Thursday, 15 June 2017

09:21 – It was 64.5F (18C) when I took Colin out around 0640 this morning, clear, bright, and calm. It’s already up to 82.3F (28C).

Barbara has to run down to Elkin this morning to pick up the beer for the charity golf event. She’ll make a supermarket run on her way back, since she’s booked solid tomorrow. Then we’ll spend some time this afternoon building more science kit subassemblies.

I’m taking the Technician and General Class amateur radio exams next week, so I need to get serious about preparing for them. So far, I’ve been coasting on my memories from being a ham radio operator 50 years ago. Obviously, some stuff has changed since then.

So yesterday I decided to visit HamExam.org and take the practice tests. I started with the Techician Exam, for which I have the official ARRL manual but haven’t read it yet. I took the test three times and averaged 33 of 35 questions correct. Passing is 26 correct. Then I decided to give the General Exam a try. I ran through it three times as well, and averaged 30 of 35 correct, with 26 again the passing score. That’s just not good enough. So I intend to spend some time over the coming weekend reading the ARRL books and studying the exam questions, for which the correct answers are provided. I’ve never failed a test in my life, and it would be embarrassing for this to be the first.

More email from Lisa overnight. She’d mentioned earlier that she intended to continue building their deep pantry until they reached at least a one-year supply of food and asked what she should focus on next. She has a Sawyer PointZeroTwo water filter on order as well as a supply of HTH. They have a wood stove, for which she just ordered another two cords of firewood, which is to be delivered in the next few days. They have a couple portable radios and several flashlights and lanterns, with a decent supply of batteries. They have a reasonably good first-aid kit, and none of them are on any critical medications.

About the only thing they’re really short on is defensive weapons. They own two .22 rifles and an old 12-gauge shotgun, but not much ammo for them. None of them other than her sons has shot at all for at least 10 or 15 years, and only her husband and father-in-law have ever so much as fired the shotgun. They bought the .22 rifles for her sons when they did an Appleseed course or similar a couple of years ago.

I suggested to Lisa that she should first find a local gun club or range and get all six of them signed up for a beginner class in gun safety. Then head for Walmart or whatever and buy a hundred rounds of buckshot for their shotgun and six bricks of .22 ammo, one for each of them. Then get each of them out to the range for several sessions and shoot 500 rounds each at targets. Then we can talk more about what defensive firearms they should buy.

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61 Responses to Thursday, 15 June 2017

  1. CowboySlim says:

    Oh-oh, more gun control needed in Baltimore – 6 killed in less than 24 hours.
    http://baltimore.cbslocal.com/2017/06/14/baltimore-homicides/

    Or, should the mayor and DA resume prosecuting cops?

  2. Dave Hardy says:

    63 here with sun and blue skies.

    Sounds like Lisa & family are on the right track; agreed with firearms recommendations.

    Ballmore needs to crack down on fanatic gun owners immediately and strengthen gun laws and make more gun laws and ordinances, and also persecute and prosecute their violent and dangerous police force and weed out the majority of criminal fascist white thugs.

    They’re heading the same way as Detroit and Chicongo; failed cities with increasingly larger no-go areas.

  3. pcb_duffer says:

    [snip] Or, should the mayor and DA resume prosecuting cops? [snip]

    When the cops do wrong, they absolutely should be prosecuted. Otherwise, they’re just a well armed gang wearing blue, who have extraordinary powers over the lives of citizens.

  4. Robert Bruce Thompson says:

    Only six in one day in Baltimore? That sounds like a pretty safe place in a country that sees 93 million Americans shot and killed every day.

  5. dkreck says:

    Heading for a heat wave. Today a mere 91F but then 97, 101, 107 and 111 on Monday. Lows near 80. Lots of pool time.

  6. nick flandrey says:

    Oh my, lotta hypocrisy from the right in the past day. Some thoughts for the interweb commentariat…

    BOTH SIDES are calling for killing politicians. Are calling, have called, whatever. Once again, like BLM, our opposition is actually doing it. This is what it looks like folks. Don’t act so surprised.

    What else is “Lampost, rope, politician- some assembly required” or “soap box, ballot box, cartridge box” or “you are updating your local accountability files, right?”

    Learn some lessons from it. Decide if this is really the path you want. See the response from the public? No, they are not gonna cheer for you.

    nick

  7. Robert Bruce Thompson says:

    No one in his right mind wants to see a shooting civil war, but it’s not a matter of what we want; it’s a matter of what’s going to happen. Maybe not this year or next. Maybe not even for five or ten years or more. But there is, in my estimation, a very high probability that it will happen at some point.

    I wouldn’t shed a tear if every prog politician died today, but I sure don’t want to see a shooting war. The problem with civil wars is the outcomes are unpredictable. Well, actually not. It’s a very rare civil war that doesn’t leave people worse off in every respect relative to the starting point. Civil wars are anything but.

    And I don’t hate all progs. I actually have friends who voted for Obama and Clinton. Most of them are very bright and well-educated in normal terms. But few of them read history, and none of them have any appreciation for what progressivism ALWAYS leads to. They think Venezuela is an exception, and it’s useless to point out the hundreds or thousands of other examples of how progressivism always ends the same way.

    These are all good, caring people. They’ve simply been misled, intentionally by the prog leadership. I don’t want to see them dead. Heinlein summed it up well: “Most people can’t think, most of the remainder won’t think, the small fraction who do think mostly can’t do it very well.”

  8. Dave Hardy says:

    “These are all good, caring people. They’ve simply been misled, intentionally by the prog leadership.”

    The problem is that I don’t see any signs whatsoever of the prog and SJW elements, including politicians, and those …very bright and well-educated…” people wising up and backing off their persecution of and contempt for us Normals. If they remain willfully ignorant of history and an accurate accounting of current events, then I have zero sympathy for them. The information is available but they absolutely refuse to countenance any views but their own “enlightened” ones. So be it.

    “Well this sums it up.”

    If this is what they truly want, they will rue the day. The thing is, though, besides defending ourselves against lunatics out here, we need to take the fight to these professors and politicians and celebs and take them out. Before it widens into another big-ass civil war.

  9. dkreck says:

    And the mentally ill take over. He can’t even shave his lip but he’s a girls (says he)…

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EwlKwuC6LkE&feature=youtu.be

  10. Robert Bruce Thompson says:

    Ayup. First they talked about killing us. Now they’re actually doing it. We Normals are a patient bunch, but enough is enough. Don’t give an inch. In fact, take back all those miles we already gave them.

  11. ech says:

    Took a technician exam on the site linked above. Got 29 correct, all but two of the misses were on regulatory stuff – what’s allowed on certain bands, etc. The electronics misses were on some RF design stuff, which I never studied in grad school – I was on the digital track, and the intro electronics course I took before grad school didn’t cover RF.

    I’ve given some thought on taking pistol lessons. Not so much for home defense, but because I enjoyed it when I did it years ago. There are a number of shooting ranges here in Houston that look interesting. I was surprised at how cheap I could rent a pistol at one (Athena gun club) for use on their indoor range.

  12. DadCooks says:

    Yesterday I sighted a Honda CRV with an “Obama and Biden” bumper sticker.

    Right there is a sign of how F’d Up things are. If you have a any Republican/Conservative stickers on your vehicle you can be assured that your vehicle will at best be keyed and at worst have it tires slashed and/or a window broken.

    Why is hate/violence/bigotry/racism okay and encouraged by the Progs/SJWs/snowflakes, and why do the Progs/SJWs/snowflakes say the source of all hate/violence/bigotry/racism are the Republicans/Conservatives/Deplorables?

    Just a rhetorical question, but I defy anyone to come up with an answer. Even more so come up with a solution other than wiping the slate clean of all ????.

    Today is dark and cloudy. Fits my mood perfectly.

    Be prepared. Preparedness is a journey not a destination.

  13. Dave Hardy says:

    They have long enjoyed and used the tactic of accusing us of what they themselves are guilty of; this is known as “projection.” You project your guilt via accusations onto someone else.

    Obviously it is they who are hateful, bigoted, racist and violent, and they accuse us of it. The idiots and cretins who are gulled by this tactic are legion. And as RBT has said, even well-educated peeps fall for it, apparently, being largely unread and ahistorical.

    To paraphrase an older and probably more controversial aphorism:

    The lefty cries as he strikes you.

  14. Greg Norton says:

    Right there is a sign of how F’d Up things are. If you have a any Republican/Conservative stickers on your vehicle you can be assured that your vehicle will at best be keyed and at worst have it tires slashed and/or a window broken.

    WA and OR west of the Cascades along with the Columbia Gorge are Prog territory.

    IMHO it will only get worse in a SHTF scenario.

  15. lynn says:

    “Putin offers political asylum to Comey”
    http://thehill.com/blogs/blog-briefing-room/news/337907-putin-offers-asylum-to-comey

    Oh man, Putin gets it. Some days, Putin is totally cool.

  16. Dave says:

    So I’ve decided that I need to know more than I do now about HTML, CSS and PHP among other Internet technologies. Since many here know more than I do about them, I thought I’d ask you a few questions:

    1. Are there any resources you would recommend to help me learn more?
    2. Are there any key technologies I left off the list?

  17. Robert Bruce Thompson says:

    Real programmers need only 1’s and 0’s.

  18. Harold says:

    Some days, Putin is totally cool.

    Agree, but that doesn’t mean I like or agree with Putin, who is a cold blooded authoritarian killer, but I do respect him. We can respect our enemies if they deserve it.

    “Rommel you magnificent bastard”

  19. Dave says:

    Real programmers need only 1’s and 0’s.

    LOL! Real programmers use the right language and tools for the task at hand. Whether that’s octal or hexadecimal digits, assembly language or one of the newfangled higher level languages.

    I once wrote a small program in Barbaric And Sadistic Instruction Code to load a string of hexadecimal bytes into memory, but I’ve never had to use binary. I did once have to explain to a more senior coworker that starting a constant in C with a zero meant it was an octal constant not a decimal one. But the only time I use ones and zeros is for bitmasks.

  20. dkreck says:

    Try here – there is also html and css sites

    http://www.php.net/

  21. Harold says:

    Looks like summer has come to Memphis .
    Next 10 days forecast has highs in the 90’s and lows in the 70’s humidity in the 80’s.
    I can’t wait to flee this miserable place. 264 days till retirement.
    Watched the evening news yesterday, something I rarely do, three stories about kids being shot in road rage, drive by, and while sitting in her bedroom. Followed by the regular litany of # of persons killed in the last 24 hours (3 yesterday – not counting the kids). Half the people here just don’t care about life, their own, their kids, or anyone else’s.

  22. Harold says:

    I have always opinined that REAL programmers are lazy.
    We will reuse existing code, library routines, and anything else to avoid writing new code. New code can be buggy code so the less we write the fewer bugs.

    Of course my first PC was home built Processor Technology SOL-20 (S-100 bus) with 2K ROM and 2K RAM (1K was the display area) and I wrote 8080 bubble sort routines, hand translated to hex, so it would sort the contents of the display RAM. I did expand it to 32K RAM, Z80 CPU, cassette tape storage medium, etxt-to-speech module, and a 300 BAUD modem before retiring it for an IBM PC. AT the time I got that first PC I had been a COBOL programmer on an IBM 360-45 for a couple of years.

  23. dkreck says:

    @harold
    +100

    also this one
    https://www.w3schools.com/

    Yes bitmask were wonderful back when memory and storage were tight.

  24. Robert Bruce Thompson says:

    “I’ve never had to use binary”

    The very first computer I built, back in about 1976, had very primitive I/O and not much memory. Input was toggle switches and Output was LEDs, supported by a massive 256 bytes of RAM (not kilobytes, bytes).

  25. paul says:

    Are there any resources you would recommend to help me learn more?

    I know nothing about PHP. I use Notepad for HTML and CSS.

    When I started my site I was told to “have fun and steal lots of code”. Viewing source and changing things to see what happened worked for me.

    A few links:
    http://validator.w3.org/
    http://www.htmlhelp.com/tools/validator/direct.html
    http://cssmenumaker.com/
    http://php.resourceindex.com/

  26. Robert Bruce Thompson says:

    “with 2K ROM and 2K RAM”

    I’m envious. You had eight times the RAM I did.

    “(1K was the display area)”

    You had a DISPLAY?

  27. Dave says:

    @dkreck
    @Harold
    @Paul

    Thanks. Are there any worthwhile books either dowloadable creative commons licensed dowload able PDFs or dead tree form you would recommend?

  28. Harold says:

    RBT: Yes, I was late to the Homebrew Computer game. I think it was 1976, second generation when I spent my $900 for the Beautiful Processor Tec SOL with the polished walnut sides.
    http://oldcomputers.net/sol-20.html
    I bought the kit and spent many long evenings trying to solder all the sockets onto the motherboard. I blame those long nights for the deteration in my vision. Put the kit together and it didn’t work. Did weeks of troubleshooting, no good. Finaly took it back to the factory, they couldn’t find the error nor could they get it to work, so they gave me a pre-assembled one. I was at West Coast Computer Fair when Steve Jobs announced the Apple II, I was not impressed. It had 64 characters per line VS the 80 characters of the SOL-20 that matched the IBM 3270 terminals I was using at work. As I have noted before, when I mentioned to Steve Jobs that I was moving from SF to Oklahoma, he offered me exclusive distributorship of Apple products for TX, OK, and KS but I didn’t see myself as a distributor, I was a coder by god, so I declined. (kicking myself ever since)

  29. Ray Thompson says:

    Real programmers use the right language and tools for the task at hand

    Ha! Real programmers develop their own language and write their own compilers. I did three of them while in the USAF. Highly specialized but full blown compilers with branching, comparisons, output formatting, output masking, everything but I/O statements as I/O was part of the language specification. Compilers were written in Algol to generate machine code for the Burroughs Medium Systems.

    And on a lighter note. Currently in Glasgow and will be heading home tomorrow. I will post pictures to my website in about a week and let you all take a peek. Scotland is wet, rained all day today. Walking off the trails is a spongy mess that if you are not careful will sink several inches. Lot of driving today.

  30. lynn says:

    To paraphrase an older and probably more controversial aphorism:

    The lefty cries as he strikes you.

    I quoted this to a friend of mine who owns a store and carries a 1911 at all times. He was rolling on the floor laughing.

  31. lynn says:

    Some days, Putin is totally cool.

    Agree, but that doesn’t mean I like or agree with Putin, who is a cold blooded authoritarian killer, but I do respect him. We can respect our enemies if they deserve it.

    Putin is trying to hold an empire together with muslim toeholds and muslim invaders in different areas. He may look like he has control but he is really riding an incredibly high wave. The least little mistake and he will come crashing down to a field of sharp knives. In fact, the Oligarchs are reputedly going to kill him if the price of crude oil drops back down in the $30 to $39 range as is forecast now. They want him to start a another war to keep the price of oil up.

  32. lynn says:

    I have always opinined that REAL programmers are lazy.
    We will reuse existing code, library routines, and anything else to avoid writing new code. New code can be buggy code so the less we write the fewer bugs.

    Never !

    Oh wait, never mind …

  33. lynn says:

    The very first computer I built, back in about 1976, had very primitive I/O and not much memory. Input was toggle switches and Output was LEDs, supported by a massive 256 bytes of RAM (not kilobytes, bytes).

    I started programming on Big Iron, a UNIVAC 1108 in 1975. Each byte was six bits, words were six bytes, a total of 36 bits. We only had upper case and, we loved it ! 32K words of code space and 32K words of data space with large programs using partitioning to run up to 1 ??? MB programs. Most programs were stored on cards but we were allocated space on a 5,000 lb rotating drum with 100 MB of storage (FASTRAND) since our customers were 10% of their business by 1975.

  34. JimL says:

    Never write what you can find on the internet.

    Never be afraid to hack what you find on the internet to make it bow to your will.

    I bow to the masters for old computers. My first was a Compaq 486/33 with a whole MByte of RAM and 120 MByte HDD. I was 24 years old and had never touched one before. Now I manage a network, 3 different ERP systems, and a helpdesk with nothing but descendants of those early computers.

  35. Dave Hardy says:

    Windows per se is itself arguably a descendant of VAX/VMS; I am given to understand that some of the same code Dave Cutler wrote back in the Neolithic Age is still present in the Windows o.s.

    I started out my little journey into pooters with a DEC Rainbow and had it for years. I ended my so-called IT career doing the systems, network and security administration for many hundreds of RHEL clustered servers in VT and NY. No programming skillz; just bash and vi shell scripts. Was thinking on and off about learning Python.

    Back from vets group; we now run a full house and talk about heavy chit. Two guys in semi-crisis today, one an Army career ‘Nam vet and the other an Afghanistan vet. We think we helped them both. We also gotto go from 90 minutes to a full two hours from now on. The group is apparently well known to the larger VA and admired for its work over the past fifteen years. I’ve only been in it for three or four years now. And we’ve lost several members to the Grim Reaper, too. Only 500,000 of us left.

  36. MrAtoz says:

    I started programming in 11th grade (1972). A local paper finishing plant had an IBM 360 where we would send our Fortran programs. The High School had two punchy-punch card machines. My first cornpooter was a Commodore 64.

  37. lynn says:

    Windows per se is itself arguably a descendant of VAX/VMS; I am given to understand that some of the same code Dave Cutler wrote back in the Neolithic Age is still present in the Windows o.s.

    Yes. And, Windows is a descendant of Unix. For example, the first tcp/ip code in Windows came straight out of BSD Unix.

  38. Eugen (Romania) says:

    @Dave
    Regarding learning CSS, I consider the CSS Specification very good for that. It has clear explanations, examples, good structure. Start with the Introduction chapter that has a small tutorial and extend from there:
    https://www.w3.org/TR/CSS2/

    Added: Similar for HTML. Go read the specification.

    Added 2: “2. Are there any key technologies I left off the list?”

    Yes, HTTP.

  39. SteveF says:

    See the response from the public? No, they are not gonna cheer for you.

    Agreed. That’s why I always suggest making the list for when the shooting begins. Don’t be the one to start the acknowledged civil war, because you’ll be lynched, but take advantage of it when someone else starts it.

    It’s a very rare civil war that doesn’t leave people worse off in every respect relative to the starting point.

    Similarly, it’s a very rare amputation that doesn’t leave you worse off. Still, if your hand is diseased badly enough, you’ll die if it’s not removed.

    If you have a any Republican/Conservative stickers on your vehicle you can be assured that your vehicle will at best be keyed and at worst have it tires slashed and/or a window broken.

    Not around here. I heard a lot of libtards talking about vandalizing cars with Trump stickers last year, but I don’t remember hearing of it actually happening. There’s a fair chance the vandals would get their dumb asses shot.

    Along the same lines, recall the DC Snipers about 15 years ago. You remember, those two muslims that we don’t use their adopted muslim names for because reasons. You’ll note that they drove around shooting at people where gun bans were pretty tight. You’ll note that they didn’t drive around the Adirondacks or Dallas.

    Dave, I second the recommendation for w3schools

    Real programmers need only 1’s and 0’s.

    Bah. Real programmers need only 1s. The 0s are like the lumpenprogrammers: all they do is take up space.

    Real programmers use the right language and tools for the task at hand.

    Very much agreed.

    I have always opinined that REAL programmers are lazy.
    We will reuse existing code, library routines, and anything else to avoid writing new code.

    Very much agreed.

    When I led my then-eight-year-old through designing the electronic circuit and writing the program for an Arduino-based voting machine last year, I hammered that in as best I could: look at what’s already there that you can use as-is, what you can copy and tweak, and what can show you how to do something. My youngest is bright but there’s no way she could have done it from scratch. However, I’d written a tutorial on handling interrupts on an Arduino and someone else had a wiring diagram and simple program on sending character output to a 2×16 LCD, and that was 90% of what she needed. Then I helped her walk through the logic of what should happen on program initialization, on button1 push, on button2 push, and so on. And an 8-y-o built a voting machine. Better than Diebold ever managed, in fact, given that her voting machine was not pre-loaded with thousands of votes for candidates on one side.

    Real programmers develop their own language and write their own compilers.

    I’ve done that, too, but these days there’s little good reason not to stick with the standards. Writing a “little language” (a term of art) for a domain-specific problem is one thing, but if you don’t have a really good reason for every bit of complexity you add, you’re probably making a mistake.

  40. RickH says:

    I use http://www.w3schools.com all the time, when I forget (or am too lazy to remember) how to do something. There are sections for HTML, CSS, Javascript, PHP, MySQL. One of the things I like there is the ‘Try It’ where you can try out their examples, and modify and run yourself.

    Then I use the googles to find little code snippets which I modify for my use.

    For an editor, Notepad++ is good to start with. If you want a specific PHP editor, RapidPHP is good (although not free). The http://www.php.net site is good for syntax lookup. Lots of sites to help out; the googles will get you started.

    There are probably as many answers to what to install for a local development environment. Although I have set up a local dev setup, I usually just develop on a sub-folder of my hosting place. Develop the code locally, upload, test, repeat (many times). I use DreamWeaver for my local editor, out of a couple of decades of habit. RapidPHP is another editor I like to use, with NotePad++ for quick look at code.

    No one ‘best’ answer; you have to find out what you are comfortable with.

  41. SteveF says:

    For an editor, Notepad++ is good to start with.

    !!!???

    Heretic! Emacs is The One True Editor!

    (Say, you know what this place needs? A nice religious war.)

  42. nick flandrey says:

    Notepad ++ with emacs keybindings??

    n

  43. nick flandrey says:

    Less, ‘cuz Less is More???

    n

  44. nick flandrey says:

    In a sort of good news, bad news– the good is they’ve got men working on it, top men. Bad news is they’re just now getting it out there, and only to 1000 this go round.

    Over the last few years, the U.S. has developed a tiered national network for the successful management of patients possibly infected with Ebola or other special pathogens. A critical component of this network is the safe transport of patients to and between designated healthcare facilities, yet numerous questions remain about how to do so safely and successfully. How has the Ebola response informed the day-to-day encounters of the EMS community with a full range of infectious agents? What lessons have been learned from exercises and real-life experiences? Where can planning resources be found? What partners need to be engaged in preparedness efforts? What practical tools are available to providers? How do jurisdictions plan to handle issues such as cross-border transport, the need for air or specialized transport, or the transport of pediatric patients?

    ASPR’s Technical Resources, Assistance Center, and Information Exchange (ASPR TRACIE) is hosting a webinar to address these and other challenging questions. The webinar will introduce the EMS Infectious Disease Playbook, ASPR TRACIE’s soon to be released one-stop information source to guide the transport of patients known or suspected of having an infectious disease. Dr. John Hick and Dr. Alex Isakov will describe why and how the Playbook was developed, walk webinar participants through the content, and share their perspectives on how webinar participants can use the Playbook in their daily practice. They will then discuss the current challenges the EMS community faces related to infectious diseases followed by a question and answer session with webinar participants.

    n

  45. SteveF says:

    Actually, I’m utterly agnostic about editors and IDEs, so long as your choices don’t affect me.

    Use of a plain editor usually doesn’t affect anyone else. Line endings can get mangled (DOS/*nix/Mac), tabs can get converted to spaces or vice versa, and trailing spaces can get trimmed, but for the most part it doesn’t matter.

    What usually does affect others is IDE choice. My current job is at least the third where I’ve come on to an existing project which can’t be built except in the IDE it was started in — Eclipse or IntelliJ or JDeveloper. It can’t be built from the command line. You have to have exactly the same version of IDE and plugins and additional libraries as everyone else. In metastasized projects, the application can be built only on the team lead’s computer, which cannot be upgraded or otherwise changed.

    Yes, of course the project can in theory be extracted from the IDE and built from a command line tool. (With most languages. Some are inherently IDE only. I’m not talking about those.) In practice “it’s not worth the time it would take” or “I like to keep in control of what’s built” or “we tried that and it didn’t work”. That’s one of the good things about being a freelance consultant: I don’t feel any obligation to pull their heads out of their asses and I just moved on at the end of the contract.

  46. nick flandrey says:

    And this is interesting, not just because it’s in Houston. New way to share EM data and video with wider group.

    In an emergency, first responders need timely and relevant data to make informed decisions. Land Mobile Radio networks are intended for voice communication and do not have the capacity to transmit large amounts of data. Commercial cellular networks can become overloaded or fail completely, as the network becomes saturated by public use. This leaves public safety agencies competing for the same network resources when trying to transmit their mission-critical information, especially video. S&T’s Datacasting project provides a solution.

    https://www.dhs.gov/sites/default/files/publications/DHS_Datacasting_One-Pager_v2-508.pdf

    The signal is included in PBS stations spectrum at their facility. Users need authorized ‘boxes’ that then connect to their PCs to view the stream. The stream can be deleted or disabled.

    n

  47. lynn says:

    “Microsoft Issues Surprise Windows XP Patch to Protect From State-Sponsored Hackers”
    https://www.extremetech.com/computing/250864-microsoft-issues-surprise-windows-xp-patch-protect-state-sponsored-hackers

    “Microsoft has tried and tried, but it just can’t get away from Windows XP. In a way, Microsoft should be happy that it released an operating system so popular that it’s still running on millions of PCs more than 15 years after it was released. Microsoft sure isn’t happy that it still has to support XP, though. The company has just released another patch for the aged OS, more than three years after ending support. It turns out unpatched Windows XP is a target of state-sponsored hackers.”

    Be scared, very scared. There is a lot of bad stuff going on out there and WannaCrypt was just the leading edge. If you aren’t updating your variant of Windows, oh well, you were warned.

  48. nick flandrey says:

    Source of some of this:
    https://www.dhs.gov/publication/siren-frg-newsletter

    FRG= first responders group

    n

  49. Greg Norton says:

    So I’ve decided that I need to know more than I do now about HTML, CSS and PHP among other Internet technologies. Since many here know more than I do about them, I thought I’d ask you a few questions:

    1. Are there any resources you would recommend to help me learn more?
    2. Are there any key technologies I left off the list?

    Download XAMPP to learn HTTP/PHP on Windows and Mac. Everything is set to go out of the box.

    XAMPP also includes MariaDB (MySQL) with the phpMyAdmin GUI. You will eventually want to pick up interfacing to a database to PHP, and your projects would have to be pretty large to outgrow MySQL.

    I use O’Reilly’s “Programming PHP” and “PHP Cookbook” as references.

    On Windows, I install Cygwin and a lot of command line tools, including the PHP interpreter. The PHP “lint” feature available in the interpreter from the command line will save a lot of hairpulling when you are first getting started:

    php -l file.php

    I have a grudging respect for PHP. It is worth picking up as your first interactive web language. If your projects don’t get too large, it may be the only such language you need.

    My day job is Java EE, and I don’t recommend that route for beginners. Same for dot Net.

  50. Greg Norton says:

    Be scared, very scared. There is a lot of bad stuff going on out there and WannaCrypt was just the leading edge. If you aren’t updating your variant of Windows, oh well, you were warned.

    I also run ZoneLabs free firewall on any Windows machine I take out onto public WiFi systems. I have my doubts about Microsoft firewalls, especially Windows 7.

    Yes, I know the conspiracy theories, but ZoneLabs doesn’t have a Clearwater, FL mailing address. I’d rather that Mossad have backdoor access to my data than the Friends of Xenu in Florida.

    Like with Putin, I can respect Mossad even if I don’t like their methods or agree with their goals.

  51. Greg Norton says:

    Are there any key technologies I left off the list?

    I almost forgot — get familiar with Docker. The new Windows 10 container support is actually pretty cool, but Docker also runs on Linux and Mac OS X.

    Docker will be useful when the time comes to put your web application on “The Cloud” with minimal fuss.

  52. lynn says:

    “The Future of Ransomware”
    https://www.schneier.com/crypto-gram/archives/2017/0615.html#2

    “Everything is becoming a computer. Your microwave is a computer that makes things hot. Your refrigerator is a computer that keeps things cold. Your car and television, the traffic lights and signals in your city and our national power grid are all computers. This is the much-hyped Internet of Things (IoT). It’s coming, and it’s coming faster than you might think. And as these devices connect to the Internet, they become vulnerable to ransomware and other computer threats.”

    “It’s only a matter of time before people get messages on their car screens saying that the engine has been disabled and it will cost $200 in bitcoin to turn it back on. Or a similar message on their phones about their Internet-enabled door lock: Pay $100 if you want to get into your house tonight. Or pay far more if they want their embedded heart defibrillator to keep working.”

    Sigh. Now why does my car have to connect to the internet ? One of my programmers has a new Hyundai Sante Fe SUV. He starts it from his pc to get the a/c going before he goes outside. His key fob does not have remote start so he just goes through the Hyundai website. Something is scary there.

  53. lynn says:

    Seen in a facebook meme, “You do realize if Democrats stop shooting people, gun violence would drop by 90%”.
    https://www.facebook.com/Capitalists/photos/a.226491315514.290842.188355460514/10158976100220515/?type=3&theater

  54. Greg Norton says:

    Sigh. Now why does my car have to connect to the internet ? One of my programmers has a new Hyundai Sante Fe SUV. He starts it from his pc to get the a/c going before he goes outside. His key fob does not have remote start so he just goes through the Hyundai website. Something is scary there.

    Pretty soon, it will be hard to find a car that doesn’t connect to the Internet.

    Once they installed the displays for the (soon) mandatory backup cameras, the temptation to go further was too hard for most automakers to resist.

    GM sucked in a bunch of CS undergrads from UT and Texas State on a hiring spree at their tech center in Austin last fall. This as they laid off MechEs in Michigan. The gadgets pay the bills.

  55. Dave Hardy says:

    From the Department of Cucks:

    https://westernrifleshooters.wordpress.com/2017/06/15/quote-of-the-week-142/

    Things could heat up a LOT more in this country over the course of the summer. No matter how nicey-nicey the RINOs and Cucks wanna play with their murderers.

  56. Dave Hardy says:

    And from the Patrick Nails It Again Department:

    http://buchanan.org/blog/long-history-leftist-hatred-127223

  57. RickH says:

    WRT to a local PHP development environment, I’ve had good luck with “Easy PHP” (here http://www.easyphp.org/ ). Complete development runtime for PHP, MySQL, Javascript, HTML, CSS, etc. Basically your own PHP web server with database capabilities.

    Easy to set up, you can enable it as needed. Get the ‘DevServer” stuff; the “WebServer” stuff will turn your computer into a web server.

    Good stuff.

  58. Miles_Teg says:

    I have WXP and W2K boxes. No way will I let them on the Internet.

  59. Mike G. says:

    And then there’s this,

    Developers who use spaces make more money than those who use tabs,

    https://stackoverflow.blog/2017/06/15/developers-use-spaces-make-money-use-tabs/

    Heresy, I know.

    .mg

  60. lynn says:

    And from the Patrick Nails It Again Department:

    http://buchanan.org/blog/long-history-leftist-hatred-127223

    Gonna be a long HOT summer.

    And again, “You do realize if Democrats stop shooting people, gun violence would drop by 90%”.
    https://www.facebook.com/Capitalists/photos/a.226491315514.290842.188355460514/10158976100220515/?type=3&theater

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