to even imagine when I first presented “The Cathedral and the Bazaar” back in 1997.”

    “I’m writing now, from all of that experience and with all that perspective, about the recent flap over the new CoC and the attempt to organize a mass withdrawal of creator permissions from the kernel.”

    Hat tip to:
    https://www.codeproject.com/script/Mailouts/View.aspx?mlid=13880&_z=1988477

    CofC = Code of Conflict

  21. lynn says:

    And here is the article ripping Linux apart, “After Years of Abusive E-mails, the Creator of Linux Steps Aside”
    https://www.newyorker.com/science/elements/after-years-of-abusive-e-mails-the-creator-of-linux-steps-aside

    “Torvalds has publicly posted thousands of scathing messages targeting programmers who submit what he deems flawed code to the Linux computer-operating-system kernel, which he brought to life more than twenty-five years ago and now administers as a collaborative, open-source project. Today, the Linux kernel is famous, running the enormous computers of Google, PayPal, Amazon, and eBay, and the two billion mobile phones using the Android operating system. Torvalds, though, retains final say over each precious line of code, just as he did when he first started working on the system as a graduate student at the University of Helsinki. For years, he has been known as Linux’s “benevolent dictator for life.””

    I would not (and don’t) run my programming shop like Linus does. But, we are currently three programmers and he is maintaining a cast of thousands ??? Apparently, some of them are fools and Linus does not suffer fools very well. And I do not want to walk a mile in his shoes, size five millions do not fit me well.

  22. Spook says:

    I’m not blocking everything. I know there are hosts files out there for the downloading but I don’t go to many sites in Europe and I don’t care to have a 4 MB hosts file.

    Paul:
    Have you used the 475~ kb hosts file below?
    Of course it will be a little larger than that in actual use.
    I have minimal overall skills, but this seems to have worked
    well for me (uh, definitely not in Windows).
    Time to muddle through this update. I’m a little behind…

    http://winhelp2002.mvps.org/hosts.htm

    The actual text file is here…

    http://winhelp2002.mvps.org/hosts.txt

    I also use Ghostery in Chromium and NoScript in Firefox.

    Comments and suggestions requested, from all.

  23. mediumwave says:

    In re ESR’s On holy wars, and a plea for peace:

    From the comments:

    “I don’t see how this is solved without a hard fork where those with the original Telos move to, leaving whatever “Linux” is to the SJW Maenad pyroclastic frenzy.”

    Yep. Leave the baizuo to fester in their own little safe space.

  24. lynn says:

    Dadgumit, I hate Windows ! I’ve been having source code file server problems today and just noticed that the stupid piece of junk ran out of C: disk drive space. Went over there because it was in the forbidden c:windowstemp directory. Found 149 GB of Windows download crap on the 256 GB SSD drive. Are you kidding me ! Deleted same and life is good now.

    Checked on the general file server and found 150 GB of download crap (CAB files) in c:windowstemp directory on its 2 TB WD Black hard drive. What in the world ? Both machines are running Windows 7 x64.

  25. lynn says:

    In re ESR’s On holy wars, and a plea for peace:

    From the comments:

    “I don’t see how this is solved without a hard fork where those with the original Telos move to, leaving whatever “Linux” is to the SJW Maenad pyroclastic frenzy.”

    Yep. Leave the baizuo to fester in their own little safe space.

    Not me, I see this going legal in a hurry. I also see Linus never going back, at least not until the federal lawsuit ends in a decade or so. The SJWs have control and they apparently have several million dollars of contributions in the bank. They will drag this out to the end and sue everyone in sight. Remember SCO ?
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SCO%E2%80%93Linux_disputes

  26. hcombs says:

    “Software disenchantment”

    Software bloat is embarrassing. We had Windows server lite with the GUI removed and an 80% reduced memory footprint as well as more secure.
    I come from a time in the 70s when we had a Chess program in 1024 bytes of 8080 machine code. Not a good Chess program but It really played. That was when we made every bit count. Now we include 200 MB libraries just for a single function. Compilers are fantastic but with cheap memory we have gotten sloppy. Memory leaks everywhere aren’t a problem because we reboot every monthly patch cycle anyway.

  27. lynn says:

    Memory leaks everywhere aren’t a problem because we reboot every monthly patch cycle anyway.

    I have to manually restart Microsoft Security Essentials every Monday since it leaks up to 500 MB to 2,000 MB over the weekend while it is checking every file on my hard drives (primary and LAN backup).

  28. Greg Norton says:

    I would not (and don’t) run my programming shop like Linus does. But, we are currently three programmers and he is maintaining a cast of thousands ??? Apparently, some of them are fools and Linus does not suffer fools very well.

    “Nvidia, f*ck you.”

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IVpOyKCNZYw

    As I stated the other day, there are a lot of pretenders in tech who lack the IQ points to do the actual work. Of course, with high IQ and creativity comes a lot of personality quirks. Linus’ quirks are pretty tame compared to some I’ve seen.

    I know how Linus feels about Nvidia. Anyone who runs Linux has a love/hate relationship with Nvidia.

  29. nick flandrey says:

    Yup and people ran their businesses on Apple II and Apple III, RadioShack Model 3’s, IBM pc’s with 256K of ram……..

    Now we have transparent effects in the GUI, physics modeling in the GUI, animated stuff, video playing on icons, and we’re STILL stuck with the desktop metaphor for filing and GUI…

    n

  30. Greg Norton says:

    I have to manually restart Microsoft Security Essentials every Monday since it leaks up to 500 MB to 2,000 MB over the weekend while it is checking every file on my hard drives (primary and LAN backup).

    IBM bought and put the knife to the company who produced the best memory leak detector on Windows, Rational. I’ve heard that even Microsoft used Rational Purify back in the day.

  31. nick flandrey says:

    Anyone who has ever had to configure any multiheaded display with nvidia, on windows or especially on Linux and who has fought with every driver breaking SOMETHING, hates nvidia……

    n

  32. Greg Norton says:

    Anyone who has ever had to configure any multiheaded display with nvidia, on windows or especially on Linux and who has fought with every driver breaking SOMETHING, hates nvidia……

    I have a Santa Rosa MacBook Pro which would make a great Linux Mint machine if it wasn’t for the infamous 9800M Nvidia chip.

  33. lynn says:

    I have to manually restart Microsoft Security Essentials every Monday since it leaks up to 500 MB to 2,000 MB over the weekend while it is checking every file on my hard drives (primary and LAN backup).

    IBM bought and put the knife to the company who produced the best memory leak detector on Windows, Rational. I’ve heard that even Microsoft used Rational Purify back in the day.

    We used to use Purify back on the Unix boxen. It was awesome when we did not crash the machine due to lack of memory and paging space.

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