Wednesday, 14 June 2017

09:42 – It was 62.7F (17C) when I took Colin out around 0620 this morning, partly cloudy and calm. Barbara is off to the gym this morning and then spending the rest of the day making up subassemblies for science kits.

Barbara is binge-watching CSI: NY on Netflix streaming. They have all nine seasons available, but for some strange reason they’re dropping the first eight seasons as of June 29th. She’s about half-way through season 2 now, so there’s no way she’ll make it through all of them before the end of the month. I don’t watch it, but it doesn’t bother me to be in the den reading or browsing the web while she watches it. The writing is pretty bad, and the forensic science is ridiculous but it’s not offensive. About the only good thing I can say about it is that they use The Who’s Baba O’Riley as the theme music.

Email overnight from the woman I mentioned last Friday, who wanted to prep quickly. I’ll call her Lisa. It sounds like she’s been spending too much time reading Zero Hedge. She’s convinced there’s a good chance the economy will collapse this summer and that with the hot weather we’ll see a return to the Days of Rage. I don’t think that’s going to happen anytime soon, but I’ve been wrong before.

Lisa’s initial goal was to be prepared for her family of six for a period of three months. She spent last weekend making multiple runs to Costco and placing orders on Amazon.com and Walmart.com, and estimates she’s progressed from about 2% prepared as of last Friday to maybe 90% prepared as of now. She hasn’t had time yet to get everything organized and stowed away, so it’s all still sitting in piles in her basement, where they still need to install shelving for everything.

She said that as long as they’re installing shelves she intends to put in a lot more than they need. Her intention is to continue accumulating supplies until they reach at least a year’s worth for the six of them. As she said, the stuff she’s bought is all foods they eat anyway, other than dry beans, so there’s no real downside to having it sitting in their basement instead of on store shelves. And the beans are a good cheap source of protein that keeps a long, long time, so she has no problem with it taking up some shelf space.

I encouraged Lisa to start actually using the bulk food for cooking meals and grow her storage by buying two or three or four more each time she uses one. Move a case of soup from long-term storage to the kitchen pantry, buy two more cases for your long-term storage, and so on.

Lisa is still concerned about best-by dates, although I told her that for almost all products they really are imaginary. She’s decided to install stand-alone steel shelving rather than shelves accessible only from one side. That way, she can add new stuff to one side of the shelf units and pull older stuff from the other side. I told her to go for it if it makes her feel better, but it’s going to involve a lot of shifting stuff around after every supply run. And since she intends to maintain only a one-year supply of LTS food, there’s really nothing to worry about anyway. The “old” stuff she pulls off the shelves will still be only a year or so old and probably still well within its best-by dates.

This entry was posted in Lisa, personal, prepping. Bookmark the permalink.

64 Responses to Wednesday, 14 June 2017

  1. nick flandrey says:

    From my recent experiences, duly noted here previously…

    High fat items, items in clear or translucent plastic packaging, and ‘pouch’ items have significant changes some time after their best by. Most of the stuff was edible at plus one year, but some (the high fat) was really not.

    UHT milk doesn’t keep, it turns into tapioca like gel with little pearls.

    Fruit cups discolor and get squishy but still taste good in cobbler.

    Cheese sauce packs (high fat) taste old. Same for pasta in cardboard. The pasta is still edible though and the taste is easy to cover with sauce.

    Even soda in thin aluminium cans will erode thru the can and leak all over your stuff, particularly coke products.

    Shelf stable meals will change significantly a couple of years after their best buy. NOT recommended to try to eat them, although the packaging was still intact and under vacuum.

    My waste due to spoilage is still a small percentage of the overall cost, and small in actual dollar terms too. I consider it a tax, due to my poor storage conditions. I keep most of it in the garage which gets HOT.

    In a basement my only concern would be moisture condensing on the cans, and being held against the metal by the shelf or shelf covering. I recommend something like ribbed plastic shelf liner to keep the cans from sitting in moisture. NOT cardboard! That said, I’ve only lost a few cans to rust, and mine sit in cardboard packaging trays from costco, in my garage, where the concrete floor sometimes condenses water from the swampy air.

    nick

  2. Robert Bruce Thompson says:

    Yeah, Nick. Most or all of your storage life problems are due to storage conditions. The old rule of thumb among chemists is that each 10C (18F) change in temperature doubles or halves the reaction rate.

    Assuming that your garage reaches 40C/104F (or even 50C/122F), that means your food is aging at least four times and possibly eight times or more faster than it would at 20C/68F.

  3. nick flandrey says:

    Yeah, it sucks, but life is compromise. I’ve got other deep storage elsewhere that doesn’t get so hot, but this is my first line of defense.

    n

    ADDED- the flip side is that it’s living proof you can store and prep in much less than perfect conditions.

  4. Robert Bruce Thompson says:

    Yeah. The other thing that most people don’t take very seriously is exposure to light, particularly short-wavelength light. Spoilage occurs by many different mechanisms, but exposure to light speeds most or all of them up, sometimes dramatically.

    We keep a lot of flour, sugar, etc. in 2- and 3-liter PET bottles. Ideally, I’d keep those in a completely dark area, but I compromised on shelving them in a spare downstairs bedroom with the blinds closed. They still get some low-intensity daylight, but no direct sunlight. I’m sure they won’t last as long as they would in the dark, but they should be good for at least 20 or 30 years down there, and that’s good enough for me. In 30 years, I’ll just try them and, if necessary replace them. That’s assuming TEOTWAWKI hasn’t occurred, and that I’m still spry at age 94. Thirty years after that, I’ll be 124.

  5. nick flandrey says:

    Your neighbors will be going thru your preps at the estate sale…

    n

  6. nick flandrey says:

    And of course this AM someone tried to take out a bunch of republicans

    http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2017-06-14/multiple-people-shot-congressional-baseball-practice-house-majority-whip-scalise-hit

    No doubt we’ll see some caving on the rep side of the gun restriction fight.

    n

  7. nick flandrey says:

    Shooter apparently from Illinois. Wonder if he has his state mandated Firearms Owners Identification Card.

    n

  8. MrAtoz says:

    Congressman shot, queue the gun control ghouls. The liars are already all over social networks. The most ridiculous – Virgina doesn’t have a “long gun” concealed carry law.

    LOL!!!!!

  9. MrAtoz says:

    Also in prominent headlines: shooter is WHITEY!

  10. Robert Bruce Thompson says:

    Bernie supporter.

  11. Robert Bruce Thompson says:

    A 66 year old white male prog.

    All of these bastards are very lucky that 66 yo white male Normals haven’t started shooting. Yet.

  12. CowboySlim says:

    “Yeah, Nick. Most or all of your storage life problems are due to storage conditions. The old rule of thumb among chemists is that each 10C (18F) change in temperature doubles or halves the reaction rate.”

    I hope that AlGore doesn’t read this.

  13. CowboySlim says:

    “A 66 year old white male prog.” ….. shoots a white congressman.

    No reason for BLM to hit the streets.

  14. Dave Hardy says:

    “…It sounds like she’s been spending too much time reading Zero Hedge. She’s convinced there’s a good chance the economy will collapse this summer and that with the hot weather we’ll see a return to the Days of Rage. I don’t think that’s going to happen anytime soon, but I’ve been wrong before.”

    I agree with Lisa, though w/o reading ZeroHedge on this particular topic. Not “convinced,” but think it highly likely now. Maybe not total collapse, but pretty huge and worse than 2008.

    The VA shooting looks like a nutter commie fuck blasting Normals, and thank God no one died and he got taken out ricky-tick. Could also be yet another weird psycho guy on various psychotropic drugs and yet another dupe in some larger scheme. Yeah, that’s how ya get after a while with this shit; it’s just too pat and too convenient too often. Cui bono here? Gun control assholes, of course.

    Watch THAT while the fuckers in the Senate do THIS:

    https://www.sovereignman.com/trends/you-wont-believe-this-stupid-new-law-against-cash-and-bitcoin-22019/?inf_contact_key=b99d17ad3e11a3f094843346361a5963eb9087332918f0ea17686f45954688fd

  15. Robert Bruce Thompson says:

    I’m beginning to wish someone would shoot, to a close approximation, 535 US Senators and Representatives, not to mention 8 of 9 SCOTUS justices and something like 5 or 8 million politicians, bureaucrats, and other federal employees.

    And I see Townhall is calling the politicians who ran out into the field to help Scalise heroes, but notes that none of them tried to help him until the shooter had been taken down. No, guys. A hero would have been the person who ran out BEFORE the shooter was taken down, and dragged Scalise out of the line of fire. What they did was what any public-spirited citizen would have done; render aid to someone who’d been injured.

  16. Eugen (Romania) says:

    Well, you can’t get bored in Romania too. The crooks are trying to replace their own Government accusing it of delays in implementing the political program. The Prim Minister and at least six of the ministers are refusing to leave (amazingly, I have to call them the good guys in this conflict). The crooks will have to dismiss the Cabinet in a vote in the Parliament if they insist with the change. The real reason for the change is that the Prim Minister and the new Minister of Justice are refusing to touch anymore the Justice laws through decrees/ordinances (a direct consequence of our protests this winter!). And the crooks and their leader don’t have time anymore (jail!) to pass crook-friendly laws through the Parliament, as that is a long process(yay!) and risky (Constitution wise).

    Added explanation: The crooks leader is the ruling Party leader. The Prim Minister was considered his puppet (not anymore, I guess). The Government was invested only 6 months ago. Because of a conviction (electoral fraud), the Party leader can’t become Prim Minister. He is currently under trial and most likely, this time, he will go to jail (yay!).

  17. Robert Bruce Thompson says:

    Wow! I may have to reconsider my position on gun control and the Second Amendment. Until the Democrat governor of Virginia said so (twice) at his news conference today, I didn’t realize that 93 million Americans are killed by guns every day. That means every American is killed by gunfire twice a week. Geez.

  18. nick flandrey says:

    See! I knew the zombie apocalypse was around here somewhere…..

    WE’RE ALL ZOMBIES!!!11!!!1!!!11111!!!11!!!!

    @Eugen, that is one MESSED UP ™ government! Best of luck sorting thru that mess.

    n

  19. Eugen (Romania) says:

    “I didn’t realize that 93 million Americans are killed by guns every day.”

    Oh, so you don’t know that the Americans have colonized half of the galaxy already?

  20. Eugen (Romania) says:

    “@Eugen, that is one MESSED UP ™ government! Best of luck sorting thru that mess.”

    It’s quite entertaining, actually. Each part is now preparing for press declarations. Exciting!

  21. CowboySlim says:

    “Oh, so you don’t know that the Americans have colonized half of the galaxy already?”

    They have to readjust gun sights for that half due different gravitational forces, according to Newton’s Law.

  22. nick flandrey says:

    I noticed in a recent article that almost twice as many people are being killed by heroin addiction than drunk driving. No mention of the relationship in the article of course. Yet we have MADD and the destruction of civil rights that they pushed for, the suborning of AA, which does some good for some people, and other nanny state intrusions into my personal life because of “alcohol abuse.”

    I guess no politician wants to admit the true extent of the heroin problem, or the basic ineffectiveness of the anti drunk driving forces, nor the HUGE amount of money being made off drunks, and ordinary people who got caught making a bad decision.

    n

  23. nick flandrey says:

    BTW, 80F and 90%RH here today, so I only painted outside for a couple hours. The short rain sprinkle might have cooled things down but mainly it steamed things up.

    I’ve been doing house and yard maintenance this week. Just a bit at a time, like OFD. Pressure washing is not too demanding, has some cooling mist involved, and is very satisfying when done. Knowing when to stop is the hard part. There’s always something more to clean. Fence looks new. Kids’ playstructure is looking good. Got most of it painted with $5/gal red stain. [this is typical of my projects. it needed some cleaning and stain for a while. I’ve been on the lookout for cheap stain. Finally H4H had 2 gallons of a good redwood color for $5 each. Time for a project. I have a mental list of stuff I’m looking for to move various projects along. When I find it, I either move the project to ‘active’ or stack the parts for later. Eventually ‘later’ and the ‘parts’ come together and money is saved.]

    nick

  24. nick flandrey says:

    Holy crap that guy got off a lot of shots

    http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2017-06-14/dramatic-new-video-captures-exact-moment-shooter-opened-fire-gop-baseball-practice

    n

    WTF was the protection detail doing this whole time?

  25. paul says:

    That means every American is killed by gunfire twice a week.

    And all this time I thought it was allergies causing my headaches…..

  26. lynn says:

    “Fears that new cladding made Grenfell Tower ‘light up like a matchstick’: First bodies are removed from building as 12 are confirmed dead and dozens missing amid chilling warning that ‘nobody on top three floors survived'”
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4601902/Huge-inferno-West-London-tower-block.html

    I have always thought that these tall residential buildings are dangerous. I am guessing that the building did not have a sprinkler system or was not maintained.

    I have been in two office building fires, one six story with a fire on the third floor (we were on the 5th floor) and a 35 story with a fire on the 23rd floor (we were on the 25th floor). Both times the fire was computer equipment. Both times it was difficult to go down the stairs when the firemen were running up the stairs with their protective clothing, air bottles, and fire axes. And of course the elevators were automatically locked out by the fire system thereby stranding the handicapped in the building.

  27. Nightraker says:

    “I agree with Lisa, though w/o reading ZeroHedge on this particular topic. Not “convinced,” but think it highly likely now. Maybe not total collapse, but pretty huge and worse than 2008.”

    Timing is everything. I’ve been reading alarmists since Nixon closed the gold window, so while I believe the system is a house of cards waiting for a slight breeze, I keep a block of salt around too. One thing I read way back when was that a collapse would hold off far longer than anyone would expect.

    I read somewhere that the triggering event for the 1929 crash was the collapse of an obscure Italian bank, so wouldn’t surprise me if some untoward event in Europe, Japan or China began a contagion that reached here. I think it’s great that the Chinese have bootstrapped themselves to the degree of prosperity they have today. OTOH, if I were writing a novel or a movie I’d have the table clearing wind start there due to epidemic corruption and central planning failure. The business press thought the Japanese were 10 feet tall during the 80’s too.

    The good news about a collapse that reboots the financial world is that the actual productive assets are not destroyed, so as long as no one gets an itchy nuke button pushing finger. Mr. Potter would be so proud.

    On a tangent, Ayn Rand wouldn’t, couldn’t have thought of the IRL names of characters like Takeshita, Putin, Madeoff or Weiner…

    If Lisa is late to the party, she is at least part of the solution. We’re all strengthened by those that stockpile.

  28. Harold says:

    RE: High-rise Fires
    These are nothing to joke about. In 2000 I was working on the 87’th floor of the “Central Tower” in Hong Kong. My firm, MCI, rented the 87th and 88th floors of the 89 story tower. Because everyone used the elevators to get from 87 to 88 and back this tied up a lot of elevator usage in the 4th bank that services the top quarter of the building. So we decided to cut a stairwell between the two floors. In the afternoon, one of the welders building the stairs, sparked a fire in the carpet that spread quickly to the drapes. The floor filled with smoke and the alarms went off. We evacuated the top 12 floors, a long long long rush down almost 90 floors to the parking garage meeting point. Luckily, they got the fire under control quickly so it didn’t spread. But in reality, if you have to flee 80+ floors for your life, picking up crowds as you descend, and dealing with injured and infirm, your chances of a safe and speedy exit are slim.

  29. Robert Bruce Thompson says:

    It takes a lot to crash a currency when the only thing backing it is electronic ones and zeroes. Equally, I don’t see the dollar losing reserve status anytime soon. Yes, it’s very weak, but it’s immensely stronger than any realistic alternative.

  30. Dave Hardy says:

    I hope Mssrs. Nightraker and RBT are correct. I just have a sorta bad feeling about this year, which means absolutely nothing, and yeah, maybe I read too much and am pessimistic most days about everything.

    WRT tall-ass buildings; no thanks. I’ve always hated them. And naturally during a fire alarm, the elevators are useless, apparently; just perfect. I got trapped some years ago for nearly an hour by myself in an elevator stalled in a parking garage structure, during a very heavy rainstorm and the whole time I could hear water rushing somewhere close by. Not a wunnerful experience for someone who’s claustrophobic.

    So a rabid anti-tRump and Sanders fanboy at age 66 comes to VA from Illinois and has a rifle ready to go at 05:30 in order to murder a bunch of GOP ball players. The whole thing stinks of bad fish if you ask me. Maybe we’ll know much more of the truth later and maybe monkeys will fly outta my butt….

  31. lynn says:

    I encouraged Lisa to start actually using the bulk food for cooking meals and grow her storage by buying two or three or four more each time she uses one. Move a case of soup from long-term storage to the kitchen pantry, buy two more cases for your long-term storage, and so on.

    I am occasionally taking off-date canned food from the pantry / master closet and moving it to my offsite storage as it freaks out the wife. My offsite storage is also air conditioned. I don’t leave anything that can deteriorate in our detached garage at the house. It can get to 120 F out there during the month of flame, August.

  32. lynn says:

    And naturally during a fire alarm, the elevators are useless, apparently; just perfect.

    I think that the logic with shutting down the elevators during a fire alarm is so that you do not ride one down and have it open onto a floor that is totally on fire. After Sep 11, the building code was revised that the stairwell shaft(s) have to be moved out of the building core and truly armored (concrete bricks) so the stairwells are truly safer now for new buildings. Older buildings, not so much.

  33. nick flandrey says:

    Ever try walking down a couple hundred stairs? Most people find it as tiring as walking UP. Meanwhile hundreds of other people are pushing and shoving past you, as the fire guys are pushing and shoving past you, carrying 100# of hose pack and wearing 100# of gear.

    I found it to be ludicrous that the changes to the code weren’t made until after 9-11. Under the old code, it’s like they just said, “fuck it, they’re not gonna get out anyway.”

    NOW we think maybe some people should be using elevators? WTH were wheelchairs supposed to do? Stair surf down 40 floors? NOW we think maybe the stairs and elevators shouldn’t all be co-located?

    Yeah, you WERE on your own, and for all intents and purposes you still are.

    n

    If I worked more than a few floors up routinely, the minimum I’d want is a nomex jumpsuit and a smoke hood. A personal Scott SCBA pack fits easily in a gymbag.

  34. SteveF says:

    but I’ve been wrong before.

    Surely you must be mistaken about that.

    Equally, I don’t see the dollar losing reserve status anytime soon. Yes, it’s very weak, but it’s immensely stronger than any realistic alternative.

    That’s my belief, too. Several replacements have been tried, either national currencies, the Euro, the market basket, and I think something else. They’ve all failed because they’re all weaker than the shaky American dollar.

    That said, the word “belief” above was chosen deliberately. I can rationalize it, but economics is not a science and even if it were I have just a tiny fraction of the data I’d need to plug into the equations.

  35. dkreck says:

    Elevators do work in fires but only with keys the fire dept has (assuming electricity and non damaged equipment). The firemen will use them if they can both to attack and rescue.
    This apt in London sounds like a shithole to begin with. Old, no working alarm, the sprinklers failed, and blocked stairwell exit.

    Public housing for muslims judging by the pics.

  36. lynn says:

    “Michael Savage predicted ‘violence’ by ‘marginals’ day before attack”
    http://www.wnd.com/2017/06/michael-savage-predicted-violence-by-marginals-day-before-attack/

    ““I don’t know how much more of this the country can take,” Savage said.”

    ““We are at a boiling point. There’s going to be a civil war,” he told his listeners Tuesday.”

  37. Dave Hardy says:

    From watching and listening to that video clip, it’s uncertain to a point as to which shots were fired by the perp and those fired by the police. I’m gonna go way out on a limb and say it sounded like the perp went through two mags with his whatever-rifle.

    But the whole thing still stinks.

    I’m a fervent right-winger AND gun guy at 64. I’m so pissed at Plastic-Face Pelosi that I’d grab a rifle, fly out to Kalifornia and catch her and her lefty pals at a 5:30 AM hen party and start shooting? I’d have to be really nuts or the whole thing is a bunch of malarkey somehow. Meanwhile they find pics and memes on my FaceCrack page of Pat Buchanan as Uncle Sam and much admiration of “wingnut” themes. (plus countless maniacal reich-wing posts on this blog over the years; shit, once they nail me, though, they’ll get the rest of youse, too!)

    As for the economy and financial collapse, etc,; as the late Nixon-era economist Herbert Stein used to say: “If something cannot go on forever, it will stop,”

    The stopping point could come as early as tomorrow afternoon or it could take a couple of decades to hit us. And anything in between. I think something big is gonna strike this summer-fall and will be a movie trailer for what comes after, somewhere down the pike.

  38. Robert Bruce Thompson says:

    “Public housing for muslims judging by the pics.”

    So, good news, then.

  39. SteveF says:

    Public housing for muslims judging by the pics.

    The fire was inevitable as the building was packed with inflammable items: hijabs, korans, and bomb-making material.

  40. pcb_duffer says:

    [snip] But in reality, if you have to flee 80+ floors for your life, picking up crowds as you descend, and dealing with injured and infirm, your chances of a safe and speedy exit are slim. [snip]

    Given my orthopedic problems, I’d be a roadblock / danger to everyone else as I was trying to evacuate the building. The local FD has a 110 flight memorial climb every year here, the weekend closest to 9/11. They get lots of firemen from all over the south to participate, many of whom do the whole thing in their bunker gear.

  41. dkreck says:

    So the city council paid 11M pounds to refurbish it and it was completed a year ago. Either corruption or the residents have destroyed much of the safety systems in a year.

  42. Greg Norton says:

    Michael Savage predicted ‘violence’ by ‘marginals’ day before attack.

    I know there are a lot of well armed Prog hunters out in the I-5 corridor between Portland and Seattle who are totally dependent on government checks of some form to keep the WiFi and cable flowing.

    We haven’t heard from them … yet. Maybe when WA State has its moment of truth about an income tax.

  43. Greg Norton says:

    After Sep 11, the building code was revised that the stairwell shaft(s) have to be moved out of the building core and truly armored (concrete bricks) so the stairwells are truly safer now for new buildings.

    Solid concrete or cinder blocks?

    I’ve seen holes chewed by rats through cinderblock back when I worked at a grocery store in Florida. The wall was all that stood between the rats and our damaged food desk so they got busy. It took us a while to find the holes too since the critters tunneled in behind the box baler.

    *Serious* cinderblocks too. The store was built in the 70s in FL, and the concrete plants were local. No CeMex.

  44. dkreck says:

    Those are some tough rodents. I would guess they chewed where there was no concrete fill. Nowadays tilt-up concrete is more common.

  45. Greg Norton says:

    Those are some tough rodents.

    Citrus grove rats. Nasty. They’re probably an endangered species these days, however, between loss of habitat and pythons.

  46. nick flandrey says:

    Flammable foam between aluminum cladding and an air gap. Sounds like a chimney to me. Bet $10 the sheet for the foam says it must be completely covered or embedded to be fire resistant.

    There is a type of construction in US residential and light commercial called “rain screen” that has a small gap between the wall sheathing and the masonry outer layer. Nothing like a couple inches of continuous air gap the height of the building. Who does something like that? Builders have known for 100 years that you need firestop in any vertical channel.

    They say that building and safety codes are written in the blood of the victims, and I’ll bet there are a bunch of old lessons relearned with this fire.

    n

    (oh, and the whole thing was to satisfy new “environmental energy codes” and pretty up an old housing project.) Could have left it alone.

  47. Dave Hardy says:

    Hahaha…we’ll take our chances here with a nearly 200-year-old house that is entirely intact, same as it ever was. Still not even close to some surviving 17th-C houses in Ipswich, MA, or even older than that back in the UK. We’ve got the main beams in the cellar and the attic that were obviously hand-hewn by axes and adzes.

    But yeah, we have a bunch of minor repairs and new chit to put in over the next several years, like more windows, the doors, the back porch, etc. Plumbing and electric need some work, too.

    La Coulter speaks on the VA caper:

    http://www.anncoulter.com/columns/2017-06-14.html

  48. nick flandrey says:

    No idea who this guy is or when he thinks these things are running out, but it’s a good list of things to have ‘put back.’ (showed up in my inbox)

    Pioneer Payton here:

    If disaster strikes, retailers
    will be flooded with “last-minute”
    preppers. This will cause a
    quick depletion of their current
    inventory. Being a step ahead
    will put you in position to

    a.) not have to participate in
    the mayhem and

    b.) barter and trade strategically
    for your benefit. This a randomly
    ordered list of items that will
    quickly become scarce (probably
    unavailable) during a large-scale
    disaster. Make sure that you have
    enough on hand for you and your
    family to function sufficiently
    for at least 7 days.

    Top 100 Things That Run Out First

    1. Bottled Water
    2. Vegetable Oil (for cooking)
    3. Charcoal, Lighter Fluid
    4. Water Containers
    5. Mini Heater head (Without this
    item, propane won’t heat a room.)
    6. Propane Cylinders
    7. Survival Guides (books)
    8. Lumber (all types)
    9. Wagons & carts
    10. Cots & Inflatable mattresses
    11. Garlic, spices & vinegar, baking supplies
    12. Dog food
    13. Flour, yeast & salt
    14. Gloves (all types)
    15. Teas
    16. Coffee
    17. Lantern Mantles
    18. Baby Supplies (Diapers, formula, etc.)
    19. Washboards (for Laundry)
    20. Propane Cookstoves
    21. Feminine Hygiene/Haircare/Skin products.
    22. Thermal underwear
    23. Tuna Fish (in oil)
    24. Fire Extinguishers
    25. Baking Soda
    26. First aid kits
    27. Batteries
    28. Matches
    29. Writing paper, pencils, solar calculators
    30. d-con Rat poison, MOUSE PRUFE II, Roach Killer
    31. Mousetraps, Ant traps & cockroach magnets
    32. Paper plates/cups/utensils (stock up, folks)
    33. Baby wipes, oils, waterless & Antibacterial soap
    34. Rain gear, rubberized boots, etc.
    35. Shaving supplies
    36. Insulated ice chests (i.e. coolers)
    37. Workboots, belts, jeans & durable shirts
    38. Flashlights, Lightsticks, torches
    39. Journals, Diaries & Scrapbooks
    40. Garbage cans
    41. Hygiene: Shampoo, Toothbrush/paste, Mouthwash, floss
    42. Cast iron cookware
    43. Fishing supplies/tools
    44. Generators
    45. Water Filters/Purifiers
    46. Seasoned Firewood.
    47. Lamp Oil, Wicks, Lamps, Lanterns
    48. Hand-can openers, & hand egg beaters, whisks.
    49. Sweeteners (Honey, Syrups, Sugar)
    Groceries for Survival50. Rice, Beans, Wheat
    51. Screen Patches
    52. Bug Repellant
    53. Vitamins & supplements
    54. Propane Cylinder Handle-Holder
    55. Duct Tape
    56. Tarps/stakes/twine/nails/rope/spikes
    57. Candles
    58. Laundry Detergent (liquid)
    59. Backpacks, Duffel Bags
    60. Garden tools & supplies
    61. Scissors, fabrics & sewing supplies
    62. Canned foods
    63. Bleach
    64. Canning supplies, (Jars/lids/wax)
    65. Knives & Sharpening tools: files, stones, steel
    66. Bicycles and parts (tires/tubes/pumps/chains, etc)
    67. Sleeping Bags & blankets/pillows/mats
    68. Carbon Monoxide Alarm (battery powered)
    69. Board Games, Cards, Dice
    70. Hand pumps & siphons (for water and for fuels)
    71. Soy sauce, vinegar, bullions/gravy/soup base
    72. Chocolate/Cocoa/Tang/Punch (water enhancers)
    73. “Survival-in-a-Can”
    74. Woolen clothing, scarves/ear-muffs/mittens
    75. Reading glasses
    76. Window Insulation Kit
    77. Graham crackers, saltines, pretzels, Trail mix/Jerky
    78. Popcorn, Peanut Butter, Nuts
    79. Socks, Underwear, T-shirts, etc.
    80. Cigarettes
    81. Wine/Liquors (for bribes, medicinal, etc,)
    82. Glue, nails, nuts, bolts, screws, etc.
    83. Chewing gum/candies
    84. Atomizers (for cooling/bathing)
    85. Hats & cotton neckerchiefs
    86. Utility animals (Big dogs, goats, chickens,
    cows, pigs)
    87. Over-the-counter medicines (pain killers,
    cough syrup, acetaminophen, etc.)
    88. Buckets and containers of all sizes
    89. Bibles
    90. Saws, axes and hatchets
    91. Aluminum Foil
    92. Gasoline Containers
    93. Camp Stove Fuel – Impossible to stockpile too much.
    94. Weapons (Guns, Ammunition, Pepper Spray, Knives,
    Clubs, Bats & Slingshots)
    95. Garbage Bags
    96. Toilet Paper, Kleenex, Paper Towels
    97. Milk (powdered & condensed)
    98. Garden Seeds
    99. Clothes pins/line/hangers
    100. Coleman’s Pump Repair Kit

    Your Friend,
    Pioneer Payton

  49. Dave Hardy says:

    Is that list in any kind of priority order or what??? Doesn’t look like it. What would be the ten, say, most critical items that run out first? And that we should have in stock for ourselves and for charity and/or barter purposes?

    I’d go with things like water purifiers rather than already-bottled wotta; matches and lighters/fluid and firestarters; all kinds of batteries but esp. the most common; laundry items; bum-wad; stuff like baking soda and vinegar which have countless uses; blankets, esp. in colder climes; soap/shampoo/toothpaste; and high-stakes barter chit like ciggies, booze and dope. Ammo goes w/o saying.

    We have the Waning Gibbous Moon this evening, low in the sky outside my window right now. Yellow but with some kind of pink cloud/aura around it, probably clouds. Or that punk-ass maniac NORK guy lit off an ICBM at it.

  50. Dave Hardy says:

    As that annoying and pesky fukstik OFD has said many times, we Normals and Dirt People live in the genuine reality dimension and the other side lives in a multiplicity of other realities and dimensions; facts and objective reality to them do not exist, but are mere constructs of the white patriarchal hegemony, etc., etc., blah, blah, blah.

    https://straightlinelogic.com/2017/06/14/in-praise-of-facts-by-robert-gore/

    https://straightlinelogic.com/2017/03/23/the-useful-and-the-useless-by-robert-gore/

  51. Miles_Teg says:

    That tower is a council housing hellhole in the middle of one of the most expensive suburbs in Londonstan.

    And a firm involved in the refurbishment took only a few hours to remove all reference to their involvement down from their site.

  52. Dave Hardy says:

    https://www.amazon.com/Strange-Death-Europe-Immigration-Identity/dp/1472942248

    This, and several other books. Europe is probably lost. Their barren, childless political leadership betrayed them. Only bright spots are Hungary, Slovakia, and Poland, currently.

  53. Robert Bruce Thompson says:

    I’d add Romania and the Czech Republic to that list. They haven’t bought into the diversity crap that the EU pushes.

  54. Dave Hardy says:

    Agreed.

    So it’s eastern Europe countries, ironically former Eastern Bloc under Soviet Communist control. The Western countries are apparently prepared to kneel before the scimitars and live as dhimmis.

  55. DadCooks says:

    The frog has long ago boiled, just too stupid to know it.

    Dad is being quiet, too many devices listening.

  56. Dave Hardy says:

    Too late, Mr. Dad, you’ve long since been “made.”

  57. DadCooks says:

    Oh I know, I know @OFD.

  58. lynn says:

    If disaster strikes, retailers
    will be flooded with “last-minute”
    preppers. This will cause a
    quick depletion of their current
    inventory. Being a step ahead
    will put you in position to

    The CME book that I just read has the mom of the protagonist family madly rushing about buying everything in sight as the forthcoming CME magnitude becomes clear. The Mom tries to buy a handgun in Nashville, TN but cannot since President Hillary’s executive order mandates a seven day waiting period on all gun purchases. So she buys bb guns that look like handguns. Then she and the daughter go to the grocery store and buy $600 of miscellaneous stuff. She has trouble checking out since the financial networks are crashing and credit cards / atm cards do not work. Then she goes to a hardware store and buys a coleman stove, propane, matches, water filters, etc, etc, etc, etc where they do accept her check for over $1,000.
    https://www.amazon.com/36-Hours-Post-Apocalyptic-Survival-Blackout/dp/1536964298/

    Prepping ahead of time works better. 36 hours notice for an apocalyptic event is not dependable, especially when the President goes on national tv and denies that any problems are coming.

  59. lynn says:

    I’d go with things like water purifiers rather than already-bottled wotta;

    I would stockpile both water and water purifiers. Oh wait, I have !

  60. Eugen (Romania) says:

    “Only bright spots are Hungary, Slovakia, and Poland, currently.”

    “I’d add Romania and the Czech Republic to that list. They haven’t bought into the diversity crap that the EU pushes.”

    The Romanians are the top supporters of EU. Not a single political party here want us to quite EU.

    The Czech Republic is under great influence of Russia, IMO.

    The Hungarians are generally frustrated because they don’t rule the region anymore as they did during the empire times. They are still demanding, they are still arrogants, and that make them to be hated around the region. They are giving away Hungarian citizenship to any person in the region who might pass as an Hungarian (by name, by ancestors, by speaking the language). To not feel that impotent they choose to bark at the EU. But they are a very important terrestrial link as they connect the rest of the EU with Romania, Bulgaria and Greece.Victor Orban says they don’t want to leave the EU.

  61. Robert Bruce Thompson says:

    Romania may support the EU, mainly because it and the rest of Eastern Europe expect transfer payment from the wealthier Northwestern members, but Romania has accepted very few muslims, and that’s not likely to change.

  62. Eugen (Romania) says:

    It’s more like the muslims haven’t accepted Romania, not the other way. With regarding to the refugees quotas, Romania stated it will receive them based on the available accomodations and possibilities not on a quota. So 2000 not 6000 (something like that).

  63. Eugen (Romania) says:

    It’s not just about payments. It’s about a lot of other possibilities and development, which could not exist outside the EU. And I assure you, the wealthier states got wealthier because of states like Romania. A LOT of their companies extended here.

  64. Eugen (Romania) says:

    An example: because of being part of the EU, Romania will host the world’s most powerful laser ( to be completed this year):

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Extreme_Light_Infrastructure#ELI_NP

Comments are closed.