Thursday, 28 September 2017

08:56 – It was 63.1F (17.5C) when I took Colin out at 0700, mostly clear. Barbara is off this morning to volunteer at the historical society museum. I need to get my application to be an amateur radio volunteer examiner filled out and submitted today.

I finally ordered a shock collar for Colin yesterday. It allows a gradually escalating stimulus, from audio/visual to start with, up through an adjustable level of electric shock. One way or another, we are going to get him trained to come when he’s called, no matter how interested he is in something else.


I forgot to mention that we’d had our first real deep pantry fail. At least I think we did. We were running out of mayonnaise upstairs, so I brought up another jar. It was reasonably fresh. The best-by date on it was January, 2016. I just put it on the kitchen counter and didn’t think any more about it.

When Barbara was making sandwiches for lunch, she opened it. She called me into the kitchen and pointed out that the PET jar had dented in and that when she opened the jar that cardboard/foil seal over the mouth of the jar just came loose freely. The contents didn’t smell bad, exactly, but there was a moderate odor. So we pitched the jar.

That’s the first time we’ve ever encountered a problem with food that was packaged in a way that I’d consider LTS-grade.


Yesterday, we assembled the first set of steel shelves I’d ordered from Walmart. The only shipping damage was a minor dent to the corner of one of the fiberboard shelves. It’s a 2X4-foot shelf unit that’s six feet tall and has five shelves. It’s rated to support 4,000 pounds total, 800 pounds per shelf, but I have my doubts. The 2X4 fiberboard shelves are supported only along the four edges, with no cross-bracing. I’d be surprised if they didn’t sag, especially since the fiberboard is only about a quarter inch thick. If it becomes a problem, I’ll just replace the shelves with 3/8″ plywood.


We started watching a documentary about stone-age humans last night. The clan had a dog running around their huts, which again made me think of Neanderthals.

H. sapiens neanderthalensis was apparently superior in just about every way to us gracile H. sapiens sapiens. They were bigger than us, much stronger, and, given their much larger cranial capacities, almost certainly smarter than us as well. So the mystery is why they faded away while modern humans became the dominant primates on the planet.

I’ve always suspected it was because modern humans domesticated Canis lupus familiaris while Neanderthals did not. One on one, a sapiens was no match for a neanderthalensis, but one modern man with a dog easily overmatched a Neanderthal.

So, gradually, neanderthalensis faded out as a distinct sub-species and was incorporated into the muttly line of modern humans.

Or so I strongly suspect. And DNA testing on various modern human lines bears that out, I think.

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63 Responses to Thursday, 28 September 2017

  1. SteveF says:

    My theory is that H.sapiens thrived because they would fuck anything, and were able to produce offspring with any number of related species. H.neanderthalis was pickier and so they didn’t bring in genes from disparate sources, and so they succumbed to disease or habitat change or some other cause. I realize this is a controversial hypothesis, but with a multi-million dollar grant I’m willing to to investigate it, and I’m intellectually honest enough to admit I was wrong if the evidence does not support it.

  2. Greg Norton says:

    So the mystery is why they faded away while modern humans became the dominant primates on the planet.

    Neanderthals may have lacked what I can only describe as “weasel” behavior genetics, best exemplified by the antics of the Pointy Haired Boss from Dilbert … or the Republican establishment, especially this week.

  3. Robert Bruce Thompson says:

    “H.sapiens … H.neanderthalis”

    I see you’re in the camp that regards us as two separate species, while I consider sapiens sapiens and sapiens neanderthalensis to be sub-species of H. sapiens. If nothing else, the admixture of neanderthalensis and sapiens genes establishes pretty definitively that the two subspecies interbred and produced fertile offspring, which is still the hallmark that defines a species as far as I’m concerned.

  4. OFD says:

    My own theory concerning the Neanderthals is that H. Sapiens was much better at teaming up and operating as attack units, more vicious, cruel and deceptive, and also used the dogs and their language better. Probably also better at tool-making. I dunno if the larger cranial capacity automatically assumes more intelligence, but I, too, am willing to investigate it all via a multi-million-dollar grant and admit I’m wrong if it turns out that way. (not giving the money back, though…)

  5. SteveF says:

    I see you’re in the camp that regards us as two separate species

    No, not really. I just wanted to distinguish between the two populations. However, if I were to get a multi-million dollar grant, I’d be happy to research all the evidence and definitions and report on whether it’s two species, two subspecies of the same species, or something else.

    Too bad I didn’t think of this a few years ago. I could have put in something about global warming and been almost sure of getting some of those sweet, sweet government grant dollars.

  6. Robert Bruce Thompson says:

    “Neanderthals may have lacked what I can only describe as “weasel” behavior genetics”

    Maybe, but I doubt it. It seems that about 1% of modern humans are born psychopaths, and available data suggest that this is a pretty steady number across different population groups and across time.

    They aren’t a problem in clans, tribes, and similar small groups, because everyone quickly realizes what they are and is wary of them. They become a problem in modern societies, because it’s impossible for everyone to know everyone.

  7. Denis says:

    “I’ve always suspected it was because modern humans domesticated Canis lupus familiaris while Neanderthals did not.”

    So why did H.S. get friendly with dogs, while H.N. did not? If they were smarter, they ought to have seen the utility. Were Neanderthals *cat* people? (shudder)

  8. ~jim says:

    Take away your pie-in-the-sky notions of miilion dollar grants, and just give me a nickel for every tadpole, snake, or whatever I brought home in those glass mayo jars! A dollar to doughnuts the lids fit a standard Mason jar.

    BTW, how did they become known as “Mason jars”?

  9. OFD says:

    IIRC, cats back then were a tad larger than felinus domesticus or whatever their name is, and also much more dangerous. Shit, now I have to look it up….

    ….Felis silvestris catus or Felis catus

    Yep, shoulda known from the cartoon of a million years ago.

  10. OFD says:

    WRT Mason jars (I had the Wikipedia page still open…)

    “A Mason jar, named after John Landis Mason who first invented and patented it in 1858…”

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mason_jar

  11. Robert Bruce Thompson says:

    “So why did H.S. get friendly with dogs, while H.N. did not?”

    Back in my younger days, I used to time-travel a lot. On one trip back to about 28,000 BCE, I discovered the answer to that question. A group of early modern humans had come across a den of weened C. lupus pups that had been orphaned. The men in the group were going to kill them, since they’d grow up to be wolves. The women put their collective foot down (Oh, look. Aren’t they adorable?) and adopted the pups. For a hundred generations, they bred out the undesirable wild traits and selected for those that ended up turning the wolves into dogs.

  12. dkreck says:

    @RBT wrt:psycopaths
    They aren’t a problem in clans, tribes, and similar small groups, because everyone quickly realizes what they are and is wary of them. They become a problem in modern societies, because it’s impossible for everyone to know everyone.

    Is that why we elect so many?

  13. Robert Bruce Thompson says:

    Yep. To a close approximation, 100% of the elected officials at the state level and above are psychopaths.

  14. JimL says:

    Big ERP migration starting today. I have the best team available working on it, but I’m still nervous about it. We’re ready, and it’s going to go fine.

    But I’m going to be busy as heck for a while.

  15. Denis says:

    A question for the peanut gallery, if I may:

    This Daynotes Journal and the late Dr Pournelle’s “view/mail” are the (only) two websites that I visit every day, without fail. I like the intelligent, but sometimes quirky, topics, and the interesting links and comments: especially the favourable signal/noise ratio. Can anyone suggest another site or sites that might start to fill the Pournelle void in the interwebs? Where did his commenters and contributors go, for example?

    Thanks.

  16. Robert Bruce Thompson says:

    Good question. I’d imagine a lot of them are kind of stumbling around wondering what to do with themselves. They’d be welcome here, of course, but I haven’t noticed any increase in traffic or new commenters.

  17. brad says:

    Yep, fiber board or particle board (MDF) shelves will inevitably sag. Real wood won’t. It’s not only irritating, it can be downright dangerous if something falls over. I tend to use 18mm (3/4″) boards, when building shelves myself, because I’m paranoid and wood is cheap.

    From what I’ve read of the Neanderthals, I think the theory is that they were much more loners, with a much less-developed social structure. Smarter, stronger, but loners who could be overwhelmed by a tribe. Which may, of course, also mean that they were not interested in cooperating with Canis Lupus.

    Training a dog to come reliably to his name: Almost entirely positive reinforcement (treats), and lots of practice, every day, for all sorts of reasons, or no reason at all. My wife trains dogs (or, rather, she trains owners) – she would say *no* negative reinforcement, because it can be so easily misunderstood, as in: my owner calls my name, and *ouch*.

    @JimL: Good luck. I’ve done a lot of migrations (only for small companies). There’s always something…hopefully your something will be easily slain.

    @Denis: I don’t know of any place like this. There are some blogs that I read regularly, but the comments are sparse and rarely interesting. Certainly nothing like this group here. FWIW: the blogs I’d recommend are Borepatch, Smallest Minority, Coyote Blog, Popehat, Bayou Renaissance Man, Status 451 and TechnoLlama. Some of them don’t post very often, but what they have to say is usually worth reading.

  18. JLP says:

    “Back in my younger days, I used to time-travel a lot.”

    WANTED: Someone to go back in time with me. This is not a joke. You’ll get paid when we get back. Must bring your own weapons. Safety not guaranteed. I have only done this once before.

    So it was you who placed that ad?

  19. lynn says:

    Over The Hedge, “World Ending”
    http://www.gocomics.com/overthehedge/2017/09/28

    “I thought that when the world ended that there would be more screaming”.

    Me too.

  20. OFD says:

    “…100% of the elected officials at the state level and above are psychopaths.”

    I’d wanna narrow down that definition a bit; I think almost all of them are narcissists, to one degree or another. They may not have gotten enough love and attention as chillunz and now they’re by Jeezum gonna get it! Some of them have that behavioral trait to an extreme, esp. the ones that get to the national levels, and a certain percentage are what Ann Barnhardt has termed “diabolical narcissists.” Examples of the latter would be Cankles, Hitler, Stalin, et. al. Yes, I know. She’s not up at that level of evil but not for lack of trying.

    Pretty simple, really; doesn’t take Freud or Jung or Adler. And they can be found at the upper levels of lots of organizations, too. Iaccoca, Gates, Zuckerberg, the commie clowns who run Goolag, Larry Ellison, et. al.

  21. OFD says:

    WRT time travel:

    Places and times you don’t wanna set the dial for:

    1.) Worcester, MA, 1953

    2.) Tudor London, circa 1525-1600, whether Catholic, Protestant or atheist

    3.) Central Maffachufetts 1672-73

    4.) Northeast Maffachufetts, 1692-93

    5.) Moscow, 1917-present

    5.) Cambodia, 1975-80

    6.) San Francisco, 1906

    7.) France, 1789-present

    8.) Germany, 1914-present

    9.) Turkey, 1913-present

    10.) Hama, Syria, 1982

  22. lynn says:

    I finally ordered a shock collar for Colin yesterday. It allows a gradually escalating stimulus, from audio/visual to start with, up through an adjustable level of electric shock. One way or another, we are going to get him trained to come when he’s called, no matter how interested he is in something else.

    Does that work with crapping on the gameroom floor while I am in the shower ? I am going to get Toby trained not to crap in the house somehow. And I took him out twice before I took my shower this morning.

  23. JimL says:

    Put him in a kennel when you’re in the shower. Then take him out when you’re done. They’ll hold it until they get out of confinement.

    I disagree about negative reinforcement. If you can catch them in the act, punishment is warranted. After the fact you can show them the problem and scold, but not punish.

    Those two things have always worked for me. But only with dogs. Cats are best left with people that can stand them.

  24. OFD says:

    My cats do what I tell them.

    And right now they’re on their way to your house, yes, I’m looking at YOU, Mr. JimL. You will be scolded AND punished for your snarkiness.

  25. Greg Norton says:

    Pretty simple, really; doesn’t take Freud or Jung or Adler. And they can be found at the upper levels of lots of organizations, too. Iaccoca, Gates, Zuckerberg, the commie clowns who run Goolag, Larry Ellison, et. al.

    Delorean was much more off the deep end than Iacocca, but “Chairman Lee” was pretty bad, inflicting the K-cars and original generation Caravan on the American public. At least Iacocca didn’t turn to selling coke to save Chrysler … that we know about. 🙂

    The last NPR-produced “Best of Car Talk” airs this weekend. Back when I was in school in the mid-80s, I remember Click and Clack getting into a lot of trouble after the older brother dropped the line (paraphrasing, probably), “It is a good thing that the Chrysler minivan has six seats. That way, when that lemon of an engine breaks, you have five guys to help you push the van uphill.”

  26. lynn says:

    “It is a good thing that the Chrysler minivan has six seats. That way, when that lemon of an engine breaks, you have five guys to help you push the van uphill.”

    The engine was just fine. I finally rebuilt the engine when it was happily burning a quart of oil every 300 miles at 110K miles. The people behind me were not so happy. It was the automatic transmission that was junk, mine blew up three times before the 100K warranty ran out.

  27. lynn says:

    Put him in a kennel when you’re in the shower. Then take him out when you’re done. They’ll hold it until they get out of confinement.

    I disagree about negative reinforcement. If you can catch them in the act, punishment is warranted. After the fact you can show them the problem and scold, but not punish.

    Good idea. He has a large crate that we use when we are gone. And I agree on negative reinforcement after the fact. Dogs live in the now, the past is gone forever to them.

    Our 14 lb Siamese male is just fine. He usually heads outside to handle his business but there is a litter box inside for him. We have a medium sized doggy door in the back door that he goes in and out of about every hour of the night.

  28. SteveF says:

    Places and times you don’t wanna set the dial for:

    1.) Worcester, MA, 1953

    Not to worry, Mr OFD, I won’t make you call me Dad.

  29. MrAtoz says:

    Some good news on my skin cancer. The biopsy came back as Actinic Keratosis, a possible precursor to cancer. No treatment right now. I’ve an appointment in six weeks for a checkup. They may spray it with liquid nitrogen to kill any possible cancer cells.

  30. Greg Norton says:

    It was the automatic transmission that was junk, mine blew up three times before the 100K warranty ran out.

    In a few years, minivan transmissions will be entertaining again when the CVT in the Nissan NV200 and 9 speed in the Ram ProMaster City start to get a little mileage on them. The people driving behind those probably won’t be happy either.

    Sadly, Click and Clack won’t be around to console the unlucky buyers.

  31. lynn says:

    I am returning the Pet Ramp that I bought for Lady. It is just too steep and slippery for her to get on the couch with. I may give it a 1 star on Amazon.
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B006I8LLGK/

    I previously bought the two step pet stairs for her. She vastly prefers the stairs.
    https://www.amazon.com/Pet-Gear-Stairs-200-pounds-Chocolate/dp/B00CGYE0IQ/

  32. Robert Bruce Thompson says:

    @MrAtoz

    Congratulations. You must be very relieved.

    Of course, what with what you used to do for a living, this might not be the first bullet you’ve dodged.

  33. OFD says:

    “Not to worry, Mr OFD, I won’t make you call me Dad.”

    That was the year of the very deadly tornado; I’ve seen old Super-8 vid clips of it. Eerie shit to watch; sky turns yellow and then black. Later, after it’s left a swath of death and destruction behind it, it’s rolling east across the landscape and the last shot of it that I saw, it was actually white. A fucking white tornado!

    I was born in New Bedford a month later, at St. Luke’s Hospital, within sight and salt smell of the hahbuh. Well over eight pounds.

    Stalin croaked that year and went to Hell, and we had an armistice in Korea. Record heat wave in NYC.

  34. paul says:

    My ‘net connection has been flaky. It pretty much quit last Thursday although the Kindle (w/0 Whispernet) would download most e-mail. Web? Forget it.

    When I called on the 19th I told them the previous repairman said “tell them 50 ft. mast and 2 man crew”. So who showed up this past Monday? One guy. Who talked to someone mere customers can’t talk to and was told “it’s not sending”. Duh. I already told them that.

    Hey, when I did my MCSE I missed 2 questions on the Network Essentials test. I’m not a genius but I’m not a dummy.

    I was told on Monday to tell the two man crew to aim at Post Mountain and use a Ubiquiti dish.

    So now, today. A different guy. I gave him the message. He drops the mast and replaced the old Motorola Canopy and dish with something that looked similar but painted dark gray. He had that pushed up by himself before the second guy showed up. Not much signal….

    Down it all came again. New stuff off and a Ubiquti device, that looks like a PowerBeam was installed. Not sure which model… tiny thing with a 12 inch dish.

    Instead of speed hovering a bit above 2Mbps on a good day (like, 5AM), 1.3Mbps usually and 60+ms latency from the tower by DPS, I have a pretty solid 3Mbps and about 20 to 30ms latency from Post Mountain.

    Seems pretty “snappy”. Actually, the best it has ever been.

    They have faster plans. I will check on the options. The “rich folks” out by the lake can get 15Mbps speed.

    And to get totally strange…. this morning the Kindle had downloaded a lot of mail and deleted stuff I’ve deleted using my phone. Huh. So I checked mail on my PC and what the heck, everything is acting normal. It drizzled rain yesterday.

  35. lynn says:

    Instead of speed hovering a bit above 2Mbps on a good day (like, 5AM), 1.3Mbps usually and 60+ms latency from the tower by DPS, I have a pretty solid 3Mbps and about 20 to 30ms latency from Post Mountain.

    Too bad you cannot get a 10 – 12 Mbps DSL line. I like our balanced DSL lines here at the office “in the sticks”. Works well for us. 56 ms to my webserver in Pittsburgh, PA.

  36. nick flandrey says:

    Some people failed to stockpile a critical prep:

    http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2017-09-28/bill-dudley-rescue-new-york-fed-says-puerto-rico-has-plenty-hand

    “Cash demand spiked in the first few days after the hurricane as merchants were unable to accept other modes of payment. First BanCorp, one of the island’s largest banks, said that nearly two-thirds of its 48 branches remained closed, and that electronic transactions had resumed at only 25% of its ATMs. ”

    “Furthermore, looting has become increasingly common across the island, increasing the danger that deliveries of cash could be intercepted by bands of robbers.”

    n

  37. OFD says:

    I was gassing the cah earlier this afternoon and the gas pump had some blonde floozie informing me that shitloads of food, water and meds were stuck parked at the PR ports, not going anywhere. They went to a commercial and by then I had my gas, so never got the reason why.

  38. nick flandrey says:

    the roads suck, there is a lack of trucks and diesel, and probably the security situation is still fluid.

    n

  39. OFD says:

    An overhead aerial shot showed hundreds of trucks and containers sitting in a vast parking lot. So probably no fuel; who’da thunk it? That a big fleet of trucks would need fuel.

    “Security situation.” Yeah, I bet it’s wicked fluid. So why aren’t the 82nd and 101st Airborne on the ground with a division of Marines? Do ColAtoz and I have to re-up and go down there ourselves or WTF, over?

  40. MrAtoz says:

    The Pussy Communist Act or something like that prevents Active Duty going in ’cause they would have to shoot all the looters.

  41. pcb_duffer says:

    RBT: I left a comment last evening, which does not show up. It wasn’t especially important, but do you know why it went to the great bit bucket in the sky?

  42. OFD says:

    …prevents Active Duty going in ’cause they would have to shoot all the looters.”

    So send in Guard or Reserve units. Jeez. Who’s in charge of this latest clusterfuck, anyway? They’re Murkan citizens; can’t they get treated the same as Texans and Floridians? i.e, shabbily? Instead of terribly? No one thought to ship fuel for the damn trucks? Or provide security for cash moving around? Jesus wept.

    Do I have to run the whole fucking country or what? This is pure common sense!!!

  43. SteveF says:

    Posse comitatus prevents US military troops from being used as law enforcement* within the United States. Puerto Rico is not a state, therefore by definition it is not within the United States, therefore the act doesn’t apply.

    * Very roughly speaking

  44. Nick Flandrey says:

    @pcb_d I looked and there aren’t any comments in spam or waiting for approval…

    Sometimes they just go missing. If I’ve written a lot, I always do Ctrl-A, Ctrl-C before I hit ‘post’, so I have it on the clipboard if something happens.

    n

  45. SteveF says:

    No one thought to ship fuel for the damn trucks? Or provide security for cash moving around?

    Does anyone seriously believe that, without the constant support of the US government, Puerto Rico would be anything other than a typical, and typically inept, Latin American kleptocracy? Virtually indistinguishable from a typical African or Middle Eastern inept kleptocracy?

    I was to guess, I’d guess that money for diesel and other emergency needs was in the budget some years ago. The money was probably first actually spent on the diesel, but the diesel was stolen or diverted to another vaguely lawful purpose. Then the diesel was never purchased and the money was stolen or diverted. Then the budgeted money was reduced, then reduced again, with the budgeted amount being redirected into some favored party’s pocket. I don’t know for sure that’s the way it happened, but I’d be willing to place a small wager on it if I got good enough odds.

  46. Ed says:

    @OFD: Here you go, boots on the ground. I’ve seen some speculation that the brass has been asleep, what with the Comfort just getting underway now.

    https://news.usni.org/2017/09/27/kearsarge-sailors-and-marines-help-start-hurricane-maria

    https://news.usni.org/2017/09/25/navy-marine-corps-providing-around-clock-hurricane-maria-relief

  47. lynn says:

    Does anyone seriously believe that, without the constant support of the US government, Puerto Rico would be anything other than a typical, and typically inept, Latin American kleptocracy? Virtually indistinguishable from a typical African or Middle Eastern inept kleptocracy?

    I was to guess, I’d guess that money for diesel and other emergency needs was in the budget some years ago. The money was probably first actually spent on the diesel, but the diesel was stolen or diverted to another vaguely lawful purpose. Then the diesel was never purchased and the money was stolen or diverted. Then the budgeted money was reduced, then reduced again, with the budgeted amount being redirected into some favored party’s pocket. I don’t know for sure that’s the way it happened, but I’d be willing to place a small wager on it if I got good enough odds.

    Sounds like any big city in the USA now. Anytime anything happens, they go running to the feddies for help. Houston is one of the better ones and they have all of kinds of financial issues due to the highly underfunded employee pension plans.

    And the USA as a total in 10 to 20 years when the Dollar fails.

  48. Greg Norton says:

    I was gassing the cah earlier this afternoon and the gas pump had some blonde floozie informing me that shitloads of food, water and meds were stuck parked at the PR ports, not going anywhere. They went to a commercial and by then I had my gas, so never got the reason why.

    The “Gas Station TV” network is already getting old. Filling up today, the volume was so loud that I had to resist the urge to tape over the speaker at the pump. Even an older gas station in rural Texas (Jerrell) had the fancy new equipment with the video “feature”.

    I usually have packing tape in my car for shipping EBay sales. A few layers would probably muffle the newsmuppet sufficiently.

  49. OFD says:

    Thanks for that update, Ed. (I know better than to say “Mr. Ed.”)

    It’s kind of odd with PR; not a state, but Murkan citizens. They serve in the Armed Forces, for petesakes. Well, this is gonna roll for a long time, anyway, just as in TX and FL. My money would be on a lot of huge players moving their enterprises to safer and higher ground away from hurricane zones.

    “And the USA as a total in 10 to 20 years when the Dollar fails.”

    I see a shorter timetable for the dollar failing, more like five to ten years, but a much longer timetable for us becoming anything like the tropical hell-holes. Maybe in some cities and areas that are already hell-holes. They’ll get worse, of course.

    And Vermont won’t escape some of the flying excrement, either; this state gets a LOT of Fed dollars to keep chit up and running. When that disappears, we’ll be back to circa 1900 dairy farms, apple orchards, commercial maritime traffic, and maybe, with any luck and some engineering assistance, the trains and the steam power plants.

    I’ll be counseling those peeps sucked in by booze and dope, esp. vets and cops, and running various networks. Assuming I don’t fall backwards down the stairs here and check out via skull fracture or broken neck.

  50. OFD says:

    “I usually have packing tape in my car for shipping EBay sales. A few layers would probably muffle the floozie sufficiently.”

    Good idea, except for surveillance cams catching you damaging private property. Gotta be a slick electronic method….yes, I have been startled more than once by these annoying blaring voices coming out of the frigging gas pumps.

    Wait, you do eBay sales, too?

  51. Nightraker says:

    “I have been startled more than once by these annoying blaring voices coming out of the frigging gas pumps”

    Wouldn’t be SO bad if you could change the channel. OTOH, 500 channels and nothing worth watching. 🙂

  52. Ray Thompson says:

    So probably no fuel; who’da thunk it?

    Nope. No drivers.

    Wouldn’t be SO bad if you could change the channel.

    Too bad they don’t show the pussy channel. The lines would be backed up on to the street. No one buying gas, just watching.

  53. OFD says:

    500 channels on the cable hookup and zero worth watching, least of all Comrade Burns’s latest agitprop caper.

    And the nabobs in PR couldn’t find any drivers anywhere? No one thought of that, either? Jesus wept.

    Oh yeah, not only puss channels but gay, too, and “alternative” stuff. Lines backed up around the block, but I think the pump has to be activated or stay activated for that.

  54. ech says:

    Can anyone suggest another site or sites that might start to fill the Pournelle void in the interwebs?

    I like the blog that Megan McArdle writes over at Bloomberg 2-3 times per week. Many good commenters there.

  55. Nick Flandrey says:

    “Nope. No drivers.”

    Houston had this problem with the ARC… our EMgmt boss, Judge Ed Emmett just said, F that, here’s some guys to drive.

    http://www.houstonpress.com/news/the-red-cross-had-a-lot-of-rules-during-harvey-that-harris-county-was-disinclined-to-follow-9816085

    “Shelters were popping up all over the city and county as faith-based leaders and schools and just regular folks opened up their doors to help. The Red Cross had both supplies and volunteers. Couldn’t the organization get both of those key resources over to these locations in need?

    The answer, she would find, was unfortunately no.

    “They didn’t necessarily have the trucks to deliver the supplies,” said Christensen, who was in charge of organizing many of the deliveries to shelters. “When they did get the trucks, they didn’t have the drivers. It would take 24 to 36 hours to even get people approved to man the shelters and get them there. Well, we didn’t have that kind of time in this emergency.””


    Harris County officials found the trucks to deliver the supplies, found the drivers — including Harris County Clerk Stan Stanart — and, when the Red Cross said it could take up to 72 hours to perform background checks on volunteers to staff the many shelters, the county found volunteers, too.

    “I told them we weren’t gonna do that,” Harris County Judge Ed Emmett said of the background checks. “I broke every bureaucratic rule in the book. Were all these people licensed truck drivers? I don’t know — but we had to get this done.”

    Yeah, fuck the red cross. Jerry’s first law is in full effect. They are in the business of raising money, not Emgmt, let them get funded as a business.

    n

    (and the Spring Valley shelter mentioned in the article was down the street and where I took my supplies- which by the time I got there, weren’t needed.)

  56. Greg Norton says:

    Good idea, except for surveillance cams catching you damaging private property. Gotta be a slick electronic method….yes, I have been startled more than once by these annoying blaring voices coming out of the frigging gas pumps.

    I could always use one of those “Coexist” stickers, but that would probably be worse than the tape in rural Texas.

    Wait, you do eBay sales, too?

    Our first year in Vantucky, I sold a bunch of things on EBay to pay rent when my wife did not receive her first real check until nearly three months into the job.

    Since then, I still do an occasional sale, and I generally have tape and a Priority Mail box in the back of my car.

  57. SteveF says:

    Not like us. While civilized humans try to rebuild Houston, or at least just get on with the basic productivity of making a living, barbarians and stupid animals wreck everything around them.

  58. Nick Flandrey says:

    I’m not longer shocked by the barbarous acts. I’m shocked by the arrogant stupidity. Blinding stupidity. POSTING your own video. That level of stupid shocks me. How the F do these ‘people’ manage to get out of bed and dressed by themselves?

    As the degeneracy increases, it looks like the drug culture all over. I used to see people, even reasonably smart people, get in trouble over pot. They simply seemed to have forgotten that it was illegal.

    Now horrifying acts of violence are getting the same treatment. Rape? Torture? Looting? Arson? Assault? Better film ourselves and share with the world…..

    n

  59. Nick Flandrey says:

    A quick and easy overview of hemorrage control presented clearly.

    https://cops.usdoj.gov/pdf/Hemorrhage_Control_Eastman.pdf

  60. pcb_duffer says:

    Thanks, Nick. My comment wasn’t important, just an observation from Admiral Hopper and a critique of my POS Honeywell digital thermostat.

  61. Robert Bruce Thompson says:

    I checked before I saw Nick’s message, and found no sign that your comment was ever posted. I’m not sure what happened. But the database includes nearly 90,000 comments, so I guess it’s not surprising that one disappears into the aether every once in a while. Sorry.

  62. lynn says:

    “I told them we weren’t gonna do that,” Harris County Judge Ed Emmett said of the background checks. “I broke every bureaucratic rule in the book. Were all these people licensed truck drivers? I don’t know — but we had to get this done.”

    I am reminded of the kid in New Orleans during Katrina who “borrowed” a school bus and drove it to Houston along with 40 or 50 XXXXX 50 to 70 people to the big shelter in Reliant Stadium. He raised gas money from his passengers so they could make it.
    http://www.chron.com/news/hurricanes/article/Bus-comandeered-by-renegade-refugees-first-to-1932813.php

    And a picture:
    https://i.imgur.com/YAWsMb8.jpeg

    That is some desperate and tired looking people.

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