Tuesday, 30 May 2017

08:59 – It was 60.7F (16C) when I took Colin out around 0715 this morning, mostly cloudy. Colin actually behaved pretty well yesterday. Only four more days until Barbara returns. We thought the sheetrock work downstairs was finished–it looked great to Barbara and me–but Sam just showed up to put on another coat of mud.

We made cornbread for dinner before Barbara left, and finished up a can of baking powder. So of course I added that to my Walmart list, along with another 20 pounds of cornmeal. I already had five boxes of Alpo Variety Snaps for Colin on the list, along with almonds for Barbara.

We periodically have breakfast-dinners, and I’ve been wanting to try johnnycakes one of these times. Those are a traditional Southern breakfast food, and are basically pancakes made with cornmeal instead of wheat flour.

Also, the last time Barbara was at Costco, she bought another case of Kirkland bottled water. This time, instead of getting the 40-pack of 500 mL bottles, she got an 80-pack of 8-ounce (237 mL) bottles. They’re cute little things, and they fit in her pocket while she’s out working in the garden or yard. I’m going to have her start saving those little bottles and transfer pancake syrup to them from the awkward gallon (3.78 L) jugs we buy it in. One of the small bottles will suffice for one or two meals, and won’t be nearly as messy as using the big jugs.

 

 

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62 Responses to Tuesday, 30 May 2017

  1. DadCooks says:

    We periodically have breakfast-dinners, and I’ve been wanting to try johnnycakes one of these times. Those are a traditional Southern breakfast food, and are basically pancakes made with cornmeal instead of wheat flour.

    Why not go full native and minimalist and make hoecakes, using a real hoe over an open fire. 😉

    http://www.slate.com/blogs/browbeat/2014/07/02/hoecakes_recipe_and_history_how_the_southern_cornbread_got_its_name.html

  2. nick flandrey says:

    Hah, I had a hoecake at the frontier days in the park event that I talked about a couple months ago. Pretty tasty, but gritty and not super sweet.

    n

  3. DadCooks says:

    “Pretty tasty, but gritty and not super sweet.”

    Real “organic”. Did they forget to clean the hoe?

    Most commercial cornmeal is now made for the snowflake generation, i.e. a flour instead of a “grit”.

  4. nick flandrey says:

    The hoe was clean but oily, and the metal was brown patina, not shiny bare metal. Honest to goodness actual hoe…

    n

  5. Robert Bruce Thompson says:

    I just ordered four more 5-pound bags of Aunt Jemima Yellow Cornmeal from Walmart at $2.84 per bag. Its texture is a lot closer to grit than to flour.

    I’d have ordered more, but I did promise Barbara that I wouldn’t order more bulk LTS food for a while. That doesn’t really count, since I’ll have it repackaged into 2-liter bottles before she gets home.

  6. dkreck says:

    I just ordered four more 5-pound bags of Aunt Jemima Yellow Cornmeal from Walmart at $2.84 per bag. Its texture is a lot closer to grit than to flour.

    Polenta – the instant is finer than the regular. Of course it’s not the same as when I was a child and my grandmother made it. It’s no longer italian ethnic food unheard of outside of the community but hipster food.

    And even with my background I prefer cowboy potatoes with my breakfast.

  7. OFD says:

    57 this AM and heading into the 60s, with continuing steady rain, possible t-storms and wind gusts to 40 MPH. Ditto tomorrow; looks like inside work today, ditto tomorrow.

    What are “cowboy potatoes,” if I may be so bold?

    I was always told that johnnycake originated in Rhode Island, but of course that or a similar food was/is known throughout the east coast of the FUSA. It is, in fact, known as hoecake in the southern states and the great Lone Star State.

    http://www.graysgristmill.com/grays/

    http://www.kenyonsgristmill.com/home.html

    The clam fritters made with this sort of flour are to die for; I can eat quite a few of them, usually with malt vinegar.

  8. dkreck says:

    Cowboy potatoes – chunks of spuds fried with peppers and onions. Bacon grease and some bacon pieces – Shrooms if you like.

    http://www.food.com/recipe/cowboy-potatoes-449786

  9. OFD says:

    Ah, thanks; no shrooms. Perfect. With scrambled eggs and a splash of Frank’s Hot Sauce. Finestkind, as they say in Maine.

    Boy, the wind is really rockin’ here today again; rain continues. Feels like we’re on an ocean harbor during a stormy day in the early spring or fall.

  10. OFD says:

    @Mr. Ray;

    Sorry for not responding on this earlier; WRT your veterans benefits denial. We found that various people tasked with helping us up here at the Legion and VFW were not very good, to say the least.

    But we also found that our state’s veterans services officers (state gummint) went the extra mile for us and have done so repeatedly. The top officer personally sat with me during my last appeal at the White River Junction VA facility and it turned out mainly to be a choice of wording that got me over the hump.

    When you get back to FUSA, get in touch with your local people:

    https://www.tn.gov/veteran/topic/state-veterans-services-offices

    Do it soon before you forget and let it slide; I have a year to appeal again and try to jack up my own benefits, which I may or may not do, depending. Right now I’m at 60% and it took me a while, and like I say, it was a simple and stupid choice of language that did the trick (I had to make it clear that I’d been in fear for my life; I’d simply ASSUMED that people would KNOW that, my bad).

    Other than that, have a great trip on the other side of our Eastern Moat and stay well.

  11. Clayton W. says:

    Facebook has so many people spewing supposed herbal remedies it is absurd. Is there a good list of real ones? For instance, Willow extract is the inspiration for Aspirin.

  12. Robert Bruce Thompson says:

    Herbal remedies pretty much aren’t.

    Yes, there are a lot of herbs that contain compounds that can be used medicinally, but pretty much all of those have been examined by pharmaceutical companies over the last 150 years or so. The ones with potential were used directly or as the basis for semi-synthetic drugs. From St. John’s Wort and rauwolfia we got the basis for a lot of anti-depressants, for example. You mention willow as a source of salicylic acid, from which acetylsalicylic acid is derived, and then of course there’s Papaver somniferum, which produces morphine and other alkaloids from which semi-synthetic opiates are derived. But those examples are few and far between.

    I always smile when I read one of the herbalists talking about an herb having antibiotic activity. Maybe, but if so it’s typically orders of magnitude less active than a modern antibiotic. And the same is true of most other “natural” drugs.

  13. lynn says:

    “Texas group calls for removal of iconic Sam Houston statue from Hermann Park”
    http://www.chron.com/news/houston-texas/houston/article/sam-houston-statue-texas-antifa-hermann-park-11182041.php

    Lets see, is it the conservatives ? No. Is it the libertarians ? No. Is it the rednecks ? No. It is the Texas Antifa !

    “The Sam Houston statue in Hermann Park has become a symbol of the city since it was installed in 1925. A group that calls itself Texas Antifa would prefer that it be removed due to the Texas icon owning slaves.”

    I may be wrong about the 20 year slide into dystopia. The civil wars may be here soon at this rate.

  14. OFD says:

    So is there any point to growing so-called medicinal plants and herbs?

    “It is the Texas Antifa !”

    Call up this guy immediately:

    http://www.basedstickman.com/

    He’s got a set.

    “I may be wrong about the 20 year slide into dystopia. The civil wars may be here soon at this rate.”

    That’s right; they’re doing their damndest to piss us off. And if they keep it up they’ll get their wish and devoutly rue the day. What thou sowest, fools, thou reapest.

    Tool up, fellow Normals.

    Some other fellow Normals got off their asses:

    https://www.yahoo.com/news/kentucky-town-welcomes-confederate-memorial-moved-louisville-041358653.html

    Would your town do the same?

  15. CowboySlim says:

    “Cowboy potatoes – chunks of spuds fried with peppers and onions. Bacon grease and some bacon pieces – Shrooms if you like.”

    I’ll add a vote home fries on the side…..
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HxOpqOn48nc

  16. lynn says:

    Tool up, fellow Normals.

    Tool up, fellow Morlocks.

    Fixed that for you.

  17. nick flandrey says:

    wow, hot today.

    I’ve been going out, working for 10 minutes, then coming in and drinking water, and sitting in the air conditioning until I feel normal again.

    Fricken heat.

    n

  18. Eugen (Romania) says:

    “Boy, the wind is really rockin’ here today again;”

    Yesterday, terrible winds caused 13 deaths in Moscow and other significant damages:

    EDITED 2: I’ve removed the video link since it was faked by fast-forward.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/may/29/moscow-reports-13-deaths-after-freak-winds

  19. OFD says:

    “Fricken heat.”

    I counted half a dozen lakeside dwellings for sale in the three-mile stretch just north of here along the shore road, Mr. Nick. Vay-cay and second or third homes for previously very well-off peeps; right on the wotta, which is quite exciting today, and many hundreds of acres of farmland on the other side of the road.

    Temps in the 50s and 60s and a helluva breeze blowing right now. No chance of heat exhaustion or collapse.

    We could use a knowledgeable couple like you and Mrs Nick up this way…just sayin’….

    And those winds in Moscow got us beat here, I guess. We have this stuff all the time, and it’s a little village, so at most, trees and branches go down, not construction cranes and whole city buildings. You’d think farm silos would be at risk but they seem to stand decade after decade OK.

  20. Eugen (Romania) says:

    The things have to go much worst and wide(!) before going bad. Not enough for a war now.

    It looks like you have there some groups/activists that are quite vocal and who rock the boat and so on, but they are just not enough for big troubles, for “revolutions”. Even if there are many more people that sympathies with them, they won’t follow them as they disapprove violence and chaos.

    Of course, your undiplomatic president is not helping. Diplomatic = “skilled in dealing with sensitive matters or people; tactful.”

  21. OFD says:

    Mr. Eugen; our history includes many episodes of rising passions and excitement, if you will, during the hot city summers. There is a LOT of polarization and friction occurring here now and the Left is ramping it up as fast as they can and looking to make it as hard as they can, too. Will it get as bad as it was back in the 1960s here? Time will tell. It certainly could.

    But Mr. Nick is also referring, and posting links to, possibilities abroad, where there are any number of hot spots getting hotter. The South China Sea, the Korean peninsula, and as always, the so-called Middle East. Frankly, as is well-known on this board, I think we need to mind our own business; we’ve got a LOT on our plates already. If the Japanese and/or Chinese are concerned about each other or the NORKs or the commie uprisings in the Philippines, let them figure it out. And the sooner we close bases and get our troops out of the Sandbox hornets’ nests, the better off we’ll all be. Let them slaughter each other with impunity, as they have done for 1,300 years and counting. And if the Europeans can’t or won’t stop their invasions, well, I’m really sorry but there’s not much we can do about it. Hard to help those who won’t help themselves. Learn to live with being dhimmis, at best, under sharia. And seeing your women treated like human garbage. If I lived in Europe right now, I’d try to move to Hungary or Poland, where they’re fighting back.

  22. Nick Flandrey says:

    We rarely see de-escalation without bloodletting.

    We have a 20yr (approx) cycle of racial violence too, so we’re a bit overdue for that.

    all the sabre rattling is worrisome because no one ever backs down.

    We are not there yet, but it sure looks like it’s coming, and it looks like there are forces at work who are working very hard to bring it about.

    n

  23. OFD says:

    Wot Nick said.

    +1,000

    The shit is being stirred.

    Vigorously.

  24. ech says:

    So is there any point to growing so-called medicinal plants and herbs?

    There is only one that I can think of, and it’s against federal law to grow it. It may have some medicinal use. It’s also much in demand for recreational use, but that’s illegal. There herbs that can substitute for moth balls to keep wool items safe. The problem is getting a standardized dose…..

  25. SteveF says:

    Herbal remedies pretty much aren’t.

    Sure they are! Just like crystals! You just gotta belieeeeeve!

    Mostly sarcastic there, obviously. I guess there’s some benefit with placebo effect, though I’m not sure how much simple belief in the herb will help with a bacterial infection.

  26. MrAtoz says:

    So, are “Chinese Herbalists” just a bunch of fukstik fakers?

  27. SteveF says:

    fukstik: Yah, I think so.
    fakers: You know, I think they really believe the crap they’re peddling.

    BTW, how did you write your message with a timestamp in the future? -gasp-! Give us your wisdom and lottery numbers, o great sage from the future!

  28. medium wave says:

    “I may be wrong about the 20 year slide into dystopia. The civil wars may be here soon at this rate.”

    Some of you may have seen pix of armed Confederate statue supporters during the recent unpleasantness in New Orleans. Not just a symbolic gesture on their part. Although not reported in the local press, Young Communists from Tulane were bused to the first night of the demonstration around the Jefferson Davis monument. Confrontations both verbal and physical ensued; arrests were made. Subsequent displays of potentially lethal response from the pro-monument side seemed to have a calming effect on the YC snowflakes.

  29. Ray Thompson says:

    Another day at the son’s house. 300 mile round trip. Wife installed the window ledge that got ripped out when doing the demolition. Sheet rock has been installed so it was time to finish some other items. Installed an A/C return grill which required some sheet rock cutting, some aluminum tape and some creative trimming. Installed two ceiling fans, installed a light in the bathroom that is being remodeled, installed a forced air vent in the same bathroom, fixed a problem with a door knob that required complete disassembly of the mechanism. Another chap is installing the cabinets and I was called in to help him with some heavy lifting.

    Plumber is arriving tomorrow to do the toilet and sink drains, probably install the dishwasher at the same time in the kitchen. Still need to install three regular outlets and two GFCI outlets. Then the counter top people arrive in a couple of weeks with marble counter tops. After that another visit by the plumber to hook up the sinks. The final visit will be the flooring people to install the new flooring.

    Basically it is a major remodel of the kitchen and master bathroom. Rather than contract it out son is doing hiring the installation contractors himself. And getting the wife and I to do some of the work. He and his wife demoed the bathroom and removed the old flooring. Saves a lot of money by contracting himself and getting family to help.

    Done with all of that for the next month. Upcoming trip overseas first part of June and then Hilton Head Island the last of June. I anxiously await the fondling by the TSA. Do I bring flowers and chocolates? Or is a simple kiss and thank you good enough?

  30. OFD says:

    Excellent news from Mr. medium wave!

    Yeah, the commies bus their tools in from wherever but when they run into stout-hearted Americans, they wet their pants and leave. That’s how to deal with wannabe bullies, folks.

  31. Nick Flandrey says:

    I’ve some exposure to TCM or Traditional Chinese Medicine… never studied it directly, but did attend the sanctuary where it was taught. Had one day or half day classes in some of the aspects.

    They believe it completely. It encompasses the herbalists and the physical stuff like acupuncture and qi manipulation thru physical activities.

    It’s worth noting that the goal of chinese medicine is to maintain and encourage health while western medicine treats poor health. It’s also worth noting that the chinese government supports and provides TCM. Whether this is good, or a sop to the traditionalists, or because it is effective, I can’t say.

    Most of the stuff their herbalists use is not stuff you’ll find in the woods around here, except ginseng if you are in the right part of the country. They have a long and comprehensive history with it and a well developed system. Their practitioners probably don’t kill as many people per capita as our doctors do, but I haven’t looked for stats.

    SOME TCM remedies are effective for the wrong reasons, and you wouldn’t want to use them, like the one for fussy children that contains lots of mercury….

    n

  32. OFD says:

    “I anxiously await the fondling by the TSA. Do I bring flowers and chocolates? Or is a simple kiss and thank you good enough?”

    Buns up kneeling, and then ask “Was it as good for you as it was for me?”

    Just kidding. Fresh flowers and quality chocolates should be OK.

  33. SteveF says:

    Ray, you can leave the flowers and chocolates locked in your luggage. The TSA guys will remove them, along with any other gifts you may have put in there.

    Nick, yah, that’s the propaganda for herbalists’ treatment. Now check into what real, live Chinese people in the PRC do when they get hurt or sick. They get Western-style medicine and treatment. If they can. I don’t know about now, but one of the reasons traditional herbalism was pushed by the government was that it was much much cheaper than real medicine. (The other reason was “It’s Chinese so it’s better.”) (Though I suppose the same reasoning applies to that piece of shit Mao’s deliberate starving of his own people: It’s a Chinese famine so it’s better than what Westerners do.)

  34. OFD says:

    Maybe some kinda selective neutron device or EMP pulse…

    http://freedomoutpost.com/portland-mayor-refuses-to-give-permit-for-free-speech-rally-stay-away-from-portland/

    …I dunno; is this city still part of the country or what? Where do these mayors get off pulling this kinda stunt? SF, Chicongo, Nawlinz, NYC, etc.

  35. dkreck says:

    Best stick with homeopathic meds. Pretty harmless unless you’re sick.

  36. SteveF says:

    My homeopathic medications depend on the active ingredient being diluted across the entire world. I’ll drink a glass of tap water and get all that medicinal goodness.

  37. MrAtoz says:

    Here’s a video refuting fukstiks like Bill Nye “The Douchebag Guy” on Global Warming. It might be worth viewing by climate dummies like myself and Mr. OFD. Uh, throw in Mr. Ray. I’d throw in Mr. SteveF, but he has knives.

    BILL NYE THE SCIENCE LIE by Bill Whittle

  38. Nick Flandrey says:

    If you drink the tap water in most cities you ARE getting all the worlds medicines.

    you’re getting hormone, drug metabolites, all kinds of funny stuff.

    n

  39. Robert Bruce Thompson says:

    “My homeopathic medications depend on the active ingredient being diluted across the entire world. I’ll drink a glass of tap water and get all that medicinal goodness.”

    But, but … The more they’re diluted the more potent they are. A glass of tap water is so dilute it’ll probably kill you.

  40. SteveF says:

    Nah. “That which does not kill me, makes me stronger.” … as said by a guy whose brain was rotting of the disease which killed him.

  41. lynn says:

    We are in the 11th year since our daughter was diagnosed with Lyme disease. She has been getting worse since last fall and is now back in a wheelchair. She wanted to go to church Sunday morning with us, that was a total zoo. Luckily, our church auditorium is only a decade old and has wheelchair cutouts.

    We have given up on antibiotics and are now trying colloidal silver through her doctor, an infectious disease specialist. I don’t know if this is homeopathic or just plain stupid but, desperate people do desperate things. And we passed desperate years ago. If her skin turns grey but, she feels better and can walk without horrible pain, we will count that as a win.

  42. SteveF says:

    I don’t know if this is homeopathic or just plain stupid

    Dunno. But if the “real” medicine doesn’t work, it’s reasonable to try other approaches.

    desperate people do desperate things.

    Yep. And should not be criticized for doing so.

    (And skin turning grey is not necessarily bad. She could go to science fiction or comic book conventions and not need makeup. I don’t suppose she’s short and has a big head and big eyes? She could wear a silvery suit and carry a sign that says “I want to abduct you.”)

  43. lynn says:

    Wanna see Europe in ten years ? “Death toll near 100 as Philippine forces pound Islamic State-allied rebels”.
    http://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2017/05/29/world/death-toll-near-100-philippine-forces-pound-islamic-state-allied-rebels-find-executed-civilians/

    and “Philippine Fight Against Muslim Rebels Gains Momentum”
    http://www.voanews.com/a/philippine-fight-against-muslim-rebels-gains-momentum/3826045.html

    This is what a real civil war looks like.

    I note that Trump speaks well of the Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte. The Philippines are between a rock and a hard place.

  44. OFD says:

    The young OFD spent a bit of time in the Philippines back in the Late Neolithic; there were still a lot of World War II-era folks around who thought very highly of Americans in general and of MacArthur in particular. My first evening there was at the “transient airmens’ barracks” and their version of the Six O’Clock News was on the tee-vee in the day room. We all noticed at one point that they were showing some guys tied to chairs in some kind of courtyard, and then the guys were shot by a firing squad. That happened just a few blocks away and we then deduced that peeps were serious there.

    I had some aircrew survival training and learned to avoid venomous reptiles all over again, esp. the ones that swim better than human beans.

    tRump also spoke well of his Sunni Arab hosts in Saudi Arabia, the king in Yemen, and believe it or not, the fugly little psycho muthafucka in Pyongyang. One wonders what he is about; playing all of them for fools, or playing us for fools. I note also, however, that he seemed quite reluctant to shake Frau Commissar Merkel’s claw. Understandable.

    The next civil war here will make the last one look like the teddy bear picnic or a day at the beach. As always, sportsfans, avoid cities, crowds and “events” if at all possible.

  45. lynn says:

    As always, sportsfans, avoid cities, crowds and “events” if at all possible.

    Especially avoid children’s concerts (i.e. Manchester, England).

  46. OFD says:

    Indeed. Although Ann Barnhardt has an extremely low opinion of that concert’s main performer and her performances; blatantly pornographic and redolent of much in the violent rapper vein of “entertainment.” No one in their right mind would take young children to those concerts.

    And Uncle Remus is back again, highly recommended:

    http://www.woodpilereport.com/html/index-480.htm

  47. SteveF says:

    Given that Arianna Grande said of her fans “I hate them all. Why don’t they just die?” or words to that effect, one can only assume she’d now say “What do you call 22 dead fans? A good start.”

  48. Robert Bruce Thompson says:

    Sorry your daughter is having a bad spell.

    Colloidal silver isn’t woo-woo. It has demonstrated antimicrobial activity on surfaces, and hospitals, nursing homes, etc. use it for that purpose. Some anecdotal evidence suggests it also has in vivo antimicrobial activity, but as far as I’m aware there’s been no controlled study done on it. I wonder if her doctor has considered using some “obsolete” antibiotics like chloramphenicol (or, better, thiamphenicol, which isn’t approved in the US but has been used in Russia and elsewhere for decades). Nowadays, chloramphenicol is used as an absolute last ditch because it kills something like one out of every 40,000 patients who receive it due to bone marrow destruction and aplastic anemia, what they used to call pernicious anemia. Oh, and some clinical studies have shown a current drug called metronidazole to be remarkably effective against Lyme.

  49. Ray Thompson says:

    The TSA guys will remove them, along with any other gifts you may have put in there

    As we learned on one of our trips. Had many of our gifts we had carefully packed in the suitcase not arrive with the rest of the contents. Airlines said it was not their problem, TSA said it was not their problem. None were expensive items but I did not like showing up at people’s homes with no token gifts.

    We have learned to pack all the gifts in the carry on luggage. Even then I watch the TSA agents carefully. Although sometimes that is tough as the scan your luggage, open it on the other end and proceed to rummage while their buddy delays you in the scanner forcing you to make multiple trips. Have had some minor items disappear in that scenario. TSA or another traveler? Who knows.

    This trip should be interesting as I will have a large carry on that is nothing but camera equipment. Couple camera bodies, four lenses, two flashes, batteries, charges, cables, brackets and other accessories. I suspect I will have to operate both cameras, flash the flashes, have TSA look through all the lenses, etc. I expect to also be fondled and groped along with the X-Ray treatment and the explosive swabbing.

    @OFD: what brand of chocolates and type of flowers do you recommend the testicle squeezing? Would it be considered offensive if I made orgasmic groans during the procedure?

  50. Eugen (Romania) says:

    About Lyme: Avril Lavigne announced in 2015 that she has it, and that she almost died. I haven’t heard news on her present condition and I’m curious.

    Here, in the Sibiu country (pop. 380,000) there had been reported 1,177 people bite by ticks in 2016 (people who went to the hospital to have them removed). Also last year, there were reported 24 new cases of Lyme. They were 30% less than 2015, which is good. This region is in the top of the country with the problem.

    Lyme sounds really terrible. I hope that your daughter get better.

  51. OFD says:

    @OFD: what brand of chocolates and type of flowers do you recommend the testicle squeezing? Would it be considered offensive if I made orgasmic groans during the procedure?”

    Godiva chocolates, obviously, and a dozen red roses, obviously. Do the groaning, too, and be sure to somehow record the whole deal on a phone or whatever and upload it for our delectation, willya?

    I’m waiting to see if I will be traveling somewhere else in FUSA with wife this year and intend to have nothing in my pockets except for my wallet, and depending on length of the flight and any layovers, I might tote my Kindle Fire. Or not. However…if we’re going to a gun rights state, I’ll check a firearm and ammo before the flight, just to see how it works in real life. I’m told it’s pretty straightforward if one has one’s ducks properly lined up.

  52. Robert Bruce Thompson says:

    With all the talk about TSA stealing stuff from checked baggage, aren’t you concerned?

  53. OFD says:

    It won’t be anything I couldn’t replace in a hahtbeat cheaply and it’ll be locked up real tight. This would just be a sort of experimental run to see if and how it works. I’ll have it all documented and phone numbers to call in advance if there are any “irregularities.” Also insured.

  54. Ray Thompson says:

    With all the talk about TSA stealing stuff from checked baggage, aren’t you concerned?

    Of course I am. I have been victimized by the TSA or baggage handlers a couple of times. Some stuff that was stolen makes little sense as was the case with a couple bottles of hand lotion.

    The expensive stuff stays with me as carry-on and stays in my view as much as possible. One time when I was asked to step for a private screening I demanded that I be allowed to retrieve my carry on. They asked why and I told them that people steal stuff that is not watched. They seemed surprised and I suspect were probably wanting to steal my stuff.

    I’ll check a firearm and ammo before the flight, just to see how it works in real life.

    Checked guns and ammo must be told to the check-in agent and the case the guns and/or ammo are in must be locked. The bag is tagged with a special baggage tag identifying there is a firearm inside. Those get special handling. Stealing a firearm from a checked bag is a federal offense and if caught the penalties are severe. A gun should be safe.

    I have found that for the most part if you treat the TSA goons with a little respect, do what they ask without bitching, be reasonable with them if you don’t like something, it is mostly OK. Like any major work force there are assholes and you just deal with it and file a complaint later.

  55. Nick Flandrey says:

    The checked firearms are tracked VERY closely. It used to be recommended by some that if you didn’t want a lost or stolen bag, check a starter pistol… they are legal everywhere but are firearms to the airlines.

    I’ve never had an issue with theft (touch wood) although my bag has been delayed. Never when I’ve checked a firearm. Sometimes TSA wants you to hang around in case they have to open your bag. I’ve had that happen at a couple of different airports. it seems to mostly depend on whether the scanners are in the terminal where people can see them instead of being behind the scenes somewhere.

    Well, i’m ready for my recycle run, and then auction pickup. It got hot. 92 in the sun in the driveway. some breeze helps but still… hot.

    n

  56. MrAtoz says:

    During my full Monty by the TSA, they said they couldn’t open my bag unless I was present. Is that the rule, now? I don’t know, but they didn’t open anything till I was done with the x-ray, nude scanner, pat down — then they opened my bag in front of me. The bomb swab pinged, so it was into the secluded room for the anal probe and *everything* out of my bag and swabbed. Somehow I think every TSA location does it different.

  57. lynn says:

    Sorry your daughter is having a bad spell.

    Thanks. It has been a tough road watching my baby slowly fade away.

    Oh, and some clinical studies have shown a current drug called metronidazole to be remarkably effective against Lyme.

    Some of the doctors are now studying Chronic Lyme cases and have discovered that Lyme carries three other bacterial diseases. The conclusion is that getting rid of all three at once is difficult at best.

  58. Robert Bruce Thompson says:

    “The conclusion is that getting rid of all three at once is difficult at best.”

    It’s all about treatment efficacy/outcomes versus worries about drug resistance. The advice all along has been for doctors to culture everything (other than in a true emergency like sepsis), find out what’s effective against it, and then use the narrowest-spectrum antibiotic that’s effective. But doctors eventually started hitting serious infections with everything they had, often not bothering to culture and do sensitivity tests. Why bother, when they could just hit it with the broadest-spectrum antibiotic they had and make sure they killed it? That, along with patient demands for antibiotics, even for viral diseases, ended up rendering lots of formerly-useful antibiotics useless as bacteria developed resistance. Many of those were (formerly broad spectrum) antibiotics. Penicillin is one example. About the only thing it’s good for nowadays is treating non-resistant syphilis. Amoxicillin in another example. This used to be a superb broad-spectrum antibiotic. Nowadays, many doctors call it placebocillin because resistance is so wide-spread. So they prescribe it as a placebo to patients who demand an antibiotic.

    All this is starting to change, as the medical community begins to fear that the days when all antibiotics are useless is fast approaching. I’ve seen the result of that when Barbara gets prescriptions. She has two replacement knees, and they told her at the time that she had to take a prophylactic dose of antibiotic before any dental work, even just a cleaning. (Best opinion now is that that’s no longer necessary, unfortunately because the increasingly useless antibiotics can still produce bad side effects.) So a couple weeks ago Barbara was going to go in for some dental work. I told her to ask the dentist for generic Augmentin (amoxicillin plus potassium clavulanate, which is still effective). He refused that request and instead prescribed cephalexin, which is one of those increasingly useless antibiotics.

    If the SHTF, I’ll be one of those “hit ’em with everything you got” people. Assuming no known allergies, if the infection appeared serious enough, I’d start them on loading dose of doxycline, give it 12 hours to show some effect, and then continue the doxy and give them a loading dose of SMZ/TMP and/or metronidazole.

    Well, actually, if the situation didn’t appear immediately life-threatening, I’d probably start them on doxy and do a culture and a Gram stain just to see if I could determine Gram- versus Gram+ and get some idea of what bacteria might be causing the problem. I wouldn’t use antibiotics at all unless the problem seemed serious, but if I did decide to use antibiotics, I’d hit them as hard as I could.

    My AB’s of last resort would be 875/125 amoxiclav and/or levofloxacin, but only because I have a limited number of courses of each of those and a lot of the other stuff.

  59. lynn says:

    He refused that request and instead prescribed cephalexin, which is one of those increasingly useless antibiotics.

    I am allergic to both penicillan and cephalexin (Keflex). I took cephalexin a second time when I forgot that I was allergic to it (it had been over ten years with another doctor). I had hives over an inch in diameter all across my chest and difficulty in breathing so the wife had me on Benadryl very quickly. The next time I saw my doctor, he got very upset and yelled at me that the next time I would die. Probably true, I am an idiot. His standard prescription now is a Z-Pak.
    https://www.drugs.com/mtm/zithromax-z-pak.html

    And infections do kill. Both my father and mother had older siblings die of infections that moved into pneumonia back in the 1930s before they were a year old.

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