Sunday, 29 October 2017

10:20 – It was 41.1F (5C) when I took Colin out at 0730, heavily overcast and with a stiff breeze. We’d had 2.4 inches (6.1 cm) of rain since yesterday. I’d have to check my records to be sure, but I think we’re around 10 inches (25 cm) for the month to date. Overnight and tomorrow, we’re to have our first hard freeze of the season and our first snow accumulation.

Barbara called yesterday afternoon to say she’d changed her mind about staying in Winston last night and heading home this morning. Instead, she just stopped long enough in Winston to transfer her personal stuff and things she’d bought in New York to her own car, after which she drove back here to Sparta, arriving at about 19:10.

Colin and I were both delighted. Barbara thought I looked so bad that she wanted to haul me over to the emergency room. I convinced her that wasn’t necessary. She agreed but only if I started doing what she told me. Right now, that’s mainly drinking lots of fluids (even though the doctor said I wasn’t at all dehydrated) and breathing deeply to draw in lots of air (even though my pulse ox this morning was 98, two points better than Barbara’s). I think the problem is that I’m still gradually recovering from pneumonia and still have some congestion in my lower lungs. And I will admit that I’m not drinking anywhere my normal 3 to 4 liters per day. For the last couple of weeks, it’s been more like one liter per day, and sometimes less.

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41 Responses to Sunday, 29 October 2017

  1. nick flandrey says:

    Um, forgive the e word, but the pinch test for dehydration is not definitive for the very young or the elderly…

    For a quick check you can try capillary refill in the nail bed, ie. pinch down on a finger nail until the nail bed goes white, then release. It should return to pink immediately. There is a similar test for gums, but I don’t use that one, so I don’t have any experience.

    Best way to monitor is color of urine, and frequency of peeing. Most healthy adults will pee about once an hour (depending on factors like being busy or focused on something) and if properly hydrated the urine will be clear or very light straw colored. This is also not definitive, because taking vitamin supplements and eating some foods will change the urine color and odor.

    I’d say, that in your case, your best indicator is the change from your normal activity, ie. you know you are drinking less than normal… assuming you are normally healthy and properly hydrated, something so different from your normal consumption would be a warning there might be something going one.

    On the other hand, your normal consumption seems high compared to mine, so your reduced consumption might put you back in the normal range for most people.

    You are probably your best judge, but be open to the idea something might not be right.

    n

  2. Robert Bruce Thompson says:

    Thanks. I know something is not right, but things seem to be improving.

  3. nick flandrey says:

    The other part of getting older is that it takes longer to heal than it used to.

    Just be sure to beat it, so it doesn’t linger on for months.

    n

  4. Greg Norton says:

    Right now, that’s mainly drinking lots of fluids (even though the doctor said I wasn’t at all dehydrated) and breathing deeply to draw in lots of air (even though my pulse ox this morning was 98, two points better than Barbara’s).

    We have a lot of experience with the non-invasive pulse-ox sensors from when my son was born as a 26 1/2 week preemie in 2001. I’m not sure about now, but state of the art at the time (Agilent) meant that the readings could be off as much as -5 due to a variety of factors, and the sensors degraded rapidly. The nurses in the NICU never got excited about my son’s readings until they were consistently below the 92 range.

    Take advantage of having access to a decent GP doctor. That guy and his wife had the good sense to get out of WA after only two years; it took me four to convince my wife that the Northwest experiment was a failure.

  5. Dave says:

    I am getting closer to abandoning my minimal support of the NFL. I’ve never been to an NFL game and only watch the Superbowl. I’m not happy with players kneeling during the national anthem, but that isn’t the only reason. The major reason why is that I have concluded that football is worse for it’s participants than boxing. I am tired of hearing about CTE (Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy). I think that NFL players have every right to play football, but I don’t want to encourage them to kill themselves.

  6. SteveF says:

    I don’t want to encourage them to kill themselves.

    Why on Earth not?

  7. CowboySlim says:

    WRT to professional football: Like baseball, the highest level of the professional league get their players from their minor league. For the NFL, their minor league is the NCAA with the “student athlete” characterization being 99% fraud.

    OK:
    What % really graduate with a bachelor’s degree?
    What is the average of the NCAA player’s GPAs?
    After 3 years of football, what % of the credits needed for graduation have been earned?
    etc? etc?

    Hey, don’t tell me about yards per carry and pass completion %, what about scholastic achievements?

  8. CowboySlim says:

    Oh yeah, who has more tattoos, college football players, mixed martial arts fighters or professional golfers?

  9. Paul H says:

    I’m pretty sure it isn’t the usual course of events, but my last doctor went through on a football scholarship and came out pretty competent. Have to agree with not supporting the head banging, etc.

  10. lynn says:

    “Texans plan pregame protest of Bob McNair’s comments”
    http://www.espn.com/nfl/story/_/id/21201419/houston-texans-players-protest-seahawks-game-wake-bob-mcnair-comment

    And I am out of here. The employees are not allowed to demonstrate on the owner’s property. The NFL can go fly a kite because I am not going to watch these crazy people anymore.

    That said, I will be watching Game 5 of the World Series tonight since my Astros are in it. I watched Game 4 last night at my neighbors house. He made us hamburgers and hot dogs so I had to have one of each. Channeling OFD, Meatspace ! BTW, this is neighbor that wants to get rid of the Electoral College and move to a pure Presidential election by raw votes.

    Now I get to go fix the leaky valve in my wellhouse. It is causing the well pump to run quite a bit.

  11. SteveF says:

    Meatspace

    Literally!

  12. MrAtoz says:

    BTW, this is neighbor that wants to get rid of the Electoral College and move to a pure Presidential election by raw votes.

    Ha ha! The latest Libturdian fantasy. If it happens (3/4 States change the Birdcage Liner), they’ll whine about cheating when they get their arses kicked in the popular vote. Cankles “won” by about 3 million votes. Less than 3% I think. President tRump was already getting more votes when douchenozzle Stein suckered them for money for WI recount.

  13. Greg Norton says:

    If it happens (3/4 States change the Birdcage Liner), they’ll whine about cheating when they get their arses kicked in the popular vote. Cankles “won” by about 3 million votes.

    Perkins Coie will need a lot more paralegals.

    Those “found in a car trunk” ballots don’t get filled out by magic … or real voters.

  14. SteveF says:

    Those “found in a car trunk” ballots don’t get filled out by magic … or real voters.

    Or for free. More fund-raising letters, stat!

  15. Ray Thompson says:

    What % really graduate with a bachelor’s degree?

    If the NCAA football players get a degree it is usually in Sports and Recreation Management. In other words, arranging picnic tables.

    When they interview some of the players you can hardly understand them for the afro-speak and the liberal sprinkling of “like” and “you know”. Most have been shuffled through school because they are athletic. If you asked most college football players what is 10% of $129.00 they would have no clue.

    I also don’t like the NCAA rules about players not getting paid. If some booster wants to give a player a new Corvette for playing at the boosters school what the hell business is that of the NCAA? Only the IRS should be concerned.

    Some of the rules are really stupid. Pat Summit’s son played basketball for a local school. His school was going to play Oliver Springs. Pat Summit had to stand in the hallway until the girls game was completed before she could enter the gym otherwise it would have been considered a recruiting trip. Watching a recruit play is against the rules, she can only watch film. Even though she was not recruiting anyone from the local school. And while she was in the gym watching her son play she was not allowed to talk to any girls basketball players or the girls basketball coach.

    A lot of colleges and universities are nothing more than sports programs with a school attached.

    my last doctor went through on a football scholarship and came out pretty competent

    That is not the norm. A very small fraction graduate with a degree that is worth anything and most are dumb as a rock.

  16. Lynn says:

    Man, 37 F to 73 F today. Took my dog out at 730am and all the roofs were frosted but good.

  17. lynn says:

    A lot of colleges and universities are nothing more than sports programs with a school attached.

    Got a list ?

  18. OFD says:

    Alive and sorta OK; Day 4 at the hospital, w/4th MRI tomorrow AM.

    Spinal Stenosis; being treated very well here by all. Managed to get up on my feet yesterday with a walker and actually shuffle along a bit with it today. Also, first shower today in over a week, sitting down and being washed by one young woman while two more looked on. They’d never seen a wet hairy Visigoth nekkid, and one of them braided my hair, too. (all true, not the meds)

    Should know more tomorrow but surgery and rehab are very likely and this week.

    Large spacious single room w/phone, wall-mount cable tee-vee, sinks, walk-in shower, wireless, sleep sofa for wife, who comes every day, and regular monitoring and meds.

    Two-hour yak-fest yesterday with 90-year-old fellow patient and WW2/Korea naval aviation veteran. Almost blind and in a wheelchair but sharp as a tack. Night LNA for a couple of days was an Army combat trauma medic in the Sandbox and obviously suffers from PTSD. We also had a good talk.

    VA apparently signed off for my treatment here and all is good so far.

    Pax vobiscum

  19. lynn says:

    Also, first shower today in over a week, sitting down and being washed by one young woman while two more looked on. They’d never seen a wet hairy Visigoth nekkid, and one of them braided my hair, too. (all true, not the meds)

    You haven’t lived until you are getting your privates shaved by 60 year old RN in preparation for heart cath with two other RNs and your wife giving helpful comments. They also shaved my chest in case the heart cath moved into a heart bypass surgery.

  20. OFD says:

    How on earth did they run that cath through you?? I guess that, indeed, I have not lived.

    Hats off!!!

  21. lynn says:

    Should know more tomorrow but surgery and rehab are very likely and this week.

    Here is hoping that they can fix most if not all of your problems. Good to see that you are outside the VA. Although, I am surprised that they could not help you, my previous experience is that the VA is very good in emergencies.

  22. lynn says:

    How on earth did they run that cath through you?? I guess that, indeed, I have not lived.

    Through the right leg groin artery up into the heart. I have pictures.

    Unless you mean Cat. Cath =Catheterization.

  23. SteveF says:

    You haven’t lived until you are getting your privates shaved by 60 year old RN

    … with Parkinson’s.

  24. OFD says:

    “…… with Parkinson’s.

    ….and shitfaced on bad tequila she used to wash down half a dozen reds….

  25. nick flandrey says:

    “Research shows that spine surgeries result in fewer complications when done by highly experienced surgeons. Don’t hesitate to ask about your surgeon’s experience with spinal stenosis surgery. If you have any doubts, get a second opinion.”

    Don’t let the new kid practice on you!

    Whatever you do, go in eyes open and committed. No matter what happens you’re better off if you were sure of your path.

    I hope they can resolve your issues and get you back on your feet. You were and are making some truly massive changes in your life, and they sound like positive ones. ‘Bout time you got a chance to enjoy and grow.

    best of luck,

    nick

  26. OFD says:

    My doc is extremely experienced with these and does them frequently. He’s ordered the multiple MRIs and the meds and word has it of his great success rate.

    I’m less worried about the surgery than I am about the rehab afterward.

    And my next-younger brother has told me for months to do this, having had several related back surgeries. He also listened on his scanner to the call about me, “64-year-old white male from xxx to xxx via ambulance last Thursday. Neighbors and family all praying for me, plus an older guy who stopped in the other day, independent and lone Christian preacher who comes through here.

    Thanks, Mr. nick, much.

  27. lynn says:

    Spinalstenosis

    I can’t find that in the dinosaur list. Is that a plant eater ?

  28. Nightraker says:

    spine-health.com puts anti stenosis surgery as pain free success 80% of the time. May the odds be ever in your favor!

    When shaving south of the border, hopefully they weren’t using a straight razor…

  29. lynn says:

    When shaving south of the border, hopefully they weren’t using a straight razor…

    Beard trimmer. No guard. Only nicked me 2 or 3 times.

  30. Nightraker says:

    “Beard trimmer. No guard. Only nicked me 2 or 3 times.”

    Egads!

  31. Miles_Teg says:

    DH and Lynn…

    Just be glad that SteveF wasn’t responsible for tidying you up Down There

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crutching#/media/File:Crutching2.JPG

    There can be slips, even though Steve is apparently very good at what he does.

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/rural/2017-09-28/lambs-for-slaughter-should-not-be-mulesed-says-sca/8996480

  32. brad says:

    @Ray: You asking about college athletes and their academic performance. Geez, this still pisses me of 35 years after I graduated. I had to work my own way through college, and I still vividly remember one semester: I had signed up for my courses and was standing in line to write a check for tuition.

    The guy in front of me was some athlete or other, handed over his registration form, and *they* handed *him* a check. WTF!

    The student athletes graduated, and with good GPAs. I think the athetic track led to a BA in business, but I’m not sure anymore. Anyway, the courses were basically segregated, but a couple of classmates somehow managed to sign up for one anyway. Show up (or not) and collect your ‘A’, what’s the problem?

    ———–

    @OFD: Best of luck with the surgery. Rehab? That’s “just” grit and determination, after a successful surgery.

  33. OFD says:

    ” Rehab? That’s “just” grit and determination, after a successful surgery.”

    That’s me, then, going back decades. But I have weak days, like the last minute this morning as I was being slid into the MRI torpedo tube. Needed that minute to get my mind right to deal with 35 minutes inside that beast for the fourth time. (Claustrophobia!)

    But no fear of young nubile women washing me in the shower.

  34. MrAtoz says:

    My prayers for a successful surgery Mr. OFD, buddy. Work hard in therapy afterwards and get home soon.

  35. Ray Thompson says:

    Needed that minute to get my mind right to deal with 35 minutes inside that beast for the fourth time.

    Indeed. When I have my MRI for my spine it was an uneasy experience. You are wedged into that machine, tight, shoulders squeezed, top of the tube just a couple inches from your nose. Loud machine. I had this fear I was going to get stuck. I normally don’t mind tight places it was just about all I could do to keep from freaking out. I was in for about 40 minutes which seemed like hours.

    I was also given a disc of the images when I got done. Sort of interesting to see the damage to my spine from when I dove into shallow water about 40 years earlier.

    Good luck Mr. OFD. Medical technology is amazing these days. They will either find a solution or kill you.

  36. brad says:

    I’m weird, I guess, no surprise to anyone. I found the MRI noise hypnotic, and nearly fell asleep.

  37. OFD says:

    Some of the MRI noise is hypnotic, and the rest sounds like terribly loud bits of Euro machine “music.” I have an eye mask, from which I do not peek, headphones w/music, except when they’re doing the head and neck areas. Plus I gotta have a dose of Ativan, which usually does the trick. Once I’m in, I count backwards the seconds I expect to be in there.

    It sucks, plain and simple. I fear the machine will malfunction and seal up both ends while sucking the air out.

  38. lynn says:

    It sucks, plain and simple. I fear the machine will malfunction and seal up both ends while sucking the air out.

    I had to hold my wife’s hand the entire time the last time that she was in a CAT or MRI scan (I’m not sure which it was, it was the big fat doughnut). She could not stay in it otherwise so I stood there for 45 minutes while she tried to break my fingers. Sucker was noisy !

  39. nick flandrey says:

    I do fall asleep. Loud noises, clicks and bangs, but the buzzing has me asleep in no time.

    Even when I had my arm above my head, wedged into the donut hole for shoulder pix, I fell asleep.

    Ear plugs, gotta have ’em to take the edge off. But beyond that, my brain says, “I’m safe here, it’s dark and warm, hmmmm buzzing…..”

    n

  40. Ray Thompson says:

    my brain says, “I’m safe here

    My brain says I am not safe as I may get stuck. The loud noises just make it worse.

    I suppose that is from my time on the farm when every spring we had to run a 6″ irrigation pipe under the road. We used a culvert to accommodate the pipe. But due to the way the land sloped on both sides it was necessary to install a pipe from each end and fasten them in the middle. This required entry into the pipe by a human, me as chosen by my uncle.

    It was a very tight fit crawling into the culvert that was being shared by the pipe. It was a concrete culvert and crawling in and out was difficult. I worked hard to suppress my fear as once I got stuck on the pipe latch. This required that I rip my clothes to extract myself and required some creative wiggling to get free. I damn near lost it and was close to panic on that incident. All my uncle did was yell at me the entire ordeal which consumed about two hours. The asshole jackass.

    Ever since then I have been very much in fear of tight enclosed spaces. MRI’s are particularly troublesome. Even the trip to the top of the St Louis arch was terrifying. Four people crammed into a small car not much larger than a bathtub inching the way to the top. I was sweating even though it was about 45 degrees.

  41. OFD says:

    I’m pretty much the same as Mr. Ray; it really, really sucks.

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